Page 6

Page 6

Never an ordinary day

CacheScene

Monday, Sept. 10, 2007

Logan fire department's C Unit respond to medical and fire calls no mat- dUring their 48-hoUr shifts, the firefighters eat, sleep, work and play at the station. Sometimes they even watch movies which are frequently interrupted by fire and medical calls. ter the time they happen. Each unit in the department works on 48-hour shift per week.

Brian hoLBrook takes a baby to an ambulance. When the fire department got the medical call, the baby wasn't breathing.

troy hooLey takes the departments old fire truck out for a spin. This particular truck is used a lot in parades.

Logan fire department's C Unit. From top left: Hoss Tomkinson, Merrill Harrison, Chad Griffin, Troy Hooley, Brian Holbrook. From bottom left: David Hull, Capt. Andy Shock, Scott Kendrick, Doug Fullmer. Hooley said they take care of each other and know each other better than their wives.

Look beyond your first impressions The first time I ever thought I was going to die was this summer as I sat on a subway train in New York City. My best friend, her fiance and I had just sat down and were ready to head to Coney Island when the automatic train doors shut and a middle-aged man holding a big, black garbage bag stood up and told us he was sorry, but he "had a situation." He began to apologize to the passengers on the train, telling us he needed to make an announcement. At that moment I thought for sure that he was going to say he had a bomb in that bag and that I would be toast in a matter of minutes. Instead, he continued to say he had recently become homeless and needed anything anyone would give him. He was not going to blow us to smithereens after all. He was asking for money. At about the same time he sat down, an old man from the other side of our train car stood up and hobbled around with a cup in his hand. Apparently he wanted money too. I had to laugh at that moment, as all my fears dissipated. I turned to my friend and said, "Once one comes out, they all come out." The interesting thing was nobody else around me was ever startled. Most of them never even looked at the man as he made his announcement, not to mention the hobbling old grandpa with the cup. Over the weekend as I traveled back and forth from Brooklyn to Manhattan, I realized that people there are used to weird stuff happening to them; these men were just another couple of homeless guys. I began to appreciate this kind of openness when my best friend, who is an aspiring actress, stood up to show us a couple African dance moves on the train. To everyone else, she was just another actress living in the big city. And when a big drunk guy got on the train from Times Square and began openly hitting on women, he was just another drunk guy. People say that New Yorkers are rude, abrupt or harsh. I never felt that from any of them. For the most part they just seemed like they simply didn't care. This made it OK for everyone to be different, look different, act different. Most people didn't even look twice when a transvestite walked on the train with a pink shirt, jean miniskirt and a manly face. For someone that was born and raised in Utah, it was surprising, to say the least, that no one really stares, points or laughs at those who don't fit into the cookie-cutter culture because there isn't one. Not everyone speaks English there, not every one is white.

Positionsareparttimeand offerflexibleschedulesforstudents. Thisisyourchancetogethands onengingeeringexperience. closeandconvenienttothecampus. Foralistofopenpositionsandinstructionson howtoapply,visitww.sdl.usu.edu/employment

- See NEW YORK, page 7

The Utah Statesman - September 10, 2007  

Opinion Features Sports Archives and breaking news always ready for you at www.utahstatesman.com A student loses a fender fight. Find out wh...

The Utah Statesman - September 10, 2007  

Opinion Features Sports Archives and breaking news always ready for you at www.utahstatesman.com A student loses a fender fight. Find out wh...

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