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RELIGION

Ethnic Church Meets Megachurch

Growing God’s Family

Indian American Christianity in Motion

The Global Orphan Care Movement and the Limits of Evangelical Activism

PREMA A. KURIEN

SAMUEL L. PERRY

ETHNIC CHURCH MEETS

MEGACHURCH I N DI A N A M E R IC A N C H R I S T I A N I T Y I N MO T ION

Traces the religious adaptation of members of an important Indian Christian church—the Mar Thoma denomination—as they make their way in the United States

Illustrates the hidden challenges embedded within the evangelical adoption movement

Growing God’s Family

For over a decade, prominent leaders and organizations among American evangelicals Evangelic a l Ac t iv ism have spent a substantial amount of time and money in an effort to address what they believe to be the “orphan crisis” of the United States. Yet, despite an expansive commitment of resources, there is no reliable evidence that these efforts have been successful. Why have evangelical mobilization efforts been so ineffective? The Glob a l

Or phan C are Movement

This book exposes how a new paradigm of ethnicity and Prema A. Kurien religion, and the megachurch phenomenon, is shaping contemporary immigrant religious institutions, specifically Indian American Christianity. Kurien draws on multi-site research in the US and India to provide a global perspective on religion by demonstrating the variety of ways that transnational processes affect religious organizations and the lives of members, both in the place of destination and of origin. The widespread prevalence of megachurches and the dominance of American evangelicalism created an environment in which the traditional practices of the ancient South Indian Mar Thoma denomination seemed alien to its American-born generation, and many young adults left to attend evangelical megachurches. Kurien examines the pressures church members face to incorporate contemporary American evangelical worship styles into their practice, including an emphasis on an individualistic faith, and praise and worship services, often at the expense of maintaining the ethnic character and support system of their religious community. Wide in scope, this book is a must read for an audience interested in the study of global religions and cultures. PREMA A. KURIEN is Professor of Sociology at Syracuse University and author of two award-winning books, Kaleidoscopic Ethnicity: International Migration and the Reconstruction of Community Identities in India, and A Place at the Multicultural Table: The Development of an American Hinduism. JUNE 2017 304 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-2637-7 • $35.00S (£28.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0475-7 • $99.00X (£82.00) RELIGION WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

and t he L imits of

SAMUEL L. PERRY

To answer this question, Samuel L. Perry draws on interviews with over 220 movement leaders and grassroots families, as well as national data on adoption and fostering, to show that the problem goes beyond orphan care. Perry argues that evangelical social engagement is fundamentally self-limiting and difficult to sustain because their approach does not work on a practical level. Growing God’s Family ultimately reveals this peculiar irony within American evangelicalism by exposing how certain aspects of the evangelical subculture may stimulate activism to address social problems, even while these same subcultural characteristics undermine their own strategic effectiveness. It provides the most recent analysis of dominant elements within the evangelical subculture and how that subculture shapes the engagement strategies of evangelicals as a group. SAMUEL L. PERRY is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Religious Studies at the University of Oklahoma.

JUNE 2017 288 PAGES • 31 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-0305-7 • $30.00S (£24.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0038-4 • $89.00X (£74.00) RELIGION SPR I NG 2017 • NY U PRESS

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NYU Press Spring 2017