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RECOVERY RESILIENCY TO

NYCHA’s Hurricane Sandy Recovery Program

Recovery to Resiliency

1


Dear Friends When Hurricane Sandy hit New York City on October 29, 2012, residents in over 750 New York City Housing Authority (NYCHA) buildings lost essential services, including electricity, elevators, heat and hot water. Of those, over 200 buildings sustained physical damage that required extensive repairs. Superstorm Sandy caused over $1.7 billion in damages to NYCHA properties and another $1.4 billion is being invested in mitigation, bringing NYCHA’s total recovery needs to over $3 billion. But there is a silver lining to the damage Hurricane Sandy inflicted: It provided NYCHA with the opportunity to not just repair our housing but to rebuild better and smarter, significantly improving structural resiliency and better protecting residents from future disasters and climate change. With FEMA funding in excess of $3 billion – the largest single FEMA grant ever awarded – NYCHA will build upon the great Sandy recovery work already underway by the State of New York, New York City, the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development and private and nonprofit groups. Our Recovery to Resiliency program will create a more sustainable future for NYCHA, its residents and the surrounding community – including safer, greener housing plus more efficient operations, new jobs and additional revenue streams. Since I was appointed NYCHA Chair and CEO in March 2014, I have visited dozens of NYCHA developments to talk with residents and staff. Their input has helped us envision a NYCHA that preserves and protects public housing for the next generation of New Yorkers. Recovery to Resiliency is a critical part of our new 10-year strategic plan, NextGeneration NYCHA. We’re making our contribution to a dynamic, livable and safe city in which New Yorkers can thrive. We hope that through these efforts NYCHA can become a model for public housing authorities across the country in how to rebuild safer, stronger and smarter. NYCHA is working alongside Mayor Bill de Blasio and his administration to ensure that Recovery to Resiliency adopts the bold initiatives set forth in OneNYC which build on previous sustainability plans, as well as initiatives for affordable housing, the fight against climate change, bolstering our coastal communities, reducing greenhouse gas emissions and promoting economic development. NYCHA’s resiliency efforts are part of a $20 billion initiative to make New York City more resilient to climate change and other 21st century threats. We are indebted to FEMA, Mayor de Blasio and his administration, our public and private partners and our employees and residents for their partnership and support throughout the planning process. As we learned after the storm, we must rely on one another to pull through difficult situations. Your partnership with NYCHA as we create a 21st century housing authority is invaluable. Sincerely,

Shola Olatoye Chair and Chief Executive Officer

NYCHA


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Recovery to Resiliency


CONTENTS Introduction

3

Protecting People and Property

4

1

6 8 10

Building Reinforcement

Surge protection 2 Infrastructure Upgrades 3

INNOVATIVE DESIGN Moving Beyond the Disaster 1

12 14 16 18 20

PLACEMAKING

Expanding Economic Opportunities 2 Creating a Sustainable NYCHA 3

Ensuring Success

22 24 26 28

Community Engagement & Partnerships 1 Communicating Our Progress 2 3

Asset Management

Conclusion

30

Acknowledgments

31

NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency

1


Developments Damaged by Hurricane Sandy

Northern Manhattan East River Isaacs Metro North Plaza Rangel

Queens Astoria

Rockaways Beach 41st Street Carleton Manor Hammel Ocean Bay (Bayside) Ocean Bay (Oceanside) Redfern

Downtown Manhattan Baruch Campos Plaza II La Guardia Lavanburg LES Rehab V Riis I Riis II Smith Two Bridges URA Wald

Red Hook Gowanus Red Hook East Red Hook West Coney Island Carey Gardens Coney Island Coney Island Site 1B Coney Island Sites 4 and 5 Coney Island Site 8 Gravesend Haber O’Dwyer Gardens Surfside Gardens

33

Developments

219

Buildings

60,000 Residents


INTRODUCTION In the eight decades since the New York City Housing Authority was founded by Mayor Fiorello La Guardia, millions of New York City’s low- and moderate-income families have relied on NYCHA for safe, secure and affordable housing. Today NYCHA, the nation’s oldest and largest public housing authority, is home to more than 400,000 New Yorkers. On October 29, 2012, Hurricane Sandy caused unprecedented damage in New York City. As one of the largest property owners in the city, NYCHA was particularly hard-hit. Sandy exacerbated nearly $17 billion in unmet capital needs across NYCHA’s aging building stock. Now NYCHA is taking aggressive action to sustain itself over the long term and deliver our residents the resources and services they deserve. In May 2015, NYCHA released its 10-year strategic plan, NextGeneration (NextGen) NYCHA, with the goal of improving residents’ quality of life and preserving public housing for future generations. NYCHA’s Hurricane Sandy recovery program, Recovery to Resiliency, incorporates NextGen goals by focusing on new revenue streams, leveraging existing available funding, reducing operating costs, improving the quality of NYCHA’s spaces and engaging residents and stakeholders in new ways. A great deal of work has been done to build upon and support research and initiatives already underway by New York City, New York State, federal agencies and the private and nonprofit sectors to make New York City stronger and more resilient. There are a number of challenges facing NYCHA in the 21st century, compelling it to evolve. Climate change is increasing the threat of more intense storm activity coupled with sea level rise which puts NYCHA at an elevated risk for storm surge and other types of flooding. Recovery to Resiliency provides a guide to actions and investments needed to create aand maintain assets while reducing vulnerabilities.

Through Recovery to Resiliency, we are working with NYCHA residents, City agencies, state and federal partners, public stakeholders, academia and a diverse team of architects, designers and engineers to envision a NYCHA that better serves its residents and the communities around them. Hurricane Sandy has created an opportunity to build back better by using the best available science, innovative design and cutting-edge technology to transform NYCHA developments into beautiful, safe, clean and connected places to live. Recovery to Resiliency is organized into three sections that relate to and reinforce one another.

Protecting People and Property Moving Beyond the Disaster Ensuring Success Each section identifies specific actions that will enrich our disaster recovery by providing multiple benefits. To explain each action, we answer four critical questions about it.

What is it?

Why is it important?

How is it achieved?

What Initiatives Does It Support?

Recovery to Resiliency provides a roadmap for the choices, commitments and actions that will deliver results during the recovery process and continue to pay dividends for our residents, the City and the environment for years to come. For more information please visit www1.nyc.gov/site/nycha/about/recovery-resiliency.page.

Recovery to Resiliency

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Protecting People and Property

4

Recovery to Resiliency


The damage Hurricane Sandy inflicted has a silver lining: It provides NYCHA with the opportunity to rebuild better and smarter, improving structural resiliency to protect residents from future disasters and climate change.

1

Building REINFORCEMENT

2

Surge protection

3

INFRASTRUCTURE UPGRADES

NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency

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Building REINFORCEMENT

1

Building REINFORCEMENT

What is it?

How is it achieved?

In building reinforcement, existing structures are retrofitted so they are less susceptible to extreme hot and cold temperatures, high winds and flooding. Why is it important? It is imperative that NYCHA build back in a way so that its structures can better withstand future storm events. Although NYCHA residents in Zone 1 were ordered to evacuate prior to Hurricane Sandy’s making landfall, most sheltered in place because of health problems, restricted physical ability to travel, fear or not having anywhere to go. Hurricane Sandy damaged 33 NYCHA developments, leaving more than 60,000 people without essential services such as electricity, elevators, heat, hot water and plumbing.

NYCHA is using a variety of strategies to make its buildings more resistant to storm-related damage. NYCHA is repairing or replacing building roofs to better resist the elements. Other reinforcement measures include architectural and structural work to dry- and wet-floodproof the buildings to protect against water. Retrofits that improve the buildings’ ability to withstand extreme temperature changes include window and door upgrades and recladding.

Wet-floodproofing allows a space to intentionally flood without damage through the use of flood-resistant flooring and by raising critical building systems above the flood elevation. These systems include boilers, fire safety systems and electrical panels. Some NYCHA buildings have first floors that contain community centers, senior centers or day cares. Building strengthening will allow these locations to serve as supply and information distribution centers following a disaster.

Recladding is the application of a new material to the surfaces of the exterior building walls. This new surface protects against wind, rain and extreme temperature, while making the buildings more energyefficient and giving them a more modern and welcoming look. Dry-floodproofing a structure makes it watertight below the flood level by sealing walls with a waterproof coating, adding watertight fittings on electrical pull boxes and installing floodproof doors. NYCHA

VULNERABLE POPULATIONS

47%

of NYCHA’s 400,000 residents meet the Social Vulnerability Index for the United States, which assesses socioeconomic variables that reduce residents’ ability to prepare for, respond to and recover from emergency events.

20%

120,000

over the age of 65

27%

162,000

under the age of 18

Source: NYCHA Dept. of Research and Management Analysis NYCHA

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Recovery to Resiliency


It is imperative that NYCHA build back to withstand future extreme weather events and protect our residents.

Flood-damaged equipment located in basement

1 mile

NYCHA - LIVING NEAR THE WATER

200

of 328 developments are within 1 mile of the coast = 8 developments

What Initiatives Does It Support? Reinforcing NYCHA buildings to make them more resilient against extreme weather advances the goals of NextGeneration NYCHA and Mayor de Blasio’s Housing New York: A Five-Borough, Ten-Year Plan to rebuild, expand and preserve public and affordable housing. Improving building resiliency implements the recommendations of HUD’s Sandy Rebuilding Task Force Report, as well as New York City’s Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency Report.

Source: NYCHA Dept. of Research and Management Analysis NYCHA

CHA

Recovery to Resiliency

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2

Surge protection

Surge protection

What is it? Storm surge is the abnormal rise in coastal water level above the regular tide caused by a severe storm such as a hurricane or nor’easter. Storm surge protection and flood barriers are designed to prevent flooding of the protected area behind them.

Why is it important? It is estimated that NYCHA will spend over $3 billion on Hurricane Sandy recovery efforts. Surge protection to protect this investment is vital.

Although surge isn’t the most frequent water inundation problem NYCHA faces, it can be the most costly, as shown by Hurricane Sandy. Surge poses a threat to everything in its path: trees, vehicles, equipment, playgrounds, site lighting, buildings and lives.

Surge protection in the form of berms blend into

th

According to the National Hurricane Center, “Storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property.” With storm surge, residents who can’t evacuate end up stranded in their buildings. Hurricane Sandy storm surge caused billions of dollars in damage. This wasn’t limited to components inside buildings. Storm surge water permeated every stormwater and sewer opening, causing lines to fill with sand and other debris. Contaminated water destroyed playgrounds, massive trash compactors, underground electrical conduits, site lighting, wrought iron fencing and thousands of trees.

Starr Whitehouse

The City is working on large-scale coastal protection systems

Surge protection in the form

RebuildByDesign.org

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Recovery to Resiliency

of


to

rm

“Storm surge is often the greatest threat to life and property,” according to the National Hurricane Center.

the landscape

How is it achieved? Site-wide surge protection can only be accomplished through the use of defensive perimeter barriers. Larger alternatives at the City scale are being considered when selecting the appropriate surge protection solution for individual sites and campuses. To protect against coastal threats, including intense storms and rising sea levels, man-made berms and other permanent features will protect against surge. For individual sites or campuses where permanent barriers are impractical, protection systems can be augmented by temporary, rapidly deployable barrier protection systems that prevent surge damage to the site and buildings.

What Initiatives Does It Support? Surge protection supports NextGen NYCHA’s goal to rebuild, expand and preserve public housing stock. It is also a key component of New York City’s Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency Report, as well as Mayor de Blasio’s Housing New York: A FiveBorough, Ten-Year Plan to preserve the quality of existing housing stock. PAST and projected sea level rise

inches

13

11-31

1900 - 2000

2000 - 2100

inches

Source: NYC Panel on Climate Change

of seating areas creates enjoyable spaces and protects residents

LiRo

Recovery to Resiliency

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Infrastructure Upgrades

3

Infrastructure Upgrades

What is it?

Why is it important?

Infrastructure upgrades improve the physical components of systems providing essential services to buildings and residents, including electrical, mechanical, plumbing, security and water management.

How is it achieved?

This is part of OneNYC’s initiative to maximize the economic, environmental and social benefits of infrastructure investments. Infrastructure upgrades will allow NYCHA buildings and sites to function better for residents. NYCHA is using the latest technology, most innovative practices and best products to ensure the reliability of these systems that residents rely on every day, and especially during an emergency. These upgrades improve safety and promote the health of the environment.

NYCHA is repairing or replacing vital infrastructure elements at each site, including integrated security upgrades, emergency back-up power and a comprehensive approach to stormwater management. Security Upgrades Security is a top priority for NYCHA and its residents. NYCHA will use a multidisciplinary approach to prevent crime. It will integrate principles of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design coupled with improved infrastructure in ways that strengthen overall

Water squares like this basketball court are designed to catch and hold large volumes of water during heavy rain events.

NYCHA

neighborhood cohesion. The Recovery to Resiliency program includes new doors, layered access to buildings, more cameras, improved stairway and site lighting and design features that promote safety through the increased use of outdoor spaces.

NDRC Protect & Connect

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Recovery to Resiliency


Security is a top priority for NYCHA. Upgrades will include layered access, additional cameras and improved stairway and site lighting.

James McCullar Architecture

What Initiatives Does It Support?

Rooftop Generators

Emergency Back-up Power Hurricane Sandy caused power outages affecting more than two million New Yorkers. Restoring power was complicated by a subsequent nor’easter. Once power was restored, hundreds of NYCHA buildings remained without power because of water damage to wiring and conduits. Residents were without power until temporary generators could be deployed. Future emergency energy needs are being addressed through the installation of stand-alone natural gas back-up generators. These will provide power independent of the power grid during weather events or power outages caused when grid demand exceeds the utility’s capacity. NYCHA wants to ensure that residents don’t have to live through another Sandy-like power disruption.

Stormwater Management NYCHA is addressing the chronic problems of site flooding with an integrated approach to stormwater management. This combination of active and passive systems is designed to maximize residents’ health and safety while minimizing maintenance costs and demands on NYCHA staff. Stormwater management solutions will be customized to the hydrology and topography of each site, and will include site recontouring, soil amendments, bioswales, permeable sidewalks and parking lots, underground water storage systems, blue roofs and water squares.

Infrastructure upgrades that prevent crime support NextGeneration NYCHA’s key strategy to increase safety and security at NYCHA developments. Stormwater management features support OneNYC’s 2030 target for the reduction of combine sewer overflows to meet requirements of the EPA’s Clean Water Act while aiming to make at least 90 percent of the City’s waterways recreation-friendly. Back-up power and drainage systems that take advantage of landscape and site characteristics are key components of New York City’s Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency Report.

Bioswale

NYCHA

Stormwater management upgrades help prevent RAIN-RELATED site flooding

37% 12%

Rooftop generator

71% 16% 37%

5% -12%

27%

National increases in heavy rain events from 1958 - 2012. Change %

<0

0-9

10-19

20-29

30-39

40+

Source: Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment, The U.S. Global Change Research Program. NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency

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INNOVATIVE DESIGN

INNOVATIVE DESIGN

Better connectivity across developments

New elevated boiler buildings

Redesigned outdoor areas

Nelligan White

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Recovery to Resiliency

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (above), LiRo (below)


NYCHA knows itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not enough to return developments damaged by Hurricane Sandy to their pre-disaster condition. NYCHA is working with a diverse team of architects, designers and engineers to envision a better future for its residents.

These renderings depict concepts NYCHA hopes to implement as pilot projects at the damaged developments, eventually expanding the best of them across its entire portfolio of properties. Innovative design features are being considered for community centers, child care centers, senior centers and common areas. Outdoor spaces will be dramatically upgraded with better connectivity, signage and visual enhancements.

Improved pedestrian experience

Stormwater Management through Placemaking

LiRo (above), New York City Dept. of Parks and Recreation (below)

Recovery to Resiliency

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MOVING BEYOND THE DISASTER

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Recovery to Resiliency


NYCHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recovery from Hurricane Sandy is an opportunity to PROVIDE improved accessibility, comfort and safety for residents.

1

PLACEMAKING

2

Expanding Economic Opportunities

3

Creating a Sustainable NYCHA

NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency

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1

PLACEMAKING

PLACEMAKING

What is it? Placemaking is a multifaceted approach to planning, designing and managing outdoor spaces. It strengthens the connection between people and the places they live in by capitalizing on the great parts of a community to promote health, happiness and wellbeing. It makes the places we live great places. Great places are safe, fun, charming and welcoming. Placemaking is communitydriven, adaptable and inclusive. It creates destinations that are flexible, culturally aware, transformative, inspiring, collaborative and sociable.

Why is it important? People want to live in beautiful, connected, safe places. NYCHA is working to provide amenities for its residents that make better neighborhoods. When NYCHA developments become destinations for live, work and play— and when they are better connected to their surrounding communities—their value is enriched, both for residents and neighbors. By making great places, NYCHA also increases surrounding property values and provides easier access to essential services within walking distance. Strengthening the physical connections between NYCHA developments and the communities that surround them creates opportunities for social interaction between residents. This helps reduce feelings of isolation that can contribute to a sense of vulnerability. Improved “connectedness” also provides more options for access and evacuation during emergencies.

James McCullar Architecture

Benefits of PLACEMAKING

Nurtures and defines community identity

Promotes a sense of comfort

Fosters frequent and meaningful contact

Creates improved accessibility

Draws a diverse population

Builds and supports the local economy

Source: www.essaymarketplace.com, Use and Spatial Qualities of Public Spaces NDRC Protect and Connect

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Recovery to Resiliency


Great places define communities, foster meaningful contact, draw a diverse population, promote a sense of comfort, improve accessibility and bolster the local economy.

How is it achieved? Listening to the community is the first step in placemaking. Residents who use spaces regularly have valuable insight into how the areas function, and can help identify important issues. Drawing on residents’ ideas is essential in creating a successful and vital community place. A unified vision for a public space addresses its character, activities and uses, and its meaning in the community. This vision should be largely defined by the people who live or work there. Design is an important component of creating great places that provide access and create active uses, economic opportunities and programming for residents.

Design should focus on placing elements in a way that encourages them to be used. For example, if a bench, coffee kiosk and trash container are placed near a bus stop, they are convenient for waiting passengers. This creates synergy and a place where people come together. Great public spaces also require partners who contribute innovative ideas and financial or political support and help plan activities. Partners magnify the positive impact of a civic space by coordinating schedules for programming and improvement projects. Effective management is vital because the use of these public spaces is constantly changing. NYCHA is forging and strengthening relationships with community groups and local businesses to build the partnerships that create great places for everyone.

What Initiatives Does It Support? Placemaking reinforces NextGeneration NYCHA’s key strategy to improve safety and security at NYCHA developments through the use of the principles of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design, a multidisciplinary approach to deterring criminal behavior. It supports Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Housing New York: A Five-Borough, Ten-Year Plan, which calls for new housing and mixed-use development that bring life to stark and inhospitable streets while reinvigorating struggling retail areas and reconnecting neighborhoods that were once linked but have been severed by highways or other obstacles. Placemaking also supports goals to reduce isolation of the elderly, improve residents’ quality of life and support the vitality and resiliency of communities in the flood zone by reconnecting NYCHA developments with the communities that surround them.

Innovative Urban Design Can Increase Access to Walking and Biking

Source: American Planning Association, Planning and Community Health Center, “The Benefits of Street-Scale Features on Walking and Biking”

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2

ExpandING Economic Opportunities

ExpandING Economic Opportunities

What is it? Expanding economic opportunities is creating jobs and improving access to organizations that offer services to support resident employability. Why is it important? There is a critical need to leverage the recovery work at NYCHA sites to create new economic opportunities for NYCHA residents. NYCHA residents have an average annual household income of $23,300. They lack access to workforce, educational and other services to help them become job-ready and move along career pathways.

opportunities for low- or very lowincome residents connected to projects and activities in their neighborhoods. Through its recovery, NYCHA is implementing innovations in resilient infrastructure and construction. With this massive undertaking comes an opportunity to employ residents and neighbors, and help position them for long-term employability. NYCHA endeavors to go above and beyond its federal requirements to provide jobs and training in job skills to residents. With more than 400,000 residents living in 328 housing developments, NYCHA will become an economic engine for the City while preparing residents for tomorrow’s workforce. NYCHA’s recovery from Hurricane Sandy will play a significant role in building a New York City that is healthier, more livable and economically vibrant. NYCHA

SUPPORTING RESIDENTS

NYCHA’s Office of Resident Economic Empowerment and Sustainability (REES) empowers residents to increase their income and assets through programs, policies and collaboration.

NYCHA is subject to a federal policy known as Section 3, a provision of the HUD Act of 1968 that helps foster local economic development, neighborhood economic improvement and individual self-sufficiency. The Section 3 program requires that recipients (contractors, vendors and suppliers) of certain HUD financial assistance provide job training, employment and contracting

www.OpportunityNYCHA.org NYCHA

18

NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency


Recovery to Resiliency will help drive long-term employability for NYCHA residents enrolled in the REES program.

How is it achieved? NYCHA is focusing its jobs training on green construction practices, while adding mentoring opportunities and new ways for residents to achieve HUD volunteer hour requirements. NYCHA’s Resident Economic Empowerment and Sustainability (REES) program provides customized training for a variety of construction and maintenance positions. Every year, NYCHA places more than 2,000 residents in quality jobs through REES, and operates skill-building and entrepreneurship workshops to economically empower residents.

NYCHA’s Resident Training Academy

805 Trainees graduated

90%

Graduation rate

92%

Placed in a job

50.2%

Women

Source: Opportunity NYCHA, 2013 Statistics

Through financial analysis, NYCHA is working to project the savings that can be achieved by using residentsin-training to assist with construction and maintenance. Economic impact studies measure the positive effects of the training program, for NYCHA residents and for local economies, while a utilization and value analysis of spaces in recovering developments will identify opportunities to maximize development through public and private investment partnerships.

What Initiatives Does It Support? Expanding economic opportunities supports NYCHA’s Annual Plan to develop strategic partnerships and leverage existing resources to connect residents to high-quality economic opportunity services that support resident economic sustainability. It also supports NextGeneration NYCHA’s goal of doubling opportunities for its residents, connecting up to 4,000 residents to quality jobs annually by 2025. Job creation is part of Mayor De Blasio’s Housing New York: A Five-Borough, Ten-Year Plan to create quality construction jobs with fair wages, safe working conditions and advancement opportunities for low-income residents while helping traditionally disadvantaged businesses, including minority- and womenowned businesses.

NYCHA is launching the Fund for Public Housing, an independent, nonprofit organization that will invest in NYCHA and its residents through innovative partnerships to create safer, cleaner and more connected communities. The Fund will reduce the financial burden on NYCHA, increase operational flexibility and build capacity amongst NYCHA residents. Among the activities planned for its first year, the Fund will create job opportunities by more than doubling the number of sites in the Jobs-Plus program and creating jobs for NYCHA residents through a lead-abatement initiative. NYCHA

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3

Creating a Sustainable NYCHA

Creating a Sustainable NYCHA

What is it?

Why is it important?

Creating a sustainable NYCHA means providing safe, clean and affordable housing while managing energy and water use and reducing NYCHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contribution to the waste stream.

Hurricane Sandy highlighted the increasing vulnerability of coastal cities to the impacts of climate change and underscored the pressing need to pursue climate change mitigation and adaptation. As the largest steward of affordable housing in New York City, NYCHA is taking a leading role in showing that affordable housing can be green and resilient. NYCHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Recovery to Resiliency program prioritizes investments in change: building systems that provide better safety, convenience and comfort while reducing energy use, water consumption and waste production. Following sustainability guidelines ensures that systems will work well together. Recovery to Resiliency uses Enterprise Green Communities Criteria, the nationally recognized green standard for affordable housing. The Criteria serve as a quality-assurance tool designed specifically to ensure the highest holistic project performance possible for affordable housing developments.

It is also the effective stewardship of our buildings for the future by making investments that protect them from rising energy and water costs. NYCHA is using its Recovery to Resiliency program to make investments that will result in more sustainable outcomes. NYCHA

NYCHA

20

Recovery to Resiliency

NYCHA


NYCHA is committed to using less water and energy while reducing the amount of CO2 in the atmosphere.

How is it achieved? In residential buildings, sustainability encompasses four key responsibilities: providing a safe, comfortable and healthy indoor environment (Indoor Environmental Quality or IEQ); energy; water; and waste. Using the Enterprise Green Communities Criteria as a guide, NYCHA’s Recovery to Resiliency program invests in new systems and repairs old ones to high-efficiency and highperformance standards. Healthy Indoor Environments IEQ is improved by repairing or replacing a building’s roof, facade, pipes and rooftop exhaust fans as well as by cleaning ducts and registers to control moisture, prevent mold and remove airborne allergens. Choosing building and finishing materials that are free of smelly fumes eliminates a trigger of asthma and allergies. Air sealing, insulation and heating system balancing help maintain comfortable indoor temperatures without wasting energy. Energy Existing lighting and appliances like refrigerators will be replaced with more energy-efficient models. Air sealing and insulating the building envelope help to keep warm air inside in winter, reducing the energy needed to heat the building. Low-flow faucets and showerheads make hot water heating systems run more efficiently. In addition to reducing energy loads, the Recovery to Resiliency program is working to ensure that NYCHA’s back-up power systems can be used

during periods of peak power use so the power grid can function more reliably, not only for NYCHA developments but for whole neighborhoods.

What Initiatives Does It Support? NextGeneration NYCHA’s comprehensive sustainability agenda is at the core of the Recovery to Resiliency program. This will support the OneNYC plan to make New York the most sustainable big city in the world and a global leader in the fight against climate change. It also supports our core commitment to a cleaner, safer, more connected NYCHA.

NYCHA

Water In addition to reducing in-home water use by updating fixtures, NYCHA is pursuing green infrastructure projects that will improve water runoff quality while reducing runoff quantity. In many neighborhoods, combined sewer overflows during rainstorms release contaminated wastewater into rivers. These low-lying sites are also more prone to flooding. NYCHA is incorporating site features that do double duty by managing storm water and enhancing quality of life for residents. These features include community gardens, planting native plant species, bioswales and permeable walking paths. Waste NYCHA is committed to installing recycling bins in every development by the end of 2016. NYCHA is also evaluating opportunities to test cuttingedge technologies to make taking out the trash easier for residents.

NYCHA

NYCHA residents generate approximately

190,000 tons of solid waste per year Source: NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency

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Ensuring Success

22

Recovery to Resiliency


TO SUCCEED, NYCHA MUST BUILD DIVERSE PARTNERSHIPS, INTEGRATE THE COMMUNITY INTO THE RECOVERY PROCESS AND CREATE A FINANCIALLY SUSTAINABLE PROCESS TO MAINTAIN OUR PROPERTIES.

1

Community Engagement and Partnerships

2

Communicating Our Progress

3

Asset Management

NYCHA

Recovery to Resiliency

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1

Community Engagement AND Partnerships

Community Engagement AND Partnerships

What is it? Community engagement and partnerships are the process through which individuals and organizations communicate and collaborate to address issues that affect their community.

Why is it important? The Recovery to Resiliency program expands partnerships with a wide range of public, nonprofit and private groups that run diverse programs and initiatives. Citizens want transparency from government, and community engagement yields valuable consumer input while building trust with community members. A critical aspect of Recovery to Resiliency is the active participation and input from residents and stakeholders.

NYCHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ongoing, intensive community engagement has gathered resident concerns regarding plans and designs. NYCHA is expanding its engagement to non-resident community stakeholders and will continue these activities throughout the recovery process. To involve residents and stakeholders effectively and efficiently, NYCHAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community engagement plan is guided by the principles which drive the entire recovery process. Collaborative partnerships with the public and private agencies will allow NYCHA to make the most of its resources, expand its funding base and reduce duplication of efforts.

NYCHA

24

Recovery to Resiliency


Community engagement yields valuable consumer input, building trust with community members.

How is it achieved? Recovery to Resiliency has established guiding principles for community engagement and partnership building. Recovery activities are coordinated with other community-wide initiatives that minimize risks and strengthen the ability of a community to withstand and recover from future disasters. NYCHA is sourcing the best practices for community engagement to leverage the successes that others have had in this area. NYCHA is expanding opportunities for residents, stakeholders and other agencies to get involved in the recovery process. Traditional meetings and the expanded use of technology platforms provide additional communication paths. Partnership building isn’t about any one solution. Recovery to Resiliency achieves engagement success through diverse approaches. The Fund for Public Housing—launched in 2015—will further enhance NYCHA’s community engagement model by creating a Resident Leadership Institute, 25 new resident associations and 10 new youth councils. NYCHA is creating resident-led committees that meet monthly to discuss resident concerns, share updates and work on the community visioning process.

What Initiatives Does It Support? Better community engagement and expanded partnerships are at the core of NYCHA’s future endeavors. NextGeneration NYCHA outlines NYCHA’s goal to develop unequaled resident engagement models to ensure that resident perspectives guide development plans, just as they are shaping the services and facilities that will be available in their communities. Climate change is affecting people now, and the choices we make will impact future generations.

and services—can promote substantial opportunities for new housing that complements and enhances neighborhood character. Recovery to Resiliency also supports Mayor de Blasio’s housing plan directive that the Dept. of City Planning’s borough offices work in close coordination with the Departments of Housing Preservation and Development, Parks and Recreation, Environmental Protection, Transportation and Small Business Services and the Economic Development Corporation to launch community development initiatives around new and existing housing and improvements needed to support growth.

Recovery to Resiliency supports OneNYC’s philosophy that New York City works best when New Yorkers are involved with their city and have a say in their government, and when government listens to their voices to make better decisions. The Recovery to Resiliency program supports Mayor de Blasio’s Housing New York: A Five-Borough, Ten-Year Plan goal that over the next 10 years the City will identify areas across the five boroughs where coordinated planning with communities—including changes to land use, zoning, infrastructure

NYCHA

NYCHA

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2

Communicating Our Progress

Communicating Our Progress

What is it? Communicating our progress is focusing on two-way communications, with transparency in the decision- and policymaking process, and meaningful incorporation of public input. NYCHA is committed to ongoing monitoring of the Recovery to Resiliency program. To keep residents and the community informed about the programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s progress and accomplishments, NYCHA has deployed an outreach team that engages residents and stakeholders in their neighborhoods and maintains a constant feedback loop.

Why is it important? Measuring and communicating the progress of recovery increases public confidence by promoting transparency, accountability and efficiency. It enables local leadership to identify ongoing recovery needs and engages partners in providing assistance and problem resolution. Communicating the progress of Recovery to Resiliency serves as a tracking mechanism for improving and adjusting recovery strategies and activities.

Open communication happens when information comes in and goes out. Technology can aid conveying accurate information through regular and consistent feedback. NYCHA is working to accomplish this without overloading the stakeholders with irrelevant or repetitive information. Different types of information should be communicated by different communication methods. Leveraging technology and systems innovation to achieve greater information sharing, accountability and transparency is critical. With over $3 billion in funding flowing to NYCHA for Hurricane Sandy recovery and resiliency efforts, the

How is it achieved? NYCHA is establishing systems to track the pre-disaster conditions against the overall recovery of residents and the reconstruction and redevelopment of infrastructure; health, social and community services; and government functions at NYCHA developments.

www1.nyc.gov/ site/nycha/about/ recovery-resiliency.page @NYCHA facebook.com/NYCHA

NYCHA

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Recovery to Resiliency


Recovery success depends upon the interaction of a wide range of public, nonprofit and private programs and initiatives.

NYCHA Interactive Sandy Transparency Map was launched as a public information tool providing details on FEMA-funded projects, spending and contracts. Updated monthly, the tracker map includes the scope of work, project phases from planning to design and construction, estimated funding levels, timelines, renderings and contractor details for the developments hard-hit by Sandy.

Recovery to Resiliency supports NextGeneration NYCHA in its intent to capture the visions, needs and concerns of residents and others as we measure and share progress, ensuring that the decision-making process is interactive and transparent.

NYCHA also launched the MyNYCHA app. This free tool allows residents to create, schedule and manage work tickets via their mobile devices. They can also subscribe to alerts for outages in their developments (NYCHA Alerts) and view inspection appointments.

It also supports Mayor de Blasioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goal to improve data-sharing platforms that will increase the transparency of infrastructure programs and facilitate greater partnerships, civic engagement and information sharing.

What Initiatives Does It Support?

NYCHA

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3

Asset Management

Asset Management

What is it? Asset management is costeffectively operating, maintaining and upgrading NYCHA’s assets. Why is it important? NYCHA is facing a projected operating deficit of $287 million by 2019 and has a portfolio with almost $17 billion in unmet capital needs. We must generate an ongoing operating surplus to become fiscally sound and attract outside financing so we can fund vital building repairs to NYCHA’s overall portfolio. Recovery to Resiliency focuses on successfully managing the billions of dollars in capital repairs needed after Hurricane Sandy.

Proper portfolio management increases the capability and transparency throughout an organization and improves process, workflow and efficiency. With a better understanding of the condition of our assets, we can make sound decisions about capital improvements based on reliable data.

NYCHA will leverage the resources spent on recovery to create new revenue streams while creating value for all New Yorkers. Recovery to Resiliency focuses on opportunities for public-private partnerships so that Sandy recovery dollars are leveraged against private funds to create the most inclusive, long-term economic benefits for NYCHA while maximizing the value of its assets.

How is it achieved? To provide operational flexibility and the ability to leverage philanthropic dollars and activate innovative partnerships to support our residents, NYCHA launched the Fund for Public Housing. The Fund will invest in improvements through innovative partnerships to create safer, cleaner and more connected communities. The Fund is a partnership model that eliminates the financial burden on NYCHA to be at once an efficient landlord and a primary service provider. The Fund will invest in new and existing partnerships to create a network of services for residents.

NYCHA buildings by age

31%

32%

Asset management ensures meeting established standards and expectations regarding financial and physical condition, regulatory and statutory compliance and reporting requirements.

23%

13%

5-Year UNMET CAPITAL NEEDS Grounds Building interior Mechanical, electrical and plumbing

$16.9B

Building exterior

28

35

814

855

596

2

0%

1% 61-75 years old

Apartment interiors

76-90 years old

Source: NYCHA NextGen

Source: NYC Open Data, “NYCHA Development Data Book,” 2013

Recovery to Resiliency

333

46-60 years old

31-45 years old

16-30 years old

0-15 years old


Asset management promotes sustainability, resiliency and long-term affordability while helping NYCHA reduce operating costs.

Realizing that NYCHA’s current financial model is not sustainable, the Fund was created to support a new resident engagement model, allow for more creative approaches to partnership and fundraising and create a network of connected communities. The Fund will focus on youth and education, health and wellness, human capital development, age-friendly integration and sustainable practices. It will be governed by an independent board of directors composed of NYCHA senior staff, NYCHA residents and private citizens.

NYCHA IS A KEY ECONOMIC DRIVER OF NEW YORK CITY AND STATE

For every $1 in direct NYCHA expenditures...

Pay less

The Fund further emphasizes the goals of NextGeneration NYCHA and its commitment to make affordable housing sustainable and available for future generations. Asset management is the foundation of NextGeneration NYCHA, building on the more than $240 million in investments already made to generate modest annual operating surpluses totaling more than $230 million over 10 years.

The Fund has a three-year fundraising goal of $200 million, $50 million in the first year. The Fund will empower NYCHA to change the way public housing looks and functions in New York City.

FUND GOAL: CHANGE THE WAY NYCHA IS FUNDED

What Initiatives Does It Support?

Sound asset management supports NYCHA’s 2015 Annual Plan to improve the quality of public housing and use information technology to improve the way NYCHA conducts day-today business.

an additional $1.80 in indirect economic activity benefits the City and State.

Asset management is an important component of Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Housing New York: A Five-Borough, Ten-Year Plan to create new and improved housing and preservation tools.

Source: NextGeneration NYCHA

to NYC.

Do a better job collecting rent and fees.

Make wiser use of ground floor space.

Reduce central office costs.

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CONCLUSION Through Recovery to Resiliency, NYCHA serves as a shining example of how a housing authority can rebuild safer, stronger and smarter. NYCHA has worked to ensure the Recovery to Resiliency program wasn’t developed in a vacuum. We are equally committed to the same collaboration through execution. Our program builds on and supports comprehensive resiliency strategies initiated by New York City, New York state, federal agencies and the private and nonprofit sectors. Recovery to Resiliency reinforces these initiatives by identifying specific actions and connecting them to long-term plans, including climate adaptation and sustainability initiatives. When it comes to climate change, New York City has long been a leader in sustainable planning. When Hurricane Sandy made landfall in October 2012, it reminded us there was more work to be done to protect our residents, affordable housing stock and critical infrastructure. Recognizing the magnitude of the storm and the rebuilding challenges, President Obama signed an Executive Order on December 7, 2012, creating the Hurricane Sandy Rebuilding Task Force and designating the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Shaun Donovan, as Chair. New York City immediately convened the Special Initiative for Rebuilding and Resiliency (SIRR) to create a more resilient City with a focus on preparing for and protecting against the impact of climate change. The final SIRR report, released in June 2013, presented recommendations for rebuilding the communities impacted by Sandy and increasing the resilience of infrastructure and buildings city-wide.

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Recovery to Resiliency

June 2013 also saw the creation of the New York State Governor’s Office of Storm Recovery (GOSR) to coordinate state-wide recovery efforts following Hurricane Sandy, Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. Through its comprehensive portfolio of NY Rising programs, GOSR has committed to investing $4.4 billion provided through HUD’s Community Development Block Grant–Disaster Recovery Program to better prepare New York State for extreme weather events. In April 2015, Mayor de Blasio launched One New York: The Plan for a Strong and Just City (OneNYC), which built upon existing long-term goals and strategies established from 2007 to 2013 under former Mayor Bloomberg’s PlaNYC. OneNYC addresses New York City’s long-term challenges: the forecast of 9 million residents by 2040, changing climate conditions, an evolving economy and aging infrastructure. New York City has committed more than $20 billion to make the City more resilient in the face of climate change and other 21st century threats. Since launching NextGeneration (NextGen) NYCHA in May 2015, NYCHA has rolled out targeted strategies from its 10-year plan. As part of Mayor de Blasio’s affordable housing plan, NextGen is a long-term strategic plan that details the ways NYCHA will create safe, clean and connected communities, with the goal of improving the quality of life for residents and preserving public housing for this and future generations. NYCHA is also committed to developing ways to support non-NYCHA projects across the City and expand their positive impacts for NYCHA residents. The difficult road to recovery does not end with a collective vision. This major undertaking will require significant time, resources and cooperation with public, private and nonprofit partners. But it will succeed. And as it progresses, residents and stakeholders will have opportunities to learn, engage and shape the future of their communities. A stronger, resilient NYCHA helps ensure that all New Yorkers thrive in a city that is dynamic, livable and safe.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS New York City Housing Authority Shola Olatoye Chair and Chief Executive Officer Michael Kelly General Manager Michael Rosen Acting Executive Vice President for Capital Projects and Vice President for Disaster Recovery Michele Moore Senior Advisor to Vice President for Disaster Recovery Anne-Marie Flatley Vice President for Research Management and Analysis Rasmia Kirmani-Frye Director of Public/Private Partnerships Melanie Hart Executive Vice President for Community Programs and Development Bomee Jung Vice President for Energy and Sustainability Dana Longstreet Senior Editor Sideya Sherman Vice President for Strategy and Partnership Karina Totah Senior Advisor to the Chair Jean Weinberg Chief Communications Officer

SPECIAL THANKS Mayor Bill de Blasio The City of New York Deputy Mayor Alicia Glen The City of New York Dan Zarilli Director, New York City Office of Recovery and Resilience John Grathwol Deputy Director, New York City Office of Management and Budget Sandy Recovery Team CB&I Photos provided by: James McCullar Architecture Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates LiRo New York City National Disaster Resilience Competition, Protect & Connect Plan Nelligan White New York City Department of Parks & Recreation New York City Housing Authority Department of Communications Presray.com RebuildByDesign.org Starr Whitehouse Data provided by: Climate Change Impacts in the United States: The Third National Climate Assessment, The U.S. Global Change Research Program New York City Housing Authority Department of Research and Management Analysis New York City Open Data, â&#x20AC;&#x153;NYCHA Development Data Book,â&#x20AC;? 2013 OpportunityNYCHA New York City Panel on Climate Change NextGeneration NYCHA Design by: Worldstudio

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@NYCHA facebook.com/NYCHA

FOR MORE INFORMATION www1.nyc.gov/site/nycha/about/recovery-resiliency.page Disaster.recovery@nycha.nyc.gov 212-306-8532

Recovery to Resiliency: NYCHA's Hurricane Sandy Recovery Program  

In October 2012, Superstorm Sandy caused the most costly and destructive disaster to impact New York City public housing in its history. The...

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