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HISTORY

NEW IN PAPERBACK

NEW IN PAPERBACK

Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway?

Insatiable Appetites

Community Politics and Grassroots Activism during the New Negro Era

Imperial Encounters with Cannibals in the North Atlantic World KELLY L. WATSON

SHANNON KING 2015 CHOICE OUTSTANDING ACADEMIC TITLE WINNER OF THE ANNA JULIA COOPER/CLR JAMES AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING BOOK IN AFRICANA STUDIES PRESENTED BY THE NATIONAL COUNCIL FOR BLACK STUDIES

Demonstrates how Harlemites’ fight for their rights and neighborhood established Harlem’s legendary political culture In Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway?, Shannon King vividly uncovers early twentieth century Harlem as an intersection between the black intellectuals and artists who created the New Negro Renaissance and the working class who fought daily to combat institutionalized racism and gender discrimination in both Harlem and across the city. By studying blacks’ immense investment in community politics, King makes visible the hidden stirrings of a social movement deeply invested in a Black Harlem. Whose Harlem Is This, Anyway? is a vibrant story of the shaping of a community during a pivotal time in American history. “[An] excellent study…A must read for those interested in urban civil rights and race in the 20thcentury US.” —Choice

A history of cross-cultural encounters and the critical role of cannibalism in the early modern period Cannibalism, for medieval and early modern Europeans, was synonymous with savagery. Humans who ate other humans, they believed, were little better than animals. The European colonizers who encountered Native Americans described them as cannibals as a matter of course, and they wrote extensively about the lurid cannibal rituals they claim to have witnessed. In this definitive analysis, Kelly L. Watson argues that the persistent rumors of cannibalism surrounding Native Americans served a specific and practical purpose for European settlers. Watson reads cannibalism as a part of a dominant European binary in which civilization is rendered as male and savagery is seen as female, and she argues that as Europeans came to dominate the New World, they continually rewrote the cannibal narrative to allow for a story in which the savage, effeminate, cannibalistic natives were overwhelmed by the force of virile European masculinity. Original and historically grounded, Insatiable Appetites uses the discourse of cannibalism to uncover the ways in which difference is understood in the West. KELLY L. WATSON is Assistant Professor of History and a member of the faculty in Women’s and Gender Studies at Avila University in Kansas City.

SHANNON KING is Associate Professor of History at The College of Wooster (OH).

APRIL 2017 272 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-8908-2 • $28.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-1127-4 In the Culture, Labor, History series HISTORY 12

N Y U PR E S S • SPR ING 2 0 1 7

APRIL 2017 288 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-7765-2 • $27.00S (£21.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6347-6 In the Early American Places series HISTORY 1.800.996.NYUP


NYU Press Spring 2017