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Urban Villages Nathan Yanosick | Fourth Year Studio | Fall 2013 Ohio City | Prof. Martha Ross


urban villages


Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Table of Contents Intent and Purpose

4

Site Research

6

White Paper

26

Final Drawings

36

Jury Response

56

Conclusion and Future Development

58

Appendix: Precedents and Sustainble Reserach

60

3


Intent and Purpose

4

urban villages

Intent to the Problem: Ohio City is a growing community within the greater context of the City of Cleveland. This town has experienced many phases of growth and depression. Though it has always remained relevelant due to the glory and nessecity of the West Side Market. The town is currently experiencing a state of growth and pride. The market culture has grown with the local movement that has been sweeping across America. large breweries have started in Ohio City, and many other food based establishments now push the new economy. The task of this design is to add to teh already growing complexity of the Ohio City economy. The intent is to provide an urban catalyst to this area that will extend its growth and development.


Principles of my Design All projects designed by me will achieve these standards to the best of my ability and knowledge.

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

+ + + +

Each project shall be sustainable

All projects must integrate in the culture in which they were created

Culture is every changing. Projects should never try to be a part of a former culture

All projects must encourage employee, occupant, and public health

5


Program.Precedent

Pearl Street, Boulder Colorado

Urban Link: Cleveland Ohio

Urban Link: Boulder Colorado

Educational Link: St. Ignatius, Cleveland State University

Educational Link: University of Colorado, Boulder High School, Fairview High School

Brewery/Beer Culture: 7 Local Breweries

Brewer/Beer Culture: 2 Local Breweries, Start up base for 10 breweries

Local Geographic Features: Lake Erie

Local Geographic Features: Rocky Mountains

Spirit: The spirit of Ohio City is a young and growing one. There is a high appreciation of small businesses, and local economy. While also a very conscious effort to support global causes and issues. The city respects its past, while also wishing to be modern. This interesting paradigm is what makes the small area so special.

Spirit: The spirit of Pearl Street, and the area surrounding it, is similar to Ohio City. The area too loves small business, and thrives on the creative economy. Items bought and found on Pearl Street are not usual items. They are special to the area. It too respects much of it’s historic past. Most of the facades have been kept true to their original 1930 design. The biggest difference lies in that Boulder is a few years further than Ohio City. Though Ohio City shows potential to achieve Pearl’s fame.

Link Between the Two: Both are a celebration of a revival of urban culture. They have a heavy respect for the environment, and other health issues such as diet. They both have youthful spirits, but do not exclude any one age group in town activities. Ohio City is a growing Pearl Street. Studying between the two will lead to the conclusion that

6

urban villages

Ohio City, Cleveland Ohio


Program.Ideas

San Ambrogio Market Firenze, Italy Urban Link: Firenze, Italy Food Culture: Home of one of the two major markets of the city. This location has a strong emphasis on food. Many famous chefs take home for restaurants around this market.

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Spirit: Respecting food on the site, it has become the star. Many famous restaurants and well known food places are nearby this market. Food expiriences range from the classical dinner in the street European concept to the new age concept of the dinner theatre.

Theatro del Sale Precedent The Buisness Concept: Opened by a famous Italian chef, this restaurant breaks the usual chain of high class eateries in the area. It offers well quality food and entertainment for an affordable cost. The meal experiences are scheduled nightly and last around 90mins. They are buffet style, but not buffet quality foods. They are meal quality foods that are new and unique to each night. After dinner Putting an emphasis on letting your food digest and letting the experience of eating food complete, the theatro offers a show after the meals. The room transforms from dining to theatre. A show takes place that is unique to each night. A few regular performers fill gaps between traveling performances. Though each night proves to be an unique experience allowing the chance for many return visits.

7


Site.Demographics

Population

Population of around 10,000 White 41.1% Black 32.0% Hispanic 22.9% Asian 1.3% Mixed Race 2.2% Total population Male Female Under 5 years 5 to 9 years 10 to 14 years 15 to 19 years 20 to 24 years 25 to 34 years

440,132 209,026 231,106

100.0 47.5 52.5

18 years and over 328,028 Male 151,820 Female 176,208

74.5 34.5 40.0

29,996 29,755 31,538 33,821 29,822 58,963

6.8 6.8 7.2 7.7 6.8 13.4

18 years and over 328,028 Male 151,820 Female 176,208

74.5 34.5 40.0

8

Research Credit to: Mary Franciosa

urban villages

Ohio City National Median Household Income $24, 751 $44,512 Single Males 23.3% 14.6% Single Females 18.1% 12.5% Median Age 32% 36% Homes with Kids 26.9% 31.4%


Site.History

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

The Basics

+Originally part of Brooklyn Township, founded in 1818 +Ohio City became an independent municipality on March 3rd, 1836 just two days before Cleveland’s incorporation. +The Cuyahoga River cuts through the two regions, therefore causing a clash between the shipping industries and other commerce. +The “Battle of the Bridge” broke out in 1836 when the residents of Ohio City wanted to stop the use of Cleveland’s Columbus Street Bridge +On June 5th, 1854 Ohio City became part of Cleveland, and was then known as the Near West Side. +On June 1st, 1890 the town was offically called Ohio City. +This Near West Side area attracted immigrants from Hungary, Ireland, New England and Germany to work at the various areas of commerce including docking, distilleries and mills. +The city’s population grew from just over 4,000 in 1850 to over 33,000 in 1910. In 1910, Ohio City was very prosperous. The town was situated on the junctio of many major railways allowing commerce, trade and economy to thrive. +One of the major job hubs was at the West Side Market, built in 1912. +Housing in Ohio City dates back to the 19th century. These historic homes can be found in the Victorian Style as one of two family buildings and can range from the modest working class group to the upper class. +Over a 6 decade period, from 1910 to around 1970, the population began to decline gradually to 20,000 in 1970.

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Research Credit to: Mary Franciosa


Site.Green Space Local Scale

There are several green spaces on the far side but near the site there are few sparse fields. The small yards in front of houses are either very narrow or non existant because there are no set back laws. There is also a farm city a few blocks behind the market consisting of a lot of greenspace which is adjacent to the river. One type of sidewalk surrounding the site consists of a concrete base with brick interspaced. This gives a sense of texture and change in scenery. In front of the market, the sidewalk changes to brick when you are approaching the Planters or entrance to the market.

10 Research Credit to: Jenny Carnprobst

urban villages

Along the adjacent roads, the sidewalk is a standard brick with trees planted in between. This is appropriate because these areas have a more homey feeling allowing the brick to be more comfortable and permanent.


Site.Movement

Entries and Exits

Most of the buildings on the site are situated to allow pedestrian access and have direct access from the sidewalks. The others that have parking adjacent to them are situated in order to allow both pedestrian and vehicular access. Other buildings including dave’s grocery store, the key bank, and morgan’s services only allow direct vehicular access and are directly entered and exited from the adjacent parking lots.

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Street Entry

Parking Lot Entry

Street and Parking Entry

Research Credit to: Jenny Carnprobst

11


Site.Climate

Yearly Averages

45% of the

year has access to sun 66 Days

97 Days

202 Days

Yearly Temperatures

8/12 months a year it is COLD

Summer Sun 71.2°

a year it is TOO HOT (and humid)

year it is (kinda) okay (hint it’s September)

Wind

Winter Sun 25°

Summer Wind N/S

Conclusion This is a colder climate. Passive heating is very valuable. Though, the sun is not always out, thus you cannot always rely on direct solar gain to heat your building. It is best to build it tight and with great R-Values to keep that heat in (or out). Internal heat gain can be a great passive strategy during the summer. Watch your program sizes. Since we heat and cool often, the larger the floor plates, the more energy. PV isn’t also the best source of energy. Try other alternatives.

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a single month a

Winter Wind SW

Side Note: Being an urban environment, we are in a microclimate. Large buildings, and other structures can alter wind and solar access from the general climate.

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Sun Angles

2/12 months


Site.Movement Yearly Averages

156

precipitation days a year

37.2 inches

57.7 inches

+20%

MORE rain per year since the1900s 1

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

2.6 inches per hour rainfall rate

1 University of Maryland Center for Integrative Environmental Research; U.S. EPA

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Site.Movement Public Transit

14 Research Credit to: Clarisse Gates

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-RTA station- connects directly to Tower City -2 RTA bus stations -Connected to the east side by the Lorain-Carnegie bridge + Detroit bridge -Route 2/Shoreway highway located to the north as a city bypass from Lake wood and Euclid -Direct routes come from Public Square, Gund Arena, and Jacob’s Field -W. 25 connects directly to Tremont, providing more connections to ethnic areas


Site.Social Attractions Local Scale

5 14 1

11,12, 13

4

8 1

3

1,2

2

3

Site

4

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

6

6 10

7

2

9

5

1

Great Lake Brewery

11

Cambodian and Vietanmese Cuisine

1

Cleveland Lofts

2

Great Lake Brewery

12

Nate’s Deli & Mideastern

2

Apartments

3

Flying Pig

13

Market Garden Brewery

4

Souper Kitchen

5

Farkas Pasrty Shoppe

1

Allstate Hairstyling Barber College

6

Touch Supper Club

2

Market Square Park

7

Crop Bistro and Bar

3

Bier Markt

8

Bar Cento

4

Great Lake Brewery

9

Bonbon Bistro

5

Something Different Gallery

10 Vegetable Market

6

Orange Blossom Press

15


Site.Social Attractions Area Scale

9

7

4

8 1

6 2 5

1

Christopher Art Installation

2

St. Ignasius

3

Breen Center for the Performing Arts

4

Cleveland State Admission

5

Loren Naji Studio Gallery

6

Ohio City Station

7

Soldiers and Sailors Monument

8

Fairview Park

9

The Bridge

16

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3


Site.Social Attractions

Regional Scale

11

13 10

3 9

12

4 3

1

7

8 2

2

1

5

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

6 1

Fairview Park

11

Cleveland Stadium

2

Rivergate Park

12

Playhouse Square

3

Nautica Pavilion

13

Great Lakes Science Center

4

Wendy Park

5

Lincoln Park

1

Tower City

6

Tremont Park

2

Cuyahoga Community College

7

Quicken Loads Arena

3

Cleveland State University

8

Progressive Field

9

Civic Center

10 Cleveland Public Library

17


Site.Community Search

Where is what?

“It really is a good model: Build on your strengths,” says Mark McDermott of Enterprise Community Partners, which joined with KeyBank to give the innovation award. He praises Ohio City for its community-centered agenda, which thrives on connecting people.”2

6-arce Farm

Social Housing

IMAGE01

2 Bernstein, Margaret. “Ohio City takes a no-resident-left-behind approach to its development.” Plain Dealer [Cleveland] 12 May 2012, n. pag. Web. 3 Nov. 2013. <http://www.cleveland.com/bernstein/index.ssf/2012/05/ohio_city_takes_a_ no-resident-.html>. 3 Bernstein, Margaret. “Ohio City takes a no-resident-left-behind approach to its development.” Plain Dealer [Cleveland] 12 May 2012, n. pag. Web. 3 Nov. 2013. <http://www.cleveland.com/bernstein/index.ssf/2012/05/ohio_city_takes_a_ no-resident-.html>. IMAGE01 http://ohiocityfarm.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/ocfmap.jpg

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Social Housing (CMHA) + Job Creation The generation of new and hard to replace business is huge in the Ohio City community. In the tough economy to create business and jobs in the area a 6-arce farm was added. The reason this farm project has been successful since its inception is due to the relationship it has with the local social housing. The farm created jobs specifically for that social housing project. Many disabled residents who could not find other jobs tend the gardens. In return these gardens feed local restaurants, and community non-profits.3


Site.Economy.Local Artisan Housing Area Types

Multifamily Housing Besides the large social housing project located in the local site area, there are few apartment buildings. Ohio City Inc, is working to keep multifamily units in this local area though.

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

The apartments that are availbe for purchase are more upscale apartments. Typically rentals. Though they have property values ranging prices are from $50k to $200k.

“Eric Wobser, executive director of Ohio City Inc., said the nonprofit’s goal is to keep multifamily development on the neighborhood’s commercial streets in order to retain the integrity of the single-family neighborhood...”5

4 McFee, Michelle Jarboe. “Entrepreneurs envision brewery incubator in Ohio City, where Medina company is moving its offices.” Plain Dealer [Cleveland] 24 July 2013, n. pag. Web. 4 Nov. 2013. <http://www.cleveland.com/business/index. ssf/2013/07/entrepreneurs_envision_brewery.html>. 5

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Site.Concentration Local Scale

“While there has been plenty of retail and restaurant growth in the busier parts of Ohio City, his site on a less-beaten path wasn’t a big enough draw.”6

Heavy Commercial + Mixed Use Heavy Traditional

Recent Failed Small Business Heavy Concentration of Economical Growth Even though a new ice cream shop, run and managed by locals, seemed to fit the new Ohio City trend of local artisan business it failed. The reason being could be it’s location.4 New business artisan type thrives on walkable routines and saftey. Mixed use and local saftey creates the success in downtown Ohio City.

6 Ondrey, Thomas. “The Plain Dealer.” Cleveland artisans craft their own economic force: Eric Wobser. 23 Apr 2011: n. page. Web. 3 Nov. 2013. <http://www.cleveland.com/opinion/index.ssf/2011/04/cleveland_artisans_craft_ their.html>.

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Advanced success could rely on the propogation of downtown walkable shops. Though as the diagram progresses it shows that evetually a divid between the downtown and the actual city could occur.


Site.Cultures Beer Culture

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

“More focused on production than consumption, Platform won’t hold typical bar hours, Benner said. When the tasting room is open, patrons will be able to try Platform beers and samples from guest brewers.”7

“‘It’s not just another brewery,’ Benner says. ‘The last thing I want is for a project I’m associated with to be viewed as just another opportunity to take advantage of a trend.’”4

4 McFee, Michelle Jarboe. “Entrepreneurs envision brewery incubator in Ohio City, where Medina company is moving its offices.” Plain Dealer [Cleveland] 24 July 2013, n. pag. Web. 4 Nov. 2013. <http://www.cleveland. com/business/index.ssf/2013/07/entrepreneurs_envision_brewery.html>. 5

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Site.Cultures Cleveland Film Society

Cleveland Film Society Based in Ohio City, this group promotes film and film culture for the entire city of Cleveland. Their largest event is the Cleveland International Film Festival. This large event features films from around the world and in various genres. It is taking place at Tower City this year, and is in the month of March. Films featured include culture topic films, and more mainstream categories. They hold “feasts” a few times a month. These events include dinner and an event. The events range on many different affairs. From karaoke, to artistic meetings to film culture events. They typically happen at various locations such as restaurants or large public spaces.

“The Cleveland International Film Festival promotes artistically and culturally significant film arts through education and exhibition to enrich the life of the community.”9

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Other film groups/events: Other film events include the the Greater Cleveland Urban Film Festival in April.


Site.Cultures Mapping

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Daylight Program The program along Lorain mostly consists of “daylight” program. It is only active during the daylight hours. Very specialized shops,except around the park. Lesser pull to public appeal. More community based.

An exception is inevitable

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Site.Cultures Mapping

Traffic and Safety Lots of people and lights means a safe feeiling for night crowds Lorain Ave. This street is often considered the boundry of the nightlife. Often due to its dark and unlit street. Great Lakes A small niche in the urban fabric that attracts larger crowds.

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Urban Gap Mostly parking lots in these blocks. They are unexplored by the welcoming street condition of Ohio City. Often considered too dangerous for night travel by many who visit Ohio City. Area is known for car thefts. Usually poorly lite at night. urban villages

Small Retail A travel agency and small world trade store is directly across our street.


Site.REGULATIONS

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Zoning Regulations

§ 343.01 Local Retail Business District (a) “Local Retail District” means a business district in which such uses are permitted as are normally required for the daily local retail business needs of the residents of the locality only. (b) Permitted Buildings and Uses. The following buildings and uses are permitted in a Local Retail Business District; and no buildings or premises shall hereafter be erected, altered, used, arranged or designed to be used, in whole or in part for other than one (1) or more of the following specified uses: (1) Except as otherwise provided in this Zoning Code, all uses permitted in the Multi-Family District and as regulated in that district, except that “kindergartens, day nurseries and children’s boarding homes” shall be permitted without the requirement for a specified setback from an adjoining premises in a Residence District not used for a similar purpose; (2) Retail business for local or neighborhood needs to the following limited extent: A. The sale of baked goods, confectionery, dairy products, delicatessen, fruits, vegetables, groceries, meats; B. The sale of dry goods and variety merchandise, excluding department stores; C. The sale of men’s and boy’s furnishings, shoes, hats, women’s ready-to-wear, furs, millinery, apparel, accessories; D. The sale of china, floor covering, hardware, household appliances, radios, paint, wallpaper, materials and objects for interior decorating; E. The sale of books, magazines and newspapers, including adult book stores subject to Section 347.07, cigars, drugs, flowers, gifts, music, photographic goods, sporting goods, stationery; F. Eating places, lunch rooms, restaurants, cafeterias and places for the sale and consumption of soft drinks, juices, ice cream and beverages, but excluding buildings which provide entertainment or dancing and buildings in which beer and intoxicating liquor are sold for consumption on the premises, provided such building for the sale of beer or intoxicating liquor is within five hundred (500) feet of the boundary of a parcel of real estate having situated thereon a school, church, library, nonprofit recreational or community center building or public playground; G. Service establishments: barber or beauty shops, custom tailors, laundry agencies, self- service laundries, hand laundries, shoe repair, ice stations and dry cleaning, pressing or tailoring shops in which not more than five (5) persons are engaged in such work or business at any one time, and in which only nonexplosive and nonflammable solvents are used and no work is done on the premises for retail outlets elsewhere and pet shops, provided noise and odors are effectively confined to the premises. As used in this division (b)(2)G., “pet shops” does not include businesses which board dogs and cats overnight or any pet hospital. (3) Business offices: banks, real estate, insurance and other similar offices, and the offices of the architectural, clerical, engineering, legal, dental, medical or other established recognized professional, but excluding morticians, undertakers and funeral directors, in which only such personnel are employed as are customarily required for the practice of such business or profession; (4) Automotive services: public parking garages and parking lots; (5) Charitable institutions not for correctional purposes; (6) Signs: permitted in accordance with the requirements of Chapter 350; (7) Other main uses: any other neighborhood store, shop or service similar to the uses listed in this division in type of goods or services sold, in business hours, in the number of persons or cars to be attracted to the premises and in effect upon the adjoining Residence Districts; (8) Accessory uses, only to the extent necessary normally accessory to the limited types of neighborhood service use permitted under this division. (Ord. No. 729-09. Passed 7-1-09, eff. 7-8-09) 11

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Concept.White Paper Goals and ProblemsContinuing Urban Renewal

Introduction

Ohio City is a growing urban hotspot. Attracting huge crowds through its new food and beer culture, the site is beginning to explode with more and more life. Ohio City is anchored by the West Side Market, and this market is the driving force for this growing food culture. Though Ohio City’s growth has hit a turning point. The growth from this point must be subject to serious debate in order for the current renewal to continue in a proper fashion. The site must keep unique and diverse attractions to keep its crowds, but also must work to honor the all the citizens of Ohio City. The mission of this project shall be that. It will create more unique and diverse food experiences to add to Ohio City’s growing food culture, but also allow for community program and acknowledgement. The cycle of Urban Renewal in America: The cycle of boom communities, hip cultures, and general urban renewal follows a very easy to spot trend in America. Areas fall into decline, renewal is sparked by the creation of a new industry, then leads to eventual gentrification of an area. Then decline sets back in as industry dies. My sustainable goal is to continue the upkeep and try to prevent the gentrification of the Ohio City area. I believe the Ohio City area has a very pure intention and general support of the poor now, that must be maintained to keep the area successful in the extended timeline.

Gentrification

The concept of Gentrification is now renewable or sustainable. It relies too much on the here and now. It pushes aside and destroys former cultures, and replaces them with even less stable culture. Keeping those who value the town and not the “hip” is key to making the city successful.

Question to pose: Is it happening here? Will it happen here? Can it be avoided in American Culture? If it can, then how? Ohio City Views: They are working to stop and prevent gentrification. They are a community built on inclusion. They large number of social housing projects in the area prove this. In fact, the whole reason the urban is successful in this region is its connection to social housing. It has people willing and able to work the farms. It has people to work the farm. Thus, the farm is successful and produces quality products for local business. 8

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8 Reference to page ____ “Site.Community Search”

urban villages

Conclusion on Gentrification in Ohio City: The site is not as vulnerable to gentrification has first impressions may show. The urban renewal cycle here, while not completely stable is beginning to take steps to be stabalized. The project here must help further these steps.


Concept.White Paper The Counter

Food is the theatre

The concept and program will be the buffet theatre. This exprience is based on the Teatro del Sale in Florence, Italy. This theater is located on a market, and food centered part of town and integrates into the culture wonderfully. The program will create appealing food expriences. They can appeal to date night for the suburbs, or that social starting point for younger couples. It can start a “date night itnerary” on site as well.

The Food Concept

Food in Ohio City is unique. This will be an unique expirience paired with unique foods. Dinner will be a spin on the buffet concept. Seating is casual, and communal and socialization is encouraged. The expirience will make you bump elbows, literally, with new people and old friends. When dinner begins the chef of the night will begin to announce new dishes. No orders are taken. Dinner will be based on seasonal availbility, and chef passion and creativety each night. Leaving an expirience that will never be the same twice. After dinner. the dining room will be reset and rearranged to theatre setting. The show’s main star will move from tonight’s food to tonight’s special guest entertainment. Shows can range from a special from the cleveland film society to the theatre groups in town. Shows will end around 10:30 -11. Allowing guests to continue the night through the bar culture in Ohio City. During the date. The dinner theatre space can be used for events, and for food education during the day.

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

The Program

The Food Theatre_This space is the true gem of the project. A dual function space saving on square footage Micro-brewery_ The micro-brewery is the relation to the local beer culture. It provides a unique expirience to the local culture. It also provides a product produced in the building that cannot be obtained elsewhere. The Kitchen_A key space providing the first star of each night. The Bar_Used mainly for off hours, and post theatre shows and integration of beer culture. The Workshop_Learn to cook and create healthy cheap meals on site, as well as other techniques as food takes an education starring role here.

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Concept.White Paper Community Program

Prevent Gentrification

Steady the Urban Renewal Cycle

Unique Industry

Extend The Street Walk Zone on Lorain

Day and Night Use

Work, Live, Play Light the street Daily “Itineraries”

Provide production and a variety of jobs

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Create people traffic on the Street


New and more Jobs The theatre can provide more job opertunties for local artists/theatre groups. As well link the film society. It also will provide more food and service jobs through the restaurant, and production jobs through the microbrewery.

the workshop_

Create and extend the “bar scene” time on the site Through the unique food concept of the theatre, it can be a start of a night’s itnerary. It will extend the activity time of the site. It also creates a new itnerary type for allowing a new type of date night on site.

the bar_

Day and Night Activity Day and night on the site can see two very different crowds. Community program can be day program and night program can be more focused on the bar culture. Appealing to a 24/7 crowd keeps the site active and safe.

food theatre_

Crowd based action The large group theatre begins to tie people together through the night. It allows new interactions and new friendships. It encourages a social atmosphere. These new friendships can result in groups, and increase person saftey as well as site traffic.

the kithcen_

The Food Industry - Unique and New While the beer culture is growing in Ohio City. Ohio city is known for its unique food expirience. Linked to the market culture. Food is an experience in Ohio City. I wish to create a new food experience that could be unique to Ohio, along with most of the US.

microbrewery_

“Teach a man to fish” Education on how to cook and provide for yourself is vital for a sustainable life. The open theatre space will have all the tools to teach locals how to use crops they harvest to create cheap meals.

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Concept.Master Plan

The Urban Village The concept of this master plan was to create and establish an community that could foster and be self supporting within the local context of Ohio City. While, Ohio City is a part of the greater context of Cleveland, it is read as it’s own entity. Thus, it should perform and function as such for it’s residents. The master plan investigated that various elements that are needed for a small “urban village” such as Ohio City to flourish. These elements were defined and centralized around nodes throughout the site. The various nodes created were the Market Node, Entry/Public Square Node, Production Node, Retail and Business Node, and the Health Node. Each of these nodes were announced and established in the community though various connected public spaces throughout the downtown Ohio City area. They would be connected by pedestrian dominated streets paved in brick to reduce car traffic. The goal of this project is the emphasis, that even though we live in a global society, we must act, sustainabily, in our own local context to affect the greater region. Through this concept a network local regions will begin to build a great and more powerful global context. My project will supply the establishment of the Production Node. This node is dominated by the presence of the brewery, and it highlighted through the use of performance as a visual focusing tool.

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urban villages

N


Detail

Health/Movement Node This area will increase focus on health for the local region. Not in a hopital way, but more in an envirnmental/activity way.

Office/Retail Node This node allows small businesses to take root in Ohio City. The proximity to local restaurants and other services will benefit the local area.

Ohio Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Brewhouse

Performance/Production Node The contrast between the typically seen and unseen. The cross between the two remind us of their similarities, and a reminder to the power of both.

Project Site

Entry Node Gateway to the city, this node of public space is the one of the first spots seen when entering the site from car/RTA. Also, located near landmark West Side Market

Market Node This is the key node to the site. Giving landmark and visual to the area. It is also a central point for the food culture in Ohio City.

10 Year Plan Livable Community Nodes

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Final Drawings Concept Diagram Form Aggregation Master Plan Site Plan Floor Plans Section Perspective Sections Axon Rendering

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Diagrams


Concept Diagram

Theatre “The Seen”

Production “The Unseen”

The Fusion


Form Aggregation 1. Initial Mass

2. Site Movement Create Site Space

3. Hold Urban Edge

4. Stack Heating and Program Requirements

5. Separation of Program Types

6. Pronounce Corner


Master Plan

N

Health/Movement Node This area will increase focus on health for the local region. Not in a hopital way, but more in an envirnmental/activity way.

Office/Retail Node This node allows small businesses to take root in Ohio City. The proximity to local restaurants and other services will benefit the local area.

Performance/Production Node The contrast between the typically seen and unseen. The cross between the two remind us of their similarities, and a reminder to the power of both.

Entry Node Gateway to the city, this node of public space is the one of the first spots seen when entering the site from car/RTA. Also, located near landmark West Side Market

Market Node This is the key node to the site. Giving landmark and visual to the area. It is also a central point for the food culture in Ohio City.

10 Year Plan Livable Community Nodes


Site Plan

N

Lorain Ave.


Floor Plans Loading Dock Mechanical

Cafe Service

Storage

Lobby for Adj. Bldg.

Kitchen Performance/Dining Space

Offices UP Lobby

First Floor 1/16” = 1’


MicroBrew

Second Floor 1/32” = 1’


Workshop

Third Floor 1/32” = 1’


Section Perspective


Section

Transverse Section Scale 1/16” = 1’


Section

Longitudinal Section Scale 1/16” = 1’


Axon

Axon of South and East Elevations


Rendering

Night Rendering - Site


Diagrams

Thermal Control Barrier

This barrier is a thermally insulated wall between the main service and the main theatre space. This barrier’s job is to thermally separate the two spaces as muc as possible. Separate structural systems will be provided for each side of the wall to avoid thermal bridging. The windows provide vision into the spaces from the theatre space, but also provides a spot to allow direct heat transfer when desired.

Internally Load Dominated Service

These spaces when active and used, will be producing large amounts of heat. That heat will overheat the space in time. Thus, the space is cooled through stack heating, or the waste heat is used through either direct or and HRV heat recovery system. This takes the extra heat and pushes it to other spaces that may need the heat.

Heat Control Scale 1/16” = 1’


Thermally Flexible Theatre

n ch

The theatre space can fluctuate in needs greatly depending on time of day and type of performance. In the busy hours the space will need cooling, which is done through stack effect cooling. In smaller performances the space could need heating. Heat is provided from waste heat in the service spaces.

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MicroBrew Heat Kitchen Heat

Public Space


Diagrams

Stack Heat Effect

Solar Heat Gain

Stack Heating


Daylighting

Storage on wall. Excess sent to main

Water Diagram


Juror Comments First Juror - Round 1 This round focused my urban design approach. The juror was interested in the concept of mini urban villages as a model for future urban development in America. Juror comments and criticisms included the extension of facade windows on the facade by using fake brick infill windows. This would continue the facadeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s human scale approach to the site. The juror also commented on various interior window sizes. The comment was to enlarge the window. Overall, it was a successful round, where my idea was clearly presented. Jurorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s other comments were generally extremely positive.

Second Juror - Round 2 The second round focused on the theatre design and the concept of performance. The juror was interested in the design of the theatre, and how it could be used in multiple ways. The juror appreciated the various number of performances that could occur. Through discussion we both came up with the idea also that the performance space could be easily linked with the Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events. Often in the public square in front of the market, small street markets are set up. These street markets also come with live performances often. My program and site offer a perfect extension to this event, and would allow further integration within the context of the project. We also discussed my choice of green wall. The juror commented, that the roof could have been easily used another space for events and more private parties to occur.

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urban villages

Third and Fourth Jurors - Round 3 The final round focused on my urban design concepts again as well as the acoustic design of my theatre. The jurors commented on my urban design ideas again and appreciated the concept. The acoustic engineer in the round gave me advice on the acoustic design. He appreciated the attempt of me using the reflector in the theatre. The jurors also commented that the workshop could be more directly connected to the theatre by it being used to produce various theatre props and set pieces the theatre may need for performances.


My Response First Juror - Round 1 I especially loved the idea of the faux windows to continue the facade of the project. Often in Ohio City, these windows are seen on facades. It would help further address the street in the design, and will help the building fit into the context further. I will be designing and adding them when this project goes through my final portfolio process.

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Second Juror - Round 2 I appreciated the juror’s ideas on my theatre. She gave me many different ways of looking at the theatre to just beyond performance. I would love to implement the upper space in my project for private parties, though I envisioned a bigger focus on the street context in my project. Thus, I probably will not be implementing this idea, as it doesn’t add to the street in this project, and would more than likely cause the project to go over budget.

Third and Fourth Juror - Round 3 This jury I really appreciated the advice on acoustics. While, short and brief, it was the first time the acoustic design of my project was a topic of the jurors. I loved the concept of using the workshop for producing theatre sets in my building as it would help tie the program even closer together.

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Conclusion and Future Development Project The success of this project is very conceptual. The project fits in conceptually, though many elements have to still be figured out. Though it is my belief that the project would be a successful element and addition to spark up the urban area. The creation of itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s master plan would allow Ohio City to be self reliant. The money brought into Ohio City would be allowed to stay there and circulate and provide for the lives of its citizens. The future of this project would ideally lead the creation of the master plan. This master plan has a 10year goal mark to be achieved. The establishment of these structures in the context of Ohio City would generate new jobs, and allow the Ohio City people to have access to a larger variety of resources. The next step would be the Business/Retail node to be implemented with the creation of a new retail block. Upon creation of this master plan, it would be the goal of the project to begin to develop down Lorain Ave. This would allow the downtown area to reach further into the context of Ohio City, and also provide more space for more jobs and resources in Ohio City.

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urban villages

Personal This project reinforced many urban design principles of my own. It also opened my mind up to the more imminent context of Cleveland. Sustainability in an urban environment is more difficult. Often you have to compete for sun, wind, and light with your neighboring structures. Though I believe that in an urban environment these structures shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t compete but rather lend themselves to each other to help improve the overall urban environment. In this project, I tried to mold my project into assisting other structures, and groups on the site rather than compete. This is one of the strongest reasons why I believe, that my project successfully integrated with the site.


Ohio Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Brewhouse

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Precedent.Program Theatro del Sale

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urban villages

Two halfs of the same coin Food and performance have always had a relationship in human history. Though for this project I took the unique concept of performance and food provided in the theatro del saleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design. Carved within the buildings of Florence Italy. This space serves many functions. The unique life of the space is the response of providing a new experience to tourist and locals alike in Italy. The whole night in this space is a celebration of food, socialization, and performance.


Precedent.Program

Ohio City’s Performing Brewhouse

Gehua Youth and Cultural Center

Indoor/Outdoor Performance Space The Cultural Center in Gehua is very interesting because it managed to create a space that provides function for a variety of performances. Giving the center lots of functionality. This could be used in my project in a sense of extending the interior functions to the exterior space to help activate it. I also enjoyed that the project managed to innovate the performance to create a brand new typology of performance. This will allow a larger variety of acts to take place.

Name Gehua Youth and Cultural Center Architect Open Architecture Location Qinhuangdao, China Built 2012

Source:”Gehua Youth and Cultural Center / Open Architecture” 01 Oct 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 13 Nov 2013. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=276957>

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Precedent.Context Pixel Building

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Name Pixel Building Architect studio505 Location Melbourne, Australia Built 2009

Source:â&#x20AC;&#x153;Center for Urban Waters / Perkins + Willâ&#x20AC;? 23 Feb 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 21 Sep 2013. <http://www. archdaily.com/112190>

urban villages

LEED in Urban Environment The Pixel building was one of the first buildings designed to be Carbon Neutral in Australia. The roof of the building was designed to be an energy producing wonder. It has multiple sun tracking solar PV panels, and wind turbines custom made for the site. Along with other passive strategies this building achieved LEED Platinum and Carbon Neutral standards. I choose it as a precedent because of the building type. I know that it is in a different environment, but I was able to look at how they operated their mechanical systems and use it as a precedent for mine to hopefully reduce the amount of energy used in my project.


Precedent.Context

Sustainability Methods

Ohio Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Brewhouse

Water This building supplies its own water. It catches rain on the flat room, which is filtered by grasses on the roof then reused through the building. The building though minimizes the amount of water it needs through efficient fixtures. Energy Energy is produced through solar panel arrays and wind power turbines on the roof. Hot water is also created through a biomass burning system linked to the plumbing system. It is available through the special toilets used, which composts and increases the density of waste to be burnt. Cooling In slab cooling is used with a very efficient cooling circulation system. This system uses night flush to recycle itself, while also reusing heat. It also provides more fresh air than required by code. The entire building is shaded too to prevent solar heat gains from the sun.

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Sustainability.Methods Wall Composition - Insulation

More than just the R-value - Insulation spraying to be efficient must look beyond what is the R-value of a single product, but more all the various elements of insulation. Insulation that is not durable or efficient is not sustainable. Greenfiber insulation is a product produced in Ohio locally. It is a sprayed on cellulose insulation. The benefits of fiber insulation include that it can be more efficiently spread around irregular shapes and pipes in the wall. Not needing to be cut it can form around different shapes. This helps prevent thermal gaps. This product is also red list free rated on the Living Building Challenge, and is also rated for LEED points. Ohio In Ohio, being a climate that experiences all four seasons, good thermal insulation is needed. As rarely the weather is at comfort level. Also being a not very sunny climate, insulation provides more benefit than solar heat gains. Rated R-values:

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urban villages

6.18â&#x20AC;? = R-22 7.83â&#x20AC;? = R-28 *Max Rated is R-60, though due to itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s increased thickness it is not suitable for more wall use


Sustainability.Methods Trombe Wall

Project University of Versailles Versailles, France 2012 Located in Versailles, this project has a great need for heating throughout the year. The project uses a trombe wall to heat up air to circulate through a space between a curtain wall and an insulated wall. The small space between the walls allows the air to flow in and out as it rises from being warmed. In the winter the warm air is redirected into the building.

Ohio Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Brewhouse

The use of this double wall facade system creates a trombe wall effect. The benefits of this wall is that it is able to be controlled between season. Thus, heating is only provided when desired.

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Sustainability.Methods Water Reuse - Urban Environments

Water Reuse and filtering

Name Center for Urban Waters Water reuse is vital to the growing world, especially in urban Architect environments. The amount of world that has access to fresh water Perkins + Will is decreasing and we must work to reuse and conserve as much Location water as possible. Washington Built The building sets a new standard for water for the location by 2010 controlling and recycling the water to be used. First, storm water is absorbed on site from the two green roofs and planting around the building. The remaining storm water is channeled into cisterns where, by reverse osmosis, is recycled and used for the fixtures in the building along with irrigation purposes.

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Source:â&#x20AC;&#x153;Center for Urban Waters / Perkins + Willâ&#x20AC;? 23 Feb 2011. ArchDaily. Accessed 21 Sep 2013. <http://www. archdaily.com/112190>

urban villages

Possible Issues Include: Price and Room


Sustainability.Methods Stormwater Control

Ohio Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Brewhouse

Water Reuse and filtering

Name Center for Urban Waters Water reuse is vital to the growing world, especially in urban Architect environments. The amount of world that has access to fresh water Perkins + Will is decreasing and we must work to reuse and conserve as much Location water as possible. Washington Built The building sets a new standard for water for the location by 2010 controlling and recycling the water to be used. First, storm water is absorbed on site from the two green roofs and planting around the building. The remaining storm water is channeled into cisterns where, by reverse osmosis, is recycled and used for the fixtures in the building along with irrigation purposes. Possible Issues Include: Price and Room

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Sustainability.Methods Stack Ventilation

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urban villages

Passive Cooling These diagrams show examples of ways that stack ventilation could be used in theatre design. Often theatres use tall volume elements. These elements have easy potential to be turned into a stack ventilation exhaust. This system is easily controlled as a control damper could determine whether heat is contained to exhausted in the space. This could easily reduce the internal heat load in my building and increase passive cooling without relying on natural wind currents as much.


Sustainability.Methods

Ohio Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Performing Brewhouse

Living Walls

Living Walls Living walls can provide many benefits to an urban environment. They are capable of reducing the Urban Heat island effect. This effect causes unhealthy air, more degree days, and can increase smog levels. These walls run on either potable, grey, or storm water and can use each respected water system in the building. They can reduce sound inside and outside the building due to their high sound absorption. They improve air quality for the surrounding air, and can sequester more carbon in the air. They also protect the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facade from UV rays which can cause colour and material degradation. They can be implemented in many different ways. A living wall implies that the vegetation is part of the building envelope system. Other types of green walls include green facades, and landscape walls.

Source: http://continuingeducation.construction.com/article.php?L=260&C=808&P=2

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Fourth Year Fall Semester 4 Week Project Final Submission - 2013 Professor Martha Ross All credit goes to sources listed


Ohio city Project Book