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ISSUE 513 JUNE 2020

OP PROTECT

Maintaining the Covid-19 effort

EXERCISE NEMESIS The hardest yards

NEW POLARIS ARRIVE IN COUNTRY

TŪ KAHA COURAGE

TŪ TIKA COMMITMENT

TŪ TIRA COMRADESHIP

TŪ MĀIA INTEGRITY


SMA.NET ISSUE 513 JUNE 2020

PEOPLE DSD for BRIG Shapland

02

CA’s writing competition

03

Welcoming our new SMA

05

Emergency responders in lockdown

16

Helping out during Level 4

20

TRAINING Train Safe

06

Steel Talon

07

Nemesis

10

Venom

12

Journey to the Red Diamond

14

CAPABILITY New Polaris arrive

09

‘Re-Org!’ As we return to work it’s a good time to pause, think and check that all team-mates are with us. I want to join the Chief of Army and many others who will be recognising your outstanding work over the pandemic response. The period of shut-down was felt in all areas of Army. Some worked through, others supported Op PROTECT, importantly our C2, emergency and key training elements remained on duty. It’s fitting to acknowledge the many enablers such as our NZDF civilian staff, civil contractors, communities and Defence vendors who kept us secure and supplied when they could have stayed home. Every family shared in the disruption – so thanks for your efforts no matter how big or small. Now that we’ve lived through Covid, we must now operate with

its effects. In a sense it’s time to ‘reorganise’ using that period between action and inactivity to pause and reassess what we’re doing and why we’re doing it. Like closing off an attack, commanders and 2IC’s need to rally the troops, check our human ammo, fuel and ‘comms’ states, and assess motivation and health states to ensure we can pivot to the next objectives. The Land Component has done a fantastic job of resetting the force. This has been done to ensure our capabilities, annual training and your career milestones continue – but it’s no ordinary year and we should acknowledge that. You will need to adopt the new schedules and be adaptive when called upon to reconfigure, gap activities or reinforce other formations. Most importantly, having reorganised teams and ourselves we’ll need to be cautious about pace. Working

smart and doing what’s needed is the right thing here. Visiting Camps with CA this week brought about questions regarding my objectives as SMA. When interviewing for the role in 2019 I encouraged two aspects: warrior development and sustained force wellbeing. To achieve this I’ve set four drivers that keep SMA’s appointment focused and networked along the right lines of Army effort. The first of four ‘P’s is Profession, doing what we must to achieve the roles of an Army (Competence). P2 is Passion, empowering what we must do – with a desire or love of doing it better (Mastery). P3 is People, helping create a balance of energy and choice within Army whānau (Tapa Whā). And the last P4 – Preference; setting conditions that support a soldier’s or an officer’s choice to select Army as a career and commit to

professionalism (Learn & Educate). I look forward to talking about each of these in more depth next month. Til then – get after it! WO1 Wiremu Moffitt 16th Sergeant Major of the Army

DEFENCE FORCE OFFICER RECEIVES DISTINGUISHED SERVICE DECORATION Brigadier Mike Shapland received a Distinguished Service Decoration in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for his 35 years of service to the New Zealand Defence Force.

Cover: An officer cadet during Exercise Nemesis. Photo: LAC Rachel Pugh

NZArmy

NZDefenceForce

The Army News is published for the Regular and Territorial Force and civilian staff of the New Zealand Army. Editor: Judith Martin Ph: 021 240 8578 E: armynews@nzdf.mil.nz www.army.mil.nz Printing: Bluestar, Petone. Design: Vanessa Edridge, DPA, NZDF Editorial contributions and letters are welcomed. They may be sent directly to Army News and do not need to be forwarded through normal command channels. Submit them to The Editor, Army News, DPA, HQ NZDF, Private Bag 39997, Wellington, or by email. Deadline instructions: Army News is published on the third Tuesday of each month, except January. Please have all contributions to the editor by the first of the month. Nothing in the Army News should be taken as overriding any New Zealand Defence Force regulation. Readers should refer to the relevant service publication before acting on any information given in this newspaper. ISSN 1170-4411 All material is copyright, and permission to reproduce must be sought from the editor.

Brigadier Shapland has served in a variety of appointments in New Zealand and overseas during his lengthy career, notably in South Sudan from May 2018 to May 2019. He was the Force Chief of Staff to the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), responsible for the planning, conduct and oversight of peacekeeping operations for more than 14,000 military staff from more than 60 countries. His citation said in the role he demonstrated interpersonal and political expertise, military strategy and leadership in support of the mission, which became instrumental in protecting the people of South Sudan. This involved dealing with human rights violations and other atrocities in one of the most dangerous and demanding peacekeeping missions in the world. “He instigated a number of key initiatives within the UNMISS Force to improve operational efficiency of the military component,” the citation said. “He also championed the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 on women, peace and security by supporting greater roles for women in command, staff and force roles. “Brigadier Shapland’s contributions were recognised by both the Force Commander and Deputy Force Commander of UNMISS as exceeding reasonable expectations. He sets an inspiring example of selfless service for New Zealanders.

BRIG Shapland

“His latest United Nations deployment represents the culmination of his loyal and dedicated service over the last 35 years, and has enhanced the reputation of the New Zealand Defence Force and of New Zealanders in the United Nations organisation and internationally.” Brigadier Shapland said he was honoured to receive the decoration. “I am very proud to get this recognition,” he said. “It also reflects on the sacrifices my family has had to make while I have been away on deployment.” Brigadier Shapland, who grew up in Christchurch, joined the Army almost by accident in 1984, having started to study law at Canterbury University. However, a chat after a rugby game with then Captain Ants Howie, an Army recruiting officer, convinced him of the opportunities available in the military. And he hasn’t been disappointed. “The experiences, challenges and opportunities that I have had

Waiting to board a UN helicopter in South Sudan.

throughout my military career have been amazing,” he said. “I am still excited about getting out of bed every morning and going to the office. The difference from a military perspective is that that office could be anywhere in the world.” He found the South Sudan posting long and testing, but extremely rewarding because of

the opportunities to contribute and make a difference in that country. “The deployment hinged significantly on relationships and being able to work across the multi-national military, police, and civilian sectors assisted greatly,” he said.


ARMYNEWS 03

A MESSAGE FROM CHIEF OF ARMY As we enter Alert Level 1 let me pick up on one of the key themes from the Land Component Commander’s article in the last Army News – his reference to the new operating environment and the need to adjust and reset our approach to training to regenerate the force. Two things stand out for me from this commentary. Firstly, the LCC outlined the reworked training plan for the Army from now until the end of 2021. He described the reset of individual and collective training, and identified critical joint and combined arms training activities. Importantly, the LCC then acknowledged that our junior commanders have shown they have the skills, attitude and drive to lead our training through this reset. On this last point I couldn’t agree more. Responding effectively to Covid-19 demanded that we delegated authority to the lowest level and that we had complete trust in our junior commanders. To their immense credit, our junior officers and NCO’s have proved themselves able to make sense of the unexpected, modify their leadership style to best suit the requirements of an incredibly unique environment, and have the confidence to take ‘intelligent initiative’. What these men and women have done in the last two months has been impressive and I am incredibly proud of the manner with which they executed their responsibilities, and I thank them for it. As we look as an Army to ‘adjust and reset’ it’s important that all of us who have command responsibilities reflect on our leadership during Covid-19, on how we adjusted to the changes the virus imposed on our environment, whether we were successful or otherwise, but most importantly what were the lessons we can take away from the last two months. Here are a couple of initial observations. Firstly, effective Mission Command enabled Army to be both agile and adaptive in challenging, quite unique circumstances. Throughout lockdown senior leaders had critical roles to play in shaping the environment and communicating key messages but it has been at the ‘coal face’ where trusted personal relationships and team cohesion have been so critical. Whilst communications did prove a challenge it was clear that the direction provided by senior leadership enabled effective low level planning and decision making by our junior commanders and, as a result, our people were able to respond to Covid-19 in a timely and effective manner. Key to these outcomes was trust. Trust is the foundation for effective fighting teams and it should be no surprise that trust was critical to the unity of effort, initiative, tempo, and teamwork that has been achieved by Army over the last two months. US General (Rtd) Jim Mattis describes the importance of

trust to the military. ‘When the spirit of your team is on the line and the stakes are high, confidence in the integrity and commitment of those around you will enable boldness and resolution; a lack of trust will see brittle, often tentative execution of the best-laid plans. Nothing compensates for a lack of trust’. My final observation is just how important it is to be able to adapt your leadership style to changes in the environment, your mission, and the needs of your team – to acknowledge that no one style of leadership is appropriate to every instance. Covid-19 was something very different, it affected us all in different ways, and it required a very different response. As we place a greater emphasis on our ability as an Army to undertake population based operations around the world, demonstrating this leadership agility in the future will be critical to mission success. If we wish to create conditions through the commitment of military forces that are enduring, then we have to do so in such a way as to create outcomes that have a very clear value-proposition for the individuals and communities with whom we are interacting. Over the coming months, as we adjust and then reset our approach to training, none of us should lose sight of what has been so important to our Army during lockdown. Mission Command remains fit for purpose for not just high end operations in the contemporary environment but across the spectrum of military activity and we must continue to develop commanders who are comfortable in its application. We must not only trust our people but convey that trust in a manner that subordinates can both sense and gain strength from. Finally, no two situations are the same – no one leadership style suits every circumstance. All of us must be comfortable with this and our training must reflect it. In the same way Mission Command, trust and adaptive leadership proved so critical to our Covid-19 response they will be key to our future force regeneration plans. John Boswell Major General

Results and placing for CA’s writing competition In April this year we launched Army’s bi-annual writing competition to promote critical thinking and professional development. The approach to life-long learning and the launch of our new Knowledge Enabled Army (KEA) professional development website has been timely given the recent Covid-19 challenge. I felt strongly about this initiative and it has been a pleasure to both promote and sponsor this activity. Overall 37 submissions were received from which a final 28 were accepted for moderation and review. A TRADOC moderation panel assessed the submissions and narrowed the field. I thoroughly enjoyed reading the finalists entries. It was clear to me that each contributor made a significant commitment to produce a submission that was thought provoking, resourceful and imaginative, I congratulate and thank you for that. It gives me great pleasure to announce the following placements in the rank-group categories.

First Place Winners 1. Army Officer Category. Major S McCulloch – “Warfare has moved from Melee to Mass, to Manoeuvre. What is the next evolution?” 2. Army Soldier Category. Corporal A Blackman – “Resilience – Enabling our soldiers” 3. Army Civilian Category. Mr J Tunnage – “Reclaim the Night – Night Vision Equipment (NVE)”

Overall placing Army Officer Category

Army Soldier Category

Army Civilian Staff

1st

MAJ Sean McCulloch

CPL Alana Blackman

2nd

CAPT Laurence MacIntosh

WO2 Kelly Carter

Mr Justin Tunnage (Justin is also a Reserve Force 2nd LT)

3rd

LTCOL Roz Michie

WO2 Robert McKie

I want to thank all participants for your efforts. Every submission provided unique insights and made interesting reading, but what led me to choose the winners was the depth of consideration and the differing viewpoints the authors considered. As the writing competition gains momentum, I look forward to seeing more people take part and share their thinking, opinions and

professional perspectives. Taking the extra effort, as you have, to think clearly about our profession challenges us all to better consider both what we do, and our direction of travel. Good work. John Boswell, Major General Chief of Army


04 ARMYPEOPLE

ARMY BAND VIDEO LOCKDOWN LOVE By Charlene Williamson

The New Zealand Army Band did what they do best during the Covid-19 lockdown; entertain the masses, but from the comfort of their living rooms.

The band reached close to five million people from around the world with their lockdown videos, with a large majority of views from the United Kingdom. Major Graham Hickman, Army Band Director of Music, said the response from around the world was stunning. “The aim of the videos was to provide entertainment and solace to people around the world during lockdown, performing upbeat, humorous and entertaining songs, however we didn’t quite expect such a huge response,” he said. The concept of the videos initially came from an idea to pre-record an Anzac Day commemoration concert and a few entertaining songs to release onto their social media channels. “A number of the younger troops suggested using software applications to record ‘isolation bubble’ performances”. “We immediately figured that if we could get the process to work, we could publish both an Anzac concert and some great entertaining songs during lockdown,” said MAJ Hickman. The videos created by the band were released onto the NZDF official social media channels including Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter, as well as the Army Band’s social media channels. The best performing video was the bands rendition of “Friend Like Me” from Disney’s Aladdin. It saw more than 800,000 views and reached more than 1.7 million

people around the world. Closely following that the video “Signed, Sealed, Delivered” by Stevie Wonder had more than 790,000 views and reached more than 1.65 million people. MAJ Hickman said the videos took “many, many hours” to complete and said there was quite a process from the beginning to the final product. After selecting a song, the Bandmaster would detail the musicians, distribute the music, delegate the form of each song, then each musician would rehearse their music, while the Bandmaster made a master video of himself conducting. The next step was for the Rhythm Section (drums, guitars, keyboard) to record their parts. These parts would then be edited together into a master track by one of the band members (a sound technician). Following this each individual musician would record their parts to the master track. These were emailed to the sound and video technicians, and all the music/video was edited and collated. “Luckily we have a number of clever Privates and Junior Non-Commissioned Officers, so the really long hours editing audio and video were shared around a few different people,” said MAJ Hickman. He said that the videos also helped with morale. The band was one of three units to provide camp security for Burnham Military Camp during the seven weeks of Level

Three and Four lockdown. This task had the potential to challenge morale. However, as almost the entire unit was also involved in recording and producing the videos, it gave everyone a creative purpose and direction during the long lockdown. “This was a new process for the band. Luckily the troops had the agility and discipline to work through their individual challenges and make it work. “Once the first videos were published they saw how good the finished products were, and the fantastic response they were getting worldwide. This really boosted morale during lockdown,” said MAJ Hickman. The success of the videos online has meant they’ve had requests for collaborations from around the world. “We are now working on a dozen other online collaborations with various groups and organisations, including the US Air Force, the Australian Army, and most of the military and police bands from around the Pacific,” he said.


ARMYPEOPLE 05

WO1 Moffitt (right) receives a gift from WO1 Douglas

WELCOMING OUR NEW SMA The ceremony in pre pandemic times would have been held at the Army Marae in Waiouru, but instead took place beside the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at the Pukeahu National War Memorial. Pointing to the tomb, MAJGEN Boswell said the soldier was a symbol of the Army’s service. “He is testimony of the pride in New Zealand’s contribution to all wars; a reminder of the sacrifice of Kiwi soldiers, sailors and airmen; and of the importance of honour and duty. “This sacred place, this soldier, also serves to remind those of us who have the privilege to lead New Zealand service men and women of the enormity of that responsibility. The Sergeant Major of the Army is both the senior soldier, and a senior leader, of the New Zealand Army, and therefore shares that responsibility. The appointment of SMA, the pinnacle of a soldier’s career, recognises an individual’s character, exemplary service and their standing as a leader. That he or she personifies Army’s ethos and values, sets high personal and professional standards, and not only demands excellence of themselves, but all they serve.” MAJGEN Boswell went on to speak about how the SMA wields great respect and influence, and is a position that holds great mana.

“You are a key advisor to me on matters not only affecting the training, management and welfare of our soldiers, but the New Zealand Army’s command environment and our strategic direction.” He told WO1 Moffitt he had every confidence in him as the 16th Sergeant Major of the New Zealand Army. “It is clear you understand the enormity of the appointment. But you are a fine soldier and leader, a warrant officer of great experience and proven service. You are the right person for the job and the opportunity is now yours. An opportunity that I know you will not only embrace but excel at.” Paying tribute to the outgoing SMA, WO1 Clive Douglas, MAJGEN Boswell said he had met every requirement of his appointment, and could take great pride in not only what he had achieved but the manner in which he had executed his responsibilities. “You have upheld, in every way and at all times, the mana of the Sergeant Major of the Army. It has been an honour to have worked alongside you over the past year and a half. I have gained significantly from your support but, more importantly, Army has gained from your service. Rounds complete my friend, rest, stand clear.” Wreaths were laid at the tomb to honour the fallen, and to honour the families of those who serve.

In a small ceremony on a clear, wintery Wellington day last month the Army’s top soldier, Warrant Officer Class One Wiremu Moffitt was welcomed into his new position by the Chief of Army, Major General John Boswell.

WO1 Douglas presented an intricately carved ceremonial pace stick to WO1 Moffitt as a taonga that represents previous SMA and the future. Each paua shell insert represents the former NZ SMA. There is also scope to have names placed into the pace stick to present its true whakapapa. He also presented a mere made of Kohatu Pakohe from the Ruapehu region. This rock is also abundant in the Nelson area and links both Islands, thereby forging a bond of leadership and guidance .

SMA’s mere.

SMA’s ceremonial pace stick. Photos: CPL Chad Sharman.


06 ARMYTRAINING

TRAIN SAFE CASE STUDY 1

JUNE 2020

Although the repetition of good practices will develop good habits, the repetition of bad practices will develop bad habits, best defined as a ‘normalization of deviancy’ that always increases risk. Maintaining oversight is the responsibility of all levels of rank and command, therefore, mentoring, discipline, attention to detail and fault checking, are critical functions in the conduct of safe and effective training. ALWAYS conduct an ‘Actions on’ incident/accident brief and rehearsals at the start of training to ensure everyone understands what to do should a medical event or emergency occur. At the completion of any training it is important to carry out a hotwash/after action review, where both participants and staff /instructors are debriefed on areas they need to improve and equally of importance, the areas where they have done well. Allow self critique, where something went wrong, allow them to understand what happened and why. NEVER assume knowledge or the experience of others, identify risk and mitigation to critical safety aspects of progressive training.

The Incident • A Pinzgauer (LOV) Operators Course was being conducted in the South Island. • Course personnel received instructions from the course manager and instructors. • The course travelled to a river within the regional training area to conduct fording.

Facts

Findings

• The course received instruction on how to correctly ford in a LOV and had conducted fording training.

• The water depth exceeded the vehicle fording depth.

• The route had been previously used by other courses and the route to be taken was advised by the instructor to the driver.

• The vehicle was significantly damaged and there was damage to service and personal kit.

• The vehicle incident was due to a failure to conduct a foot recon.

• The vehicle lost traction, then floated before becoming submerged. • All personnel were able to exit the vehicle and there were no injuries, other than some bruising.

Conclusion: Failure to conduct authorised standard operating procedures • The instructor was found guilty of negligently permitting damage to service property at a subsequent disciplinary hearing. • It was recommended that the following training be included in the LOV Operators Course fording module: – Emergency exit procedures from all LOV variants including locating and using the seat recliner in an emergency to exit via the rear door, – The location of the emergency exit, and – The effect of water pressure on the doors (i.e. opening doors on the downstream side of the vehicle is easier than opening the door against the current). • In addition, the recommendations outlined above should be advised to all vehicle occupants, (not just those on vehicle operator courses).

‘Learn from the past – live in the present – plan for the future’ This case study is based on real events. Some details have been omitted to protect privacy.

ARMOURED HISTORY MAINTAINS MOMENTUM The Royal New Zealand Armoured Corps (RNZAC) History Project Charitable Trust (Details-Charities Services Website) was formed in 2019 to publish the long overdue first consolidated history of the RNZAC and its predecessor Cavalry and Mounted Rifles Units. Well known military and social historian Matthew Wright is the author. Distinguished military historian, Lieutenant Colonel (Retired) Christopher Pugsley, ONZM, DPhil, FRHistS is historical advisor to the Trust. Good progress has already been made to accurately document the Corp’s and its predecessors’ sacrifices, achievements and challenges over the period 1860–2020. Please direct enquiries to Chris Wotton, Deputy Chair – 021 047 0642 | am.cg.wotton@gmail.com.


ARMYPEOPLE 07

WORKING WITH THE AIR FORCE:

EXERCISE STEEL TALON

Soldiers from 5 Movements Company, 16 Field Regiment and the High Readiness Task Unit are training with the RNZAF on Exercise Steel Talon as this issue of Army News goes to print.

Exercise Steel Talon is a major tactical flying exercise in the central North Island designed to improve interoperability, test gunnery skills, and hone transport and air lift techniques. A strong premise running through Exercise Steel Talon is the relationship between the Air Force and the New Zealand Army. This was strengthened during fast roping training at Linton Military Camp for members of the High Readiness Task Unit from an NH90 helicopter, hovering about three storeys off the ground.

Lance Corporal Darren Pace said the training was to ensure the soldiers are qualified to work out of the Air Force’s NH90. “This particular training is really important to make sure that we can use it as an infiltration method in any situation. So if an NH90 can’t land on a surface including a building, structure or the ground, we can get on the ground and carry out our mission,” he said. “It’s so important to have that interoperability between the two services. They are obviously operated differently, but it is so important that we have a smoothrunning process operating between us, so that when we go overseas we work as a good team.” The NH90 was an ideal platform for the fast roping, “especially for the amount of people it can carry”, LCPL Pace said. “It’s quite handy for the High Readiness Task Unit and when we conducted an exercise involving weapons practice earlier this year it was great to see how well the infantry could work with the Air Force.” The July issue of Army News will include full coverage of the exercise.


08 ARMYPEOPLE

Legislative changes to support the wellbeing of veterans and their families The Minister for Veterans Ron Mark has welcomed the First Reading of a Bill that will make legislative changes to further improve the veterans’ support system. The Veterans’ Support Amendment Bill No 2, which will amend the Veterans’ Support Act 2014, passed First Reading today. The bill addresses a number of the recommendations of a 2018 report into the operation of the Act by Professor Ron Paterson. “The changes being made will have an immediate impact on the wellbeing of our veterans and their families,” said Mr Mark. Increased access to mental health services is being proposed, along with more support for the families of veterans. The amendment bill will also be an opportunity to make the Act fairer. “Occasionally deployments can’t be made public for security reasons, and not being able to gazette these deployments, as the

Act requires, means those taking part don’t qualify for services and support from Veterans’ Affairs,” said Mr Mark. “The amendment would give the responsible Minister discretion, for security or operational reasons, to declare operations to be qualifying operational service without requiring that they be gazetted. “This announcement, together with the new funding provided across the three previous Budgets, as well as actions already taken by Veterans’ Affairs to improve their processes, show significant progress has been made to improve the veteran support system and to implement the recommendations of the Paterson report. “The veterans of New Zealand have been waiting a long time for the improvements Professor Paterson called for to be brought into effect. They do not deserve to wait any longer, and it is my intent that the Bill is passed prior to the end of this Parliamentary term. “For that reason, the Bill will have a short period at Select Committee, and will be reported back to the House by 21 July 2020. “I encourage those interested in the veterans’ support system to engage with the Social Services and Community Committee as it considers the Bill,” he said.

What amendments to the Veterans’ Support Act 2014 are being proposed? The provisions in the Veterans Support Amendment Bill No 2 will: • enable Veterans’ Affairs to fund mental health services for veterans with acute needs before eligibility has been established; • enable treatment and rehabilitation services provided by Veterans’ Affairs to continue when a veteran is imprisoned until they have been transferred to the Corrections system; • extend some services to families, for example counselling, where this is necessary for the veteran’s well-being;

• modernise definitions in the Act, such as the term “child”, which will change to better reflect the make-up of modern families; • extend the Children’s Bursary to cover situations where the veteran and child live overseas; and to extend the definition of recognised tertiary institutions; • abolish the five-year restriction on childcare assistance; • enable Veterans’ Independence Programme household support services to continue for 12 months when a veteran goes into care, so as to assist their spouse or partner;

• make it easier for surviving spouses or partners to access pensions and be reimbursed for funeral costs when a veteran dies; • standardise a grace period of 28 days following the death of a veteran, to minimise chances of debt building up if payment of an entitlement is not immediately stopped; • better recognise psychological illness conditions that are attributed to, or aggravated by a veteran’s service;

• give Veterans’ Affairs discretion to recognise injuries, illness, or death should they have occurred when a veteran was briefly absent without leave, or committing a minor offence; • enable Veterans’ Affairs to continue providing a spouse, partner, or family with a veteran’s entitlements if the veteran is imprisoned, until other arrangements can be made;

operations to be qualifying operational service without the requirement to publish a notice in the Gazette; and • align the process for setting Veteran’s Pension rates with the process for setting other Veterans’ Support entitlements.

• increase flexibility for decisionmaking timeframes; • provide the responsible Minister with discretion, for security or operational reasons, to declare

NZDF MIBP SPECIAL 60 DAY OFFER: MIBP Tiers 2 and 3 – No health assessment required for additional insurance cover (up to prescribed limits and ages), subject to answering no to 2 questions. Through July and August, NZDF Insurance providers are offering the opportunity for RF, TF and most civilian employees to obtain additional life, income protection and critical illness insurance, up to prescribed

limits and ages, without the requirement for a health assessment (under MIBP Tier 2). For TF members cover under Tier 2 extends to cover outside of NZDF and includes events arising from illness and accident

Members are also able to obtain life and critical illness cover for partners/spouses, up to prescribed limits, under MIBP Tier 3.

To find out more or obtain a quote, email MIBP at  nz.nzdf.enquiries@aon.com or Phone 0800 642 748


ARMYCAPABILITY 09

Major Paul Napier with the Polaris MRZR.

NEW POLARIS MRZR ARRIVE The purchase of the low cost, light weight, compact size vehicle follows extensive trials conducted over two years by the Army. The MRZR is a militarised version of the popular Polaris RZR recreational vehicles. It is diesel powered, fitted with run flat tires and an infra-red light to aid driving using night vision goggles. MRZR are widely used by defence forces around the world in a variety of roles including:

• Movement of personnel and their equipment • Movement of light infantry support weapons • Movement of combat supplies • Casualty evacuation • Support of small groups of specialist personnel with heavy or bulky equipment • Humanitarian and disaster relief activities.

The Protected Mobility Capability Project (PMCP) is gradually replacing Defence’s main operational land vehicle fleets. This includes both armoured and non-armoured vehicles. Six vehicles arrived as part of the PMCP, with an option of additional vehicles in the near future, and a number for the Counter Explosives Hazard project. The MRZR is a lightweight drive four seat vehicle with side-by-side seating and is specifically designed

The first six Polaris MRZR vehicles have been delivered to the Army, as part of the Protected Mobility Capability Project.

for off road use. The driver and up to three passengers are restrained in their seats with four point harnesses within a Roll Over Protection Structure that meets the NZDF standard. Both rear seats can be removed to increase the cargo space or to carry up to two patients secured on stretchers. The side-by-side configuration is inherently safer than the ride-on quad bikes Army has traditionally operated as our light off road vehicle role.

A number of New Zealand built transport trailers will be used to transport the MRZR on public roads. The vehicles are capable of being moved by C-130, NH90 helicopters and on HMNZS Canterbury. MRZR will be introduced into service with the New Zealand Army shortly, with the six PMCP vehicles being issued to the High Readiness Company (1 RNZIR).

EOD SELECTION BOARD  NOVEMBER 2020 Nominations for the New Zealand EOD Operator trade open 1 June 2020 New Zealand EOD Operators have an important role within the NZDF. Whether supporting the New Zealand Defence Force, New Zealand Police, or Special Operations Forces we must deliver precise results in sensitive, complex and challenging environments. Our people are innovative and agile. We are looking for NZDF personnel that are humble, disciplined, brook no sense of class and are committed to pursuing excellence. We need people who work well in a small team and can make decisions in complex situations. The EOD Operator Assessment Week is open to men and women from within the NZDF.

Minimum requirements

Successful civilian recruits

Successful NZDF recruits

• Hold a rank of Private (Band 4), Leading Aircraftman or Able Seaman.

1. All Arms Recruit Course (AARC) July 2020.

1. Basic Combat Engineer course. (8 weeks – Jan 2021)

2. Basic Combat Engineer course. (8 weeks – Jan 2021)

2. Basic EOD course (12 weeks)

3. Basic EOD course (12 weeks)

3. Support Element Special Operations Training (2 Weeks)

• Have a full class one vehicle license • Hold a confidential vetting security clearance • Have a minimum medical grade of A4, G2, Z1 (RFL minimum G2) • Complete the R-Series Tests 1–5. Administered during the assessment week and an evaluation by an NZDF psychologist as suitable to operate as an IEDD team member. Successful candidates will undergo the following training prior to posting to an EOD Response Troop in either Auckland, Wellington, or Christchurch.

4. Support Element Special Operations Training (2 Weeks)

Visit http://org/nzsof/LP/ Recruiting.aspx for more information and to download your application.

Application AFNZ 3E 1. To be completed with comments from your Commanding Officer. 2. Forwarded to DACM and Squadron Sergeant Major E SQN NLT 01 September 2020. LENARD.BURLAND@nzdf.mil.nz DACM_S1_Matters@nzdf.mil.nz 3. Meet all the above minimum requirements. For further information please contact Warrant Officer Diver Len Burland, Squadron Sergeant Major E SQN.


10 ARMYEXERCISE

EXERCISE NEMESIS Living up to its name

Officer Cadet Craig McKernan had heard about Exercise Nemesis when he put himself up for selection to be an Army Officer in 2019. Despite it being every bit as harsh as it is reputed to be, it was his favourite so far. This is his story.

Nemesis is the only exercise on the New Zealand Commissioning Course that is supposed to be a secret, therefore virtually guaranteeing that every cadet thinks they know exactly what to expect. It is six days of starvation and sleep deprivation intended to test the mettle, resilience and grit of Officer Cadets. I had my reservations about the stories I had heard, and I assumed the tales of hallucinations and collapse from fatigue were the Cadets’ equivalent of exaggerated war stories. Having just completed the exercise I can confidently say that the stories were not just stories. Nemesis well and truly lived up to the hype. When the 12am fire alarm sounded it was not a surprise. Through the garrison grapevine the start time of the exercise was known by every cadet on the course. The forewarning was little

comfort however, and that abrasive alarm signalled the beginning of a thing that had been in the back of our minds for months. Inexorably drawing closer, Nemesis was finally here. To ease us into the exercise we were treated to five hours of the most intense PT session of our brief military careers. One cadet threw up just one hour into the pool session – this received zero attention from DS apart from him being abruptly told to clean it up. The tone was set early on, and we would not be receiving any sympathy for our suffering this week. My initial plan was to hold back as much as possible during the PT session. I’m not as young as other cadets and I intended to save my body for the hell to come. A combination of ego, excitement and adrenaline meant that these plans were quickly forgotten.

I threw everything at each different exercise, smiling at the PT Instructors as they were trying to wear us down. Perhaps not a good plan physically, mentally however, this attitude set me up for success during the exercise, laughing at the world of pain that was sure to come. The following six days consisted of two 11 hour tasks per day. Over 180kms with loads ranging from 30kg to 70kg when carrying the double jerries through the fabled Ngamatea Swamp task. The hallucinations started from around day three. Though terrifying at times, they did provide a welcome respite from the monotony of muttoning up Waitangi for 11 hours straight with tyres around my neck. Equal parts frustrating and hilarious were attempts at conversations with other cadets while they were not at their mental best. I had to laugh despite the chaos when I realised our signaller had been scrolling through the Brigade Standard Operating Procedures for half an hour looking for the section on how to Roudem power lines during a long halt. Our section started with ten, and ended with five, with knees, ankles and finally the cold all taking their toll. Of the ones that did last, none of us came out the other side unscathed. The morning after the exercise it took me 15 minutes to walk the 50 metres to the showers. When I saw our platoon march the following day it was clear that we were all in a similar amount of pain.  Despite the hardship, or maybe because of it, Nemesis was by far my favourite exercise to date and a pivotal experience of my life. Though I’m sure that in the future when I’m retelling the story of my Nemesis, the weights will be heavier, the pack marches longer, the hallucinations more vivid. I will know with absolute certainty that the infamous exercise well and truly lived up to its name.

Photos: LAC Rachel Pugh


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12 ARMYEXERCISE

EX VENOM 1: Urban Live Field Firing


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By Lieutenant Alex Iversen

“Closed door left, red zone right, left clear, right clear, room clear, wait, marked, man up” Coming out of the Covid-19 lockdown, the High Readiness Task Unit (HRTU) was resolute, ready to train, and rearing to go. After being given the green light to conduct training at company level, there was no time to waste achieving the first collective training milestone for the HRTU: section live field firing in an urban environment. Due to the current ban on urban live field firing, HRTU was granted a dispensation to conduct this training. The key to our success during this training was safety and trust. We had to ensure that we developed training progressively for the soldiers: can they hit the black dot; that the experience of live field firing planners was adequate for the roles they would fulfil; and finally, that well considered safety measures that were specific to urban live field firing were developed. In order to achieve this last point, the Company Sergeant Major HRTU delivered an urban range conducting officer package to the platoon headquarters before the live field firing practices. This was the first condition of a failsafe training concept: if the soldiers can hit the black dot, is the black dot placed in a safe place where no one will be in danger? This helped the platoon headquarters design of urban facades to achieve the aim of the exercise safely. The main lesson: target placement. Are targets placed within the arcs for all firers in the room? Yes, check. Are any other personnel in the live field firing box, positioned on the other side of the target area or in an unsafe location relative to the firer? No, check. The next condition in the fail-safe training concept was progression. What did this look like on the ground? We initially began with dry training in the urban container village, and mine taped areas to ensure the drills were aligned with doctrine, and were safe. Live firing

then began. A field zero occurred, where individual firers engaged targets from 10m with their master hand and offhand each day: this confirmed they could hit the black dot. Firing then progressed to pairs live firing within mine taped areas for visibility, before moving into pairs firing inside the facades. Two days of pairs firing at two different boxes preceded two days of assault team live firing. Once the safety supervisors and range control officers were happy that everyone was at a good level in terms of their standard operating procedures and safety standards, we moved on to two days of section live field firing. Importantly, the section practices were used to test the section commander’s command and control during the final approach, gaining entry and clearance phases of an urban attack. CSM HRTU provided guidance to the platoon headquarters about their live field firing practises, highlighting where improvements could be made. In addition, safety supervisors conducted thorough rehearsals of all possible actions by participants in each room when live firing. The HRTU enablers came along for the ride too. Intelligence Operators were integrated into the sections to fight alongside the infantry. The engineers section went through the boxes as the rifle sections did, and the signallers were providing feedback to the commanders.

Objective Hamlet The section testing box was a small cluster of buildings in the Argo Valley, with hostile Returning Armed Movement elements known to be in the objective. The section commanders were given orders. The cordons were set, snipers in over watch, and fire support group ready to deploy as a quick reaction force. With the sniper pairs and fire support providing isolating fire between buildings and the black side of the objective, the sections had to ensure they provided covering approach fire and intimate fire support. Aperture labelling, room marking, communications, threat identification, building size, foothold size and report lines are but some of the many considerations burning through a section commander’s mind during an assault. “Closed door left, red zone right, left clear, right clear, room clear, wait, marked, man up”. Communications from the soldiers are essential in an urban environment to enhance the situational awareness of the commander. Snap Orders were delivered on the fly – “Next bound… Primary Point of entry… Alternate Point of Entry, Primary method of entry… Alternate method of entry… Intimate fire support on apertures… H Hour at…” Each section member had a role whether it be shotgun breacher, thumper carrier, linkman, room marker – all alien roles for a soldier who trained in the close country in 2019. But such is life for a soldier in the HRTU. We need to be trained sufficiently in all terrains that exist in our allocated area of responsibility: the South West Pacific.


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JOURNEY TO THE RED DIAMOND:

From basic training to Infantry – Part One By Charlene Williamson

In this story series, Army News follows young soldiers from the start of recruit training, through to Combat Corp Training, to marching out and gaining the coveted Red Diamond of the New Zealand Army’s infantry battalions. Photos: CPL Sean Spivey

Twelve weeks ago 81 young men and women marched into Waiouru Military Camp to begin their lives as soldiers of the New Zealand Army. April Ma’a, 17, first started thinking about joining the Army in Year 10. She says it started out as a joke to her Mum, but as the years went by she thought seriously about joining. “I want a different outlook on life and to find my purpose, I suppose while having some fun and also meeting new people. I wanted to serve, discover and learn new things – I thought this would be an awesome career,” said Ma’a. Following a careers experience talk at her High School in Golden Bay, it opened her eyes up to the possibility of working for the New Zealand Defence Force and made her want to join even more. Before marching in, she said she was expecting recruit course to involve sweat and tears, but also

she expected lots of knowledge and awesome experiences. “What I hope to achieve in the 16 weeks in Waiouru would be, new skills, as well as adjusting and understanding the Army lifestyle, while meeting new mates,” she said. Ma’a said that she is most worried about injuries that could happen throughout training, and being sent home. She was also concerned about being left behind and not being able to handle the intense physical and mental training while undergoing the 16 weeks of training. “I’ve wanted to be a part of the NZDF for so long and to be told to leave would be disappointing,” she said. Ma’a said she joined the Infantry Corps because she loves getting in there and putting in the hard yards, while still having a smile on her face. “I am not afraid of getting my hands dirty, or ruining my nails. I am a proud female Kiwi, doing the


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“I want a different outlook on life and to find my purpose, I suppose while having some fun and also meeting new people. I wanted to serve, discover and learn new things – I thought this would be an awesome career.” – April Ma’a

same hard work as any male can achieve,” she said. Ma’a said that RRF is “eye opening” and has given her “a different perspective on life” in the eight weeks she’s been on course. Recruit Course also isn’t quite what she expected, she thought it would be less modern than it is. “I did however, expect it to be hard and mentally challenging because if it was easy then everyone would be joining,” she said. She is now looking forward to the final aspects of recruit training and going out into the field to “put what we have been taught into practice” and she can test herself both as a soldier and as a person. Tanei Dean, 20, is a Limited Service Volunteer Course (LSV) graduate. LSV is a 6-week course NZDF runs on behalf of the Ministry of Social Development. Dean was successful on the LSV course – he was awarded

top speech, first place in cross country, peers’ choice awarded, and the most effective team member and leadership award. Joining the New Zealand Army was a naturally good fit for him. His early life wasn’t easy; he was placed in foster care at three months of age until he was 16 when his older brother took him in. “With 15 plus placements and two different family homes, I was always struggling through school and finding it hard to make friends and maintain those friendships due to moving so much. “Life was difficult, I found myself lost growing up. It was only when my brother took me in he changed my life and gave me the opportunity to have a better future,” said Dean. He is looking forward to where his Army career will take him and said there are so many pathways and different opportunities for him, he is also looking forward to making

new friends and to have that “family feel for once”. He said he also chose Infantry because he wants to be on the ground, with people and learn how they live and how he can help in future deployments. “Growing up in foster care, I had so many people trying to help me. I’d love to give back as much as I can, so I decided to join the military as a way to give back to New Zealand.” He chose the Infantry Corps because he wants to be challenged physically, mentally, and be pushed beyond his limits. “I feel like being in the Infantry will help me grow as a person, and develop new skills that will help me in the future,” said Dean. Most of all he wants to make his brother and family proud. “I want to have a long career in the NZDF. I hope to achieve good standards and be confident when

leaving The Army Depot (TAD) and being posted to my unit,” said Dean. Eight weeks into recruit course PTE Dean said he was expecting it to be hard and put him out of his comfort zone, but “I really had no idea what the Army had in store for me”. “I am absolutely enjoying the course. Making new friends and getting opportunities that other kids my age don’t get. Learning new skills every day and finally having that feeling of a new life,” he said. We will join the recruits next when they have marched out of TAD and are at Combat Corp Training at Burnham Military Camp.

Recruit Regular Force (RRF) is a 16-week course which is commonly known as ‘basic training’, this course will give them the basic skills needed to become a successful soldier, covering everything from the fundamentals of weapons training, first aid, navigation and lessons on military law. Not all will make it, but those that do will march out and then head to their respective Corp to start the next phase of training. Combat Corp Training (CCT) is a 14-week course that aims to prepare them to operate as an effective member of a rifle section, on completing they will march out as members of the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (RNZIR) and gain the coveted red diamond. The Red Diamond, worn on the left shoulder of the New Zealand Army dress uniform, in modern times, signifies those who have successfully completed Combat Corp Training and are members of the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment (See page 23).


16 ARMYPEOPLE

LOCKDOWN

How our emergency responders coped

It may have been lockdown for most of the rest of the country but for the Army’s emergency responders the pandemic at its peak was virtually business as usual. When news of the pending lockdown was first announced Burnham based Warrant Officer Class Two Jared Davidson who runs the camp’s emergency response troop set to organising his staff so they would stay as well as possible but still do the work they were required to do. One of the outputs for Army was to maintain response to emergency incidents. Adjusting their shifts to minimize contact between teams was one of their strategies to maintain the force. Pre-Covid-19, the emergency response teams would run a day shift, night shift, and a 24hr shift. During Covid-19, the squadron operated a 48hr shift, meaning there were fewer handovers and less contact between teams. Troop members have the technical skills, knowledge, and ability to maintain the equipment used daily by the team. A big chunk of the morning was spent preparing the fire truck for that day. A register is kept to ensure each vehicle is maintained in a constant state of readiness. Essential daily

Photos: CPL Sean Spivey

tasks include first parading the vehicles and equipment to ensure there are no faults, re-fitting all specialist equipment, and signing off the registers as vehicles are complete. Other tasks were routine maintenance of any equipment, training and maintaining physical fitness. Prior to a shift changeover, the shift would spend time sanitising the workplace. This included wiping down surfaces, tables, door handles, workstations, ablutions and the vehicle itself. WO2 Davidson said his emergency responders were flexible and aware of what they had to do. “We also had to be prepared to meet Fire and Emergency New Zealand procedures at any medical incident we might attend so it was vital everyone knew what was required of them and that we operated in accordance with their procedures as well. In the beginning information was changing daily so it was imperative that individuals kept abreast of the changes to their specific role.”


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18 ARMYLOOKINGBACK

Monitoring a ceasefire in a far off land Forty years ago New Zealand troops returned home from Rhodesia after monitoring a ceasefire there. New Zealand troops arrived in Salisbury, Rhodesia – now Harare, Zimbabwe, in 1979. All members of the New Zealand Contingent deployed to the African nation as part of the Commonwealth Ceasefire Monitoring Force. Its mission was to monitor the ceasefire agreement between the Rhodesian Security Forces, and the Patriotic Front. The latter had two factions; ZIPRA (Zimbabwe People’s Revolutionary Army) and ZANLA (Zimbabwe African National Liberation Army). The Patriotic Front wasn’t keen at first on New Zealand’s participation in the CMF. It believed the New Zealand Government, because of its acceptance of sporting contacts with South Africa, was unsympathetic to the indigenous struggle. There was a change of heart however when the contingent’s large number of Māori (about 25 percent) was pointed out. No one deployed below the rank of corporal, and the team members were selected against a wide range

of trade and skill sets which allowed them to be prepared for what might eventuate. Prior to their departure they had very little idea of what they might be required to do and how they might be received. The Rhodesian War had been crippling the country for 14 years, with atrocities on all sides, but by 1979 the Rhodesian Security Forces had reached a stage where they were losing ground and a ceasefire was warranted. The Patriotic Front had a strong hold, particularly in rural areas. The various factions in the conflict had waged guerrilla warfare, with a wide variety of small arms, heavy machine guns and some surface to air missiles. After many months of discussion the United Kingdom brokered Lancaster House Agreement was finalised in late December 1979 and the Commonwealth troops were rapidly deployed from home locations to monitor the fledgling peace. The Commonwealth Monitoring Force had about 1,400 members – most of them British personnel, with detachments from New Zealand, Australia, Canada, Fiji and Kenya. The New Zealand contingent comprised about 76 Army personnel and was commanded by Colonel David Moloney. Within two weeks of the New Zealanders arriving more than 20,000 guerrillas from the Patriotic Front’s two factions had emerged

from the bush to gather and then be moved to designated assembly places. The Kiwis had processed between 4,000 to 5,000 Patriotic Front personnel by the end of their deployment. The intent was to create collection points, known as RVs, for the Patriotic Front, and move them to Assembly Places where they could be disarmed and reintegrated into their tribal homelands prior to the elections. The reality was that there were insufficient collection points so more were created shortly after the New Zealanders arrived.” Colonel (Rtd) Brendon Fraher, then a Captain in the NZ Army: “It soon became apparent that the Patriotic Front had no intention of being disarmed, which made our white arm bands more important than our rifles. We felt quite safe; the Patriotic Front was a well-tuned, well informed, organisation. I don’t think the Commonwealth, at the time, gave due credit to just how well informed they were. “They knew more about the ceasefire than we did, and they were very balanced as they had the upper hand. They wanted peace, and their fair share of what is now Zimbabwe.” The New Zealanders returned from the mission in about April 1980.

Above: Kiwi members of the monitoring force, including second from left, now-Major General (Rtd) Martyn Dunne, third from left, Colonel (Rtd) Brendon Fraher and, far right, Colonel (Rtd) David Moloney.


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NEW TERTIARY SCHEMES ON BOARD NEXT YEAR Two Tertiary Scholarship Schemes that contribute towards the Chief of Army’s ‘Army 25’ Directive will be introduced next year. The scholarships will support the focus on people that the NZ Army is committed to enhancing. Critical to a modern, agile and highly adaptive light combat force, the NZ Army requires a diverse range of General List Officers who bring with them critical thinking and analytical problem solving skills. Tertiary education of NZ Army officers is one way to achieve this, contributing to a force that is agile in thought and action and invests in its people so they can realise their potential. The Chief of Army, Major General John Boswell says he hopes the scholarships will help increase the recruitment and retention of officers. “These scholarships are the beginning of our Army 25 People initiatives to develop ways to leverage off the talent our people can provide to the organisation.”

The scholarships are:

Captain Jacob Corlett

• Kia Atamai te Whawhai (fight smart) This scholarship scheme will allow Officers to study towards a range of Bachelor’s Degrees through Massey University. Officers will graduate from the New Zealand Commissioning Course (NZCC) followed by study towards Bachelor Degrees; either Corps focused or beneficial to a NZ Army General List Officer. University breaks will be filled

with a combination of Unit, Army and individual training opportunities. • Tū Ako (higher learning) This scholarship scheme aims to recruit Officers who already hold a degree of value to the NZ Army, through incentive payments made to the Officer post NZCC. The scholarships complement the Kippenberger Scholarship Scheme, enabling part or full time study for Officers and Non Commissioned Officers, and of note, supports the conduct of post-graduate study for personnel who already hold a degree. Captain Jacob Corlett conducted study under the Kippenberger Officer Cadet Scheme in 2010–2011 prior to the Scheme closing down, and completed his degree (Bachelor of Arts, double majoring in Political Science and Defence/ Strategic Studies) in 2014 under the Kippenberger Scholarship Scheme. On reflection, CAPT Corlett has found that completion of tertiary study has rounded out his ability to think critically, and to communicate effectively and professionally. “I found that university study, particularly in my chosen fields, broadened my awareness of the political environment that the NZDF operates in. I gained new appreciation for the importance of our peacekeeping contributions around the world, and how those contributions add to New Zealand’s standing as a respected global citizen. While often challenging, I have no doubt that tertiary study has enhanced my analytical approach in all the roles I’ve undertaken since.”

Are you looking for a new challenge? As part of 1 NZSAS Regt, Support Enablers are the personnel tasked with supporting capability through specialist logistical, medical, signals and intelligence input throughout the full spectrum of operations. As logisticians, medics, signalers and intelligence analysts our goals are to enhance, enable and empower 1 NZSAS Regt by increasing capability depth through specialist knowledge in all combat support areas ranging from the front lines through to sustaining operations. Our selection is made up of a two week package called Support Enabler Special Operations Training (SESOT) and is designed to test and integrate all enablers into the Special Operations family. It is mentally and physically rewarding and the friends you make are for life.

1NZSAS Regt Support Enablers To express interest in becoming a 1 NZSAS Regt Support Enabler, please: • submit an AFNZ49 with the posting preference to Support Squadron, 1 NZSAS Regt through your CoC to DACM. • Ensure that you are physically fit and deployable as well as a trusted team player. Any questions you may have on SESOT, what a support enabler does or what it is like living in Auckland can be sent to SASRec@nzdf.mil.nz and someone will get back to you.


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LIFE OF AN ARMY ELECTRICAL FITTER DURING ALERT LEVEL 4

Electrical Fitter Corporal Matthew Fahy thought his days on the tools were virtually over when he secured an out of trade posting to a Youth Development Unit. He was wrong, thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic. He was grateful, he says, to be able to give back a little.

“Once the country went into Alert Level 4, only authorised essential businesses were to remain operating. This placed a huge burden on a small local facemask production factory – Quality Safety International (QSI) Whanganui. This unique facility was now having to produce facemasks for the Ministry of Health’s National Pandemic stock to replenish what District Health Boards had ordered. This was huge, so large that it was bigger than the queues at every fast food restaurant combined throughout the country at 0420 on 28 April – start of Alert Level 3. Due to my background, I was tasked by Joint Forces New Zealand to be part of the NZDF support to Operation Protect. I began working at QSI, as their onsite support electrician. The opportunity was awesome and the people were dedicated to

playing their part in “Unite against Covid-19”. They produced tens of thousands of different types of facemasks from surgical tie up, ear loop and N95 duckbill, daily on a 24-hour schedule. The main equipment I worked on was the Radio Frequency Power Amplifiers which welded all layers of the facemask together to create the filter that individuals breathe through. I worked alongside one other technician from Alpha Engineering in Whanganui. He made sure all mechanical parts were functioning correctly and I maintained the electrical side. This experience saw me staying at the 5/7 Battalion Welfare house for 28 days sending daily sitreps to Liaison Officer Captain Grant Daniels. This Covid-19 response gave me tremendous job satisfaction, utilising my Army experience and trade knowledge.

Working alongside the civilian sector showed me that the training that we get as electrical fitters, is well-matched in the civilian environment. I felt like I was contributing to the fight against Covid-19, through my trade, in an absolute constructive way that made me proud to be part of an organisation that can adapt and execute any tasks directed by the Government.


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BOOK REVIEW Quartered Safe Out Here A recollection of the war in Burma By George MacDonald Fraser Published (this edition, 2019) by Harper Collins The cover of this book, first published in 1993, displays a review quote describing it as being “One of the great personal memoirs of the Second World War”. It’s a good quote because this is indeed a great personal memoir, not just of the Second World War but of soldiering in general. McDonald Fraser is best known for the Flashman series of novels about fictitious Victorian military adventurer, Harry Flashman. Anyone who recognises the author’s name and expects a similarly great read from this memoir is in for a treat. If you are not familiar with The Flashman Papers, they are well worth checking out. Born in 1925, MacDonald Fraser didn’t join the British Army until late in the Second World War. He was posted to a rifle section of his county regiment, The Border

Regiment. He found himself fighting the Japanese as part of what became popularly known, due to the focus on the antiGerman push in Europe, as “the forgotten Army” in Burma. MacDonald Fraser is a gifted and skilled writer which makes this book a joy to read. His use of language to paint a picture of life in a rifle section in combat draws the reader into his world of close country operations against a feared enemy. The author also discusses the allied armies fighting the Japanese, the weapons and personal equipment of those armies and he ruminates at various points in the text on leadership and aspects of soldiering, with great real world examples to illustrate his points. The members of Nine Section were almost all from the Northwest of England and dialogue has been recorded phonetically which can be challenging to read and interpret correctly (if you’re not married to someone from the North!). If the reader is unfamiliar with the Northwestern accent

or speech patterns the author’s notes on pronunciation greatly aid understanding as do videos on YouTube. In short, this book is a brilliantly written record of a young man in combat. It provides a vivid picture of how the section was composed and worked and what infantry life in Burma was all about. You can read official histories or Field Marshal Slim’s famous “Defeat into Victory” to understand the campaign at the macro level, but nothing paints a picture of life at the bottom of a jungle shell scrape like this book.

Reviewed by Captain Jeremy Seed

CHANGES TO ARMY REGIONAL SUPPORT CENTRE NAMES As of 1 July 2020 the naming of New Zealand Army Regional Support Centres will be all aligned with the same names and acronyms. Regional Support Centres are located in Burnham, Linton, Trentham and Waiouru Military Camps across the country. • Wellington Regional Support Centre in Trentham is renamed Trentham Regional Support Centre (TRSC) and; • Waiouru Military Training Facility is renamed Waiouru Regional Support Centre (WRSC).

Region Support Centres

LINTON REGIONAL SUPPORT CENTRE (LRSC) – LINTON

WAIOURU REGIONAL SUPPORT CENTRE (WRSC) – WAIOURU TRENTHAM REGIONAL SUPPORT CENTRE (TRSC) - TRENTHAM

SOUTHERN REGIONAL SUPPORT CENTRE (SRSC) – BURNHAM


22 ARMYNEWS

Acting Sergeant Mark Hayward of 2/1 RNZIR is in his element when he is exploring new trails and experiencing the thrill of technical downhill descents on his mountain bike. Christchurch’s Port Hills or the Christchurch Adventure Park are his domains of choice, and he tries to get out and do long, adventure type trails whenever he can. Photos: Corporal Sean Spivey


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NZ Army Quiz 1. In Radio Telephone (RATEL) Procedure, who would you be asking for if you requested Starlight? 2. What was unique (in military terms) about the Bougainville deployment? 3. Arte et Marte – By skill and fighting is the motto of which disestablished Corps? 4. A sabretache is a. A style of moustache b. A dish made for troops on the Western Front

How well do you know the NZ Army? Take our quiz to find out.

10. The MRAD is a. A light operational vehicle b. A sniper rifle c. An inflatable craft 11. The NZDF sent two soldiers to help in a counter poaching operation in what country last year? a. Zimbabwe b. Peru c. Malawi 12. What three bridging systems are held by the RNZE?

c. A ceremonial leather case. 5. What year was 2nd Engineer Regiment established? 6. Name the eight trades in the RNZE? 7. What was the only Army Corps to retain distinctive beret colour when the one-Army beret was introduced? 8. New Zealand’s current UK High Commissioner held what position in the NZDF?

Why a Red Diamond?

9. What is the motto on RNZE soldiers’ cap badge? a. Quo Fas Et Gloria Ducunt b. Ubique c. Honi Soit Qui Mal Y Pense

Answers 1. Medics; 2. Troops were unarmed; 3. Royal New Zealand Electrical and Mechanical Engineers; 4. c; 5. 1 July 1993; 6. Carpenter, Combat Engineer, Electrician, Emergency Responder, Engineer Officer, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Operator, Plant Operator, Plumber; 7. NZSAS; 8. CDF; 9. c; 10. b; 11. c; 12. Medium Girder Bridge (MGB), Bailey Bridge, Rapidly Emplaced Bridge System (REBS).

The Red Diamond, worn on the left shoulder of dress uniform, traces its origin to 22 Battalion, 2nd NZ Expeditionary Force who adopted the patch of 9 NZ Infantry Brigade deployed as part of the British Commonwealth Occupation of Japan, known as J Force. In 1947 2 NZEF’S Brigade in Japan was reorganised and 22 Battalion was re-designated 2 Battalion of the New Zealand Regiment. The battalion was disbanded in

1948 and reformed in July 1959 when the CO claimed descent for the new battalion from the re-designated and disbanded, 22 Battalion. In 1963 the 1st Battalion Depot was formed and the Red Diamond was awarded to personnel who had completed Infantry Corps training. Later, when the two Battalions of the NZ Regiment became 1RNZIR and 1st Bn Depot, the patch was worn as a dress distinction by personnel who were posted

to the Unit. From 1964 it was awarded to soldiers of the 1st Battalion and the 2nd/1st Battalion of the Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment who had successfully completed Infantry Corps training. In 2007 the patch was approved to be recognised as a qualification rather than a Corps distinction and it is awarded to, and worn by, all personnel who have successfully completed combat corps training regardless of unit or posting.

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Word Search Can you find all of the hidden words listed below? ARMISTICE

KOSOVO

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Exercise Nemesis. Photo: LAC Rachel Pugh

Profile for New Zealand Defence Force

New Zealand Army | Army News - Issue 513, June 2020  

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