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The Public Charge Proposal May Harm Our NY-9 Communities On October 10, 2018, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) proposed to change this long-standing policy by excluding anyone who is likely to use certain health care, nutrition or housing programs in the future. The proposed test adds specific standards for income, health, age and even English proficiency, and expands the forms of public assistance that are counted in a “public charge” determination. The public charge ruling is a part of an ongoing strategy by the Administration to destroy safety net programs and criminalize individuals in need.

This policy is in alignment with the Trump Administration’s reckless use of the law to divide and conquer Americans. This policy legally codifies class and racial discrimination and is a continuation of policies that are attacking Social Security, the public school system, and accessibility to healthcare, while lining the pockets of the already wealthy.

All families in America suffer when policies restrict access to basic needs programs. District 9 has several diverse communities. Of the over 750,000 households in NY-9, there are over 294,883 immigrant families. Health, nutrition, and housing supports are the assistance that working class communities need to improve the quality of life for generations. It is essential that we defend access to public assistance and fight for programs that support Black immigrants’ ability to access a better standard of living. ●

Food Stamp/SNAP - 22.6% of Immigrant households in District 9 ​are recipients of Food Stamps/SNAP benefits along with 26.9% of all Brooklyn households. Health Insurance - 16.0% of the immigrant households in District 9 are uninsured. ​17.5% of the immigrant households are uninsured in Brooklyn Borough. Families with children under 18 - 16.4% of low-income immigrant households in District 9 have children under the age of 18.​​ 19.5% of low-income immigrant households in Brooklyn Borough have children under the age of 18.

*Statistics based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates


Like all people of color in America, immigrant families face discrimination. This policy paints people of color as undeserving when they receive public assistance. Punishing Black and Brown immigrants and their U.S. citizen family members for relying on healthcare and nutrition programs builds upon the shameful but effective practice of stigmatizing public programs and the people who participate in them. ●

Although there are fewer total Black immigrants than Latinos or Asian Pacific Islanders, Black immigrants made up nearly ​one-quarter of people who became lawful permanent residents in one year. The proposed rule would have a chilling effect on an estimated ​1.8 million Black immigrants​​ and their families.

IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO FIGHT BACK Join us in submitting public comments opposing the proposed changes to public charge policy.

https://protectingimmigrantfamilies.org/#take-action

Organize your networks, your neighbors, and your family, asking them to do the same. Share your own story. Visit ​https://ProtectingImmigrantFamilies.org​ to find out how you can fight this proposal and receive updates about this issue.

*Statistics based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau 2012-2016 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates

The Public Charge Proposal May Harm Our NY-9 Communities  

UndocuBlack one-pager on the Public Charge Rule Proposal changes.

The Public Charge Proposal May Harm Our NY-9 Communities  

UndocuBlack one-pager on the Public Charge Rule Proposal changes.

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