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Volume 21 · Number 3 · Fall 2010

Vet Tech TIMES

Official Newsletter of the New York State Association of Veterinary Technicians

Continuing Education: What Does it Mean For Me?

After several iterations and years of waiting, a continuing education bill for veterinary medicine has passed the New York State Legislature and has been signed by the governor. NYSAVT recently met with the State Education Department to ensure that the voice of NYSAVT and the vet tech community is heard. At that meeting, it was decided that all NYSAVT-approved courses would meet the mandatory continuing education requirements. Additionally, coursework provided by approved sponsors (see below) in 2011 will count toward the mandatory CE that will be required starting in 2012. ABOUT THE BILL This new bill requires veterinarians and veterinary technicians to complete continuing education during each threeyear registration period and provides various exemptions. The bill becomes effective January 1, 2011. Beginning January 1, 2012, anyone renewing (registering) their license will have to produce proof that they have fulfilled the prorated CE requirements, which are based on date of license registration. For proration details visit NYSAVT.org. Vet techs that do not complete mandatory CE will be unable to practice until they have met these requirements and have received a registration or conditional registration certificate. Exemptions • A vet tech is exempt from mandatory CE for the first three years after licensure. • A vet tech teaching veterinary medicine full-time at a veterinary education

program registered with or accepted by the NYS Education Department is exempt from mandatory CE. • Non-practicing licensed vet techs are exempt from mandatory CE upon notifying the Education Department. Prior to returning to practice, you must notify the department and meet mandatory CE requirements.

CE Requirements • During each three-year registration period, licensed vet techs must complete a minimum of 24 hours of acceptable, formal continuing education. • Of these hours, no more than 12 may be self-instructional coursework accepted by the department. • Proration: The first three years of the mandatory CE requirements may be confusing. See chart on NYSAVT.org. • If you have not satisfied the mandatory CE requirement, you will not receive a triennial registration certificate and will be unable to practice until a conditional registration certificate is issued or you have met the mandatory CE requirements. • Vet techs are able to determine their individual courses or programs of study. Conditional Registration • At the department’s discretion, a conditional registration may be issued to a vet tech who fails to meet the CE requirements but who agrees to make up any deficiencies and take additional education that may be required. • If your registration is denied because you do not submit proper evidence of CE, because you fail to complete

required CE, or because you continue to practice without proper registration, you may be subject to disciplinary action.

Acceptable Formal Continuing Education • In order to fulfill the mandatory CE requirement, programs must be offered by sponsors of Veterinary Technician Continuing Education which include: • State or national professional associations established to further the veterinary professions (this includes NYSAVT); • Any affiliates of state or national associations, including local veterinary medical societies and local veterinary technician societies; • State, national and international veterinary and veterinary technician conferences at which professional continuing education is a major component; • Universities and colleges offering programs leading to licensure in the veterinary medical professions. Cost The mandatory CE fee will be established by the department, must be payable on or before the first day of each triennial registration period and must be paid in addition to the triennial registration fee. This fee has not yet been established. Visit NYSAVT.org to read the complete bill and for additional information related to CE. As regulations are approved and set forth from the State Board for Veterinary Medicine, they will be posted to the NYSAVT website.


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NYSAVT Spring Seminar 2011: April 15-17

With the big changes in mandatory continuing education coming to the field of veterinary technology, NYSAVT has decided to put on an Annual Spring Seminar unlike any we have had in the past. We have completely revamped Spring Seminar this year, and have reserved the beautiful property of Beaver Hollow for the location.

Beaver Hollow Conference Center Beaver Hollow is located at 1083 Pit Road in Java Center, NY, between Rochester and Buffalo. The conference center and resort draws its beauty from the surrounding nature. Nestled on a 300-acre natural wonderland and bejeweled with its own private lake, Beaver Hollow features a perfect balance of technology and nature.

The Program The 2011 Spring Seminar will be a submersion in education and we have received a good response regarding the site and program. With 2011 NYSAVTapproved courses counting toward the new mandatory CE requirement, we expect quite a turn out. Last year’s Seminar drew over one hundred and fifty attendees, speakers and exhibitors; we are hoping to top that this coming year. With that in mind, NYSAVT strongly recommends that members reserve their rooms starting now to ensure their place at Spring Seminar. Overnight guest rooms are only $100 for single or double occupancy. Call Beaver Hollow at 800-9647903 and mention you are reserving for the NYSAVT 2011 Spring Seminar.

You will enjoy authentic Farm to Table cuisine, accommodations in cozy cottages, unlimited recreation (during your time not in class of course!) and Beaver Hollow’s legendary nightly bonfires with s’mores. And the cost is comparable to years past!

We are putting together a truly amazing program, with experts in their fields and leaders in veterinary medicine presenting. We expect the program to include courses on acupuncture and holistic medicine, reproduction and conservation programs at the Buffalo Zoo, shelter medicine, practice management, a backstage animal care tour of Hidden Valley Animal Adventure, and rehabilitation, physical therapy, orthopedics and more.

A low-cost family getaway Bring your family with you to enjoy the property and surrounding area while you get ahead on mandatory CE! There are so many things to do on the property (all complimentary), including rowboats, nature trails and hiking, fishing, tennis, basketball and bocce courts, pool tables, Wii Sports and so much more. Area attractions include Crag Burn, a year round, picturesque golf destination with an 18-hole golf course, Historic East Aurora with its nostalgic five-and-dime store, ice cream parlor and big screen theatre with classic neon marquee, all of which compliment the meticulously preserved homes along Main Street. Hidden Valley Animal Adventure is just minutes away providing full tours of animals in a safarilike setting as well as real farm tours with methane digesters. And you won’t want to miss the Wind Turbine Farm!

Beaver Hollow will also accommodate our extended NYSAVT family, with separate meal offerings (for spouses and kids that don’t want to sit through an Awards banquet with speaker!) and movie nights for kids and adults. Green Initiatives at Beaver Hollow Beaver Hollow and has been distinguished as LEED registered by the U.S. Green Building Council for its environmentally responsible facilities and services With their farm to table dining initiative, they work directly with local farms that practice environmentally sound farming and produce sustainable produces. By using local produce, they have been able to decrease their trucking carbon footprint by over 430%. The property uses Purple Martin and Bat Houses for natural pest control with the use of no chemicals. They have re-purposed furniture throughout the property for ascetically pleasing garbage containers and other meeting room needs. Natural fertilizers are used in planting beds and throughout the property in between events for a chemical free alternative for their gardens. All conference space features full windows with the availability to use nature’s natural breeze for cooling and warming rooms.

Save the date, save your room and keep an eye out for registration information coming just around the corner. You won’t want to miss the 2011 NYSAVT Spring Seminar!


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New Vet Tech Program at Genesee Community College From Genesee Community College

This past September, Genesee Community College began a new Associate in Applied Science (A.A.S.) degree program in Veterinary Technology. The program will prepare students to work in partnerships with veterinarians as licensed veterinary technicians.

In recent years, many prospective Genesee students have asked about veterinary technology programs, said Dr. Eunice Bellinger, Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at Genesee. The demand for veterinary technologists is expected to grow by 20% in New York State over the next six years, and 41% nationwide, Dr. Bellinger said. “This is a very high-demand profession,” she told trustees. “The high concentration of farms in our region is one factor in local demand for the veterinary technology profession, and the overall popularity of pets is another.” The College began the program during the Fall 2010 semester, with 10 students admitted to the first class. That number will more than double during the second year, Dr. Bellinger said. Genesee will probably receive many more applications for the program than it can accept, she said. “We anticipate that this will be a highly competitive program, much like other health care programs at Genesee,” she said.

Genesee Community College Veterinary Technology students will complete courses in Anatomy and Physiology, Veterinary Pharmacy and Pharmacology,

Veterinary Nutrition, Techniques in Laboratory Animals and Exotics, Small Animal Pathology and Nursing, Large Animal Pathology and Nursing, Surgical Nursing and Anesthesiology, Veterinary Radiology and Dentistry, Parasitology, as well as general education courses that include communications and mathematics. Students also complete three “externships”—supervised experience working with animals in a clinical setting.

The entire program consists of 72 credit hours, and can be completed by students pursuing full-time study in two years. Nine of the program’s courses include extensive lab work, and the College is developing a veterinary lab at the Batavia Campus, Dr. Bellinger said. The program will prepare students to complete the Veterinary Technician National Examination (VTNE), which is required for veterinary technician licensure in New York State. Genesee will apply to have the program accredited by the American Association of Veterinary State Boards. Genesee graduates with an A.A.S. degree in veterinary technology will also have the opportunity to deepen their education in the veterinary management field or even become veterinarians, Dr. Bellinger told trustees. The College plans to develop transfer agreements with colleges and

universities offering baccalaureate and other advanced veterinary programs. SUNY Canton, which offers a degree in Veterinary Management Services, and SUNY Delhi, which offers a Bachelor of Business Administration in Veterinary Technology, have both expressed interest in developing a transfer program for Genesee graduates. Cornell University and Ross University School of Veterinary Science have both expressed interest in developing transfer programs for students who wish to become veterinarians. The new Veterinary Technology Program will be a deep source of pride to Genesee, Dr. Bellinger said. “Our health care programs have long been regarded as among the very best in the northeastern United States,” she said. “In our heavily agricultural region, an academic program focusing on animal health is a natural outgrowth of our mission and expertise. We look forward to developing a veterinary technology program that will be held in high esteem by students, the entire veterinary profession and the community.”

For information contact Kathryn Seweryniak, MS, LVT Vet Tech Program Director 585-343-0055 x6187 keseweryniak@genesee.edu


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2010 State Fair

Tina Lynch, LVT, State Fair Chairperson September 5-6, 2010 NYSAVT was once again invited to take part in the New York State Fair in conjunction with the New York State Veterinary Medical Society. This year’s topic was Disaster Preparedness and Animal First Aid. Our exhibit showed pet owners what they should keep included an emergency crate (food, water, medication, tie out extra leashes and tags, litter box and litter). We had a very good turnout for the event. We also raffled off three prizes. First prize was a gift basket containing Disaster Ready workbooks, water bottles, a clock, and a hat, second and third place prioces were dog and cat encyclopedias. I would like to thank this year’s volunteers: Kasandra Miranda, LVT; Cathy Dornton, LVT; Eileen Jobson, LVT; Joan Gramazio, LVT; Lori TylerOschner, LVT; Sabrina Turco; Pauline Baker, LVT; Alan Franks, LVT. Also I would like to thank our sponsors: The Humane Society of the United States, ASPCA, Bark Busters, Animal Sheltering Magazine, Cheryl Hollaway from Purina, American Veterinary Hospital Association, Pets America, Iams Pet Foods, VIP Pet insurance, John Sauer from Royal Canine, and the Red Cross. We all had a very good time and look forward to seeing more of you next year!

Your NYS Government

As of this publication, the ruling party of New York State Senate is still up in the air. However, it looks like Republicans will take a new majority. With the votes for three seats still being counted, we should have further details in December. Republicans picked up a number of seats in the NYS Assembly, but it remains overwhelmingly Democratic. And of course, our New York State’s new governorelect, Andrew Cuomo will take office in January 2011.

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Vet Tech License FAQs

I have recently moved. Whom do I need to contact, besides NYSAVT? You are required to notify the State Board within 30 days of any name or address changes. Contact change forms may be downloaded from the State Board’s website at www.op.nysed.gov/anchange.pdf. I took my licensing exam outside of New York. Can I still be licensed in New York? Yes. You will need to have your test scores transferred to New York. Visit www.aavsb.org for more information. I am a licensed veterinary technician in another state. Do I have to take another exam to be licensed in New York? No. The NYS Education Department may endorse a veterinary technician license issued by another state if the Department determines you have met New York’s education requirements, have passed a comparable licensing examination and have • Met all general veterinary technician application requirements; • Been licensed in another jurisdiction of the U.S. and practiced lawfully for at least two years (fulltime) following initial licensure; and • Not failed a licensing examination used by the State of New York either prior to or after making application for licensure by endorsement, unless you have later passed a comparable licensing examination.

Your Executive Board

President Lori Tyler-Ochsner, LVT Lake Road Animal Hospital lorilvt@yahoo.com President-Elect Kathy Bliss, LVT Alfred State College blisskm@alfredstate.edu Secretary Raeleen Willard, LVT SUNY Canton willardr@canton.edu Treasurer Steve Smith, LVT stevepvm@yahoo.com Immediate Past-President Stephanie Leech, LVT Veterinary Medical Center of Long Island (VMCLI) sleech@vmcli.com Staff Amy Slater Jessica Stephenson nysavt@gmail.com

NYSAVT

119 Washington Avenue 2nd Floor Albany, NY 12210 P 518-426-7920 F 518-432-5902 nysavt@gmail.com

Classified Advertisement

Animal Care & Control of NYC seeks licensed veterinary technicians to assist in the provision of medical and surgical care for animals at locations in each of the five boroughs. Work under the veterinarians’ direction and assist in providing compassionate, high quality care for animals in the shelter. Example job duties include but are not limited to medication administration, induction and monitoring of anesthesia, assisting in surgery, performance of basic laboratory tests, assistance with documentation of animal cruelty cases, humane euthanasia. Qualifications: Active NYS LVT license in good standing. Candidate must be motivated and compassionate with good written/oral communication skills, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills; attention to detail, ability to multi-task and prioritize. Previous experience working with animal shelter preferred but not required. Competitive salary and vacation allowance, full benefits including health, dental and vision, 401(k). Join us in caring for NYC’s homeless animals and getting them ready for their new lives! To apply send resume and cover letter to HR@ nycacc.org or fax to (212) 442-2066.


Vet Tech Times Nov/Dec 2010