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Critical Race Theory An Introduction Third Edition

Expatriation in America from the Colonial Era to the War on Terror

RICHARD DELGADO and JEAN STEFANCIC

t h i R d e d i t i o n

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Race c R i t i c a l

Updated to include the Black Lives Matter movement, the presidency of Barack Obama, the rise of hate speech, and more

t h e o R y

Since the publication of the first edition of Critical Race Theory in 2001, the United States has lived through two economic downturns, an outbreak of terrorism, and the onset of an epidemic of hate directed against immigrants, especially undocumented Latinos and Middle Eastern people. On a more hopeful note, the country elected and re-elected its first black president and has witnessed the impressive advance of gay rights. an intRoduction

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As a field, critical race theory has taken note of all these developments, and this primer does so as well. Critical Race Theory is essential for understanding across this burgeoning field, which has spread to other disciplines and countries. The new edition also covers how its teachings have been adapted and, for readers wanting to advance a progressive race agenda, includes new questions for discussion, aimed at outlining practical steps to achieve this objective. “A marvelously readable overview of this pathbreaking and controversial area of legal thought.” —Derrick Bell, author of Faces at the Bottom of the Well

RICHARD DELGADO is Professor of Law at Seattle University. JEAN STEFANCIC is Research Professor of Law at Seattle University. She and Professor Delgado have collaborated on The Latino Condition, Second Edition (NYU Press, 2010), and The Derrick Bell Reader (NYU Press, 2005). MARCH 2017 224 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-0276-0 • $19.00S (£15.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4636-8 • $89.00X (£74.00) Previous Edition • PAPER • 978-0-8147-2135-3 In the Critical America series LAW • RACE & ETHNICITY 18

Revoking Citizenship

N Y U PR E S S • SPR ING 2 0 1 7

BEN HERZOG With a foreword by EDIBERTO ROMÁN Why, when, and with what justification do states take away citizenship from their subjects? Expatriation, or the stripping away of citizenship and all the rights that come with it, is usually associated with despotic and totalitarian regimes. Yet these practices are not just a product of undemocratic events or extreme situations, but are standard clauses within the legal systems of most democratic states, including the United States. Witness, for example, Yaser Esam Hamdi, captured in Afghanistan in November 2001, sent to Guantánamo, transferred to a naval brig in South Carolina when it was revealed that he was a U.S. citizen, and held there without trial until 2004, when the Justice Department released Hamdi to Saudi Arabia without charge on the condition that he renounce his U.S. citizenship. Hamdi’s story may be the best known expatriation story in recent memory, but in Revoking Citizenship, Ben Herzog reveals America’s long history of making both naturalized immigrants and native-born citizens un-American after their citizenship was stripped away. Using the history and policies of revoking citizenship as a lens, Revoking Citizenship examines, describes, and analyzes the complex relationships between citizenship, immigration, and national identity. “For Herzog, expatriation policy and practices are windows to American understanding of citizenship.” —Choice

BEN HERZOG is a Lecturer at the Ben-Gurion Research Institute at the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. EDIBERTO ROMÁN is Professor of Law at Florida International University.

MARCH 2017 216 PAGES • 12 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-7771-3 • $27.00S (£21.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6038-3 In the Citizenship and Migration in the Americas series LAW 1.800.996.NYUP


NYU Press Spring 2017