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AMERICAN STUDIES

Chicana/o Remix

Unnamable

Art and Errata Since the Sixties

The Ends of Asian American Art

KAREN MARY DAVALOS

SUSETTE MIN

Chicana/o

Remix

Rewrites our understanding of the last 50 years of Chicana/o cultural production

Chicana/o Remix casts new light not only on artists— such as Sandra de la Loza, Judy Baca, and David Botello, among others— but on the exhibitions that feature their work, and the collectors, curators, critics, and advocates who engage it. Art and Errata since the Sixties

K A R E N M A RY DAVA L OS

Combining feminist theory, critical ethnic studies, art historical analysis, and extensive archival and field research, Karen Mary Davalos argues that narrow notions of identity, politics, and aesthetics limit our ability to understand the full capacities of Chicana/o art. She employs fresh vernacular concepts such as the “errata exhibit,” or the staging of exhibits that critically question mainstream art museums, and the “remix,” or the act of bringing new narratives and forgotten histories from the background and into the foreground. These concepts, which emerge out of art practice itself, drive her analysis and reinforce the rejection of familiar narratives that evaluate Chicana/o art in simplistic, traditional terms, such as political versus commercial, or realist versus conceptual. As a leading scholar in the study of Chicana/o artists, art spaces, and exhibition practices, Davalos presents her most ambitious project to date in this re-examination of fifty years of Chicana/o art production. KAREN MARY DAVALOS, Professor of Chicano and Latino Studies at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, is an independent curator and an author of three books about Chicana/o art.

JULY 2017 336 PAGES • 40 color illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-2112-9 • $30.00S (£24.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7796-6 • $89.00X (£74.00) ART • LATINO STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

Redraws the map of Asian American art, attempting to free it from a categorization that stifles more than it reveals

UNNAMABLE

Charting its historical conditions and the expansive contexts of its emergence, Susette Min challenges the notion of Asian American art as a site of reconciliation or as a way for marginalized artists to enter into an established canon. Pressing critically on the politics of visibility and how this categorization reduces artworks by Asian American artists within narrow parameters of interpretation, Unnamable reconceives Asian American art not as a subset of objects, but as a medium that disrupts representations and embedded knowledge. By approaching Asian American art in this way, Min refigures the way we see Asian American art as an oppositional practice, less in terms of its aspirations to be seen—its greater visibility—and more in terms of how it models a different way of seeing and encountering the world. THE ENDS OF

A SI A N A ME RICA N A R T

SUSETTE MIN

Uniquely presented, the chapters are organized thematically as mini-exhibitions, and offer readings of select works by contemporary artists including Tehching Hsieh, Byron Kim, Simon Leung, Mary Lum, and Nikki S. Lee. Min displays a curatorial practice and reading method that conceives of these works not as “exemplary” examples of Asian American art, but as engaged in an aesthetic practice that is openended. Ultimately, Unnamable insists that in order to reassess Asian American art and its place in art history, we need to let go not only of established viewing practices, but potentially even the category of Asian American art itself. SUSETTE MIN is Associate Professor at the University of California, Davis, where she teaches Asian American studies, art history, curatorial studies, and cultural studies. JULY 2017 272 PAGES • 64 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-0-8147-6430-5 • $30.00S (£24.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6429-9 • $89.00X (£74.00) ART • ASIAN AMERICAN STUDIES SPR I NG 2017 • NY U PRESS

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NYU Press Spring 2017