Page 37

New Planes: 105th Receives Extended Range C17s By Tech. Sgt. Michael O’Halloran, 105th Airlift Wing STEWART AIR NATIONAL GUARD BASE, NEWBURGH -- Aircrews of the New York Air National Guard’s 105th Airlift Wing now have the capability to travel farther with two new C17 Globemaster aircraft fitted with extended range fuel tanks. The airlift wing received the second of two C-17 cargo aircraft with extended range fuel tanks October 9. The first extended range aircraft was delivered to the wing in late September. The two new aircraft will “immediately increase our capability and ability to provide vital airlift to Air Mobility Command, the Department of Defense and New York State,” said Wing Commander Col. Timothy LaBarge. The typical range of a wing C-17 could be from Stewart to California, but with the extended fuel tanks, the plane could fly without refueling all the way to Hawaii, LaBarge explained. “Receiving this upgrade to the C-17 fleet is critical to our defense and homeland security operations, as well as the strength of the Stewart Air National Guard Base,” said U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee. “As one of the Hudson Valley’s largest employers ... this is an important step that can help strengthen our equipment and missions here at Stewart.” Stewart now has nine C-17s, which have replaced the Vietnam War era C-5s.

New York Air National Guard Staff Sgt. Brian Burns prepares the nose area of C-17 Tail Number 10188, formerly assigned to Joint Base Charleston, for painting with 105th Airlift Wing markings on Wednesday, October 10. The plane, the second of two extended range C-17s, arrived at the base on Tuesday, Oct. 9. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael O’Halloran, 105th Airlift Wing.

And New Names: 174th Renamed Attack Wing By Maj. Jeffrey D. Brown, 174th Attack Wing more closely align with our new HANCOCK FIELD mission,” said Col. Greg Semmel, AIR NATIONAL 174th Fighter Wing Commander. GUARD BASE, SYRACUSE “We selected the ‘Attack’ designa-- The New York Air National tion because it mirrors the organiGuard’s 174th Fighter Wing zation nomenclature already used became the 174th Attack Wing by all three Air Force active duty here Sept. 9. MQ-9 squadrons.” The new name for the historic Along with the change in name unit reflects the change of mission of the wing, the 138th Fighter from flying fighter aircraft to opSquadron, a sub-organization erating the MQ-9 remotely piloted under the wing which operates aircraft, which the wing has done the MQ-9 combat mission, also since December 2009. changed its name to the 138th AtThe new designation was retack Squadron. quested by unit leadership shortly Currently, three other Air after the unit ended its F-16 FightForce squadrons which opering Falcon mission with the last ate the MQ-9 have already been F-16 departing Syracuse in March designated as attack squadrons. 2010. Importantly, the 174th Fighter “When we ended our proud Wing and 138th Fighter Squadron 60-year history of flying fighter will retain their history and lineage aircraft, it was decided to request after redesignation. a change in our designation to Fall 2012

The 174th Fighter Wing was established in 1947 as the first Air National Guard flying unit in New York. It currently flies the state-of-the-art MQ-9 in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. The newly redesignated 174th Attack Wing will continue its combat mission as well as its multiple training missions, including operating the Field Training Detachment (FTD) which trains all Air Force personnel on MQ-9 maintenance procedures, and the Formal Training Unit (FTU) which provides initial qualification training to MQ-9 aircrews. Archive photo.

37

Fall 2012 Guard Times Magazine  

Fall 2012 Guard Times Magazine

Fall 2012 Guard Times Magazine  

Fall 2012 Guard Times Magazine

Advertisement