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New York

nurse special edition/New York City – Region one | october 2018

the official publication of the new york state nurses association

General Election November 6, 2018

NYSNA Endorsed Candidates

VOTE! NYSNA list of endorsements, pp. 6-7


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New York Nurse october 2018

Re-elect Governor Andrew Cuomo

G

overnor Andrew M. Cuomo (D) has proven to be a tireless and uncompromising champion of laws and regulations that enhance the health and well-being of all New Yorkers. He has successfully spearheaded the fight for a living wage, the Marriage Equality Act, New York’s Safe Act, access to healthcare, and protecting women’s reproductive rights in the face of federal assault, and many others. Our 56th governor has distinguished himself through his words, principles and actions. He was unflinching in his support for working people and unions in our organizing drive at Albany Medical Center.

Union state

Advocating for patients. Advancing the profession.

SM

Board of Directors President Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, RN, MSN, FNP First Vice President Anthony Ciampa, RN Second Vice President Karine M. Raymond, RN, MSN Secretary Tracey Kavanagh, RN, BSN Treasurer Patricia Kane, RN Directors at Large Anne Bové, RN, MSN, BC, CCRN, ANP Judith Cutchin, RN Seth Dressekie, RN, MSN, NP Jacqueline Gilbert, RN Nancy Hagans, RN Robin Krinsky, RN Lilia V. Marquez, RN Nella Pineda-Marcon, RN, BC Verginia Stewart, RN Marva Wade, RN Regional Directors Southeastern Yasmine Beausejour, RN Southern Sean Petty, RN Central Marion Enright, RN Lower Hudson/NJ Jayne Cammisa, RN, BSN Western Chiqkena Collins, RN Eastern Martha Wilcox, RN Executive Editor Jill Furillo, RN, BSN, PHN Executive Director Editorial offices located at: 131 W 33rd St., New York, NY 10001 Phone: 212-785-0157 x 159 Email: communications@nysna.org Website: www.nysna.org Subscription rate: $33 per year ISSN (Print) 1934-7588/ISSN (Online) 1934-7596 ©2018, All rights reserved

“New York is a union state,” Governor Cuomo said on April 15, 2018, “and we have zero tolerance for any attempts to illegally interfere in the fundamental right to join a union.” In June, the governor issued an executive order instructing the NYS Department of Labor to “vigorously enforce workforce protections.” With laws and executive orders he has demonstrated a profound understanding of the lives of New Yorkers and the importance of our work in hospitals, the role of unions and the need for greater economic parity. In the devastating aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newton, Connecticut, Governor Cuomo signed New York’s Safe Act, the strongest gun safety legislation in America. His July 9 executive order, Protecting Women’s Access to Contraception, shored up “the full range of reproductive healthcare services” for all New York women in the face of federal attack. He is committed to enacting the protections of Roe v. Wade into state law. Major commitment to safe staffing

Governor Cuomo announced in June his intention to implement safe staffing levels for nurses and caregivers at hospitals and nursing homes throughout New York State. Toward this end, he will include a measure for safe staffing in the state budget, making it a high priority early in 2019. “We know that quality of care is directly linked to appropriate staffing levels,” he

Governor Andrew Cuomo with NYSNA members

wrote in a June 22 directive to the NYS Labor Department. In the face of the Janus decision, he signed legislation to strengthen the rights of working men and women. The legislation protects union membership in the state’s public sector. Subsequent action taken by him protects the privacy of union members. He has vowed to “vigorously enforce workforce protections,” calling for penalty pay for nurses, citing work through lunch breaks and ad-

ditional hours without fair compensation, such as mandatory overtime. Governor Cuomo knows that safety net hospitals are the backbone of care for the people and he joined forces with allies across the state, including NYSNA, to make certain that they are protected in the face of federal incursion. “Health is a critical priority and this administration will do everything we can to protect…funding and quality care,” he has said repeatedly.

Kirsten Gillibrand for U.S. Senate

K

irsten Gillibrand (D) is seeking re-election to the U.S. Senate and we strongly support her. Born and raised in Albany, Gillibrand is an attorney who early in her career took on pro bono cases defending abused women and their children. She also worked to defend tenants seeking safe housing. First as a member of Congress and since entering the U.S. Senate in 2009, Gillibrand has given priority to creating and protecting jobs and she knows well the importance of unions in keeping communities strong and vital. “Our unions are key to rebuilding the middle class with good wages, safe jobs and retirement and healthcare benefits, all of which will lift up our economy. I will always speak out for good union jobs, and for our workers’ freedom to organize,” she said. Gillibrand is in favor of single payer healthcare and voted for the Medicare for All Act of 2017. “Ensuring that every American has access to quality, affordable healthcare coverage is a national priority.”

U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand

Another national priority for Gillibrand is ensuring veterans’ care. “Too many New York veterans are not getting the quality care they have earned because the federal bureaucracy fails to reach out and let our vets know what services they are entitled to.” Gillibrand stands for the protection of women’s access to the full range of reproductive healthcare services. She has been outspoken on issues of sexual assault in the military and sexual harassment. And she supported civil unions for same-sex couples. Across the board on this range of essential issues Gillibrand has spoken out and taken action. She has earned out strong endorsement.


NEW YORK NURSE

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october 2018

Letitia James for Attorney General

T

here are a litany of firsts in the political life of Letitia “Tish” James (D). In 2014, she shattered the glass ceiling for AfricanAmerican women in New York City and became the first black woman elected to citywide office, as well as the first African-American — man or woman — to serve as New York City’s Public Advocate. Her successful bid to run for New York State Attorney General on the Democratic ticket this year garnered James another first in New York politics: she is the first black woman to be nominated for statewide office by a major political party. There is no denying the significance of these breakthrough achievements, but when it comes to understanding the extraordinary role James has played in shaping a vision for a better New York, her long and distinguished record speaks for itself. Since her election to the New York City Council 18 years ago, James has fought the good fight — for decent housing and access to quality healthcare, against environmental harm, and against discrimination in its many forms — including wage discrimination. James has been an advocate for paid family leave, invoking an understanding that this law promotes financial stability and sustains careers. She has defended our union and the communities it serves and fought to protect the rights of all working men and women, from Long Island College Hospital (LICH) to the steps of the Supreme Court.

Shoulder to shoulder

Who could forget James standing ground with us in Brooklyn against the LICH closing, a closing that threatened the health and safety of thousands of Brooklyn residents? Who does not remember James taking the lead at Interfaith Medical Center (IMC), working for months to keep open and fully and fairly funded the principal healthcare destination for more than one million Central Brooklyn residents, including many from underserved communities and communities of color? In the Bronx — the poorest congressional district in the

a substandard for-profit dialysis company to take over clinics at New York City’s public hospitals, keeping jobs and quality dialysis care intact at those facilities. Stand with unions

NYC Public Advocate Letitia James

nation — her staunch efforts to keep North Central Bronx as a viable facility for maternal care helped ensure that quality Labor & Delivery and other maternal health services, remain readily available today for women in that underserved community. We recall vividly the difference James made by refusing to allow

In recent months, James has been vocal and unequivocal in her support for unions, calling for a forum of labor leaders to discuss the ramifications of the Janus v. AFSCME case. Who could miss her at the rally against the Supreme Court’s Janus decision? James is a brilliant lawyer and a defender of working people. She has used the judicial system with mastery in her role as New York City Public Advocate to protect our most vulnerable residents. Her consistent track record, and her years of legal experience as a public defender and as an Assistant Attorney General, make her imminently qualified to serve as our next Attorney General. Tish James for NYS Attorney General!

Thomas DiNapoli for Comptroller

A

s New York State Comptroller Thomas “Tom” DiNapoli (D) acts as our state’s chief fiscal officer. With a reputation for transparency, independence and integrity, his vigilant oversight guarantees a gold standard of attention to a range of key financial issues. As comptroller, DiNapoli manages the state’s more than $200 billion dollar pension fund, including contributions from all public sector employees. That means NYSNA members who work in public hospitals and other staterun healthcare facilities. DiNapoli audits the spending practices of the New York State Department of Labor and the New York State Department of Health in addition to all other state agencies and local governments. He reviews New York State and City budgets and approves all state contracts. He is responsible for the financial health of our public healthcare system and for fiscal oversight of New York State Medicaid spending and other healthcare programs. He approves all state contracts.

Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli For access to healthcare

On September 5, 2018, DiNapoli came out swinging in support of access to healthcare. He released the report “7 Million and Counting: More New Yorkers Benefit from State Health Coverage,” detailing the rapidly rising number of New Yorkers who depend on Medicaid and other major state programs for healthcare — a number that grew by a very substantial 57 percent over the last 10 years and accounts for one-third of all New York residents. “There are disturbing calls in Continued on page 4

Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul

Kathy Hochul for Lieutenant Governor

A

Democrat from Buffalo, Kathleen “Kathy” Courtney Hochul is a versatile and skilled legislator. She is the fourth woman to serve as lieutenant governor of New York State and acts at the governor’s behest as chair of the Regional Economic Development Councils, chair of the Women’s Suffrage Commission, and chair of the Task Force on Heroin and Opioid Abuse and Addiction. She spearheads the Enough is Enough campaign — Governor Andrew Cuomo’s signature sexual assault program — and is committed to passing the strictest laws against sexual harassment in the nation. As lieutenant governor, Hochul travels the state advancing the governor’s agenda, including the successful fight for a $15 minimum wage and Paid Family Leave. In 2011, Hochul ran for U.S. representative in the special election for Erie and Niagara counties and won. Hochul opposed the plan to transform Medicare into a voucher system. Hochul, whose congressional term ended in 2013, supports the Affordable Care Act, a woman’s right to choose, and the rights of the LGBTQ community. Her father was a proud union member. Now running for her second term as lieutenant governor, Hochul is the Democratic Party, the Independence Party, and the Women’s Equality Party candidate. NYSNA endorses Kathy Hochul for lieutenant governor.


4

New York Nurse october 2018

A word from Pat kane, RN

Your vote counts

A By Pat Kane, RN, NYSNA Treasurer

Certainty to vote is up 32 points among women younger than 40, compared with 2014. Among men and women ages 18 to 29, it has risen 17 points.

s a recent candidate in the Democratic primary for the 61st New York State Assembly, I sincerely and deeply appreciate all of the voters — and especially the nurses — who took the time to go to the polls and mark their ballot for me. It’s such an incredible honor to be a candidate for public office and to articulate NYSNA’s vision for a just healthcare system for our community. This is the time to study your candidates, read our endorsements closely and on November 6 make your way to the voting booth. Let nothing interfere. The political battles are fierce —  reaching directly into our hospitals, onto our floors, into our practice, affecting our families, our patient’s outcomes and our communities. Electoral contests will make a profound difference in our lives. There are very significant issues, for sure, and many qualified and dedicated candidates on both the state and national level. Our endorsed candidates for U.S. Congress and in the New York State Senate and Assembly deserve a vote — including those running a first race, as they press for safe staffing, guaranteed healthcare for all, protecting the labor rights and safety of New York workers and a healthy environment.

DiNapoli Continued from page 3

Washington to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and make radical changes to Medicaid,” DiNapoli said. “We cannot go backwards on health care and force people to choose between buying groceries or seeing a doctor. We need more people to have access to quality healthcare, not fewer.” These cuts would also impact the state budget and require difficult decisions to cover shortfalls. A commitment to labor

Raised on Long Island in a middle-class, union household, DiNapoli has been a strong and

Governor Andrew Cuomo, Lieutenant Governor Kathleen Hochul and NYS Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli have our strong endorsements for re-election. NYC Public Advocate Letitia James is running for NYS attorney general and we are excited about her election. Her exemplary record in defense of healthcare for underserved communities is an undeniable indication of her values and leadership abilities.

But victory is only possible with your participation. What happened at the midterm elections four years ago? Midterm voter turnout fell to its lowest level in more than half a century! Today, with the GOP House majority at risk and some close Senate races that will determine who has control of that chamber in

January, a 77 percent majority of registered voters say they are certain to vote next month or have already voted, according to a Washington Post-ABC News poll released on October 14. This is up from a 65 percent majority of registered voters in the same poll of October 2014. The economy and healthcare rank as the most important voting issues this fall, followed by changing the way things work in Washington, the equal treatment of women and men, taxes, immigration and the appointment of judges to the high court. Certainty to vote is up 32 points among women younger than 40, compared with 2014. Among men and women ages 18 to 29, it has risen 17 points. Against this backdrop of heightened interest in issues and outcomes, you need to weigh in. Your vote counts!

public voice in support of unions. In the aftermath of Janus v. AFSCME, DiNapoli called the U.S. Supreme Court decision “just plain wrong,” saying, “we must stand together to defend unions and working families in all parts of our country and fight further attacks by special interest groups that mean to undermine decades of progress. Labor remains the backbone of the New York and American economy. Unions created our middle class and are still building it. A strong and united labor movement will preserve employee benefits and retirements, support fair contracts and promote safe working conditions.”

DiNapoli has a long and impressive career in New York politics. At age 18, he became the youngest person in New York State history to be elected to public office, winning a position on the Mineola Board of Education. From 1987 to 2007, he served in the New York State Assembly as a representative from Long Island and chaired a number of standing committees including, Ethics and Guidance, Consumer Affairs, Government Operations, Local Government, and Environmental Conservation. He is currently running for his third term as New York State comptroller and we are proud to give our endorsement for his re-election.

Your time to weigh in


nYC – Region one

NEW YORK NURSE

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october 2018

andrew Gounardes for Senate, District 22 Max Rose for Congress, CD-11 Max Rose is bringing 25 years of community healthcare experience to his run for Congress. Rose has worked in the nonprofit healthcare field dedicated to the needs of underserved New Yorkers by a health clinic, food pantries and substance abuse programs (including a 24-hour recovery center that helps Staten Islanders address their addictions). Rose has the distinction of being the first post-9/11 combat veteran of the War in Afghanistan to seek office in New York City. For his service in the U.S. Army, Rose earned a Bronze Star, Purple Heart and Combat Infantryman Badge and has remained in service in the National Guard. Rose has also worked in the field of criminal justice in Brooklyn, helping to lead in the development of several nationally recognized programs that keep people out of jail for low-level offenses. “There’s no reason we can’t have affordable, universal healthcare or an education system that prepares students for the 21st century without burying them in debt,” said Rose. “I reject the idea that there’s not enough funding to bring the same resources to fighting the opioid and heroin epidemic that we did to the HIV/AIDS epidemic.”

After Superstorm Sandy, Andrew Gounardes cofounded Bay Ridge Cares, an organization that prepared 25,000 hot meals for victims after the storm. We saw him in action, caring for New Yorkers in crisis, and we are very pleased to endorse him now for State Senate. Having served on the staffs of the NYC Council and the Office of Brooklyn Borough President, as well as serving as a member of Community Board 10, Gounardes brings considerable political experience to his first run for state public office. Early work for Citizens Committee for New York City, a non-profit that provides neighborhood improvement grants to community groups across the city, adds to his record of service.

We think Rose’s in-depth, hands-on experience and compassion should earn him a place in Congress. He has our endorsement.

Gounardes is also a trustee of the New York City Employees’ Retirement System, one of the largest municipal pension funds in the country.

Diane savino for Senate, District 23

His attention has been focused on mass transit and the hardships many residents face simply in getting to work, as well as on the issues of disabled New Yorkers and their demands for handicap-accessible subway stations in South Brooklyn.

Diane Savino is the Democratic incumbent running for re-election on Staten Island and in South Brooklyn. A past member of SEIU and of AFSCME, she is a staunch supporter of unions and a strong believer in improving the quality of healthcare for all New Yorkers. Savino has held office since 2004 and has worked with nurses on critical healthcare initiatives, including the Safe Staffing for Quality Act and the NY Health Act. Of the Reproductive Health Act, Savino says, “It is clear that we need to pass the Reproductive Health Act in New York now more than ever. We cannot allow the federal government to put women's reproductive health rights at risk. Voters need to know where their senators stand on this issue.” She

Andrew Gounardes is intimately in touch with the communities he hopes to serve in Albany. His sincerity, hard work and judgment earn him our nod.

has shown a keen interest in climate change, and was a sponsor of the New York State Climate and Community Protection Act. Once again, NYSNA is pleased to endorse Diane Savino for NY State Senate.

mathylde frontus for Assembly, District 46 Mathylde Frontus emerged as the Democratic candidate in a tightly contested primary race for the open, South Brooklyn seat in the NY State Assembly. Frontus, an educator and community organizer, is a proud supporter of unions and the issues facing the nursing community. Frontus holds a PhD from the Columbia University School of Social Work where she specialized in Social Policy and Adminstration. One of the research topics for her dissertation was the mental health needs of the African-American community, and she offers consulting to mental health agencies. She will be a strong advocate for safe staffing and single payer/Medicare for All healthcare legislation. We stand behind Mathylde Frontus for State Assembly.


NYSNA Voter Guide 2018 New York Statewide Races CANDIDATE Andrew Cuomo Letitia James Tom DiNapoli Kathy Hochul

OFFICE Governor Attorney General State Comptroller Lieutenant Governor

DISTRICT Statewide Statewide Statewide Statewide

CAPITAL REGION PARTY D D D D

New York Congressional Races CANDIDATE Perry Gershon

OFFICE US House

DISTRICT 1

PARTY D

Liuba Grechen Shirley Tom Suozzi Gregory Meeks Grace Meng Nydia Velazquez Hakeem Jeffries Yvette Clarke Jerrold Nadler Max Rose Carolyn Maloney Adriano Espaillat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez José E. Serrano Eliot Engel Nita Lowey Sean Patrick Maloney Antonio Delgado Paul Tonko Tedra Cobb Anthony Brindisi Tracy Mitrano Dana Balter Joe Morelle Brian Higgins Nate McMurray Kirsten Gillibrand

US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US House US Senate

2 3 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 NY

D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D D

CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

Aaron Gladd

Senate

43

D

Neil Breslin

Senate

44

D

Tistrya Houghtling

Assembly 107

D

Patricia Fahy

Assembly 109

D

Phil Steck

Assembly 110

D

Angelo Santabarbara

Assembly 111

D

Carrie Woerner

Assembly 113

D

CENTRAL NY CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST PARTY

Joseph Griffo

Senate

47

R

Patty Ritchie

Senate

48

R

John Mannion

Senate

50

D

Joyce St. George

Senate

51

D

Rachel May

Senate

53

D

Rich Funke

Senate

55

R

Billy Jones

Assembly 115

D

Addie Jenne

Assembly 116

D

Marianne Buttenschon

Assembly 119

D

William Magee

Assembly 121

D

Donna Lupardo

Assembly 123

D

Barbara Lifton

Assembly 125

D

Keith Batman

Assembly 126

D

Al Stirpe

Assembly 127

D

Pamela Hunter

Assembly 128

D

William Magnarelli

Assembly 129

D

LONG ISLAND CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST PARTY

Phil Boyle

Senate

4

R

Jim Gaughran

Senate

5

D

Kevin Thomas

Senate

6

D

Anna Kaplan

Senate

7

D

John Brooks

Senate

8

D

Todd Kaminsky

Senate

9

D

Fred Thiele, Jr.

Assembly 1

D

Steve Englebright

Assembly 4

D

Doug Smith

Assembly 5

R

Phil Ramos

Assembly 6

D

Christine Pellegrino

Assembly 9

D

Steve Stern

Assembly 10

D

Kimberly Jean-Pierre

Assembly 11

D

Andrew Raia

Assembly 12

R

Charles Lavine

Assembly 13

D

Michael Reid

Assembly 14

D

Allen Foley

Assembly 15

D

Anthony D’Urso

Assembly 16

D

Taylor Raynor

Assembly 18

D

Edward Ra

Assembly 19

R

Melissa Miller

Assembly 20

R

Michaelle Solages

Assembly 22

D


New York City

HUDSON VALLEY CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

Andrea Stewart-Cousins

Senate

35

D

Shelley Mayer

Senate

37

D

David Carlucci

Senate

38

D

James Skoufis

Senate

39

D

Terrence Murphy

Senate

40

R

Sue Serino

Senate

41

R

Jen Metzger

Senate

42

D

Amy Paulin

Assembly 88

D

J. Gary Pretlow

Assembly 89

D

Nader Sayegh

Assembly 90

D

Steve Otis

Assembly 91

D

Tom Abinanti

Assembly 92

D

David Buchwald

Assembly 93

D

Kevin Byrne

Assembly 94

R

Sandy Galef

Assembly 95

D

Kenneth Zebrowski

Assembly 96

D

Ellen Jaffee

Assembly 97

D

Karl Brabenec

Assembly 98

R

Aileen Gunther

Assembly 100

Chad McEvoy

QUEENS

MANHATTAN, cont.

CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

Stacey Pheffer Amato

Assembly

23

D

Robert Jackson

Senate

31

D

David Weprin

Assembly

24

D

Yuh-Line Niou

Assembly

65

D

Nily Rozic

Assembly

25

D

Deborah Glick

Assembly

66

D

Ed Braunstein

Assembly

26

D

Linda Rosenthal

Assembly

67

D

Daniel Rosenthal

Assembly

27

D

Daniel O’Donnell

Assembly

69

D

Andrew Hevesi

Assembly

28

D

Inez Dickens

Assembly

70

D

Alicia Hyndman

Assembly

29

D

Al Taylor

Assembly

71

D

Brian Barnwell

Assembly

30

D

Carmen De la Rosa

Assembly

72

D

Michele Titus

Assembly

31

D

Dan Quart

Assembly

73

D

Vivian Cook

Assembly

32

D

Harvey Epstein

Assembly

74

D

Clyde Vanel

Assembly

33

D

Richard Gottfried

Assembly

75

D

Michael DenDekker

Assembly

34

D

Rebecca Seawright

Assembly

76

D

Jeffrion Aubry

Assembly

35

D

Aravella Simotas

Assembly

36

D

BROOKLYN

Catherine Nolan

Assembly

37

D

CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

Michael Miller

Assembly

38

D

Julia Salazar

Senate

18

D

D

Catalina Cruz

Assembly

39

D

Roxanne Persaud

Senate

19

D

Assembly 101

D

Ron Kim

Assembly

40

D

Zellnor Myrie

Senate

20

D

Aidan O’Connor Jr.

Assembly 102

D

James Sanders, Jr.

Senate

10

D

Kevin Parker

Senate

21

D

Kevin Cahill

Assembly 103

D

John Liu

Senate

11

D

Andrew Gounardes

Senate

22

D

Jonathan Jacobson

Assembly 104

D

Michael Gianaris

Senate

12

D

Velmanette Montgomery Senate

25

D

Didi Barrett

Assembly 106

D

Jessica Ramos

Senate

13

D

Helene Weinstein

Assembly

41

D

Leroy Comrie

Senate

14

D

Rodneyse Bichotte

Assembly

42

D

Joe Addabbo

Senate

15

D

Diana Richardson

Assembly

43

D

Toby Ann Stavisky

Senate

16

D

Robert Carroll

Assembly

44

D

Steven Cymbrowitz

Assembly

45

D

Mathylde Frontus

Assembly

46

D

WESTERN/SOUTHERN TIER CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST PARTY

Joseph Robach

Senate

56

R

BRONX

Joan Seamans

Senate

61

D

CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

William Colton

Assembly

47

D

Tim Kennedy

Senate

63

D

José M. Serrano

Senate

29

D

Simcha Eichenstein

Assembly

48

D

Jamie Romeo

Assembly 136

D

Luis Sepúlveda

Senate

32

D

Peter Abbate, Jr.

Assembly

49

D

David Gantt

Assembly 137

D

Gustavo Rivera

Senate

33

D

Joseph Lentol

Assembly

50

D

Harry Bronson

Assembly 138

D

Alessandra Biaggi

Senate

34

D

Félix Ortiz

Assembly

51

D

Crystal Peoples-Stokes

Assembly 141

D

Jamaal Bailey

Senate

36

D

Jo Anne Simon

Assembly

52

D

Pat Burke

Assembly 142

D

Latoya Joyner

Assembly

77

D

Maritza Davila

Assembly

53

D

Monica Wallace

Assembly 143

D

Jose Rivera

Assembly

78

D

Erik Dilan

Assembly

54

D

Sean Ryan

Assembly 149

D

Michael Blake

Assembly

79

D

Latrice Walker

Assembly

55

D

Nathalia Fernandez

Assembly

80

D

Tremaine Wright

Assembly

56

D

Jeffrey Dinowitz

Assembly

81

D

Walter Mosley

Assembly

57

D

Michael Benedetto

Assembly

82

D

N. Nick Perry

Assembly

58

D

Carl Heastie

Assembly

83

D

Jaime Williams

Assembly

59

D

Carmen Arroyo

Assembly

84

D

Charles Barron

Assembly

60

D

Marcos Crespo

Assembly

85

D

Victor Pichardo

Assembly

86

D

STATEN ISLAND

Karines Reyes

Assembly

87

D

CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

Diane Savino

Senate

23

D

Andrew Lanza

Senate

24

R

MANHATTAN CANDIDATE

OFFICE

DIST

PARTY

Michael Cusick

Assembly

63

D

Brian Kavanagh

Senate

26

D

Adam Baumel

Assembly

64

D

Brad Hoylman

Senate

27

D

Liz Krueger

Senate

28

D

Brian Benjamin

Senate

30

D


NEW YORK NURSE

Non-Profit US Postage Paid NYSNA

october 2018

131 West 33rd Street, 4th Floor New York, NY 10001

1NY

How to Vote by Absentee Ballot (Deadlines) l Applications for absentee ballots are available at your county board

of elections. l Upon completion, applications must be mailed to your county board no

later than the seventh day before the election (October 30) or delivered in person no later than the day before the election (November 5). l You may also request an absentee ballot by sending a letter to your

county board of elections. The letter must be received by your county board no earlier than 30 days (October 6) and no later than seven days

before the election (October 30). The letter must contain the following information: The address where you are registered An address where the ballot is to be sent The reason for the request, and The signature of the voter If you apply by letter, an application form will be mailed with your ballot. The application form must be completed and returned with your ballot.

Right to Election Day Leave Time – NY Election Law 3-110 All voters registered in New York State are entitled to sufficient leave time on Election Day so that they are able to vote. The law considers four consecutive hours between the hours of 6 am and 9 pm (when the polls are open) to be sufficient time to vote, either at the beginning of your shift or after the end of your shift.

sufficient time to vote. For example, if your shift is scheduled from 7 am to 7:30 pm and you will not have enough time to vote, you are entitled to leave at either the beginning or end of your shift to give you enough time to vote, so that you have up to a four hour window to vote while the polls are open.

If you will not have four hours in which to vote either before or after your shift, you are entitled to leave under the law so that you have

You must provide notice to your employer at least two days, but not more than ten days, prior to the election that you will need leave and your

employer may designate whether the leave will be at the beginning or end of your shift. Under many of our private sector collective bargaining agreements, you are entitled to be paid for all of this leave time. Under NYS law, you are entitled to pay for at least two hours of leave time to vote. If you wish to volunteer for a political campaign or as a poll worker, you can request time off from your employer through the usual process.

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