Page 1

Tower

2003


YOU

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4^;YOU CONTENTS TAKE TIME AND ^l£L\A/€ TH EVENTS THAT SHAPED STUDENT LIFE

;06

LOOK BACK AND ^l/CpJi^M ^lA^UJA^^AAj/ THE ACTION OF DIVISION

Flip

II

SPORTS

through and ^ieCAX)uJfi

memories of organizations

EXAMINE AND ^vea<i ^IAlAAAUI/

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:StM^ y^«>A4K«(r

:mk

TO THE

DIFFERENT FACES OF PEOPLE

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NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY ^i

«.'*

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ttttSffaadty,

:>ute

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r.

alumni and community manbers cheer during tiie liomeamifigfooAdligame. The Buucats ideated CaUidMiaomi for the ninth win of the season, photo by Matt Frye

13-

W

Tower 2003 VOLUME 82 800 UNIVERSITY DRIVE MARYVILLE, MO 64468 (660) 562-1212 ENROLLMENT: 6,335 WWW.NWMISSOURI.EDU


It

was a year regarding you and your convictions.

Reflect

^n

on the positive and negative experiences that

created your character.

You clipped coupons

as the statewide

$284 million

higher education budget cut struck home. While the university added a $5 per credit hour surcharge,

.V,

enroUment went down

5 percent.

forced to cut $19 million from

budget.

its

Northwest was

annual operations

The Capital Campaign for Northwest offered

one way

to offset state cuts, attempting to raise $21

million for the 21" Century. In August a boil order Nich Bodcii and

other ivsidciicc

interrupted the

hall employees distribute bottled

first

week

water diiriii^ the August boil order.

In addition

to snpplyin^^ residents j

of classes after a major

with bottled water, the university brought in two milk trucks filled

with water, photo by

water line broke east of

Matt Frye Maryville.

A

Campus water

construction worker installs

wire piping while renomting Rickenbrode Stadium The stadium's renovation was ahead of schedule due to mild winter weather photo by Matt Frye

fountains were turned off in buildings to protect you

.

.

from getting

ill.

Trucks distributed 9,000 bottles of

water on campus while a few residence halls locked

bathroom doors due

Campus

to sanitation concerns.

Safety patrolled the university freshly

outfitted with firearms.

While guns were an

issue at

the university, but you watched the topic invade the

news.

Men

country runner Matt gazes out the bus

s cross

Nipperf

u'indow en route

to the

Wildcat

Invitational in Baldwin,

Kan.

Nippert placed 15th overall at the meet, photo by Matt Frye

02:msssmm


In June you saw northwest Missouri brought into

the national spotlight as Jeffress of

CNN

Kearney shot four monks in Conception.

The country was on

the brink of war with Iraq;

meanwhile, snipers John Allen

John Lee Malvo, 10

reported that Lloyd

fatal, in

17,

Muhammad,

and

41,

were convicted of 13 shootings,

the Washington D.C. area.

Visions of professional football entertained you at

Arrowhead Stadium, home of the Kansas City Chiefs, Oct. 17. Chances are you or your friends attended the

Clash of the Champions Provost Taylor Barnes and Abbot Gregory dedicate a newly planted chinquapin oak tree near Golden Pond. The ceremony was held Oct. 11 in remembrance of the Gonception Abbey shootings on JunelO. photo by Bill Knust

as

it

broke the

Division

NCAA

attendance

II

record with 26,695 fans.

You gathered

J controversy

The Bearcat Marching Band

to address

that faced

createsformauom during half-time

on the piayitigfield ifArrowhead Stadium. "It makes it exciting lu'cause it's a nightfootball game, not only to say it's in this major complex, " band director Al Sergei said, photo hy Matt Fiye

Northwest. Bearcat Voice was implemented as a organization

new

on campus with the main purpose of

discussing current problems

and ways

to address them.

The people you interacted with everyday, the classes you attended and the

lifestyle

you chose made a

difference to you. Regarding you

Northwest,

it

was a year to

and your

life at

react.

Satoshi Tanihata andjaehee

Kim

discuss photography over

an afternoon

coffee.

Students

gathered at Java' City, in the

W. Jones Student Union, between classes to work on

J.

homework, relax and vhoto by Matt Frye

socialize,


1


.

:Niyell.

P^teuOh.

.â&#x20AC;˘^iv^.fafa^.

S>-afMtX nlUfvKA l^ff^pA^iUep.

.-EWuMv Et^sfc

.-I^^LeJUet

Bm^

ffSt Relive the emotions of change regarding student

life.

Despite

the alterations filtering through campus you continued witb tradition.

Your daily the

life

was interrupted with budget

fall trimester,

your school

bills

cuts.

Beginning

ir

were provided solely online

The new process saved Northwest around $8,000. Money was alsc saved in labor costs of custodial services in the residence halls

a;

paper towels and trashcans were removed. Despite the budget woes, the Board of Regents unanimously

approved a $100 million plan to build new residence halls

Your finances were strained

after local bar

owners signed

agreement in June to eliminate all-you-can-drink

Homecoming was pushed back temperatures, a crowd of

to

.

ar

specials.

November; despite

frigic

more than 9,000 remained through

th(

fourth quarter

Tradition interwoven with diversity in people and idea: formulated the attitude of student

life.

The Homecoming parade proceed down Fourth Street Nov. 2. Ph Mu won best overall mini-float while Sigma Sigma Sigma and Ph Sigma Kappa won overall bes float, photo by Matt Frye


^^ Its

good

TO GO TO SCHOOL

AND

BE

HEKE

PAKT

OF THE

COMMUNITY.

BRUSH

volunteer Latonya Davis paints

Grecly home.

tlie

Se\'eral tinics 3 year volunteers restored

homes ihrou^out

the community, phoio by .Xtjtt l-ryc

Volunteer David Burrough focuses uraping paint (Voin the bottom ot. it .in. UKUM rcnÂŤivjtu>ns were tumied through local busuicss I

dnllJllons.

02:\ Features

phiilo hy Af.iff

I

tyr


Home RENOVATION

Volunteers

BRUSH UP Students from a \ arie ty of cami\js organizafions pifch in to renovate older homes around the community.

A

^

cenrury-vild hrnne

giit

a fresh

new

kxJc

on a

clixxly

"It's

good to go to schtxil here and he a part t>f the community,"

Hiatt said.

Sanndav-

BRUSH, which

stands for Beautifying Residences Using

Student Help, was a service project centered on the renovation

ct)mmunity." Efecky Greely u'as delighted with the renovations at

of iJdcr hinnes. CK-er 100 students gave their time and energ>'

September 7 and

14.

BRUSH

involved organisations including

"As a student you have a lot of free time on your it seems like you did stimcthing gixxJ for the

hands, and

2nd

St. TTie

home has been

fraternities, siwonties.

the American Marketing AsstKiation, the

lifetime of the house;

Student Affairs

and

nHwn.

"I ha\-c r»\>

le|;acY.

one

is

office

things that

variixis individuals. 1

u-ant to leave

voluntcenng.

conununiry better than

I

the>- f<.iund it," Assistant

Student Affairs Carol Qiwles President

Northwest with

Vice President

said.

Dcan Hubbatd and wife Aleta initiated the BRUSH

in

"We needed to stan fixing up houses anxmd Maryvilie," Aleta

htxjse

is

two of her

aliiKKt

Greely's

siblings

100 years old.

anxind 1907," Greely

were

bom

Volunteer John Hiatt was excited to be involved with the it

allowed

him

to volunteer off-campus.

E.

in the front

My grandparents moved

siiid.

home was

the fourth renovated by

BRUSH

have never done anything

"1

off.

work

1

think that

it is

in Maryvilie, the schixil gets so

ne;« that the university and

together," volunteer

Angela Jennings

town can

said.

Assisting Maryvilie residents with the renovation

said.

i03

volunteers. Volunteers tackled three htxnes in April.

shut

pn)|ect.

pfU|ect because

"The

as a

think students should leave a

I

in the Greely family for nearly the

homes, volunteer

efforts like

BRUSH

i>f

their

gave students the

opportunity to reach out to the residents of Mary\'ille.

Stephanie Davidion and Jacci Prcwilt analyze the drying protc** ot' pjint Hru%h volunteer) came from various campu« organi/Jtlon\.

pit/*'

hy .\hlt

l-ryr

:0*?


Charlcatha Rhodes peers into J.iss Salon's display ot body jcwclcry. Items at the C^rganizational Fair were not for sale due to uni\ersit\- policy, jyhoio hy M.m hryr

Salon owner Jenny Mullen displays

Jass

prcjducts at a bi>otli during Fair.

Mullen has been

years, pholo hy \Uitt

tlie

t)rganizationaI

in business tor

over three

l-ryr

Gerry Hindricks attends computer traiinng in (!oldeii Hall. Durmg Advantage Week, freshmen attended sessions designed to ease the transition into college,

WW

fihohi

liy

M.ill

liy

was nice being with the people in MY FRESHMAN SEMINAR BECAUSE THE PEOPLE YOU ARE AROUND A LOT ARE THE PEOPLE THAT BECOME YOUR FRIENDS. It

^^

:KARA AKERS

10:

FVFNTS


5

ADVANTAGE WEEK

Open a fresh chapter IN LIFE A iveek ofinfoniiatmuil sessions arid activities

MiL'hjcl

Dye and

ctmiiruii ihc

I'ctc 'I'hiiiiut

Oyc'* di»rfii riM>ni. Frc»hnicn nuwrd residence hill« two djyt brforr

lofc ior

help

new students adjust

to life as Bearcats.

into uppcrclaumcn.

^fcoio

hy \ta» hryr

BY BETSY LKl The summer between high school and college was a time full of afprehcmsion and ckcttement. one incoming freshman kept a record of his feelings prior to arriving at northwest.

D

Ascending upt>n campus

for the first

them with

resources to help

their transition,"

lime, freshmen me( with bliK'ked roads and a

llunn

schedule of mandatory events.

addition to the sessions, cvcnint; entertainment was provided. Sex Signals w:is

Advantage Week

said.

In

Aug.

activities tix>k place

22-25, requiring students to attend classes and

one of the major mandatory events The

informational sessions throughout their

event educated students about sexual hara.ssmcnt.

weekend

at

first

Northwest.

Aug. 22, when residence halls were opened. Blocked roads and parking lot constructK>n hindered the moving-in process Activities kicked

for

some

"It

oft'

students.

was a pain trying to get things up here,"

.^ug. 2

Although many events were cited many freshmen chose ti> skip

mandatory,

evening

^

;i>

trying to get our riH>m together,"

Hannah Jackson said. "We were and getting to know everyone."

Providing additional opportunities for freshmen to get involved and meet new people, the Organizational Fair tixik place Aug. 24. Over

way."

Rebecca Dunn, Coordinator of Student OnentatKWi and Transfer Skills,

said that in spite

of the construction, traffic flow was actually better than usual.

up Kxnhs outside the J.W. Jones Student Union, hoping to attract new members. "We actually got one new member from it and 25 organizations

THREE WEEKS MOVE TO N.W. AM

LIKE

BEFORE

I

I

A LITTLE NERVOUS, A LITTLE

EXCITED AND A LITTLE

GUESS EVERY FRESHMAN IS. HOPE THAT IT WILL GO GOOD, BUT TO KEEP MY SCHOLARSHIPS HAVE TO I

I

just sociaiiiinu

the other cars were in the

all

IT IS

SCARED.

Perrin resident Kara Akers said. "You couldn't

park close because

by Michael Dye

the

activities.

"We were just

My words

set

I

KEEP A 3.3 G.P.A. IT WILL BE DIFFICULT, BUT THINK CAN DO IT. WENT SHOPPING WITH I

I

I

MY MOM AND BOUGHT NEW THINGS FOR COLLEGE. THINK I

After moving in Thursday, freshmen had an

eveningof activities planned

for

dinner at the Bell Tower, a

movie night and

them, including a

darKe at the Tundra spons»>red by CJountry

Faith.

The next morning freshmen attended

their

Throughout the week, classes allowed freshmen to meet other students who were interested in their major. "It was nice being with the people in my freshman seminar because the people you are around a l<^ are the people that become your seminar classes

fricmds."

Akers

for the first time.

said.

Freshmen were required to attend

1

that's exceptional for us," all. It's

Kyle

hard to find people to be in the Chemistry

AlthiHigh they were not required to attend the clusters of freshman crowded around the booths getting information about variety o( fair,

campus "It

activities.

was

said. "It

clubs

I

really informative,"

helped

me

might be interested

campus life. The goal of the week is to provide students with an opponunity to meet new people and gain their adjustment to

and

in."

ceremony which officially inducted new students, concluded Advantage Conv»Katu>n,

Week Aug.

a

25. Administration such as Provost

to the

freshmen with

Nancy Hammond

find out aK>ut activities

TayU>r Barnes and President

assist

"I

IS WHEN IT HIT ME THAT WAS GOING TO COLLEGE. AM GOING TO MISS ALL MY FRIENDS, BUT KNOW THAT WILL MAKE NEW ONES UP THERE. AM A LITTLE SAD AND

THAT

I

I

informatK>nal se»ions thnxighout the remainder

the topics were selected to

"After

Club."

of the week. Sc»ion topics ranged from persiinal health to campus diversity. According to l"Hinn

I>aily said.

new

IVan Hubbard

I

I

I

A NEW ADVENTURE WAITS GUESS, AND IT IS UP TO ME WHAT MAKE OF IT. A LITTLE GLAD.

I

I

spoki-

students.

liked that they ti»ok thcit time out to

welcome all us freshmen," Amy Lassitcr said. With the goal ot helping adju.st to college life. Advantage Week offered a wide variety ot opportunities and activities for new students.

fUkJ

^^

0'


1

Capital CAMPAIO '

T

S

Y

L

N

F4nil

E E

^

A JLm

ÂŤ

University targets

INITIATIVES ACTIXELY SEEKING PRi\'ATE DONATIONS

BROUGHT THE CAMPAICrJ

FOR Northwest closer to the goal of raising $21 million.

F

or the first time in university history, an aggressive on to pursue

campaign sought private donations

million for business initiatives and $5.5 million for athletic initiatives.

The $ 10 million raised for student initiatives would

educational goals.

The Campaign first

for

Northwest was the

formal capital campaign.

university's

With the goal of raising

provide

Increased

resources.

will help ensure that later

"These contributions

$21 million, the campaign entered the public phase

Aug.

technological

scholarships and research opportunities.

generations will have the same opportunities as us,"

25.

According to Campaign for Northwest Chairman Dick Leet, the campaign had been in planning stages since January 2000. The steering

Student Senate President Kara Karssen

committee wanted to secure half of the campaign

program and the endowment of a masters degree

goal before public announcement. Treasurer

Bud Edwards

raising efforts

had

said as of

Campaign

hoped

"I'm pleased and impressed with the results of the

to provide for the International business

program in

quality.

Athletic allocations hoped to

June 2002 fund

verified $12.9 million.

said.

Funds appropriated to meet business-initiative goals

endow

scholarships

and support stadium construction. Scheduled to be completed August 2003, plans for the stadium

new home

locker room, a

quiet phase of the campaign," Edwards said. "It gives

renovation included a

me

renovated press box and additional seating. TTie

great

hope

for

achievement during the public

phase."

Working to secure (iinds for the campaign, nineteen

Aug. 25, when the campaign was announced. "This

university employees volunteered their time as prospect managers.

It

"Prospect managers have a ptxjl of donors, and they

is

the

really takes

first

Advancement Lance Burchett said. "They are focused

to be proud of."

private support to finance the

Campaign contributors could designate where their would be allocated. The steering committee hoped

to raise

$10 million

to go for student Initiatives, $5.5

gotten to see the model;

is

that

It

gives our fans something

Striving to reach the goal of $21 million by 2006,

The Campaign

campaign."

I've

Mel Tjeerdsma said. "It will really help with recmiting, but the best thing

on generating the

time

your breath away," head football coach

are cultivating them," Vice President for University

gift

first

scaled model of the renovated stadium was unveiled

for

Northwest had

far

reaching

Implications in areas from athletics to academics.

"As a university we determine our destiny," Edwards said.

"We make

things happen."

Campaign for Northwest Chairman Dick Lcct Mifwrrf

2

question about the cjinpjtgn. Lcet

paroclpjtcd in a ptr\s confca-ncc after for

Northwest luncheon, Aug.

2Tt.

tlie C '.ainpal^i

jthi^o

hy Malt iryr

I 12:

FEATURES


T\

ILSF

COr4iRIBUIlC)h>S WILL

LNSURI

I

ILLP

THAT

LATER

GENERATIONS WILL

|-iA\'E

THE

SAME OPPORTUNITIES AS

US

•Kara Karssin Stadium-renovation crew

mcmben

check

blucpnim When the campiign wn jnmmrKcd Aug. 25. fundniicn had *ccurrd cnrr hjil'ol'thc %•> i millK'ti price ug phdo hy Man l-tyr ihcir

i-ARTALCAMPft^VJ,


D"

"EMI As

BY Bi rsY

the crowd amassed, hundreds of

underfoot and the

soft grass

harmonies of the Alliance of Black

Pinned memorial notes surrounding the

Collegians Gospel Choir floating into the

Tower waved

softly in

the wind, a

reminder of the reason

silent

for the

gathering.

The

air,

the flame spread through the crowd.

The candlelight created a s<ift glow in the quickly darkening sky.

sky was slowly darkening as the

crowd gathered

for the candlelight vigil

Following the

the crowd began a

flag,

procession toward the International

Sept. 11. Student Support Services

Plaza. People

organized the vigil as a way to bring

protecting the symbol of peace from the

people together to memorialize the event.

wind.

"I

came here tonight because of my

love for the country," Michael "I've always

had

Long said.

a lot of pride, but seeing

everyone's faces tonight inspired me."

Before any speaker rose to the podium

thought there were maybe a couple

hundred people," Mary Bossong

are here to

moving

or class schedules. However, the

moment

show they

to see so

truly

made the walk

through the flagpoles at the International Plaza, to gather near

members of Phi

Colden Pond. As

Mu

Alpha Sinfonia

performed the "Star Spangled Banner,"

silence prevailed. shifting,

was

Over a thousand people, still clutching their melting candles,

a voice crackled over the loudspeaker,

No

care.' It

many people here."

breaking through the crisp night

air,

said.

"Then when we started walking I thought, 'Oh my God, all these people

social gathering. People in small groups

than their daily events, weekend plans

cupped their candles,

"When we were gathered at the tower, 1

the atmosphere was similar to any other

conversed about nothing more prophetic

no movements and no

noise occurred for a

moment. Only the

shuffling of students trying to catch a

members of the crowd

"It unified us as

Kelly

down

much emotion

the sidewalk broke the silence.

hesitantly added

their voices to the hamionies.

glimpse of the American flag proceeding

Following the flag presentation,

Hucke

said.

everyone joined

in,"

"You could hear so

in their voices."

Softly singing the Lord's Prayer as the

Mu

Provost Taylor Barnes attempted to

crowd dispersed, members of Phi

express the day's meaning.

Alpha Sinfonia hugged each other

"No words can describe the insane acts we witnessed," Barnes said. "As we gather

warmly; a few wiped away

we is

are tragically

not

symbol of freedom,

to me," Chris

so powerfril."

Campus

Ministry Marjean Ehlers addressed onlookers gathered to remember the 1

1

ceremony began

,

2001

.

The candlelight

after the final speaker

Student Senate President Kara Karssen k?ft

Shobe said. "The words are

According to Shobe, the gathering at

free."

Barnes and the Director of

events of Sept.

tears.

"The Lord's Prayer is always so moving

reminded that freedom

at our Bell Tower, a

FPATIK^rS

With

voices rose together, creating a dull roar.

Bell

m'\

^

Lfi

the podiiun.

tu

the candlelight sufficiently "It's

a

vigil

was not enough tOa

memorialize the event.

start.

1

think

it's

fl

sad to see thar-

we couldn't come together like this before the terrorist attacks," Shobe

said.

"We

need to keep doing it, remembering those

who died and showing our pride."

9


1

^^

As WE GATHER AT OUR BELI Tower, a symbol of freedom. we are tragically reminded

that freedom

is

not

free.

55

:TAYI()k BaR".(S

A poem (

lell

111

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iloruiu (ilow-rv t^HHi^hi\

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our

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who

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help but

inipuiitcJ

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In rrn»rmbranc« of Sept. II. 2001 Burnc** Cochrinc pin* j nuinonal to the tjhrit jroutul the Ikll Io\Mr Stixlnitv thnnij^Hit tJx" tLi\ kit

MfCzi, jriry «kI jmica Lucz fcachcr

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IVwidwith '*thki>t\aiKlii*iiiinmif\ itKit»hm The jmlk-Iif^tit wjik hcy^Au jriHUKt the IW-ll r«»wrT and

I

SEPTEMBER

1

IS


Student MUSICIANS lY

A

Rocking

/vvaryville's

MUaC

SCENE

Bands uke Prank Monkey, Mile 29 and Ethos perform at area venues; each fill a niche and satisfy the musical hunger of students.

w W

hei

hether it was writing lyrics to free one's mind, taking frustrations out on an innocent drumhead or

last to graduate in May 2004; then, the sky was the limit. Hutchins said they wanted to take Prank Monkey as far as

jumping in a mosh pit to release built-up energy, music has long been an outlet for students.

they could, preferably in California.

Students took advantage of Maryville's various genres

jam bands, techno and more supplied opportunity for people to find their niche. Prank Monkey, Mile 29 and Ethos were three of a handful of bands who entertained crowds in and around the area. The members of each band were dedicated to each other and improving music in Maryville and surrounding areas.

"We just want necessarily

The

to feed their musical hunger. Punk,

"It's

bassist

Rob Eischen

said.

Eischen, along with two others, improved the situation

by creating a pop-punk band.

"Man, my

balls are sweaty;

Hey, check out our kick-ass web lead singer

and

guitarist

1

need some Gold Bond prankmonkey.com!"

site at

of Prank

Monkey came from

the combined

Green Day, Incubus, Blink 182, MxPx and and drummer Brian Jewell used these influences to form "new punk," a term they used to influences of

others. Hutchins, Eischen

describe their fast-paced, punk- influenced songs about

Prank Monkey formed

girls.

September 2001 and played 30-plus shows within the year. Maryville appearances included The Pub, The Palms, Molly's and the Hole-lnOne Ind{K>r Miniature Golf Course. The band branched out of Maryville to larger cities in the Midwest including Dcs Moines, Iowa; Omaha, Neb; St. Joseph and Lawrence, in

Kan.

Their fan base grew outside of the United States as well. "We even have fans in Europe who sign our web site guestbook saying they loved the music they downloaded off our site," Hutchins said. Jewell said the real turning point for the band occurred

when they played five shows and started to They hoped to form a bigger fan base members graduated. Hutchins planned to be the 2002,

earn real followers. after all

explode

future of the

band

—we don't

like Blink," Jewell said.

after college

was up to

fate.

that in order to succeed they would have

"We would kill each other on a tour bus," Eischen said. "At times we act like a bunch of 40-year-old women going through menopause, bitching at each other." Despite the occasional bickering,

all

members

felt

they

had the musical skills and friendship to achieve their goals. "What makes Prank Monkey different from other bands is that we have energy, crowd interaction, experience and dedication," Jewell said.

"We

are tight as a

band and

as a

whole."

Prank Monkey's look was also unique, compared to other

and Hutchins could be spotted from mohawks. They changed hair color weekly, encompassing every shade in the color wheel. They accesorized thrift store apparel and the occasional leather jacket with an array of jewelry and piercings. Along with a punk look, the band's name made them stand out. Hutchins said the idea came from the "Simpsons" episode where Homer was dressed as a panda and his boss, local bands. Jewell

The sound

in April

to

to withstand the occasional verbal fight.

Jonathan Hutchins screamed, while

onstage.

to be able to support ourselves

Members thought

(Maryville) the musical black hole of the universe,"

Prank Monkey

have

afar by colorful

Mr. Burns said,

'I

will

now call you my

little

prank monkey.'

Another Northwest-founded group with a unique style and name was Mile 29. The band said their name was more than just a name it took on a life meaning. "It comes from a mile marker on 1-29," Bass guitarist

Brent Steffens said. "There are so

many

mile markers, like

You go from mile marker to mile marker every Everyone is going to pass the one marker." in

life.

Mile to

29's

day.

music was the true passion of the five guys trying

make it in Maryville. "Up until the last few years, the music scene really sucked

in Maryville," saxophoni.st

Jason Paiva said.

# Com inued page 19

761

FEATURES


yp^^^_

\\

^4.

'4^ .

'im-^.Ar. Prank Monkey performs their "new punk" The hand entertained patrons

niu4U' it Molly't

nAice

Pmk Monkey dmrnmcr, the

>.-v-ii^ult

ui

>iTiahj.

(

u) a

month.

;Wk*c

fry

SUtt

f-ryt

Brwn Jewell ikmt

(kinng a pcrttmnam c

Neh The hand

J

Jt

Fmitan Smrt

futked thru r\|uipnirnl

hvd fApk *cr to make the drT\r f^» ^ SUk Hyr

Prank Monkey lead vocaliti Jon Hulrhint and bau pl«y*r Rob Eitcben perfc»mi at Far nam Street in t>maha.

Neb

i^Tf M* th*"*"* a >Tar /**«•

y \Un ftp

Phe hand plnrtJ

fcfc?j!i:»;ja :

n


Mile 29 performs at a concert outside the Delta Chi house to benefit victims of testicular cancer. The Oct. 4 performance was moved to the Palm's after noise complamts. photo hy Man Frye

Mile 29

drummer Brent Vogt plays durmg a

performance Oct. 4

29 practiced

at least

performances,

at the Delta Chi house. Mile once per week to prepare for

phoio hy

Man

Iryr

Prank Money drummer Brian Jewell accompanies

bass

pbycr l<ob Hischen. The band

occasionally pcrfonncd at the VAii\\. pftaiohY Mail l^ryr

1ÂŁ:


'

tn

f

^

'

'

,

"

-'-â&#x20AC;˘J*

"

'^4 '.

iTlrtlgart

ROCKINO AAARYVILLE'S

MUSIC SCENE # i ontmued fntm fwnr

If*

Paiva and Steffens, Chad Gamhlin, lead ami rhythm Kuiiar

Brent Vtigt, drums; and Jimmy Tliompvin, and haclcKtound viK'aU made up the hand. "There are not very many hands like us, with actHulics, sax and only our own music," Gamhhn said. .ind lead viK'als;

lead Kuitar

Mile

29's style

was similar to thai of I")avc Matthews Band,

Jack Johnson and John Mayer. "1

know what you would

don't

"We

said.

are Mile

29 music.

call

our music," Stcffcas

We are taking a different path

to get our name out there hy having mostly original vmgs and doing few covers. It's a tough way to do it hccausc there's no crowd involvement hecause they don't know our songs."

The hand

said they

hoped

their unique style

would take

them

to the top or at least out of Maryville. After the school

year,

most memhers would part ways hecause of graduation.

However, Gamhlin knew that he would always he doing music. "Pretty all

your

much

life,

it's

like,

do you want

to

for somebody Gamhlin said.

work

or do what you want to do.'"

Short-term goals included progressing with their music

and getting

their

name out

Steffcns said

to the public.

another goal was to get big enough to make Paiva stop playing in various

"He

is

other bands in Maryville.

him in all Another band

"We

goal

is

They

own.

"The kind of music we play

Our musical

are trying

that Paiva played with was Ethos.

a musical genre all their

Ki:ilarmut said.

we

the way," Steffens said.

to reel

had

the best band, hut

just trying to find

is

undefined,"

drummer John

purptisely play outside of any genre.

to stretch listeners' ears to music they

normally wouldn't." Paiva and Ki:ilarmut joined lead guitarist and vtKalist

Buhman and keyKiardist Jeremy Meyer to form Ethos in August 2002. A one-time gig at The Pub in mid-September turned into a biweekly show. Ki:ilarmut said they got really good reception, which came .Austin Howell, bassist Craig

as a surprise.

Their goal was to have audiences appreciate a

An

example of this complex jaz: piece. Band influences included Medeski Martin WtxxJ, Herbie HanctKk and other funkAvip sounds. 124 Music's Vlike Smith made the funk/pop sound that wider spectrum of musical

style

^^ It s

good to

was the adaptation

filtered

have a

through

Smith was linked

a

possibilities.

i>f simple

The Pub

blues tune into a

every other Thursday possible.

to success of all the bands in Maryville;

he

supplied the bands with various performance equipment.

local resource; otherwise we would be headed out of town.

"It's gtxxi to have a local resource; otherwi.sc we would be headed out of town," Ki:ilarmut said. Thtwnpson, of Mile 29 also appreciated the support of 24. "Even more so than the Kxal bars, though a huge help, 124 has been the most avid supporter of Uxal bands." 1

Thompstin

55 John

said.

Smith, the Kx:al venues and the bands

Kizilarmut

to bring musical aid to Maryville.

No

all

came together

matter

how much

success these bands reached, they had the opportunity to say they helped turn MaryNillc's musical black hole to a shade

of gray.

|:H


PÂťtt Stewart purchases a 'Northwest mom' mug. Patt. the mother of Bearcat wide receiver Mark Stewart, came to watch the Bearcats take on

Missouri-RoUa.

pholo by Matt l-ryr

The Hamiltons

are honored as the 2002 Northwest Family of the Year. The family received a SSOf) scholarship to apply towards tuition and fees, pholo hy

20:

Man Iryr

Events


Family Day

Honoring bonds with

n

i

families One Saturday offers Students an opportunity to slxire college life

with those closest to them. fci

N

orthwest

students, enjoy iooA

Family Day

House with

and watch Bearcat

festivities

hegan

at

the

ftxtthall.

Alumni

Kt R -

i

\A'

1

i

L

A

i

M -,

Their three daughters Katie, Natalie and Megan

and friends

families

descended upiin campus to spend time with

V

attended Northwest. According to Katie, the submitted the application to show

girls

how much they

appreciated their parents' hard work.

a tailgate party before the Bearcats

"I

win

didn't think we'd

submitted

played the Misstnin-Rolla Miners. Petiple loaded

just

plates with chips, cookies, vegetables and

parents."

it

as a

really,"

Katie said.

good thing to do

"Wc

for our

barbecue sauce-drenched hamburgers while

After the award presentation, the Hamiltons

supplemented the background

joined hundreds of other families and students at

friendly chatter

Rickenbrixle Stadium to cheer for the Bearcats.

music. Tailgaters snacked while listening to vocal

and

Greeting fans with smiles, Bearcat Sweethearts

instrumental performances by alumni Maria

sold buttons with player's photos

Newquist and Stiren Wohlers.

shaped Mardi Gras heads before kick

"I

of

love

my

coming back

friends

here," Newquist said. "Lots

and family

of all ages

filled

and football People

off.

the stadium as parents found seats

next to students.

are here."

University Prov4>st Taylor Barnes,

Campus

Dining Director Barry Beacom, President

i>f

the

National Alumni .Association Bixird of Directors

"It

was

coi>l to

take

them

to a fot)tball

and show them what college

game

life is like,"

said

Jennifer Winkler.

John McCune and Alumni Relations Director

After the game

many

families took the

Michael Johnson presented the Family of the Year

opportunity to spend time together.

Award

"My brt>ther went out to the bars, but stayed home and watched movies with my parents," Daniel Mack said.

to the Hamilions. Barbara and

Mark

graduated from Northwest before moving to Winfield, Iowa. "It's

always neat to

1

come back home and

participate in these festivities

and

school has going on," Mark said.

see

what the

After a day of activities, families packed their cars, leaving

at

with a better of undentanding of life

Norlltweil

perfomu f-iinily

Mouse

â&#x20AC;˘lumnut Sorrn Wohlcri n th<r Aiuinni Mouse

tor the crtnvd

Djv tjilgitm KJthcrcd kir i prrgallx-

it

the

Alumni

Kirhevue and cntenainmeni

Northwest.

^i WAS COOL TO TAKE THEM TO A FOOTBALL GAME AND SHOW THEM WHAT COLLEGE LIFE IS LIKE.

IT

55 :JENNIFEM WINKLER

Family Day \:21


BY MeussaGaijtz

ID,ivots

in the floor provided a

first

bullet struck Father Norbert's sciatic

constant reminder of the day bullets

nerve to the

showered

next hour, he would lose a

the

peaceful

of

halls

left

The next two

Conception Abbey.

At 8:40 a.m. on June

10,

Lloyd Jeffress,

of Kearney, Mo., opened fire on the

monks

Kenneth

in his side

my

"Part of

Mo. Before the gunman turned the gun on

1

and the Rev. Norbert Schappler were injured. Brother

Damian Larson and the

first

"I

was

in

my

shot go,"

office

when

heard the

Abbot Gregory Polan

honestly thought that a

fallen out

1

of blood.

shin,

meanwhile

kept

were

said. "1

my hand down

falling out,"

never looked, but

there."

Leaving a trail of blood. Father Norbert drug himself 30 feet to a phone.

After

attempting to reach the business office

Rev. Philip Schuster were killed. "I

and

insides

Father Kenneth

Kenneth Reichert

liter

bullets struck Father

shattering his finger.

of Conception Abbey, in Conception,

himself, the Rev.

Over the

of his groin.

said.

window had

and infirmary on campus to warn he dialed 911

The Rev.

Patrick Caveglia was the

to encounter the body of Brother

and crashed."

others,

for rescue. first

Damian.

Unknown to Abbot Gregory, the quiet

After pausing to make the sign of the cross

abbey was transformed by a national news

over him, Father Patrick proceeded

Abbey

through the abbey and found other

event. According to Conception

Director of Communications

Dan

Madden, the following events unfurled walked into Conception Abbey

carrying two boxes containing a caliber first

Jeffress

had continued

his rampage,

attempting to gain access to an office with

that day: Jeffress

injured monks.

Ruger and a

MAK-90

rifle.

hallway where he shot and killed Father

first

of

his victims. Brother

Damian was the first

of four shot and the

first

Philip with

two more

down the hallway. After

bullets.

The shooting spree came the Basilica of Conception Jeffress

to

an end

in

Abbey where

shot and killed himself, leaving his

body slumped over

slain.

Leaving Brother Damian behind, Jeffress continued

door

The

monastery when Jeffress walked to the end

of two

inside. After finding the

he continued walking down the

locked,

shots pierced the hallways of the

of the glass hallway and found the

two monks

.22-

Within the

first

in a

back pew.

hour of the

shtxitings,

more than 80 policeman responded

to the

hearing shots, curiosity led Father

scene. Reporters, photographers and

Kenneth, who was posting information

in

videographers descended upon the area;

who

news of the shootings would receive

the coffee room, and Father Norbert, wa.s

cleaning in the annex after breakfast,

directly to the

Another

three

national coverage. Press conferences

gunman. shots

echoed

throughout the halls of the abbey.

The

were held throughout

the day while officers assessed the

morning events.

â&#x20AC;˘ Continued page 24

221

Ffaturfs

^^


Hcllcopcen and ambulcncet wail lot near I oiurjHion Abbey rcjily to

m

i

^nw

irin%pt>rt

(hiwrinjurrdiiMhc UHHHingJuiK* 1" Mclui>p«cr\ hovered overheiti vejrt-htntt the ^rouiu) e»tr

^Bv^lj^


LENCIEt lEWED â&#x20AC;˘

"There

is

a lot of blood; there are

victims lying out on the main

Highway

floor," Missouri State

Patrol Sgt. Sheldon Lyon said at a

Continued from page 22

community of Conception and the monks of Conception Abbey were closely interwoven.

"Many

of the people

press conference. "1 have never

us are part of this

seen anything like

Abbot Gregory

before.

it

shocking to see not only

who

but someone

It is

a person,

a priest- very

is

disturbing."

clear by their outpouring of

for

concern

that they are going to walk this difficult

Helicopters waited on a grass lot

said.

who work

community," "And it's very

On

path with us."

the evening of the shooting,

Chuck Tobin

near the abbey while others

the Rev.

hovered overhead; some primed for

prayer service at St. Gregory's

medical transport, others sought

Catholic Church. The families of

gunmen. Fear

possible

community

safety of the

questions were

Unsure Basilica,

for the

Father Philip and Brother

spread, as

were among 350 attendees.

unanswered.

left

Jeffress,

if

dead

in the

was the alleged shooter,

authorities advised the

community

"Stay in homes, don't be out walkin' around,"

know

if

we

Lyon

said.

"We

got this guy or

According to Tobin, the service was intended to center the

community during confusion,

suspicious package was found

in Jeffress' vehicle.

was called

grief,

searching and wondering.

authorities were unable to ease the

minds

of

A bomb

squad

in to investigate

and

found nothing dangerous.

community.

the

Investigations closed in August with

no answers

not."

A

Damian

After weeks of investigation,

to be careful.

don't

officiated a

fire

as to

why

opened

Jeffress

on the abbey.

Four months after the shootings.

Northwest

officials

planted

near the Peace Pavilion

at

a tree

Colden

Monks

recess nut ot C'oiKcptioii Ablx'v iliinng

tlio luiif 14 (untTiil.'T

"I

keep asking myself these

questions:

Why? How

did this

Pond out of respect for the monks. Through community assistance and

pcrtoniH'ii in C loiiccption, C

tlu-

hf

rite ofC'liristi.in biiruil \\ms

li.isilic.i

ot the InHii.K~iil.itlon

AHKvptioii Ahln-y tor

tiu'

Si'huslcr -ind Hrothcr D.inii.iii. t'liowhy

happen? It's just such Abbot Gregory said. "It

a

shock,"

is still

very

unreal for me. These kind of things

don't happen in

Benedictine

faith the

monks

Abbey found ways "For

1

of

500 years Benedictines have in that spirit,

Mourners bear

school and offices in Maryville

and that won't change," Abbot Gregory said. "Monasteries are places of peace, and we will work to

were on precautionary lock-down

restore the spirit of peace that's

St.

Gregory's Catholic Church

throughout

2k

the

ordeal.

The

tin- t.iskct

l.loyil |^t(r^^s. Jinic1

).iini.in L.(r\ÂŤni .ukI

c.irrii'il

monasteries."

I'hillip

Conception

to persevere.

been welcoming people

Kcv.

.\l,li^^.i <.'.i/if.-

III,

I

ot j

Ik-

the Kc\.

monk

liodu's

IMiiIlip

of

shot

l>y

Itrotlu-r

Schuster were

to the tcint-tcry .ut4iss the street troni

t!oiueption Ahhey.

;>Jiw..

/-j'

.\t.7i>,.i t.'.i/pr-

here."

FEATURES

^^^^


i

I

>nr iiKmk lookt K*. i

thr jiitw 14 tuttcr^l

tlM><hcr Hjoiiitt

Vhu^frr

jihl

t

it

the |in vrwh tut

URDERED Iiih-

4ttcr

lkis\l tctfrnt thiX aihI kiDc\t

jfMin jiul the

Kcv Philhp KrKhcn

u^rrv) the Kr\ Knuicth

Brother Damian Larson,

3

March

TTSTT^ST^^ll^SS^f^S

Io.

I

O.S.B.

or- June 10/2002

Monk," Larstin gave weekly weather reports that on the Conception AhK-y website. He also worked as a groundskeeper and tended to the abbey's orchards.

Deemed

were

The

the "Weather

ptisted

Rev. Phiup Schuster. O.S.B. August

The

25. 1917-JuneIO.

Rev. Philhp Schuster acted as retreat master for

by the

Abby Center for

Prayer and Ministry.

He

many events

2002 offered

also authored the

See/cmg God's Will Througk Faith and

Kx)k

Hope and Charily

URED The Shot

Hex;

in the

Kenneth Rbchert,

abdomen, the Rev. Kenneth Reichcrt was

O.S.B.

fltiwn to

Heartland Regional Medical Center by LifeNet medical helicopter. After being released Reichert continued his work as Pryor.

October he was able to walk without a limp

The The

Re\'.

Norbert

m MarvAillc, Mo. He »t»

still

Qiunty ambulanc*

in the

inhnairs

As of

using a brace.

Schappuer, QS.B.

Rev. N»irbcrt Schapplcr w:as taken hy a Ncxlaway

to Si. FiaiKis Hispiral

if

is

ot

October; doctor's antK:i[Xitcd pcnruincnt ncr\e dimiige


Show

Variety

kicks weekend, events filled

with patriotism VARIETY Homecoming

activities

SHOW BY BFTSY LEE

brought alumni and students together for a

American

celebration of Northwest and

Pride.

Reflecting the theme," American Pride, Northwest Style," the Variety

Show

kicked off Homecoming weekend. component of the Variety Show was the crowning of the Homecoming King and Queen. Crowned Oct. 30, Kelli Rowlands and

A

Logan Lightfoot were both sponsored by Delta Zeta. The Variety Show acts incorporated the theme by playing off aspects of American culture. "Live from the 'Ville," performed by Sigma Sigma Sigma and Sigma Phi Epsilon,

"We

satirized

United States "TV"

American

tried to incorporate

culture.

culture into our act," Lauralyn

Sullivan said. "'Saturday Night Live' and 'Wayne's World' are part of

American

culture."

Individuals and groups also had the opportunity to perform songs in American Ben Fuentes, Jara Sunderman, Beau Heyen,

prevalent culture.

Craig

Buhman and Jeremy

Meyer-performed individually.

Show

final

success

The

Variety

product was a

among audience

members. "I

expected

Piarson said.

skits," "1 just

Andy didn't

expect them to be this fiinny."

Comedy was

the main

focus of the Variety Show.

Between

skits

and vocal

presentations, the Masters' of

Ceremony, Rtxldy

Jasa, Jeff

Harp, Kathy Hundley and

Melanie

Siedschlag

performed sketches to keep

members

audience

entertained. IXiring the Nov.

Homecoming Queen Kelli Rowland receives i

1

performance of the show,

Harp had

to

performance

for being, as

stated

the

a

hug

trnin (!.iroliiic CIross,

dnubic tiujor

cconiinilCS. photo hy Mott

Bobby Bearcat waves

the- Aiiicricjti (lag ss'hilc

orhcr Sigina Alpha Iota

the speculation that Harp was

national anthem.

The

members perform

the

of their

was

title

"Ainenian Pride Pageant."

Events

business jiui

he

on stage, "overly cra.ss."

wa.s hearsay.

in

l-ryr

Siedschlag said she thought

drunk

26:

leave

t(Âťngr.ituljti>ry

Kiiwbnd wa%

pJirtpfty 7rr?yÂť(

slclt

IjuJ^y


^EBSEX-ll


Hg^(M¥3s An

internatioanal look at Northwest pride OF rmTllRFS

FFSTIVAI Snapping

in the brisk northeast wind,

flags flew at half-mast,

and

Nov.

at the International Plaza

to celebrate the fifth-annual Flag Raising Day.

Preceding the flag raising ceremony, the eighth-

annual Festival of Cultures featured tables of Various cultural groups displayed trinkets, food and

At one table, students from Mexico marketed homemade chips and other items available for purchase.

Authentic wares from Korea covered another

bought a fan from Korea

Wood

said.

"You

as a souvenir,"

Angela

just don't see these things in

America."

"Each

flag

is

unique,"

you

see your flag

White said. "And when you

feel like you're

home."

Many students planning to raise their flags echoed "This

is

so special because

it's

way to feel close

a

to

my country when though I am here," Nadin Novoa, from Ecuador,

said.

Student Monica Knapp took the podium

after

alphabetical order.

When

in

representatives heard the

announcement, they hoisted

up gleaming

their flag

silver poles.

Multicultural tables were set up from

noon

to

4

p.m. along the sidewalk adjacent to the International Plaza.

international students a place of their own.

White, announcing each 55 countries represented

table. "I

to the

White's statements.

multicultural displays.

salsa.

Hubbard turned the microphone over

founder of the International Plaza, Harvey White. The goal of the plaza, according to White, was to give

celebration.

Crowds gathered 1

two rows of

ready to he raised with pride

ry rft.;y iff

Representing his

home country of Kenya, John

"I felt like crying,"

Laeyoung Kim, from Korea, said.

"I'm so glad to be raising my country's flag in America."

Shouts, clapping and laughter sounded throughout

Novoa

Kasoa showed students a sandal made from cut-up

the plaza as each flag was raised into the

tires.

couldn't help but express her happiness while she used

"Feel, they are comfortable,"

Kasoa

the thin rope to pull her flag up the pole.

said.

The Alliance of Black Collegians set up a table for face paintings. Bume'a Gnhrine painted the Indian flag

on Akshay Kamath's check

before he raised his

and black colors turban Kamath wore to

painting's orange

complemented the vibrant

symbolize pride in his country.

Kamath because his

"We were shouting 'Ecuador... while

we

raised our flag,"

Novoa

Ecuador... Ecuador' said.

Amnesty

After the flag raising concluded.

Amnesty

International caught Hubbard's attention.

country's flag.

The

air.

said the day

home

city,

was very special

Bombay, was

for

him

also celebrating

International attended

Tibetan

was not

flag

to protest the fact that the

raised in

honor of a Tibetan

student. According to Jed Murr, President

Hubbard

from the group and gave

a verbal

took a

flier

commitment

that the flag

would be

raised in the

a festival of flags.

future.

"We are a very diverse people, and it's a symbol of how we can coexist together," Kamath said.

representatives, international students returned to

While crowds mingled through the

tables,

music

from different ethnic backgrounds blared through loudspeakers centered at a ptxlium in front of the

Martindale Gymnasium.

When

the flag raising ceremony began at 2 p.m..

addressed onlookers before

intrixlucing University President l\'an L. Hubbard.

"TTie very fact that Northwest cares display ixir flags

makes

enough

to

us feel welcome," Nixla said.

Hubbard emphasized

spoke

with

Amnesty

their tables for the continuation of the Festival of

Cultures.

A

group from China played Mahjong, while

interested students tried to catch a glimpse of the

International Student Organization President

Mamiko Noda

Hubbard

While

that the International Plazii

was a symbol of Northwest's commitment to diversity.

"We want to remind everyone on this campus that wc are a multicultural communiry," I lubbard said. ." "We are a divctse aimmunity and we iire pn >ud of thit

colorfiil pieces.

"In

Hong Kong they play a

a week,"

lot,

three to four times

Shean Chan, from China,

play the whole night

TTie annual

Rag

if

said.

"TTicy will

they have time."

Raising and Festival of Cultures

gave international students an outlet to share their culture

and

patriotism.

"Raising

my

country's flag with

all

the other

countries hcre-it means integration, diversity," s;iid.

it

means

Gasim Ibrahimkhan, from Saudi Arabia

"We're bringing the world to them." Students, faculty and rominunity iiictnbcn

gather tor the rit'th-.iniiii.il rl.i(; R jisingt crcmuiiy in honor of Northwc\t\ intornjtiotui stmlciils. InlcriLKioiul suijcnts h.iJ lo c»>ntJir SlmltMit AlVjirv to rjiw thfir

2g:|

Events

IIjj;. /Jk-*.-

hy

Mmi

/

ij»


Jangyonx Park, LMryuung Kim Scyuung Park, from Korra waich iticcriijditiul xKiilrnu I

uikc

priiiunlv

India native Miirnc'j

(

'tintrvMljg

pjinimio C\Tn»

for

by

tiiiiiictl

While

IIjr\c\ Jiul |i»V<r

elic

i>ntriluttiitnt

t

hf Mjii

pk.'ir'

:.i.<

tit

ii..ia>

student* titled the K^r^

wrk<imtnii Kotnc, feaMinx

Oirntum ClamptM i>jt

tt)

been

^Iuk d^m-n

in

H«inwc4icninK. ^ Mnallcr ernup fratherrd in a warm,

itthnnc tiiii\hc%

painting oi hit

j

AlU "itjtc-painnnglxMith wiUltiic S (he gnmp nude %H frutn ihc I .

/Jh** hy KtJtt

t'tyr

H«iuic held (he (^tncake tred

»

»

Walk

Dsv tradtiKm.

'It

ttancd aKiut

ai(i\~

Dirrctdr Rf^Rrr C^^harlo'

uid

wich a briwij tmilc "^icnnine «aid to me, 'We th(<ukl Have »

midntcht pancake feed •.lixne

It

e*-ef

MtKe

'

I

wid.

jrMnkiwn jndjiacr. flm^kfMmhyt

and we've been

c(«4[ir^ up

4eNr4iivrm«n>vrar«acit Aeble^ivrn were aMunded^-er^iim n^ parKakrv c<«itaminc fried the aeble«kiver«

indentatuwn

man>

ti^

(he «atne ir^Kredtent^

in a rnurni

pan with

tii

NarKv

concave

givn

ytnt

an uppivTunity tu

without alcohol."

in the«e things

"

%ttident« filled

Ufc and to have

WTk:*xr>rd tnembert

wanted to partKipate

Roger

am

ar«d

(-tofkins taid. 'Plua,

NarK> civitinued

the U«( Mudent

"Sffitern^le

Samp Mhl TKi*

hm

left ((«

thirds there i*

Jitfrrrnt

and nther

in the akoht^-free e^-enr

dim't dnnk. arnJ the^e people are fun to

member Rebekah

at 1

*iay <iut

Amy FWming taid

The CJhrMian CZampu^ M<nne student!) wha> "I

Nancr Charle> began

u m> much ch(4e«ten>l

their platen artd «ettled into ciimftvtable c«miche« to wKialia-

"

In adiitMwi tn pancake*.

ijhvCfwwibffd pnpMwa pHKilbn ji the C IhrMun Cjnifiut tf<iuv. N<n I. Fnendi gjlhcred to cntivme fwcT J Im iiighl bieakte n4 pancakci.

'Ytiu're cnzv.'

have them vcr\ t»tlcn,"NarKV mkI "Tho're made

with buttermilk, ht there

"It

vran

ftmir

BY BETSY LEE

While Ro«er attd Nancy wt^ked at the gnddle.

puncakei and achlc^ivm.

twt

"YiHi can't

»»!'

t tyr

Akihay Kantath patirnlly waits

MIDNIGHT PANCAKE FEED X

t

luiivc llagt

tlicir

he liitrriutunul IMi/j wj% Luiuiriit Tnt in

l''''K,

himiif

antl oilu

i''

wr

hang tmt with."

all like

to tat."

to fry foxl tatr into the nighi.

home

tn^hmg to dii but drmk." Artdirw

"

Flag Raising :2'?


Organization relays message with controversial jalopy PARADE A

controversy brewed amidst the

colorful floats

the

BY BETSY LEE

Homecoming

Amnesty

people were against the small group.

and animated clowns of

"You could

the negativity

feel

seething forth," Tady said.

parade.

International created a

Amnesty members dealt with

stir

reactions throughout the entire parade

intended to raise awareness about

route.

United States human

rights offenses.

people," Jed

Murr

awareness to the

said.

Amnesty planned trimester.

It

country-things are very patriotic right

now," Lori O'Neal said. "But it's America, and they have the right to say what they want." Other students were amazed that Amnesty entered the jalopy in a parade

"We're bringing

issues."

the parade at the

contrary to the whole feel of the

"It's

a great forum to help educate

"It's

to enter a float in

beginning of the

wasn't until a week before

the parade that a focus was determined.

with a patriotic theme.

"With the theme 'American Pride, Northwest Style,' we wanted to take a

"I'm really surprised they put something

different approach," President

Ben Rogers

said.

like that in."

is

The

negative initial response was

tempered with more positive reactions

Posters quoting facts, like 'The U.S. is

really brave,"

"It's

Megan

Tady said. "To have pride in America to have pride in its policies."

received after the parade,

one of only four nations that executes

"We heard

Murr

said.

later that professors

Murr said.

children,' covered the truck used in the

received positive comments,"

Amnesty members with bound hands walked behind the vehicle, wearing black hoods covering their

Along with Amnesty's float, 157 entries progressed down Fourth Street. The winning float by Phi Sigma Kappa

parade.

faces.

The

figures symbolized prisoners

"We're in

figures to impart their message,

"I'd rather

Amnesty members walked with the float,

handing out

human "I

fliers

with additional

rights information.

had someone take

a

flier,

crumple

in his

it

parts.

to win,"

Oz Sheeley said.

do too much than not

enough."

As

the parade

streets,

hand in front of my face and throw it on the ground," Tady said. According to Tady, the parade was a daunting experience because mobs of it

moving

and

In addition to using posters

hooded

and Sigma Sigma Sigma featured a battle ship with

held unlawfully in the United States.

wound through

.Overall Best

Clown

HIGHLY COMPETITIVE PHI SIGMA KAPPA -

beer bottles lined the

streets.

"Festivities lasted a little long last

night, so there hasn't been any sleep yet,"

Rogers

said. "But, so far,

the parade

has been awesome."

'.Overall Best Parade PHI SIGMA KAPPA & PHI MU

COMPETITIVE SIGMA SOCIETY -

'.Jalopies

'.Overall Best Float SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA & PHI SIGMA KAPPA -.Overall PHIMU

Best Mini-float

Events

lit

the

people clutching coffee mugs and

HOMECOMING WINNERS

30:

various

along the parade route with a jalopy

-RESIDENCE HALL

ASSOCIATION


Aninctly Intrrnacional tnritibcrt arl jt i>( ivMiuictKc trjilin|(ijjli)|>) Sipn on

priMMtci^

fhcir bjck\ rcjti "tortured." "iXC* Utcd " pfc** hf \Utt hryr

Amy

"diuppcirrd"

Carr and Megan Tady make

jikI

titul

idjustiiiciitN to t^H- AintK-\(y Inirriuiioiul jjli>py

1 he tirgiiiizjtion u\cd the parjdc to ciinvry thjt pjft

.

J-

of being jn AineruMn

i\

\uppi)rting huiiun


Bearcats dominate defense

come out

to

Mules

victorious over FOOTRAI fiAME I

Steam rose from football players' heads as sweat met cold air accompanied in the stands by breath puffs from cheering fans bundled in coats and hats. ,

Tension boiled from the a

first

kick-off throughout

scoreless halftime, released finally by the

that, they weren't

The

The Homecoming game with Central

Missouri

"It's

of the game. Stewart

Northwest surge continued

caught quarterback John the goal line for a

/Âť/i<iro

hy Mitt hryi-

goal with 3:18

left in

Ibarra

a field

the third quarter.

The

in the fourth quarter

McMenamin connected

as

with wide receiver

and on the hills around Rickenbrode Stadium expecting an offensive showcase of Northwest's

could have secured the game in the fourth quarter,

Conference championship.

fourth quarter. Ibarra missed two field goals that

Damienn Chumley's two

passing

game and Central's rushing game. Instead, game turned out to be a defensive duel. The Bearcat offense struggled early in the first quarter. A 36-yard drive ended with CMSU

but strong safety

the

interceptions with 5:41 and 3:48

blocking kicker Eddie Ibarra's field-goal attempt

defensive efforts, which included seven tackles,

8:

1

6

left.

Later in the

first,

a fumble by wide

Otte was followed by an interception by linebacker John Edmonds to give

receiver John

Northwest the

CMSU

ball

and

5-yard line.

a

chance to score

The Mules

stuffed

Chumley earned

the

Don

means

"It

mean

as

a lot, but the

much

as the win,"

appreciate the award, and

McMenamin's

recognizing that

first

time, and then

we

stopped and turned the ball over," Herring said of the

first

twice

quarter effort.

down

in the

"We

end zone.

should have scored

was

It

The The

I

I

award

itself

Chumley

said.

doesn't

"But

I

appreciate everybody

played a pretty good

defense that allowed

The

total offense.

game out

many

integral parts of a

CMSU

only 275 yards in

of

team's previous average had

been 446.9 yards-per-game.

"We knew

just mis.sed

that

we were

playing the best offense

and we knew we had to come up Edmonds said. "We just relied on each other

in the nation,

opportunities." struggle continued in the second quarter

as Ibarra missed

The

here today."

Chumley was one driving the

Black Award for his

Valuable Player.

running back Mitch Herring and quarterback John

"We were

game

award traditionally honors the Homecoming Most

both

rush attempts at the 1-yard line to

crucial

the

two interceptions and two pass breakups.

the

at

left in

preserved a 10-7 win.

quarter.

another

field goal

from 32 yards.

defense, however, stepped up as cornerback

CMSU

big," all

week and had

faith in

each other that we'd get

the job done."

pass in

After the hard-fought contest, the Bearcats

Northwest's end zone to halt the Mules' scoring praised his

honored 4 seniors who had played their last game of the regular season in Rickenbrode Stadium. A

team's extraordinary defensive effort throughout

few tears may have been shed, but they

the game.

disappeared amidst the sweat of a

"They |CMSU| only threatened to score twice the whole ballgamc," Tjeerdsma said. "Other than

battle that fueled hopes for a

Darryl Ridley intercepted a

attempt.

Events

"We came

Fans huddled in the stands, along the fences

get the ball back at the beginning of the second

321

said.

Mark Stewart for a 5 1 -yard touchdown reception. The Mules immediately responded with a touchdown to make it 10-7 with 10:23 left in the

with

McMenamin's pass and raced to SI -yard touchdown reception.

in

and we didn't even

With the crowd growing in intensity, on the board with

No. 1 regional ranking, increase the chances of home-field advantage in the playoffs and continue toward an

tiic

touchdown

Northwest fans

find anything."

finally put the Bearcats

MIAA

Steu'art celebrates tn

all

awesome," Darby Caton

two undefeated powerhouses. Nationally-ranked No. 4 Northwest (8-0) took on No. 6 Central (80) with the intent to steal Central's

Mark

both teams scoreless

left

keeping almost

their seats despite the bitter cold.

State University was an intense battle between

receiver

defensive battle

at halftime,

at halftime looking for a seat,

the stadium in triumph.

Wide

even close enough to think of

a field goal."

endurance of a team and their fans driven to leave

cndziJlic after scoring Northwest's only

ry a ÂŤ;hi ff fpwim

Head coach McI Tjeerdsma

1

season.

Homecoming

championship

-fi:': *-


Hrad coach Mel Tjecrdtnia congratuUcet strong ufcrv'

Northwest

Damicnn C-humio'

\ictor>*.

foU*wAing the

crhumlo' earned the IX»n

UUck Awanl (iw hxs tJcfrnuvT t'»>ntnb*ition* in the homecomintc game, including rwo kev inten eptionv

Following

/A.*.- 1^

M^t

ftyr

victory over No. 6 Central

Miftftouri Slate Untvertity,

Tjeerdtma thanki I

head coach Mel

team

tor (heir ert*»rt

tcc'dmia ( haUcnged the pLnrrv to

uptonimg (

hi*

t»pp<»ncnt. Mi»*ouri

ftx u* <>n their

Weitern State

"oUcge rv.** *7 XUft hyr

Football

13^


1


CAMPU5 SAFETY BY

Arming

Ka

I

I

WaiuEki

the

OFFICERS THE MIDST OF CONIROXLRSY. CAMPUS SAFETY OFFICERS PATROL THE CAMPUS ARMED TO FULLY PROTECT STUDENTS.

\N

I

very morning, even before eating breakfast,

Campus

Safety officers

Ttx)Is like

gamed 10

mace, pepper

spray, batons, radios,

keys and medical gloves had always been a part uf the uniform.

The newest

was a Clock .40 caliber

addition to equipment

pistol.

Arming Campus Safety created a stir of ciwitroversy on campus. Some students opposed the motion for the simple reastm of geography. "It's

iKH necessary for <.>fficers in rural northwest

MisMxih to be armed." Sarah Zuerlin said. Other students disagreed with Zucrlin, feeling that safety should be a priority. "if it

it's

making

safer for us,"

it

safer for the officer,

Dam Zimmerman

it's

making

from 43 peer

and data collection

Research showed that officers

at

70 percent of

institutions similar to Northwest carried firearms.

safety to

have

Director of

Mid

all

100 percent required campas

p«>lice cenification.

Campus

Safety Clarence

Green

the officers were full-time commi.ssioned

at

Northwest have

never been high. Green said arming Campus

extended the department's

Safety

backup from Maryvillc Public

"You don't know what can happen," Green s;ud. "Nobody would have ever thought there would be a (shooting) at Conception Abbey. Having guns just makes us more prepared to rcsptind." According to Green, the protection came at no extra cost to the university or students. "We will actually save the university money in the long run," Green said. Experiscs,

amounting to $8,800 for the arms and

department's

reserves.

k

aim

dunnic

m

The

university saved

money because they did not have

to pay $20,000

armed officers tt) patrol tinttball games, a Mid- American Athletic AsstKiation to hire

requirement.

For Sgt.

Ray Ottman. carrying

have added to was worth it.

a pistol

may

his waistline, but the extra weight

"With the duties and requirements in the job we have, y»xj want to have all the tix)ls

ability to

available so you can better serve the students, faculty

we

and

staff at

Northwest," Ottman

are here to protect arul serve,

law-enforcement sense to

protect students.

il

called for

Safety.

description

police officers in the state of MisMxjri.

.Although crime statistics

first

a year

institutions.

Of those institutions,

enabled them to act to calls where shots may have been fired. E^fore they would have officers

when responding

ammunition, were covered through the

said.

The decisum to arm campus safety officers came after four years of research

Arming the

independently

pt)unds.

it

said. "If

made

got-nj

fully t«xil all officers."

tuiiuUcni

wwy it lnnidBTK>hr jtmcdLCxr^MtSviy gi

offiocn sua

lopnt j pMo>-4|uiincacioi»-ai]^ tni

Campus guns :?S


UWb DRAINED BY

1

QWtK

Si

A

S

f

Missouri budget

BATTLE RNANQAL wots IN STATE

AND

strain THt ECONOMY AND FORQ $284 Mil LION $18.9 MILLION IN UNIVERSITY BUDGET CUTS.

I n the Missouri budget battle, higher education was an easily defeated

"As a

opponent.

political pressure point in a (state) budget,

much political

as

strength, plus

new cuts could be

passed

to the students."

Statewide, higher education cuts amounted to $284 million.

filled

with one-year appointments instead of tenure

positions.

higher education was just lower on the list," Vice President of Finance Ray Courter said. "It doesn't have

on

were

To compensate. Northwest was

"We'll continue to meet with academic deans and department chairs and approach the problem as a family," Provost Taylor Barnes said.

The university took money from areas that were not provided for by the state to compensate for other cuts. The

auxiliary fund,

monies regulated

for the residence

Jones Student Union and dining services, was

forced to cut

halls, J.W.

$18.9 million from the university's $90 million annual

dealt cuts.

operations budget.

Forced to slash $160,000 from its operations, custodial and miscellaneous budget, Residential Life removed paper towels and trash cans from residence halls. This solution saved $10,000 and helped avoid a 12 percent room and board increase. "When Residential Life and Student Affairs came to

Traditionally, the state provided the university about

47 percent of its budget, including capital improvements. However, things changed in July 2001 when the cuts were first announced. The university started by giving up about $14.3 million, delaying renovations on the Olive DeLuce Fine Arts Building.

Cuts came again later that month, forcing Northwest to give up an additional $1.5 million. This time, the budget was cut by $561 ,471 and a $5 surcharge per credit hour was added. The university also pulled $445,186 from the reserve account. The reserve monies came from small amounts of money left over from previous years. Annually, this amounted to anywhere from $ 100,000 to $300,000. Over time, this account accumulated to about $3 million. Courter said a nonprofit organization such as a university should routinely have 5 to 10 percent of its budget in reserves.

'We can't wait for every dollar from the state or tuition

Residence Hall Association with this proposal, that the general reaction,

proposal did not

1

think

mine included, was that

make much

sense,"

RH A

this

President Paul

Klute said. "However, after hearing the reasoning behind

members of RH A warmed to the idea." worked with the administration to refine the

the situation, the

RHA

made the decision, the groups follow-up survey, which produced

proposal. After they

administered overwhelming

a

results

— 59 percent of the students living

in the affected halls felt that the

removal of trash

receptacles and paper towel dispensers was not an issue.

Twelve percent of the students felt it was an inconvenience; 29 percent felt the proposal was acceptable, but said they would like to have hand-

come in," he said. "If an elevator broke we wouldn't have any reserves to go to." However, when state cuts continued into January and

sanituer provided.

May

"That, combined with suppressed rot>m and K>ard rates,

to

2002, administrators basically drained the reserve

account. This made the beginning of the 2002-2003 school year grim campus- wide, including a $10 per credit

hour surcharge and several department mergers. Faculty faced a reduction in travel funds for educatioital confereiKes, and retirement faculty positions

"1

think

it

was very noble of the administration to ask

students for feedback before

makes the removal of

it

takes action," Klute said.

trash receptacles

and paper towel

dispensers a justified decision."

Dealing with the state budget battle, university attempted to minimize the effects on students and staff.

officials

Slair hiKhcr xlDralioii allocaliont fore* N'lrthwf^i to cut 4lmo«r tVt tniilion trom

opmnon« bu<l|tct. RrnonnofM wtr put on boM ind rvudrnce iulU implcmrnicd new

37


$TATE ARBORETUM B

Y

SAM

FARR

MUSEUM

LIVING

ENRICHES NORTHWEST'S TREE COLLECTION ROOTS ITSELF IN UNIVERSITY HISTORY WHILE PROVIDING A SERENE ATMOSPHERE.

L

eaves beautified campus with shades of gold and

providing students with a crunchy walk to

rust,

The Missouri State Arboretum took root in 1870, when Thomas Gaunt built the Gaunt House. He planted Austrian pines and according to the Tree Walk guide there is a possibility he

also planted pecans

and a black oak. Between 1915 and

1927, grounds superintendent J. R. Brink developed a nursery raising over 7,000 trees

A

and planted over 300

trees

on campus.

removal program for decayed and aging trees began in the

fall

of 1 998.

low and

The program protected students and mowers from trees

were brought to the pellet plant and made

and coiiling on campus. Future plans for the arboretum included expansion throughout Missouri. Affiliation sites would contain trees that could not grow in Northwest Missouri.

mulch or chips used

for heating

By 2002, approximately 1,300

trees

from 150 different

on campus. Two of the most valuable trees on campus were the black oaks west of the Gaunt Hou.se, highly regarded for their age, size and condition. Another species were planted

valued tree was a ginkgo by the Administration Building. President Uel

W. Lamkin brought the ginkgo

to

Northwest

from China.

The Arboretum had various uses at Northwest, one of which Lezlee Johnson, students did better in a

people had better moods and

less

Wime environment; The comfortable,

depression.

beautiful setting also helped with student recruitment.

"One

3g:| FEATURES

thing students have told us sch<H)ls

Native plants, native

flora

is

when

they are deciding

and they've got about even choices, coming

Johnson

is

them make

helps

said.

and wcxxiy landscape plants were

examples of classes that used the Arboretum to study

trees

locally instead of travelling to a different IcKation.

Northwest created

a

Commemorative Tree Program.

Trees

could honor a loved one, the deceased, events, or anything a

donor wanted. tree planted

A

donation of $250 received a plaque and a

on campus.

Tree location was determined by tree such as leaves and

size sunlight,

and what can

fall

wind

out of trees

fruit.

Arboretum caretakers had a list of trees they dreamed of planting. Recently added trees taken from the wish list included a red pine, Serbian spruce and a Bosnian pine. According to former Arboretum employee Brian Fish, one problem with the maintenance of the arboretum, was vandalism and other damage from students. One summer, some people drove on the grass through campus and ran over

One

approximately $ 1 7,000. People tore the branches off new

"It

rises,

was

especially a few

trees.

person ran their car into a ginkgo, a tree valued at

destroying them.

high

student satisfaction. According to Arboretum Gxjrdinator

between

campus and seeing how pretty this

protection, care requirements

falling branches.

Removed into

to visit

their decision for Northwest,"

class.

where there a

weeks

is

I'd

the

a lot of student activity.

major source of frustration

when

trees,

Damage was especially prevalent around if

nothing

plant the tree and then have

it

else,

vandalized

later," Fish said.

The ArK)retum

beautified campus and educated students. autumn and winter stripped trees of foliage, spring forced fuzzy buds to appear, beginning a new year of Northwest

Even

after

greenery.


Erin McKillip. Mindy l^athrrman and Darrick CouCt r«Ux m the \hji)c oti i \utt liay (luring the hr^c wrck ot i U**c-% Temper Jture* oltcn reached '*•' tlcgrcc\ in the fir« week* t»f cU**Ct

ptuMc hy

.Ktdft

itp

The branches c»f a while

ath ctretch mirw-jird. wa\ one <i4"ihc Ur|{nt jth irco in North AincTua, u»mctime\ rrjching l*"' ft in

The white

a\h

A wide variety of tree* enhance littipu*

Mif^-viUc betjmc

in I*'**8 pjrtly

jfK>rmiin

j

NorthwT«'\ "Trrc C"it>- USA"

bccjuve of the univrr»ii>-'i

f^*i*<'

hy \Utt

/^

Arboretum

J*?


Events


HOOBASTANK

ROCK CRAWLS THROUGH MARYVILLE Music fans experience punk/alternative style ofnational headliner and opening acts. BY

:M

West Coast rock when Mary Linn Auditorium.

aryN'ilie tasted

Hoobastank headlined

at

As part of their national tour, platinum rockers Hoobastank stopped at Northwest Oct. 21 to

jumped on and

off stage

AMBER Brazil

and dodged objects that

Blindside and roadies were throwing from backstage.

Carrots,

M&Ms

and bouncy

flying across stage, along with

balls

The child's-play could have been something that

headline the three-band rock concert before going to Kaiuas City. Hoobastank was joined by Blindside,

happened

a Swedish "garage

nxk" band and Greenwheel, the opening band. Students and fans from around

celebration of good times because

northwest Missoun lined up hours before the doors

were headed back to Europe

opened on the cold autumn night remaining bakony tickets.

it

when

big

night

at every show, or perhaps

on the

it

it

was

Island/Def

After a stop in Atlanta, they

tour.

for a short break.

Blindside, of Stockholm,

Sweden, had been

thanked fellow rock band P.O.D., 1998, for being

sti

just a

was Blindside's

touring in the United States for five years.

Calif. After years of playing southern California

made

last

to grab the

Hoobastank fonned in late 1994 in Agoura Hills, venues, Hoobastank

could be seen

an occasional person.

who

They

they met in

supportive of their music, which

they called grunge revisited.

The tour supported their

Jam Records released their self-titled album in November 2001. The first single, "Crawling in the EXark." saw heavy rotation on radio and MTV. By

The Blindside set was more hard-core rock than Greenwheel and Hoobastank, a difference

the end of January 2002, the album was certified

noticeable in their stage movements and sound.

recently released single "Pitiful."

"The

goU.

modem

Hoobastank 's around the intense

rifis

rock sound revolved

of IXin Estrtn's guitar paired

with Doug Robb's voice weaving

m and out of the

and drum expkisions. Robb's voice was often compared to Brandon

guitar blasts

Boyd of Incubus, a close

friend from southern

Blindside

show was

really entertaining to

watch, but the music was too screamy," Sherry

Bowen said. The band

that

opened the show, Greenwheel,

earned a few more fans.

Many had not heard of them

before the show, though they are based out of St.

Charles, a suburb of St. Louis,

Mo. Their rwo singles,

"Shelter" and "Breathe," had played the radio waves,

California.

"Braixkxi and

I

were friends before any record

but

many did not know they were Missouri-Kim hits.

Robb said. "Brandon was compared to Mike Patton of Faith No More, and we are both huge fans of them, so some might say our voices sound the

was awesome; a good selection for an opening band,"

same. Whatever anyone wants to think; I don't force

the radio but didn't have a

opinions on anyone."

the music."

deals,"

Incubus or

iKit,

Maryville was ecstatic for the

A

California group.

10 foot barrier between the

audience and the stage teased the crowd.

The seating sucks." Robb said. "I am appalled that they won't let anyone

As a way

to be

m the front area."

second single off the platinum album. sang the hit song

you guys

Away," the

The audietKe

m unison with the vocalist.

"I'm used to piaytng at places where in the hcadi;

I

miss that !"

can smack

I

Robb said

crowd. "Hegaidleas well have a good time

was here to see Hoobastank, but Greenwheel

Shawn Carpenter

said. "I

had heard

name

their songs

to the

—you rock

on

to associate with

Whether being awestruck by the local Missoun barnJ or getting to rock with West Qwst platinum artists, it only made Northwest students thirsty for

Northwnl Mudcnu pr*««n( ihcir nckctt to u%hcr\ for the H»*oha*tank. Circcnwhccl and BhixiiKlc concert Ho(4^J^tank'("C'^3wttngtnthc ino« pii)Td xidco the week of t>»k" wa« .

MTV«

Feb U.2an2 ,J^I>,MMFr,^

more.

"Northwest definitely needs more bands

cbxr to the crowd, Robb stood

at audience level while singing "Running

"I

thw." Carpenter said.

school to get a

lot

"It's

like

a very gixid thing for the

of people together with the same

ptBitive attitude. There's a lot of positive energy

generated here." Big bands fitim the coast

come hack Robb said,

to the

little

may feel

the same and

Musouri college town. As

the Midwest wasn't that had, arvl the

country anmisphere was actually refreshing after

Throughout Hoobastank's hour

set,

Rob

tounng city

after city.

HOOBASTANK \:U1


CENTER Y

BETSY

LEE

McKemy's OUTREACH from a variety of institutions and grant-funded programs housed in one campus building

Missouri reaps benefits

U I

I

oused in a refinished agricultural building, seven

programs used Northwest

TTie McKemy Center for Lifelong Learning, formerly the McKemy Agricultural Building, was rededicated in 1999. The agricultural building

was

home

to the fish hatchery of

Marvin

An aquarium of Hoskey

's

fish

remained

Located in the entryway to the

welcomed workers

for

offices,

after the renovation.

the Hoskey aquarium

the Missouri Assessment Program,

Northwest Educational Consortium and Outreach Education.

Also housed

in the

McKemy

Center was the Regional

Development Center, Rural Technology Capacity

As Regional Resources

Building Qjnsortium, Select Teacher

and Missouri Small Business Development Center.

MAP

headquarters.

Establishing professional development programs for Missouri

teachers and implementing a

new

assessment program for the

educational program were two main goals of the program.

"MAP provides training and

infrastructure to apply the

new

Harwood said. Northwest Missouri Educational Consortium The NMEC .st)ught to improve the quality of education

area colleges

and

universities through the

u.se

at

of Interactive

McKemy housed one of Northwest's two distance learning

Brown Hall. "It's pretty exciting because this year we have our first out-ofstate student usmg the ITV," Director Mike Grudzinski said. A graduate student, who moved to Utah, was able (o finish her degree by usmg the distance learning classrixims. the other was located in

RPDC

skills

and behaviors into the classroom.

"Technology

is

important in the classroom," Harwood

"We're trying to provide them with those

said.

tools."

Rural Technology Capacity Building Consortium Working withm rural school districts, RTCBC provided teachers with the ability to use state-of-the-art technology

The grant-funded program helped school money for technological equipment and training. Teachers As Regional Resources

within the classroom.

The STARR program selected

three area teachers to serve as

peer educators. These teachers spent a year learning

new

teaching methods and a year travelling the state to teach other educators. "It's

given

me

a wonderful opportunity to

STARR

have access to the

teacher Stormy McClellan said.

STARR teachers served as resources for schools by demonstrating lessons, leading seminars and serving as consultants.

Missouri Small Business Development Center like the MSBDC were MSBDC helped businesses

Small business development centers liKated

all

over the United States.

with fewer than 500 employees get loans and grants. According to Shelby Blonde, the state

and Northwest provided funds

for

Outreach Education

MSBIX:. Working met once

projp-am gave graduate students in education the opportunity

meetings."

to take cla.sses part-time without driving to Northwest.

"We all work together," Gnidzinski said. "Fk-ing together in one building allows us to share contacts and sources of

Outreach Education Offcrmg courses

in 19 counties, the

Outreach offered degree programs

in

Educational Leadership

and hvttructional Technology. Chillicothe,

^2

served as tool for teachers in the northwest

Missouri region. Offering programs and seminars,

newest resources,"

assessment," program assistant Peggy

clas.sr<x)ras;

Regional Professional Development Center

The RPDC

Select

Maryville served as one of nine

TV.

offered

districts raise

Missouri Assessment Program

state's

all

sites.

representatives assisted area educators to integrating new ideas,

Hoskey.

Professional

Kansas City and Missouri Western State College extension classroom

as a regional base of operations.

Features

Kirksville,

North

together as a team, institutions housed in a

month

infomiation."

for

McKemy

what Grudzinski called "McKemy


WL I

VORK

All

OGt

f

I

ILR-

Bbng TOGLTdrRIN Or^L BUILD NG

ALLOWS US TO SHAKE

GO N TACTS AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION.

:Mjkl

GRUD/]\SKJ

MCKEMY

:^3


.

^

""fl^

\

H


Lack of ROLE MODELS BY

Hard to

UE

Bet<y

find

A MENTOR

Wnill BIACK SIllDtMS S KLICCLLD lO HND I-ACUIIY Oh lUK RACt. JOB ADVtRIlSLMLNT LACKED DI\LRSE VINUIS. I

1

1

OWN

W

hitt hitc t^Acs Jimuruirnl the Nixthutst fcacu]r>',

pursuing applicants was responsible for actively

Mack stuJmts searching kn a

seeking "applications fTi>m

InivinK

nK-ntiir.

inienutumal

Althiiuiih the tviculrv huiJ several

lacmhcn, no AlTKan-Amcnciuis scn-eJ Junnt; the schiiol ynr.

Aihcan- American stuJents felt

thus

void.

can irlaie men topeiiplc of youriiwn culture

and KKkgrnund," Ranieshit Jaclmm

"Having

said.

mote bLick bicuin wxxiki make me mi«e ciimfiirtabk."

Accordmi! to an SceievHvres:

A

Case

may

possess the stated qualifications

To

recruit

Afncan-Amcncan f.Kulty, on their own contiKts and

African-

To advertise, the department chiur filled init a form for

Human

Resources, ixitlining where they would

>.ik1.

the Director of

Human

according

the

Nivthweat admintstratoni had goab to increase camfXB. The Diveisitv StiategK

Initiative

Melping to achieve

this

to

Rest»urces

manual,

who

should,

"distribute

the

to minonr>- institutions."

Human

m 2001

-

gjral

Provcxst Taylor

Dtnpite the lack of a specifK goal. Assistant Vice

Resources and Equal

Director of

"We may make jtximal,"

Thn>ener

fWnes

said that

minonty

a suggestion about a

9S percent of department chairs

ts

"It's

a statewide Lvsue," Mi-ssiHin

"Seeing

H>meone

enormously important."

The The

fill

a "mailing

professional caucuses, including those with

"You have to do more than anrKxincement

in the Chrimicle,"

just

Barnes

put an

directones. CVily specific,

office of

24 faculty

one of the journals was minonry

"Minonr>-

Women's

of institutions, organizations,

predominately female and/or min«inr\' membership."

Requinng department

said.

According to dixruments pnivided by the

list

Diictoral Ditectory."

There were over 100 mirKWiry specific journals and

chairs to devekip a search

plan that includes minonties ctxild raise awareness to the

is.sue

and couki help

Northwest coukl

al.s«>

recruit

vita banlcs, adverti.se in other

expand those involved President IViin

minonty )<ximaLs

HubKird

new ^ulry (ell upon two

Education" and the "Future EMack Faculty Database."

^ f»ct^

thji

The

bclunft

chair of the department

a work

knd

"If

I

w-.vs

imponant Kit

was convinced ikil

a

were not puiMiing minonties, heartbeat,"

Hubbanl

.ind

iigrced the rccruittnent

thought the university was doing

"It's

faculty.

in the se.irch prxKess.

ad\-ert»ed, including the "journal of Blacks in Higher

"Searches take time." Barnes said.

mintmry

use free services like minoriry

IVxcJuirs kn Bllins Faculrv PiNtK^i VacatKies" the

Restxircn.

Human

a faculty positKm.

of minonty faculry

individuals, the deparrment chair and the Director of

the

request required department chairs to submit

online databases in which Northwest could have

Human

"Something

siiid.

director received a search plan as part of the

According to the Northwest manual, "Policies and

rofnnsibilirv ior recruiting

Commissioner of

EducatKm."

vacatKics in 2002 were placed in 1 8 )<xjmaLs<ir online

important.

said.

other area universities

at

from Nonhwest's plan.

simply request an ad in the "Chronicle of Higher

Human Resources, advertisements for the

Giwles

Minonty recruitment varies

departmental request to

said.

nKtuittt« African- American

be, seeing

be

middle of the process."

Higher Education Quentin Wilson

heskient for Student Affairs Carol Cowlcs thouf^t

ahsoiutely necessary,"

in the

how

said. "It wixild

overall search pnxress.

Bmo, there was no facult>' nxruitment center.

iomcone that you could

K"

Throener

advertisements.

did not have a

^ulrv »-as

minorities,"

receive a report

I

were interviewed and

Resources Director was extensively involved in the

i|iK^ ft.Tai to increase mimvirv or African- American According to Universitv

helpfiil to

Minonr>- recruitment was also the responsibility of

announcement

many were

finishc-d,

is

ptxiple

Emplo>inent Opportunir>' OffKer Mary Tlwoener said

K 2004- 2C05. HoMncvcr, this initiati\-e

said nothing about

how many

she does not direct department chairs in their

5>tratcgK lnitiati\-e cited a goal of

empkiyvts; the

The form

"After the pnvcss alxHJt

handicapped status and

goal,

>hich specifkallv targeted iTunonr>- students.

nocsBinK minivit>' cmplo>'ecs invn 6 percent

be placed.

requested information from the applicants, such as

one of

pan of the

enipk>>-ed five student recruiters,

identifiable to yciu

EEO form to each applicant iifter

;in

application materials were received. This ft>rm

we need to focus on at all institutions." At Central MtssiHin State University',

Sad specific rimIs for the recruitment of minonry

"It ts

TriK-ncr sent all

their racc/cthnicity,

ii<

tnirusfer, iind/i)r

promotion."

educational hickgrtxind.

and

women are given

ensure that minonties ,ind

opportunities to employment,

suppimive of that."

Fries- Bntt

placing ads in minority journals.

bculty.

Modem

Linguiiges Chair Theophill Rt»s said Ni>nhwest was

an institutum to support a black [> fuLitKn. >wj need black facult>-," Bume'a Githnne

all

full

"Northwest has an obligation to provide

"In tirder for

included

results to

itdvcnising.

cixnmittcd to irKreiising faculty diversity.

like ads to

Z002 to 10 percent

depiirtmcnt

nepartment of Qxnmunication, The-ater and

\mencan bcuhy and admintstration.

The DnTrMt>-

EEO officer's responsibilities

included "peruxJitaily reviewing hiring procc-ss and

opportunities for diversity," Ri>ss said. "I'm very

TumiT. Hick students at prcdmniniUelv w+iite

Monhwest

process. Acct)iding to Eiqual

Opportunity C mklelines,

article entitled 'Facing

urm-cTMtKrsleli tsnl.itedKxausei)» the lack

>nftient».

The EEO officer wus responsible for overseeing the hinng and reciuitment

Slud>- c4 Black Students i>n a

White Gmipus," K>- autKm Shanm L

iiNTisitv on

of

the f.Kulty pisition viK";incy."

li>r

chairs relied

"V'lw

Bndifrt

minonties whi>

women and members

all

it

said that

he

could.

department or colkge I

wxiukJ

mo\e

in, in

a

s.iij.

m iht coniciofnmoao

made up Northwr%t

fjculcy.

^faiikm«ihidaoA<rKii>-Ainmcjn£Kuky ^**

Minority

\:US


Campuj ACCESSIBILITY

FARR

On Four WHEELS Tower

reporter, experiences

campus

life

in

a wheelchair

D I ^^

ocking back and forth,

1

tried to pull the

A girl

wheelchair out of a crevice in the crosswalk. passed, staring.

After spending two days in a wheelchair researching handicap accessibility on campus,

I

got a

taste of the challenges facing students

with disabilities.

While some experiences were merely

irritating,

others

were dangerous. Cracks in sidewalks and crosswalks were the most dangerous challenges to campus

When

accessibility.

someone assisted me by pushing the wheelchair, cracks

became especially tricky because the chair was rolling faster

than

usual.

Deep holes with sharp

asphalt or

concrete edges pulled the rubber ring off the wheel, leaving the chair crooked and tipping until there was

a chance to fix Phillips Hall,

it.

On

the craggy sidewalk outside

one sidewalk section was about

inch higher than the one before

it.

Running

higher section, the wheelchair almost

a half

into the

dumped me

onto the ground.

On campus, a few sidewalk signs 1

warned

inclines were so steep

pet)ple in wheelchairs not to use

them.

was ttx) afraid to injure myself taking those sidewalks,

so 1 went the

to

my

kmg way arcxind, adding 5 to

1

minutes

traveling time.

# Sam

Farr ilruggici to

roll

up

puKt'

ilic

'1^

r.iinpi:d

I

)cLiii r

Fine Arts huiUlmK.

Farr. this

wjÂť the

iixnt ihtfK

cmr.iin c of the

Attordinu to

( 'onlimii'd

(

>livc

iilt

tmtp

ro lUVlgJtr t)n t:arnpil\ /JK*n illuitMlnw hy XUtt tryr

^6:

Feature^


On four WHEELS # Ramps

Continued from page 46

in front of buildings

were

difficult for

nonelectric wheelchairs. In particular, the Olive

DeLuce Fine Arts Building ramp was a seemed steeper than the this

challenge;

ramp, while not dangerous, presented a

it

on

Overfilled cracks

rest.

difficult

obstacle course.

As a trumpet player in the Studio Jazz Ensemble, was usually required to stand on the third row

band room;

this

row was not

had not been moved

1

in the

accessible. If rehearsal

condemned Charles

to the

Johnson Theater, I would have had to upset the front

row by playing next to them. TTie second floor bathroom of the Olive DeLuce Fine Arts Building was not too

accessible.

Some,

as

1

did,

may find

this

out

late.

Trouble also plagued the street to sidewalk access ramps.

Though they were better than having no ramp, made for a difficult ride.

they were bumpy, and

Electric doors did not open consistently,

and heavy

doors were difficult to open from a sitting position.

The doors swung closed quickly behind the chair and pushed

my knees or fingers

into the dcx)r frame.

Entering a door at the end of the day,

heave the chair over the tiny

to It I

rise

was a necessary part of a d(X)r, but

it

was difficult

of the threshold. it

was something

had never noticed while walking.

Even

at

home, problems occurred. High

accessible while the elevators

elevators lacked

were

maneuvering r(X)m when there were

other people in them. to

rises

were working, but the

The

hiillways

were

t(x)

narrow

accommodate a wheelchair and a person walking,

or another wheelchair or a cleaning cart. In the r(X)ms themselves, between schtxjl-supplied furniture and furniture from

a wheelchair

home, there was not enough rix)m and two

resident-s. In

only option was to take a bath

The campus was

for

bathr<x)ms, the

instcjid of a

shower.

not originally planned

for the

Maybe someday, people in manual wheclchiiirs would not have ti worry ah nit

accessibility of wheclchiiirs.

>

getting stuck in

^n

pavement

Flatures

cracks.


'

u> nrjkh (hr «»!> iiui hinr

^) VI' y^nn Snxlrni Uiuun

Evrrvdiv i»k»

M

w«»

YOUR WORDS ON CAMPUS ACCESSIBILITY ;

FiVk Baxter

"TmE rCONOMiCS WA!. MAD AT ONE SCHOOL SO THINOS

wcNC merry run-down. The nick thing about northwest is that th«v kce^ things ur and accessible, and thev have a better income coming in to maintain their buil0inc8,"

'.Amanda Dunn oody "When

it snows, northwest's custodial services and sroundskeepers have done usually a pretty good job keeping the sidewalks clean. usually don't have much trouble getting around, unless it's like an early class when they don't have time to clean off the sidewalks before have to leave, but it's usually not that bad." i

i

Amlwr

Oltipy

"THERE'S A COUPLE AREAS WHERE THEY

HAVE THE RAMPS THAT THEY HAVE ALREADY BUILT ACES AGO. NOW, ACCORDING TO THE A.D.A. (AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT), THEY ARE TOO STEEP AND SO THEY HAVE THE SIGNS THAT SAY. 'Too STEEP. DON'T GO DOWN THIS RAMP." WELL. THERE'S A COUPLE OF SPOTS WHERE HAVE TO DO IT ANYWAY IN ORDER TO GET WHERE NEED TO GO." I

I

:

AllKa Stpwart

"Mo. WEST (Missouri Western state university) HAS so many hills and bumps and different things. northwest is flat and small. easier to get around. mu (university of missouri) has the

same problems as mo. west. bumpy and everything. some of the buildings, a wheelchair can't even get in. ku (university of kansas) is just huge. you can't get around. Even if you're walking vou

Fm MMTn(i«

I

Vim c Fmc Am

Sam Fwr urugcln ^ith « rue m cht «dr tnwmpLimrTMn I>nw

lnundonrj«nw^;*w»Ai—ifcwtlyMi»yTy

FjrrliiwidniBii'

probably couldn't. the thing about stupid LONCVICW (COMMUNITY COLLEGE), THEY HAVE WHEELCHAIR DOORS. BUT THEY HAVE STEPS SO YOU CAN'T GET UP THERE TO THE WHEELCHAIR DOORS.'*


Cultural ASSIMILATION

Struooles with

DIVERSITY International students strive to overcome social constraints and

language

C

and

ulture

hoping to

barriers,

"American students

diversity flourished

on campus, yet an invisible

line

a

little bit,"

avoid you

try to

Mansoor said. "Not because

separated international students from

they hate you, because they are afraid.

everyone

learn

else.

After deciding to

make

the journey

to Northwest, international students

I

I

have to go and introduce myself

to them, so they feel

more comfortable."

Social Barriers

Though

cultural differences and difficulty learning in and out of the classroom.

Marcolino, from

Language Barriers

strange she did not have

American

culture. International students

were

challenged with language barriers,

International students faced language

cultivate

thought

Brazil,

it

was

more American

friends.

become

"Minority groups usually hang around

each other," Marcolino said. "Everybody

while

perfect a

new

trying

to

language, they often

felt

intimidated and avoided speaking with

American

my

facing the

Adapting English

skills,"

same

situation- difficulty

with language, adaptation to dorms."

students.

worry about

"I

is

to

challenged Marcolino; she found the social constraints frustrating.

many

just don't get it,"

Talking to people from different cultures

intimidated

also

some

students

felt

have been in classes where we are supposed to work in groups a lot," Claudia Molina, from Honduras, they think

nerd, the popular

me

due

said. "She's a big sister."

said.

I

brought American and international

"The

students together. Grant Riggins, from

girl.

Blue Springs, Mo. was grateful for the

People carry these labels through

relationship he developed with an

the cute

girl,

interviewed

American culture as Maeda, from Japan, lix)ked toward creating American to

fit

He

would enrich

his speaking skills.

felt

the experience

life,

"I

tried to be like other friends,"

Mansoor

I

act like them, dress

international student," Riggins said.

"The guy

I

know

actually

knows three

languages."

them, they're going to accept me."

Challenges fitting in and excelling in

the classroom faced international

"No matter how hard

I

tried to please

my friends, they wanted more," MansÂťxir they can't accept me how am,

the tension while trying to form

said. "If

American

I

friendships.

said. "If

"It's

began after Riggins him for a speech class. really cool to get to know an

Mansoor soon realized she Wiw not the one who needed to change.

like

Malcenii Manstxir, from Afghanistan,

found that she could eliminate stime of

international student from Africa. Their

During a transitional period

in

friendships.

did struggle in her

to the language barrier, she

"She's not just a teacher advisor,"

Mansoor

Mansoor changed her personality to fit the labels and constraints of American society.

Hoping

because that

sought support from her advisor, Carol

April Haslag, from Ltxjse Creek, Mo.,

part of his experience, Sota

me

so much."

When Mansoor classes

friendship

their accents are hard

might need extra help.

I

Don't underestimate

Despite academic hurdles, classes

"Here, people put labels on people.

Marcolino

said.

"Because I'm a minority or different,

in her

"Sometimes

and others felt they

"1

college."

to understand."

they were not given enough

positive motivation

American students. "They have their own language," said.

Some

hurdles in the classrooms.

Spradling.

American culture

Doosan Baek, from Korea, said. "Many people want to talk with me. I didn't talk times."

International students also faced

bothers

accustomed to campus. While trying to

barriers

n

Classroom Barriers

were alienated because of their ethnicity.

the students hoped to American friendships, they found comfort and acceptance with other international students. Monica

faced problems fitting into

american society.

fully experience

don't need

1

them

as friends."

American culture. Mansiwr offered advice for both groups to promote acceptance. students adapting to

"Just say hi

and smile," ManstK)r said.

"That opens the

dixir to ever\'thing."

Ricko Noiiaka from Japan and Monica Morcolino from Honduras converse prior to i iiu'otin^. Northwest's intcrtutloiul students came trom 3H

SO:

Ffatijrfs

ditlercnt

t

ouiitnes.

;Âť^iifii fry

Xtittt

htyr


Sarhic Haiula, t

>t

(lie

SutiK-

Aiiiffu

ill

StiulcMt

(

(i( I

liruiii Japan,

Uiuliiurk^

>r>:Jttl/Jtl<tli

Proplr gather

lonh vtmnn

rrplicalrt ilv

jlxTT\ SokicntN

1 1

niurik

itiiriii^ iii

IntrritJtHmil

llicdtll^ pitLtfhi

to \\\axc lutivr

let!

Khn

UhhU

t tyt

ji

the

liitmuthHul Stuticnt OrgJiti/Jtinn'^ ilinncr A iSt > gtul w-« u> pnniKXr brttci rrUrhHiUup aiiHifi^

6^

Because I'm a minority different they think

or i

might need extra help. don't underestimate me because

that bothers

me so much.

55 :Cl Alia A Moil". A

DIVFRSITY

SI


National Coming Out Week

To TEACH STUDENTS TOLERANCE Common Ground members host a week ofevents and prejudice.

with the goal of ending hate

BY Betsy Lee

:C

olorful chalk illustrations covered the

According to

Common Ground

sidewalks around campus, drawing students to the

Heather Lafon,

culminating event of a week-long campaign to end

Coming Out Week were

intolerance and hate.

stereotypes.

Trying to attract students to the Matthew

Shepherd Candlelight

who was "1

vigil

in front of the B.D.

Common Ground members presented "Coming Out

memorialized Matthew Shepherd,

killed because of his sexual orientation.

think that more awareness might prevent

something Keegan

like that

happening

towards the Bell Tower. attended the

vigil at

the library,

candles and proceeded silently

lit

vigil

Many

of the students

who

I

would

definitely fight for

you

understanding and compassion. is

fundamentally wrong with the

you have to hide your

Lauren Leach

light,

G)mmon Ground

really are,"

your soul,

who

faculty adviser

their part

it is siife

the fight with you to create a world to be

you love," Leach

G)mmon

who you

are

and to love who

C}round

pjircnts.

to support

part of the program.

likes, dislikes

Common

and sexual orientation.

to pass

judgment on

us before

knew us," Alii Brown said. "We wanted to show do that because you're not always

that you can't right."

about stereotypes.

was

gay,

she was sorry that she assumed

girl said

and

was

I

wrong with being

like,

gay,'"

'It's

member Soraya

Fays spoke

Fays tearfully encouraged students

anyone who decided

to

come

out.

I

okay, there's nothing

Brown

said.

For the second part of the program, sponsors

handed out cardboard

stars

life

and

family, friends

and

symbolizing the

dreams of a person coming out to

After the sponsors read different

co-workers.

left

with

completely tom-apart stars. According to Brown, the stars symlxilized that

suicide victims

The

last

were

over 30 percent of

gay, lesbian or bisexual.

event of the week was a potluck dinner

and movie night

said.

aKnit a friend whocommitted suicide after coming out to his

they

tom-apart

in increasing .s<x:ietal awareness.

where

first

"coming out" scenarios, many students were

said.

Leach urged students to continue to do

"I will fight

about their

"One

those present, others expressed frustration about

if

During the

Ground sponsors asked students to make assumptions

The sponsors eventually revealed the truth about

rights because

"Something

each night, sometimes

themselves and engaged the group in a discussion

Although many of the speakers commended

world

halls

my

yours," Phillip Holthos said.

society's lack of

two residence

took turns addressing the group.

applaud everyone here for fighting for

human

Stars" at

drawing more than 25 students.

"We wanted them

Students gathered for the

"I

in the future,"

Palzhill said.

where they

"Coming Out Stars,"

a program presented at residence halls Oct. 7 and 8.

Library and the J.W. Jones Student Union.

The Oct. 9

designed to expel societal

of these events was

first

Vice President

the events planned for National

Common Ground

Vigil,

members chalked sidewalks

Owens

TTie

all

Members hoped

for

Common Ground

members.

the potluck, like the other events

of the week, would encourage students to feel

Scott Ware and Taylor Harness fill tiicir pUto during N.ituÂťiul C'oinmg t")ut Week's potluck duiiuT. The duuKT was hold .it the We\ley C!cnter Jlld

comfortable with their sexuality.

"We hope

it

gives people hope, because there

is

was followed by

a

nume.

think

It's

horrible that people live in a

ct)mmunity where they arc so afraid to be are," Fays said.

S2:

Events

who they

week detlicated

to coming out," Allyson Lirgent

"Hopefully they can

who

they really arc."

feel

comfortable lo

tell

hyr

a Tyler Swoni and Bccka

"I

/VhWo hy \tatt

s;iid.

people

Thompson rellect *Âťn

stcrct>typcs Ueinj; honuwcxiials.

They

individuals speak abt>ut hate at the

Shephenl

C'aiidleli^ht Vigil.

/Ji.**

hy

listened to

Matthew

Mut />)^


Your words on coming out

'.Alysoti

Lar^ent

was about two years aoo when oecioco to tcu. MV DAD. AND WE BOTH OCCIOCO NOT TO T«U. MV MOM. AFTER DID. THERE WAS ALMOST A POINT WHEN THOUOHT WAS GOING TO HAVE TO MOVE OUT. THERE WAS A TIME WHEN My OAO THOUGHT IT WOULD BE BEST FOR ALL Of US TO GET AWAY FROM THE SITUATION. CAME TO NORTHWEST EARLY TO GET AWAY AND GIVE HER TIME TO GET USED TO IT. MOM PRETTY MUCH SAID, 'You CANT BE GAY. YOU'RE NOT GAY.' SHE WANTED ME TO BE STRAIGHT. IT WAS KINO OF HURTFUL BECAUSE SHE WANTED ME TO CHOOSE BETWEEN HER AND THE FAMILY AND MY GIRLFRIEND. NOW. MY MOM ACCEPTS IT. irs NOT WHAT SHE WANTS FOR ME, BUT SHE HAS DECIDED TO MAKE THE "It

I

I

I

I

I

BEST OF

IT."

lAdam Schneider DECIDED TO TELL MY MOM ONE NIGHT WHILE

WE WERE AND DON'T KNOW WHAT BROUGHT IT UP; IJUST CAME OUT AND SAID IT. KNEW SHE WAS GOING TO GO UPSTAIRS AND CRY FOR A "I

FIXING DINNER.

I

I

Alii

Brown and Athlcy Cunningham

dccoralc the sidewalk in front ofthcJ.W. Jonc% Student Union. The decorations hoped to attract students to the

Candlelight Vigil.

Matthew Shepherd

photc hy Matt

WHILE. JUST KIND OF WENT OVER TO THE TABLE AND SAT DOWN AND BREATHED A SIGH OF RELIEF. FELT BAD FOR HER, BUT THERE'S NOT A LOT I COULD DO, IT WAS JUST SOMETHING THAT WAS GOING I

I

hyr

^^ Something

is

TO TAKE TIME FOR HER TO ADJUST TO."

fundamentally

wrong with the world if you have to hide

;

Lance Lewis

"WHEN THOUGHT ABOUT COMING OUT. FEAR WAS WHAT CAME INTO MY MIND. BEFORE CAME OUT WAS A CANDIDATE FOR MINISTRY IN THE UNITED METHODIST Church. And when came out publicly at Matthew Shepherd's memorial, came out without knowing it. it was the first time CAME OUT IN FRONT OF A GROUP OF PEOPLE. IT WAS GOOD. THOUGH. BECAUSE IT WAS RIGHT BEFORE TOLD MV FAMILY THAT STOPPED A LOT OF MY FEAR, BECAUSE KNEW IF COULD TBLL A GROUP OF STRANGERS. COULD TELL EACH OF I

I

I

i

your light, your soul,

who you

I

I

I

really are.

I

I

99 iAUMN

Leach

MV FAMILY MEMBERS."

I


Rape

REPORT BY

Betsy

Lee

A

SHORTAGE OF

SUPPORT pehqnt of femaiis and only 65 percent of males agreed THAT students SHOULD BE EDUCATID ON HOW TO AVOID SEXUAL ASSAULT.

Ninety-six

I n a cold, dark pool of fear, rape and sexual assault victims struggled to keep their heads above water.

For one Northwest student the fight began

when she was raped by a date and was so paralyzed by fear that she was unable to

happened

anyone what

victim said.

1

"1 felt really

it

was

my

fault,"

alone, like

it

one

didn't

female students indicated that

78 percent

and a half ago. Green said the line received hundreds of calls each year. At the time of publication, the hospital had a 24-hour crisis line for the Children and Family Center of Northwest

and 19

many myths about

changed their habits

after

hearing about the attacks. Fifty-four chose to carry

news of

my own assault a lot," she

so scary to think that

it

800-656-4673.

Of men

still exist. is

no

surveyed, the statement

situation in

1

According to Student Affairs Director Carol

According to Counseling Center counselor

Cowles, the attitude clearly reflects the need for

Simine Sarnie, the hotline would provide a victim

further education.

with a needed outlet.

some men have very understanding of sexual assault," Cowles

"TTiat statistic suggests that little

said. "1 don't find

it

surprising,

it's

sad, but not

As

a law enforcement officer.

fact that 19 percent of

women

okay to assault

men

Green found the

surveyed believe

it's

astounding.

"That's just horrible,"

Green said.

"It

makes me

rape victim agreed that education might

enlighten students about the facts of rape.

has happened

"It's

not a small

issue,"

she said. "Maybe

more

does happen, maybe they

girls realized

won't

aggression defense course helped 95 percent of

encouraged other rape victims to find the courage

on campus.

that

feel like

1

it

did, like

it

Though she chose not to

do

so.

The

only happened to me."

to report her attack, she

victim said she wished

.she

"The rape aggression defense course is an excellent program," Director of Campus Safety Clarence Green said. "It teaches women to get

have had the courage to get help early on. "Personally, think it would be so much

out of the situation."

face-to-face," she said.

I

if

you could

thing rape victims need

Samie

is

someone "They

said.

already feel powerless so they shouldn't be

call instead

To

further ensure that students not feel pushed

making a formal report, Cowles developed an anonymous sexual assault report form four years ago. Using this report, victims could document into

could

file

formal

charges. "It

if

Northwest protected female students from assault; programs like the escort service and a rape feel safe

first

the assault without feeling pressure to

sad to think about, really."

The

"The

to listen, just to be there,"

pushed."

to other people."

female students

Missouri.

that they disagreed or strongly disagreed.

the attacks prompted fear and uncertainty.

thought abtiut

a year

Green said Campus Safety encouraged women who were hesitant to file a formal report to call RAIN, a Rape Abuse Incest National hotline at

pepper spray or insisted that people walk with after dark. For the rape victim, the

crisis

which a woman should be forced into sex" prompted 9 percent to state

rape

According to a survey of 263 female Northwest

is

statistics,

their attacker

surprising."

students, 22 percent

"I still

know

raped

Hospital

St. Francis

hotline that was discontinued

funded a rape

percent were raped by their boyfriend or husband.

"There

to other people."

precautions.

said. "It

women

According to Green,

According

Attitudes reflected in a survey of 163 male and

thought

But it does happen to others. According to the National Victim Center, 1,871 rapes occur nationwide each day, and it happens at Northwest; Maryville Public Safety received two calls in the fall trimester from Northwest students alleging that they had been raped. These reports prompted Campus Safety Oct. 24 to send out a campuswide email urging students to take further

them

Victim Center

to National

of

to her.

"For so long

happen

tell

Avoidance of rape was primarily the responsibility of the female student.

simply offers a way to get a handle

climate,"

on the

Cowles said. "We want students to have

confidence in our

statistics."

To obtain an anonymous

report form, a victim

must go to the Counseling Center or J.W. Jones Student Union or approach a Hall Director. To file

Campus Campus Safety officers would

a formal report a victim should call

Safety at 562- 1 254. easier

arrange for a counselor to meet with the victim

of talking to someone

and would gather the evidence needed to prosecute an alleged assailant.

Two reported rapet prompted tctiMoiu to rise women's \.ilcr\*. Six percent surveyed reptÂťried Ix'ing sexually

i>ncjin(nis rcpjrding i)f 26.^ tciiulc*

assjulted.

S^:

Features

/]fe*o itt4tfwn.iÂťi

hy

\Un l-ryr


fl

'


'

pirii

LiL

:.±olidai3)S l>i|

Irnc

liiH

,

The spirit of holiday giving and fellou'ship spread thniugh the communitY of Mar>'ville and the Northwest family.

Northwest holiday spint was spread thrvxigh the Angel Tree, faculty

and students

chance to contribute

a

Throughout Maryville,

to area

residents enjoyed carriage rides

needy

and

visits

oflfering

families.

to Santa's

house.

Sponsored by the Interfiratemiry and Panhellenic Councils, the Angel Tree had angel shaped cut(xits, representing a child's Christmas wish-list.

The individuals were selected ftxjm a list of needy families supplied by Q>mmuniry Service Agency of Nodaway Qxinry. In 1997, Director of Campas Activities Bryan Vanosdale mitiated service project seeking donations from students,

community members and lists

local businesses.

campus

the

the

organizations,

Vanosdale said many children's

include basics such as socks, clothes that

or crayons. By the end of

fit

the donation dnve, the Angel Tree was surrourvded with stacks of bnghtly

wrapped presents. The project supplied

gifts for

104 individuals, totalmg

over $6,000 in donations. "I

was really impressed with how well campus students respcxided to those

individuals

who needed

help during Christmas," Panhellenic Council

President Jenny Eirunker said.

Another .ictiviiies.

project provided an opportunity to participate in holiday

The Greater

.innual visit from Santa

Marv-ville

Chamber

of

Commerce

and Mrs. Claus. The commerce

set

sponsored an

up a temporarv

residence for Santa and Mrs. Claus, inviting children and their lamilies to Santa's house Dec. •itxjthwest

1

3,

from 6-8 p.m. The house was positioned on the

comer of Maryville

ctxirthixise square.

"s

Anxious children played outside the unveiling their Christmas wishes. their eyes

their

way up the

steps

grew wide, fixed on Mrs. Claus' pearly »+iite smile and Santa

Qaus' extended infilled

cixirthiiuse lawn, antKiparing

As children made

anivs.

The

K>\ts

were played

b>'

Northwrst

retirees,

excitement into the tradition of Santa Claus, bringing

gifts

who to

all

children.

The minute ytxi see those kids' eyes light up. its Chnstmas," Santa said. Wishes faxn the chiUren included a puppy, heroes. Santa

leave "!

had a request

him one of their favonte

dolLs, race cars

and action

each child as well; he wanted the chikiren to types of tixJcies.

got a taste of w+iat the real Santa wouki feel like," Santa said.

excitement

is

infectious."

Chmimai bulbi %»Trr

for

jo« one

iUumiiuc*

Their

9 Continued page 5S *

tm iKjtviiir i home on Victor>' Line

poftrj>il of Miry'vilk'*

Oct- oritnr hght%

C'hntfnm yint

HOLIDAYS |:S7


pir JjT

of Ike

[.Jiolidags â&#x20AC;¢

S?:| FEATURES

Continued from page 57


IVr\Kk-iii

kiuiv HruiilwT «kI

Vur

Prcutknl

i4 Ni^ttu

Kjpfu't

jliiiiint

rrUthui^

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JiU Autry

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/

m' .

^T_3ll^w

trjnic

pUrrt

m

>.

j

putiirr Irjtnc- in

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j

j

Uix

tiu Si^iiu Kjf^vi'v

sweater, iiukc-iip jnJ

j tvith .iiui

An^rl

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rrr iltHUiHHt

pin hj^c<i Vi H I

^^^4^1

Panhcltrnic Council Prr«idmt Jrnny Brunkrr. Vice l*rr«idrn( oTSigma Kapps't alumni rrUbons JiD Autry and Sigma Kappa Pmidmi Krely Burnt wrap tlic

Kw i4X !hrntiiuvptt\ d»€7. piin iuvii h>r tl>cir pri thnm^ti

I

"jinjMi*

At tmtic\

itni the

(

(

"(XitnlHitHKn

irratct Min-villr t

v^mr itutV in<'<mn«nnK-

luinlx^

»i*

i

"«Hiiincn r

Cutout* hanging tnun the IntrrtViicrnm Jtu) Pjnhcllcnic CtHimil't Ar^l Tnrc %\inlHihzc the Chn\ttnJ« wuhc^ ot'Kn* jnJ prU »! iic«-«K h<»inc* In*^I^^.^^uK. or^nizjtit>n\

i>r

hu\inc^v\ t.(HiM nmtribiitc

Continued pafie 60

Holidays hS'?


Features


The chance

to

tell

Stnta their

ChnsmuN

u-i\hri

brought nurn'

Kh al chiKlrrn and taiiiihc^ to the C'laus' icmpuran- htHitc in Ihint of the Ntnlaway (_\>unt\' CiXirth<Hnc, Santa also nutir af>pcaran4f* around iin\ij Nov- 2** aiid IV*"- 7

As Santa Ihtrm in, Jacob Cacek imitnds hi\\iiun^rr utfrrjouuirr Cjirk what the wanti Kir t'hmmuv jctiniirr wanted a new doQ and jamh asked (iÂťf a tunputcr ^nr. "Backvanl Mix krv '*

t

HOLIDAYS

:G1


:<!tt^i,--


Sexual ENCOUNTERS BY

B,

Lit

Bittersweet

SEDUCTION LOOKS

W

IHROUGI ALCOHOLIC HAZL CAUSL A ,MC.l II A THE BAR TO END WITH UNPLANNED ACTION BETWEEN THE SHEETS.

Sl.\SU,-\L

A M

>uh<lc

game was

pla>'ed out in the

>»fatv. KTindin); KtJies

EleKinntnK with twisted hall lor

lit

.t

on the dance

StEN

mass flix>r.

meaninghil kxik .ind eivJmg

sheets, a simple seduction often

ma

made

Jance

the

first

fUx>r. a

on

enciHinter

a tightly-packed

someone entered

the crowd revealed

who might he interested in hooking up. With gu>-s It's the way they dress, the way they comb their hair.' Bnan Rowe said. "You can tell everything they

di>

centers anxind getting a

According to Rowe,

sptrtting a

girl."

woman who

be open to advances was more

While alcohol served

Rowe said

difficult

Shyness melted

after a

the dance

fitxir

"Everybixly just sluts out and rubs up

each other," IngeLs

the dance

flixir

women

Zach Ingels said

women

by their clothes.

talking to multiple guys

Muki be appntached. the

with a guy, and then JMY has

it all

more game."

The darKe

that are going to go just

home

comes down to which

IngeLs said.

ncounter. .Men and

women

alike

had trouble

iftproaching somevxie they did ikh know. I

usually don't approach girls

%0«« said.

"If they're starxiing

9 and tntnxluce myself

I

I

don't know,"

with a fnend

kxik for a

I'll

go

way to talk to

According to Teresa Dickerson. consuming it easier to talk to metv

ikohol made can't

all

approach any guy when I'm sober,"

"I've

if

dance

I

turn around and

Ambra Harder said.

off; if

they

lo*ik

"If

good

I

hand

in

hand into the

cixil

said.

each other and

When

"Usually

"It's

say,

it's

it's

a friend,

far

just laughs.

We just

'Man, what did we

and the

night's events

didn't

I

and then Ux>k

do.''"

the sun rose the next morning,

on the

an uncomfortable

they

keep

never ended up with stimetmc

Rowe

anything happened

light

it

shed

pair could face

situation.

the walk of shame,"

"Every girl has done

it.

Amanda

You just

waking them up." While Ingels contended

th;it

Herbel

said.

to leave without

tr>'

people could have

commented that

sex without attaching meaning, he

much better when it was with stimctme he cared about. The difference was ver>' apparent. "When she touches you or when y»>u touch her sex was

with a

night, that's

girl

and you're dancing

when you kinda make the

maybe not to go directly home. like to somewhere first that's comfortable," 1

girl

Rowe said the evening goal a guy was to make the woman want to spend iTHirc time with him. "When guys invite a girl over they always try t»i make it Hiund like it's the girLs idea," Rowe said. IngeLs said he always

wanted to make sure

tricky.

women

did rrnt feel pressured. "I've never

It's It

just like,

bam! You can

feel

it.

You can

had anybody be offended by

created an emotional connection

a loving partner itvsteikl

of simply

a physical one.

"You're just going through the motions." Herbel said.

"But

when

you're

m

a rclatiortship

you do

it

to be closer to the other pervm."

Sex within

a meaningful relationship contrasted

sharply with the onc-night st.inds a

just feel

inside." Ingels said.

According to Herbel. sex with

Ingels said.

Extending an invitation to h<xik up was

JlCtD.

I

I

"If ytxj get to dance

take a

each other out to see how

According to Rowe, knowing each other made

at

them from behind.

l«xik gixxi,"

in sweat filed out

invite,

nf M\JuctH>n began with the initial

game

was unplanned those

Kxindaries," Ingels said.

lights

After the lights were turned on, dancers cloaked

with her

tryst

I

Men approached women on

darkness.

girls

the

"It comes to a point where we're making out and maybe take off her .shin-l learned this in psych and it's kind of funny-It's called testing your

over

dancing."

tell.'

gu>'s spot

feel

know,"

guy comes up behind me,

they

involved had to

by asking them to dance or

Uxik creepy

you can

all

Grinding to the music under strobe

if

if

the situation more comfortable.

said.

encouraged flination.

"If a

want anyone

the suggestion was accepted, the

continued, but

women

Both men and

looking to meet stimeone.

md she's wranng a little shin with her skin halfway

tell

act out of

few drmk.s and a couple

flixir.

wordlessly accosting

'You can

make people

If

just don't

I

offended or pressured."

things would Ro.

hours on the dance

see

feel

to reduce inhibitions,

character.

hit

suggestion," Ingels said. " tti

the drinks he referred to as "confidence

women dress up when hining the hars. 'Women are diiferent: WMmen always like to kxjc ;ood," RowT said. "But if it s the middle i>f winter because most

Not only did

drunk, the fear of

"Alcohol makes people more straight forward,"

quKk glarKe over

jp her rear,

if yixi're

Rowe said. "I think nine times out of 10 both people wanted it anyway. They were just kind of shy."

\X'hen a person kxtking to meet

Id

"But

"Do you

come home with mcr

the Kar, a

said.

rejection goes out the window."

culmination of a moments often

tCMillcd in the s«)<Tly-whlspeTed question, »-ant to

Dickerson

I

builders," did not usually

unlikely bed pattners.

Ftimti

\

thiit

vimelimes

resulted from bar encounters.

m

fcy x<iic iiui lf i jftKTbwtunc. itjiMh cndrd noriunit walk< of

n

Bar

Life

|:63


Storyteller Josh Tulley gestures to another player while acting as a vampire.

As

Storyteller,

Tulley was responsible for advancing the plot of the rolc-pbying game, photo by Miin

l-ryt-

MkiieUe Tulley and Melanie Goddard role-play vaij^Jirecluractcrs during a

Halloween

feast,

Tulley

played the role of

Prince, the ruler of the

underground

by

cit)'. /jfe*'

V

M.m f'tye

i

Heidi Wilkendorf records a move m her playhook durmga Dungeons and Dragons game at Hudson Mall. Dimgeonsand Dragons gamers had character sheets in whuli they recorded their character's history, attributes ablhties.

/>/infii

by \t.m Ityr

and special


Campus GAMING BY

B

t

T

i

r

L

[

[

:

Welcome to their world From tradi honal Dungions and Dragons games to newer Live Action Role Play, students portray various characters.

L,

cave

realitY

behind by entering the world of

wizards ar>d fames or by transceiuling into the

darker realm of vampires and demons.

actum

It's

said. 'I like

easier for

me

the fact that with live

to portray

my character."

LARP was one of the newest fads in the fantasy gaming world. One local LARP group met every two weeks, engroMiitg themselves

a kind of euphoria that

in a

vampire

game.

politics of the city

*I start

getting excited for

anticipate

it

when assume I

games that morning," I

start to

being a good game."

and punishing vampires that

succession of rock-paper-scissor games.

Sjothun

While conflicts were

a small

component of live

offset weaknesses, players

could

ranging from dexterity to wizardry. ExpcrierKe points were gathered by attending gimcs. winning battles and introducing new people to the game. ikills,

Characters could use these

skills in battle

to

A

game

tabletop

set in the

Dungeons and Dragons

battles

middle ages.

were resolved on

publicity about gamers causing

or others.

The

which were

dice,

selected by playen, were unique to the game.

D-20 dice system had dice with up

to

for

carefully

The

20 different

person,"

this

when

might you're

making people

According to Tulley, additional misunderstandings may come from negative

mathematical equations.

"I

harm to themselves

think most often those gamers did the big

no-no and mixed role-playing with drugs," Sjothun

said.

"They give role-playing a bad name."

Gaming handbooks never mentioned

the use

of drugs or alcohol, nor did they encourage

Character selection was also an important Dungeons and Dragons. Players could

aspect of

choose from seven species ranging from humans

and gnomes. After selecting

to elves

a species,

abilities

and

While

Storytellers run

and Dragons gamers

DM,

t>r

Game

Storytellers roles;

violence.

Handbooks specifically outlined combat gaming violence.

rules to prevent "I

think that

handbook

people bothered to pick up the

if

they'd see really quickly that there wn't

any cKCult material," Ea.ston

said.

According to gamers, benefits from gaming

far

outweighed the stereotyping they faced.

flaws.

LARP games.

relied

on

GM,

Master,

a

Dungeons Dungeon Master,

to propel the game.

and Dungetm Masters had similar

both adjusted the plot of the game and

assisted with character

"When

I

first

my group of the GM," Josh

the prince, enjoyed being able to play such a

Most games contained elaborate plot lines involving demons, violent battles and reality-

Sjothun

said.

thtNight, 'This

"Once IS

I

me

to be

learned more about

my forte.

I

"Gaming

helps build teamwork and tolerance

towards different

lifestyles,"

Easton

said. "I

mean,

you get used to getting into the mind of an wizard-it just teaches you to look ai things

evil

from

a

different angle."

A.ssuming the role of a wiÂťrd or dwarf became

development.

staned playing with

friends they encouraged

powerful character.

lead to misconceptions, especially

the game-board using sets of dice and complicated

Dice and game handbooks were key tools

first

someone overhears,

talking about bending reality and

gam political power within the underground city. The priiKe was one of the m<Âťt pow erful \-ampires. Tulley, who played the role of help their clan

said. "If

gamers tend to

character in

explode."

players chose a class for their character; classes

To

"I've noticed that after awhile

Dungeons and Dragons games.

determined the character's special

experience points to acquire additional

in private, avoiding

action role-play, battles were a central part of

Gamers selected a character from different clans at vampires, each of which had strengths and l|iply

games

start referring to their

of the mott important aspects of the games.

weaknesses.

their role-playing

public scrutiny.

humans to see them. The prince also mediated battles, which were decided by a

sides.

To prepare for LARP sessions, players often dormed costumes af>d applied makeup to get into character. According to Heidi Wilkendorf, character selection was a personal process aixl one

altering magic. Years of misconceptions about

these story lines have pushed gamers to pursue

allow

competition.

Tulley said. "Throughout the day

feel

I

Princes were responsible for governing the

Almost any escape was possible in the vast world of laming. Tabletop games like Dungeons md Dragons focused on combat and strategy while Live Action Role Play, or LARP, emphasized actit\g and character development. "Table top games are harder to understand. They're more structured and rule-bound," Michelle Tulley

"It's

my role," Tulley said.

it

I

love telling stories.""

simple for

LARP

and Dungeons and Dragons

gamers. While passionate about playing these characters, Ea.ston said overall gamers rarely took their roles tix)

"We

far.

love our characters," Easton said.

don't identify with them, but

we

"We

love them."

:6S


A

FRE5H

APPEARANCE BY Danny Burns

Landscape

IMPROVES construction utter campus as renovations improved Landmarks, Roads, parking lots and various buildings. Signs of

^^^^

range fencing, heavy machinery,

and west of College Park. College Park Drive was

budget and determine

construction crews and detour signs became a

widened and repaved due

continue construction.

common

work, causing

facilities

sight.

From University symbols

to

used by students everyday, numerous

Colden Pond

sat

empty

after

work crews

drained, deepened and installed pipes for a fish

lot at

Rickenbrode Stadium and the resurfacing

of the J.W. Jones lot

Union parking

Foster Aquatic Center

soon

"With the drought

as rain filled

The

it.

we wanted

this year,

to

additional costs to the project," Environmental

Services Director Jeff Barlow said. Bell of '48

The

Bell of '48 received a new bell house and cement work around its base. The project cost $5,400, which was taken from the maintenance and repair fund.

fresh

was our goal to repair the

aesthetic

bell's

According manager David Duvall, the 20year-old pool system in the building was in desperate need of repair. "The environment simply became too risky, 2002

for a two-part renovation project.

we shut

Duvall

it

down so the

To save money. University workers final cost of the project

new

chemical system.

pool was also repaired.

Parking and Road Construction

elevate the

when

a three-phase

installed

and

filters,

did most of million, the

was $750,000. Crews

The

exterior brickwork of the

Crews added cement

new pool system

safer access

below pool

.2

pumps and an automated

Northwest." Driving around campus and finding a place to

to

additional road north of B.D.

Owens

extension of a gravel road to

16'''

Library,

Street and

reconstruction of the CJarrett-Strong parking

Phase two began Parking

lots

in the

summer

lot.

of 2002.

were resurfaced behind Hudson and

Pcrrin halls, south of the high-rise residence halls

Ffiatures

new

some water damaged sheet

might be

in the library a little longer,"

lights

and

rock, so

Duvall

we

said.

Rickenbrode Stadium

Work continued on the $5

million construction

project for Rickenbrode Stadium. to

Crews hoped

complete the multilevel structure by Aug.

1,

2003.

"We are on schedule and very excited about new stadium," Athletic Director Bob Boerigter

said.

In addition to traditional outdoor seating, special suites

Some

suites

would be available for purchase. were fully furnished with a

kitchenette and private rest room

facilities.

Members of the media would

new

receive a

press

office

and meeting spaces.

Private donors funded the $5 million, according to Boerigter.

area.

The ptx)l was set

to be reopened Dec. 20, 2002,

but that date was

moved

because

were on back order.

pcx)l filters

to mid-January

2003

leaking

was resurfaced

rcKif

in the

two major projects

had to wait

of the B.D.

summer

Owens

Library

of 2002 as part of

for the building.

"The State of Missouri doesn't fund athletic we had to bring in all the money

facilities, so

ourselves," Boerigter said.

B.D. Owens Library

The

plan on adding some

replacing

and better views of the action. The project would also include larger IcKker r(.x>ms and additional

For the second part of the project, workers

in

$750,000

because the old system was housed

level.

added a heating and ctwling system to the pool

began

skylights, costing

box, expanded telecommunication capabilities

According to Vice President of Finance Ray

summer 2001. Completed during 2001-2002, phase one encompassed construction of an

to get to

allowing for easier

parking and road construction plan began. Ct)urter, the multimillion dollar project

Completion of the

the

the work. Originally estimated at $1

we had

was scheduled to conclude in November.

repairs could be started,"

said.

in the library, the

that roof," Duvall said.

to construction

so

part of the

in June.

potential for loss was so high,

gravel

Foster Aquatic Center closed in April

and functional condition," Barlow said. "It adds so significantly to our traditions here at

park became more difficult

The

funds were available to

The second

"With the value of what's

"We

resurfaced.

taken out of the maintenance and repair budget. as

lot.

behind Perrin and Hudson halls would also be

if

project, the replacement of the library's skylights,

began

habitat. Construction costs totaling $3 1 ,000 were

avoid draining the local water supply and adding

66:

be rerouted around the

2003 with the creation of an additional parking

Part of Northwest's landscape for over 40

"It

utility

Phase three would be completed in the summer

Colden Pond

The pond reopened

underground

campus.

renovations occurred throughout campus.

years,

traffic to

to

Administrators

for the State of Missouri to release the

Orange fencing and changing landscapes became part of everyday campus life. Needed improvements to University

facilities

sought to

create a more functional and aestheticallypleasing campus.


An tmployvc aClHP InduunaX hanp Aiid kyrh tfrain pipe

Thi\

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/A»t7.'

u^e

Northvrrtt conttruction worker tprradi at the BcU **t 4K An cuinuir hn all ihr

»m« rrtr

"

RENOVATION:

:67


Placed TO

CALL

BY

Danny Burns

HOME

New

residential

OPTIONS Administrators unvbl plans designed selections

I

mproved

living conditions

community were the Life's

Master Plan

for

to

and a closer knit

two to four people per

fully-equipped

unit. Students

traditional

new

not be available in the rooms.

residence halls.

four to ten years to complete. three different building

sites,

It

would encompass

bring more residents

and move away from traditional

would have

meal plans because a kitchen would

focal point of Residential

Costing $24-5 million, the plan would take

closer together

and

include suites

to expand residence

The Conference

Center would be remodeled and act community building desk, meeting

for the suites

as a

with a front

rooms and lounges

for suite

Meanwhile, construction of the apartments and

The phase one

goal of the plan was the

a

"If we

can get the financing, the market

and we're

really ready, we'll

of South

Perrin Halls similar to the renovation

Complex

that took place in 2000.

community building

for the

apartments would

Apartment

approximately two years from the

take place north of the library.

said before that phase began,

two to four people per unit with

probably be torn down.

Mark

Hetzler, the project's cost

would be

self-

"The students who

live there will

for all the operating costs

"There

is

be paying

and loans," Hetzler said.

no impact on the

institutional budget

at all."

Students could expect an increase of $50 per

month

they chose to live in a suite or apartment.

if

Bonds would

subsidize

which would be paid

much

of the project,

off incrementally over the

apartment complex north of the

"We'd

like to

library.

Hetzler

Franken Hall would '.

open up that area

as a greeiv=

have added amenities, including a private bath

space, a sort of entrance to that part of campus,"-

and kitchen,

Hetzler said.

bar-style eating area, dishwasher,

microwave and refrigerator. Students

living in the

Offering expanded

facilities

apartments had the option of purchasing a

of community, the Residential

commuter meal

hoped

plan.

The convenience on campus was "I

think

of living in the apartments

attractive to

it's

a

some

students.

to provide

on campus

and a better sense Life's

Master Plan

residents

all

the

amenities of off-campus living.

good plan that should of have

happened a long time ago," Joanna Townley

said.

Following the completion of phase one,

next 20 years. Contractors planned to break ground for the suite-style

a separate

bedroom for each resident. The apartments would

start.

Phase three called for the addition of another

complexes, also three stories high, would house

supporting.

right

Phase two would involve the renovation of

Hudson and

an apartment complex, both to be completed by 2004. According to Residential Life Director

is

forward."

Hetzler said.

construction of a suite-style housing complex and

fall

move

According to Hetzler, the phase would be finished

residents.

high-rise structures.

hall

apartments

complex

in

March 2003. Constructed

Tundra, the three-story

in the

suites

Hetzler said the start of phase

^^^^

two would follow.

were to house

TT^

•'

.—

rt

m^^ Li-

mHC* .' 1

.„<'yf^^^

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vT-^^Iw¥^m^^m£ mM:a^v^^^\r:.^em&^wmL,


PLANS FOR A TYPICAL

TWO-BED

UNIT WITHIN A

COMPLEX

SUITE

Plans for the suites included 56 four-bedRxim units, two accessible four-bedroom units, 57 two-bedrcx^m units

four accessible

two-bedroom

to construct the suites

units.

and

Administration planned

on the Tundra.

Exterior,

and

interior

plans for the campus

apartment complex The

four

bedroom

unit, pictured left,

one of the units anticipated. Plans

was

just

for the

apartments included 39 four-bedroom units, three accessible four-bedroom units, nine two-

bedroom units and three accessible two-bedroom units.

Administrators planned to construct the

apartments north of the

library.


Tech N9ne lyrically mixes together entertaining a sold-out Charles Johnson Theater. his career,

Tech recorded with

and Eminem.

p/i.vÂŤ

artist

Throughout such

as

2Pac

by .\Uii Frye

Tech N9ne's fans anticipate his next perftirmace between songs. Waiting open,

a

for the concert dtx>rs to

hne stretched from Charles Johnson

Theater to the

street in front

Fine Arts Building,

of the OHve Delucc

piu^o by Matt Frye

Former Northwest students Young D* Danger and Clak entertain prior to Tech Nine's performance. The rappers left the university to pursue

70:|

a career in

Events

music, photo by Matt Frye


Tech n9ne

KANSAS CITY RAPPER SWEEPS SMALL TOWN Nationally -known performer comes to Charles Johnson Theater for one night. BV BETSY LEE

L

ines of 13^ fiuu snaked iXicskle Charles

hutton-up

local talent and the hmflinerTechN9ne.

Joseph

electrifying pert'ormance of

Before the groups even firushed their suimd checks, fifffts

were lined up around CJT, trying to get a gixxJ

seat <»* the shim-.

The dix>n> opened at 8 p.m., Nov. 9.

6 p.m., ar»J the crowd has been ^thering since then," Gk»iana Gkiver said. "It's "We'\-e been here since

a little chilly, hut I don't mittd the wait because

TechN9ne." Before Tech N9rve

I

love

shirt.

Amanda

to hokl his hiind,"

"I gi>t

Baher, from St.

said. "I felt his sweat."

After performing "Slacker," Tech N9ne's hack-up singers

the stage, and his manager placed a lone

left

chair at the center of the

removed

st;ige.

before sitting

down

for

This

Tech N9ne slowly

Chiefs

his shin, rcvealir\g a

jersey replica,

Ring."

"I'm doing 'This Ring' tonight and that's the

Hands down.

ultimate. hit the stage, a series of area

marks on his bright red

creases in his face, leaving

Johnstm Theater, each petsiin eager flw a shtmvase nf

heard

it's

it,

'This Ring,'

if

you've ever

Tech N9ne

straight fi-om here,"

bands entertamed the crowd. Northwest student and

gesturing towards his heart. "Beautiful.

comedian Ben hjcntes took the

everything down."

stage

first,

folkiwed

The

by emcee Ralph Harton, a Northwest senwr. Rappers DoeDo, ICY and Dope Rhyme, from

Omaha-based Rockin Shiesih Recoids, took the stage at 8^30 p.m. [^irii\g

up

for the concert,

and Young 'IT tha Dangler fblkiwed

kxals Clak

at 9:30 p.m.,

imptesine snidents who have seen them around town. "I really liked their

performance," James Palmer

ud. "It's cool to see kxal people perform."

"1

loved

beyond

This Ring,"' Carrie Quandt said.

just beat. It

Tech N9ne rocked the crowd with Alive,' that's a

no

last.

the theater. Tech

N9ne leapt onto the stage at

p.m., opening with a song from his newest

10:30

CD,

"Abnlute Power," which hit stores Sept. 10. With the waid "Homy" written acnns his forehead makeup, Tech N9ne thnst

his hatvl toward

the crowd, his fingen playing to the rhythm of his wolds.

Tech N9ne said of the movements.

"I

love energy."

Tech N9ne's vigoitMS daoKe moves

inspired the

audience. Ptople at the back of the theater

left

seaD lofile down to the

hands

the

air tt>

dinvn the back

front,

waving

their

their in

While perfarmmg "I'm a

Ptaya." from "Absolute

N9ne hopped down from

aisle,

song,

Tech N9ne progressed

Tech N9nc't crew rapt to i tr^k jlhiim, An)(Hcllic.

shaking fans' hands.

Tnh

lud been

tntin hi% dcbui tn the

buunc^f

pumped everyone

up."

Tech N9ne has been entertaining audiences since 1985. "I

wrote my first rhyme in '85

grade, so

it's

Tech N9ne

like, I've

when was in seventh I

been into masic sitKe day one,"

said.

Since his original perfixmance, Tech said his music has changed in subtle ways. discovered pitch and pitch

is

the thing," Tech

N9ne said. "Because pitch, it's memorable." Tech N9ne concentrated on pitch and varying rhythms to enhance his musical appeal. He hoped to help infuse the Midwest market with rap options.

"You got Ncil>- w+io Wow up St. Louis, yxxi got Bone-

Thuj^n-Harmony, they blew up Qe\-eland. Eminem

the fast-paced heat.

Power." Tech

1

Alive' was by far the best song," Bridget Shiekk

said. "It

"I

"It's enerjfV."

1

to hear."

""It's

through the chests of th>«e gathered at the front of

in white

You know,

While rapping the

Lights dimmed and the heavy bass began to thump

Alive," to

N9ne said. "So know what they came

save that for

"We're here to see Tech N9ne!"

"It's

brainer. That's like

poup Young Gutts brvxight fans to their feet, pumping them up for the much-anticipated Tech N9ne said.

went

ck»e out the concert. "'It's

Palmer

lyrics.

something."

City anthem," Tech

for awhile,"

"It

was a song that actually meant

the.. .Kansas

"We've been waitmg

said,

shuts

concert tempo slowed during the song,

allowing the audience to absorb the meaningful

After a brief intermtssion. the Kansas City based

petfocmatKe.

It

the stage to

dance with the crowd. Sweat streamed through the

blew up Detroit," Tech N9ne scream

it.

said.

"SomeKxIy got to

Karuas Ciry, Musoun, we got

it

too.

We

got talent."

:77


ENCORE SERIES BY BETSY LEE

DAN SANDERS LEAH

ST.

CLAIR

MARA PICARDI )EFF RIX Designed to bring culture to students, the Encore Series brought acts

from

over the country to Maryville.

all

Beats of romance

A

performance

movements

lit

filled

with passion, love, jealousy and

fiery

dance

up the stage of Mary Linn Auditorium.

Gaelforce took the stage

March

14, after groups

One World and

Celticfusion cancelled their appearances due to transportation

The show told the story of two brothers who fell in love with woman. Dancers from Gaelforce awed the audience with their

problems. the same

dancing movements.

rapid Irish "1

was so intrigued by the amazing tap

skills all

of the dancers had,"

Andrew Elder said. "They all danced together so well and looked awesome doing

it."

Atomic tension Based on events that unfolded in 1941 Germany, "Copenhagen" recreated global tension during the

Performed April physicists Niels possibility

World War

11

era.

the play depicted a secret meeting between

3,

Bohr and Werner Heisenberg; the two talked of the

of producing an atomic bomb.

Joyce Tinsely enjoyed the play but wished she had more knowledge of

World War "1

wish

11.

knew my

1

history better because

it

would make the time

frame and understanding the background of what was going on a

lot

easier," Tinsely said.

Classical experience Smooth sounds of the Hungarian Orchestra provided a sharp contrast Mary Linn

to the plays that previously occupied the stage of the

Auditorium.

The

orchestra performed Oct.

1,

featuring soloist Veronique

Bonnecaze, a pianist educated at Julliard in "1

New York City.

loved watching all the strings and the pianist.

Jordan Goecker

1

was very impressed,"

said.

Both the orchestra and the

soloist received

standing ovations from

the audience.

Pacific love Originally,

opening on Broadway in 1949, "South Pacific," entertained

audiences on stages around the country.

The musical, performed at Mary Linn Auditorium Oct. 6, was set on World War II. The main character Nellie, a U.S. Navy nurse, began a relationship with a mysterious Frenchman. 1

a small Pacific island during

"I like

the war backgrtxjnd of the play," Eddie Graves said.

better than

72:| Features

I

thought

it

would be."

"It

was


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Holly Davis Ensign Nrllt* Forbuth performs "I'm (iomu Wa*h Thai Man Rjf^l

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Encore

:75


Pollack shares

NBC

Dateline program The program focused on the emotional well-being of a middle school boy who was bullied, plwto by Matt I-ryta

illustrating findings from a case study.

LECTURE

SERIES BY BETSY LEE

LEAH

ST.

CLAIR

SCOTT PHILLIPS SAM FARR TATIANNA JOHNSON Established in 1990, the goal of the Distinguished

Stereotypes turned around

Lecture Series was to infuse Northwest's learning

Attempting to dispel myths, William Pollack

environment with lectures representing different

toured the country spreading information about the

backgrounds and

struggles facing

ideas.

Rejection of hate Awestruck

at the

former Hammerskin member,

the audience stared as he explained

how his

life

used

dominated by a hate group. Leyden brought his knowledge of T.J. Hammerskins and other white supremacist groups to Charles Johnson Theater March 6. In his presentation, "Turning Away from Hate," Leyden discussed everything from how the U.S. to be

military trains hate groups to ways the groups recruit

more members. "If anyone ever tells you the white race movement in the United States is not using military training for their revolution, tell them to take a drive to

Oklahoma memorial

City. Tell

for

them

to take a look at a

168 people. There's proof that they

Leyden said. Leyden said the groups recruit teenagers from 13 to 15 because they were a susceptible group. are,"

According

to Leyden, family

was the main way to

have certain people in my life that kept pushing and pushing me and pushing me. thank them

"1

I

thank God for them," Leyden Revealing the facts

everyday.

I

effects. Dr. Jeffery

students,

as they

progressed into adulthood. Pollack also served as the

co-director of the Center for

Men

at

McLean

Hospital in the Harvard Medical School.

"Boys face the same media and societal pressure that girls do," Pollack said.

"Our culture

just hasn't

been as aware of it." During his presentation Oct. 7, Pollack showed a short testimonial video about boys who had participated in his study. Pollack also provided ways for boys to avoid conflict without becoming stereotyped as a weak individual.

Innovative teaching methods

A two-time California Teacher-of-Year spoke Feb. 6 to students and educators

at the

Performing Arts

Center. Erin Gruwell received her 1999 and 2000 teaching

awards based on her innovative teaching methods.

Weigand spoke

to

smoking advertisements.

Weigand took the

"Teachers didn't

in journals

know how it,"

and reading.

to deal with racial

Gruwell

said.

Gruwell held fund-raisers to make sure that her

to college

one of the groups most susceptible

and violence by writing tension, so they ignored

said.

On a quest to cast away myths about tobacco and its

on how society silenced boys' voices

Gruwell encouraged her students to escape racism

stop hate.

me

American boys. Author of "Real Boys: Rescuing Our Sons from the Myths of Boyhood," Pollack shared his studies

students had the classroom materials they needed.

According to her students, Gruwell also went the extra mile to form relationships with them. "I

thought teachers were supposed to do their

Mary Linn

eight hours of work and then go home," said Melvin

Auditorium March 18 to relate his battle with the former Brown and Will jam.son Tobacco Corporation.

genuinely cared, and she found a way to connect

Weigand

stage at the

risked his job by writing a report about

the health risk of the cigarettes. report eventually resulted

The

submission of

m Weigand's termination

from Brown and William.son.

Weigand's experience influenced the 1999 movie

The

Insider."

7^:| Features

Logan, a student

who toured

with Gruwell. "Ms. 'G'

with us." In addition to teaching, Gruwell published a tolerance book and founded the Tolerance Education Foundation, a nonprofit organization devoted to teaching tolerance and providing

scholarships to underprivileged students.


C*r«y Cat«y ipeaki

Ust

iii

the

I

>ivni»gui\hcii Iciiiirc Scries, C j*c>-

hcld the judiciu c^ jttcntioii by tVeiiucntly ind iTat ntnc. /JMk' fry .Viifi ( -jwi^

)t>ktii^

jKnii hi\ b»g bp»

A c//Ver5e focus by Ucey Bjgley

A new lecture series focused on diversity issues kicked off

with a speaker

who had expenenced

prejudice and

segregation.

The Plo^wft

Diversity Lecture Senes sponsored the

Natitxvil Fellowship of Christian Athletes Rxindation

President Carey Casey in the University ConferetKC

Center Feb. 25

Month. Casey

as part of Black History

focused his speech

on diversity and character.

The former fixwhall player for the University t/North Carolina Chapel Hill began bus lecture by giving a

brief,

humoious history tif his experiences anending a segretiated school until the fourth grade. Casey's experience led

him

to believe the impoftance

of diversity. " rXm't let

culture

is

your cokir hokl yew back," Casey said. "Every

valuable."

Casey encixiraged audierKe members to themselves to someime

who was

introdtice

Casey

also

emphasized the imptirtance of good character

arKJ

different.

optimism.

He said that fiill,

the glass shouki always be viewed as half

and people shixjU

part>'

when

there

is

"Your character, integnty and honcst>' ferther than anything

Mu Piilhi IM11— Imfimhinioahmir

Booker

T.

you cantvx leave your mark on the worid."

t

TmikBp hjw

M lam lopubWi

baniu cm

are,

you

said

you

li

i'oiliOL

music.

quonng secure in what

you ever do," Casey

Washington. "Unril you are

rK)

will carry

Stephanie Habry said she was glad she w«nt to the lecture.

She was impre<*ed with the energy he

exhibited while presenting.

m AthmM

JWinrv Wiigmil apaalu lo nudu about thr 'ur cflrcn otcKantfc f <-j<h dunn n br HWjk J cAnn of £>rmn dunnn dat I^IIOt. ^hat^M^Fryr

"He was definitely wvxth going to. He made his point Habey thought.

very well,"

:7S


Greek Week

Gathered together as a community Greeks spend a week bonding through a variety

of activities and competitions. BY BETSY LEE

:G to

reek

Week camaraderie

evolved into an effort

improve the community.

The

Children's Center of Maryville was designated as

Week philanthropy

Greek Sing produced a lot of laughs for Greeks in the Mary Linn Auditorium. Having prepared various songs and dances for the event, sororities walked to the

As a result of fundHera pageant, participants raised approximately $4,800 for the

Performing Arts Center in packs cheering and chanting.

Children's Center and completed 700 service hours.

incorporate dance moves and stuff."

the Greek

in 2001.

raising efforts, like the Zeus and

"Greek Song it

Vice President for Student Affairs Kent Porterfield said the shift to a more giving Greek

community

in recent

Greek members appreciate the week. "Greek Week didn't pocket any money," co-chair Allison Clevenger said. "Even the money from the T-shirts went to the philanthropy; the profit went to the Children's

years has helped

Greeks also raised money by charging a $1 entrance annual Zeus and Hera pageant. One pageant

fee to the

participant was nominated by each

Greek organization.

To win the pageant, nominees competed in a toga contest and talent competition. Winners Mike Voris and Hilary Morris were elected to preside over the week's events.

canoes were hauled from Lake Mozingo for the race.

Canoe

Race," Tiffany Barmann said. "It was funny though, because a lot of people fell in the water."

of the path.

"It

i

said.

was covered with baked beans, mustard, ketchup, oil, bread crumbs and chocolate syrup," Welch

"Watching that

The Olympiad was

76:1

Events

pbato by

Amanda

is

the most fun part."

the only all-day event. Continuing

new event to the Olympiad each Farm Relay had contestants from every Greek organization stacking hay and wearing rubber boots. the tradition of adding a

a

Hyler

always fun to see people doing things out of the

ordinary for them,"

Kim Lamberty

said.

At the end of the week, Greeks were invited to the annual Greek Feast at College Park. Greeks then moved to the Mary Linn Auditorium for a slide show and award presentation. Awards were given to winners of the week activities

mi

tug-of-war.

Tlie t")lympiad also introduced the

Farm Relay,

course, they had to slide

vegetable

and fraternities participate

variety of events, including

To complete the

a white tarp covered with food.

During the Greek Week Olympiad, sororities

think

obstacle course, trying to collect flags hidden in each part

"It's

Each Greek organization selected members to participate in the Canoe Race at Colden Pond. University started raining during the

"I

year, the

Greek Week events included the Canoe Race, Greek

it

always huge," Clevenger said.

According to Brian Carroll, the Double-Dare race became a highlighted Greek Week event after Greek adviser Bryan Vanosdale jumped in the race. Members from each Greek organization ran through an

Sing, Double-Dare race and Olympiad.

sucked when

is

bigger for sororities than fraternities because they

down

Center."

"It

is

new

and academic achievements during the

year.


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President

Dean Hubbard

overhead

screen

importance of

a

is projected on an emphasizing the

while

college degree. Following the

conferring of bachelor's degrees, Provost Taylor

Barnes presented the candidates for Master's and

Education Speciahst degrees,

Students

rise a^ President

photo by Mart Frye

Dean Hubbard begins

conferring bachelor's degrees. Nine students received a Bachelor's of Arts degree, while 462

earned Bachelor's of Science,

photo by

Man Fryr

Behind the tcenet volunteer! ensure that ,

proji-ttion

the

and sound equipment run properly.

The projcttion streen. setup on the side of the and friends to see graduates

stage, jllowcd fannly ret civc their

7?:

Events

dipjonus.

fhitio

by

Man

I tyr


Winter Graduation

Future goals highlighted by graduation commencment Bearcat Arena December 13-

Largest winter graduation IS fills

UY

:W

hilc square-topped hats

The

K>bbed with

speeches

made

at

Sam Farr

the graduation ceremony reflected

excitement, students waited to receive degrees and begin lives

the students excitement. President IX-an Hubbard

beyond the

first

university.

Bearcat Arena was filled Dec. 13 as a record 481 students graduated.

Some planned

to attain jobs in the professional

world while others planned further scholarship. "I'm a

little ner\'ous. It's just

exciting to be done," Erin

The Jltxir and bleachers of Bearcat Arena were full of proud members of

i>ffered praise "It's

the

IS

a special night for our graduates,"

the climax

i>f

Hubbard

said. "It

four years of hard work."

After Hubbard, former Board of Regents

Marsh added humor to the evening by

member Danny

listing the Ti>p

10 events

no longer college students. Among these were filing for their own taxes, keeping more ftxxl than beer in the fridge and having a salary that was less that reminding graduates they were

Nally said.

family

"This is

made

speech, recogniiing the importance of night.

graduates, while various robed officials

and advice.

than the cost of tuition.

kind oi like a dream," Jackie Loucks said. "We'll wake

up tonuMTow and enjoy

it

Marsh

also provided a prescription for mental health,

including keeping physically

then."

fit,

remembering the

# Continued page HO

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Future goals by high lighted graduation â&#x20AC;˘ importance of family, keeping

in

Continued from page 79

touch with professors and

doing good work. "Prepare to be a lifelong pursuer of quality," Marsh said.

Kara Karssen, Student Senate President, reminded when they had procrastinated

graduates of the days before

with their studies and crammed the night before

tests. If

graduates thought the days of procrastination would end

with graduation, they were wrong.

"The

years

ahead of you

will

go quickly," Karssen

Graduation was not only a source of pride

said.

for graduates,

but for their family members as well.

"We

are pretty proud at the

mother of Sarah Moser. "This

is

moment,"

said Lois Moser,

our fourth of five (children]

the second from Northwest.

to graduate, this

is

accomplishment

for her

and greater

After the ceremony, the

It's

a great

for us."

President Dean Hubbard shakes the hand graduate Casey Bell after he recieved his diploin i

Hubbard greeted the assembly, conferred degrees on the graduates and remarks, photo by Matt Fryv

made

tl

closir

new alumni walked out of Bearcat

Arena while "Pomp and Circumstance" was played by the Bell Tower Brass Quintet. Family members and friends

The audience watches as Angela Davis prep.ir

greeted graduates with hugs and flowers at a reception in

on each graduate, projecting

the basement of Lamkin Activity Center.

?0:

EVENTS

to recieve her Bachelor's degree.

A camera tbcus<

their face

overhead screen, photo by Mutt Frye

onto

i


WS^'

Review

Maryville Washington U.N. Weapons Boil Order Sniper Inspections


2

h^lg^Sl^^^A^glslt^lAf ^

Moscow theater turns into war zone hyRptsyli-p

Masked Chechens snuck into

Moscow

a

theater turning a night

out into a four-day hostage ordeal for

more than 800 theatergoers.

On

the evening of Oct. 23, 50

male and female Chechen rebels took over a southeast Moscow theater during a presentation of the

musical "Nord-Ost." Rebels held

the

theater

four

for

days,

demanding that Russia withdraw troops from Chechnya within a week.

Russian troops have been in

Chechnya since October 1999. The troops invaded after Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin dea 1996 accord giving

nounced

Chechnya

de

government.

Since the Russian

facto

occupation of the sides

self-

the two constant

state,

have been

in

A Russian police officer, armed with a Kalashnikov rifle, looks at the main entrance of the theater which was seized by armed Chechen Moscow theater shot and killed one captive and dying." AP Photo/Ivan Sekrrtam'

conflict.

gunmen on Thursday,

by Chechen Movsar Barayev, the group of rebels considered the taking of the

ready to die for their cause, warning that thousands

theater as a last ditch effort to

of the hostages staged antiwar

rebels sitting

achieve Chechen autonomy.

demonstrations outside the theater.

explosives strapped to their bodies.

hearing

After the hostages and the rebels

Jamestown Foundation, the use of the gas may have been illegal. Dan Eggen, correspondent for the Washington Post, stated that the

unconscious, Russian troops

Russian forces appeared to use an

Led

Negotiations between the rebels

Oct. 24. Chechen rebels holding hundreds of hostages in

TTiroughout the ordeal, relatives

After

reportedly

and Putin began Oct. 23. By the

gunshots and explosions, Russian

end of the first night, the attackers freed 30 hostages.

troops

moved

on the theater

a

said

they were

more of their comrades were "keen on

system, geared at incapacitating the

fell

among the crowd with

may fall

at

busted through the doors of the

"incapacitating agent that

3:30 a.m. Oct. 26. By 7:25 a.m., the

theater and shot the rebels with the

into the gray area of international

Putin promised

troops released 750 hostages. All of

explosives in the temple.

to guarantee the lives of the

the rebels and over 90 hostages

on chemical weapons." CBS News, Putin acknowledged the loss of life by stating, "We could not save

Two

days

attackers

later,

if

they released the

hostages. In response, the rebels

in

were killed in the

According to

troops loaded most of the hostages

siege.

CBS

News, the

threatened to start shooting

Russian troops used an unidentified

hostages at 6 a.m. Oct. 26

gas to subdue the rebels.

if

their

The

gas

poured through the ventilation

demands were not met.

restrictions

After securing the theater, the

onto busses to be treated

at area

everyone. Forgive us."

hospitals.

According Weekly,"

According to

a

to

"Chechnya

publication of the

www.cnn.com www.usatoday.com

STRIKES RESUCnN^JTLC Rl SIS icey

^TMB

Bagley

Oils cost soared as a result of one country's Strikes

and

supplies.

strife.

protests in Venezuela plunged nations around the

world into an oil crisis. Protests about the leadership of Venezuelan President

Hugo Chavez, caused the world's fifth

to reduce

its

A

output to

less

than one-third of

its

peaceful protest in Caracas, Venezuela,

turned violent

when

largest oil exporter

amount.

typical

March

10,

2002,

sharpshooters fired into a crowd, killing

1

people and injuring dozens more.

oil

company, launched a

strike in protest of

Pefrolcos de Venezuela workers were sectors in the

Chavez.

joined by several other

economy, including private banking. After two

weeks, the strike resulted in the depletion of basic humanitarian

flour, sugar,

and milk trom Colombia

In the city of Caracas, motorists waited in

Brazil.

lines that stretched for

two miles

for gas.

Tlie universal strike lasted 63 days before

all sectors,

except for

employees of Petroleos de Venezuela resumed work.

As of Feb.

27, the strike

continued pushing

oil prices to a

thrcc-viMr

high of $40 a barrel. TTie fight to

In December, workers for Pctroleo* de Venezuela, the state

owned

Chavez began importing

and gasoline from

which called

remove Chavez continued with 'The Great Signup" people to sign a petition that would remove

for 1.8 million

Chavez through an amendment to the national :www.cnn.com :www.globeandmail.com :www.m$nbc.com

constitution.


I

^^M


fJl I

b|4^s| ^lilit^ =

il I

Global tensions rise

by Betsy l^e

Over 10

Gulf War, strained

Hesse said that people should have read newspapers

United States and Iraq to the

from other areas to gain an accurate view on the conflict.

years after the

relations brought the

first

Troops Deployment

edge of violent conflict. Since Sep. 2002, President George Bush had been seeking United Natiorw support in disarming Iraq, regardless of required force. TTie

United Nations

responded to Bush's entreaties by issuing Iraq an

Despite the lack of an official war declaration, the

number of deployment steadily increased

According to

orders issued by the Pentagon

from Dec. 24 to Feb.

8.

CNN,

from Dec. 24 to Jan. 5 the 25,000 deployment orders; the number

ultimatum; Iraq must allow weapons inspectors

Pentagon issued

complete access without conditions.

of orders was more than tripled from Feb. 2 to Feb.8.

Iraqi leaders agreed to the terms laid out

by the

United Nations, allowing inspectors into the country

November. Since November, the United States

in

has scrambled for international support for an attack while the inspections continue to examine Iraqi

More than 140,000

troops were deployed, including

Northwest faculty member Mark Corson and nine students.

Considering Involvement TTie Turkish parliament voted

military installments.

more than 60,000 troops

W eapons Inspections

with

As the weight of war hung in the balance, United Nations weapons inspectors attempted to continue

Iraq.

The

decision

March

not to allow

1

came

as a surprise to

States officials who, according to

United

CNN, have had U.S.

ships hovering off shore of the Turkish port of

inspections of several Iraqi military installments.

Iskenderun. There were already 50 warplanes and

Chief Inspector Hans Blix reported March

troops stationed in Turkey.

Iraqi officials destroyed four

al-Samond

1

that

2 missiles.

According to the United Nations, the

missiles

had a range beyond the 150 kilometers allowed by U.N. resolutions. Inspectors discovered the missiles at storage facility in

Al

Taji, a

northern Iraqi

city.

The United Nations suspected that Iraqi had over 100 al-Samond two

war

to use their bases for a

1

,500

The United States offered Turkey over $26 billion in grants

and

loans,

hoping to entice their cooperation.

Turkish people have shown States;

little

support for the United

hundreds of thousands have staged

Turkey had a 2 1 8-mile border with officials

saw Turkey

as a

way

Iraq.

protests.

U.S. military

to attack Iraq from

two

While France said the destruction of the missiles was a step in the disarmament process, U.S. and British officials

General Richard Myers said that he anticipated that

argued that Iraq needed to disarm completely.

U.S. forces would be in Turkey one way or another.

missiles.

fronts.

According to

CNN,

Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman

Support Sought United Nations support related to the reports

for the

war directly

from weapon inspectors. In

Blix's first report to the

:www.globalsecuri ty.com

:www.msnbc.com

:www.news.bbc.com

United Nations, he stated

that Iraqis were not serious about complying with

disarmament

:www.cnn.com

resolutions.

Bush and U.S. Secretary

people pass

of President Saddam Hussein in Wednesday, Dec. 4. Iraqi people staged protests against cotiflict with the United States. APPhtno/NasserNassei Iracji

Baghdad's Alawi

a giant poster

district

of State Colin Powell anticipated a similar second repjort

that would help

woo support for the

war.

On Feb. 14, Blix's second report stressed that Iraqi was demonstrating new degrees of cooperation; according to Time magazine, one U.S. State

Department

official said that

the report was a solid

blow to the U.S. cause.

Bush continued

to seek the support of the

and the American people. As of Feb.

28,

U.N.

Bush only

had the direct support of three members of the U.N.; six

other nonpermanent members were undecided.

Bush needed nine votes to pass a resolution. While

any permanent member of the U.N. Security Council had veto power, going against the vote of the council would be difficult for any country.

"Without the blessing of the U.N. more

radical

groups will seek violent retribution against the U.S.,"

Assfxiate Professor of Political Science Brian Hesse said.

In a February

Time/CNN

poll, 61

percent of

Americans either opposed the war in Iraq on any terms or would support one only if it had the United Natiofvs backing. Hesse said that the administration

was not providing the public enough

"As a rumnal all

citizen

I

information," Hesse said. "But

privy to

?^:

details.

don't expect to be privy to

more information."

I

would

like to

be

woriun unload rqiiipinent from a U.N. plane carrying the 17 uupecton to Saddam International Airp<irt Monday, Nov. 25 U.N weapon inspectors arrived m Iraq for the first time in four years. AP Ph(Mo/)tusim Mohammed Iraqi

.

.

m

Baghdad.

Iraq.


with conflict in the Philippines by Betsy L««

F»>r

the

first

time, U.S. trtxips cihiKI

play an offensive role in the c«)nflict

between the Philippine Kovemment

and Muslim

rebels this

summer.

According to sources from the Pentagon, U.S. Special Forces would he actively searching for rebel leader

Abu 1

Sayyaf. In addition, another

,400 tnxjps would

assist

the military

in supportive roles.

For 31 years, Muslim rebels have

engaged

in guerilla warfare while

fighting for an independent

Muslim

state.

The United

States began assisting

the Philippine government in 2001

Appnixiinately

1

,200 military trainer>

and support crews conducted training operations for the Philippine

military-.

:www.insnbc.com :\\-\\Av.cnnw(irldnews.cnm

^K

SHALL POX SCARE

ANTI-WAR PROTESTS

brBctsTLcc

by Bet5v Lee and Klait Frye

^PRcaring ihe poMabibty of biological wtirfare.

President George Bush

unveiled plans to

make

small pox

vacdnMianiavalUble to all American*.

Announced Dec

Bwh's plan included (he tameiliMe vaodnadon of 5O0;XX)hea>dic»«odDmaid510j000 tnxips who

12,

mi^ 0D to war. Burf> hoped

to eventually vaccinate 10 million

emerfeiKy workers and any other American who wanted to take the

attd

1

The vaodite ioelf couU also result m such as heaifachw

Health care worker* acrou the

out of

peace.

vaccinated rkationwide.

a protest in Pdcistan, 70,000 protestDn

dttesK that raifd a

grisly

death in

NfwBrirtrk Safety and noxiniui

feBoa«d by the appeannoe of patnfid

oTZOOO.

The

vfety needia to

w minu*Muesyin)tia is

Victioia< jyc il

employen to

mmmuie

uk

the risk of

woikos. According to the American Nuaes AaodMian (ANA), injufy to

heakh workers suffer between 600jOCD

i

i

the streets, Feb.

CtW,

largest

Locally, protestors

convened

m

1

5.

According

the detnonstration was the

London has ever seen. During

marched through the "the world say*

city chanting,

no to war."

Afghanistan and

la.

In Kansas City, group* of 2,000 to

3,000 gathered weekly at the ].C. Nichols Fountain on the Plaza.

Meeting every Sunday, membets of the group carried posten and chanted to express disdain for military conflict

Proteston abo took to the street* in Italy, Iraq,

and Des Moines,

many

with

Iraq.

President Oeotge Bush laid he

wouU

otheriution*.

be unswayed by the protests. Slating that

In dM United States, people made up to 45-hour trip* crtM country to

he 'respectfully disagreed" with the

fann at the Vitus caused bleeding RDm every uliAcecf the body.

protest

boils

act required

2 million protestors

In filled

about 30 percent of those infected.

Act

London,

boasted the thinJ-highest

to

Q^itol to the White House. KatuasCity; Columbia; Lawrence, Kan.

number of vacdttations in the nation. Asof Feb. 27, Mosouri had vaccinated 119 of the 1,043 individuals

comny tdwedtDbevacamaedfaKauK Buh^ pkn did not cain|>ly with the i

oppose war. Protestots inarched from the

cry.

protestors gathered to ask leaders for

MiMowl

estinuited

anti-war

soRneas, nouKa and death in two caaes

milUan.

Washington D.C. an

500,000 Americans came together to

From San FraiKisco to South Korea,

I

In

prepared for war, civilians took up the

,

in health probfa

Small pcK was a highly infectious

precaution.

While countries around the worU

milliun neccDestick injuries per

year.

on the ba, arms aitd

legs.

One

on

the step* of the nation's

% dtere

the weekend of Feb

were luimerous

nvww.aleiiitet.otg

www.cfaniew(xaiii

Capitol.

On

million asking for peace.

protests.

H,

wwwxiut.con www.kansascitystarxom

\:2S


JTfA^iTiTI^fAfl

Tragedy strikes space program hy lason Price

Above Texas took the

a cosmic disaster

seven astronauts

lives of

and temporarily grounded the aspirations of

The

NASA. its

is

out there," student Larry Jones said.

NASA

The

program had become

second nature to many Americans.

space shuttle Galumbia was

scheduled to end

program because we need to know what

16-day mission

around 9 a.m. Saturday, Feb.l.

"We

take

something Jessica

it

Lane

then

for granted,

like this

happens," student

said.

the Columbia crew radioed Mission

The nation and the campus mourned the loss of dedicated men and women

Control and explained they were

supporting any advances the outer world

having problems with landing

can produce.

Upon re-entering the atmosphere,

gear.

Shortly afterwards, the shuttle lost all

communication with

As NASA

NASA.

As

of

March

investigation by

waited for a response,

two

1,

NASA

an ongoing had surfaced

possible causes for the explosion.

The aerospace experts thought either

Columbia exploded. The shuttle reentered the atmosphere, racing

the problem was in defective hydrazine

across the sky in a burning mass of

tanks or

of white

Some

flames followed by a

trail

"I just felt horrible

when I saw

just couldn't believe that

it;

it

happened because there hadn't been anything awhile,"

like that

happen

in quite

Megan Dolt said. Rick

at

tiles.

damage

to a fuel

the time of launch could

have caused a hole in the

tiles

of the

shuttle.

The

hole would have exposed the

shuttle's

interior

to

the

high

temperatures of re-entry. This could

All seven astronauts, Shuttle

Commander

insulation

scientists say

tank suffered

smoke.

I

damaged

Husband,

have caused Columbia to disintegrate mid-flight.

Michael Anderson, David Brown,

:www.abc.com

Kalpana Chawla, Laurel Clark, William McCool and Ham Ramon.the first Israeli national in

:www.cnn.com

space, lost their lives in the

CAPE CANAVERAL, FL - JANUARY 16: (FILE PHOTO) The crew ofthe Space Shutde

explosion.

Among

the crew, only

members had previously flown. While national debate erupted concerning the advantages and three

disadvantages of the space program,

many still believed in NASA's work. "It

is

government

important to

for

the

go ahead with the

:www.chron.com :www.nasa.gov

Columbia for mission STS-107, in the front row, William McCool and Husband. Row 2: Mission Pilot

Commander Rick Specialists

Kalpana

Chawla and Laurel Clark. Back row: Payload Specialist Dan Ramon, Payload Commander Michael Anderson and Mission Specialist David Brcfwn walk to the launch pad on January 16 at Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Florida. Columbia broke up upon re-entry to earth February 1,20()3. (Ptwioby NASA/Caty Images)

NIGHTCLUB DISASTERS iB^r

by Lacey Bagley

In less than a week, two accidents caused the deaths of

week

erupted in flames.

On Feb. 17, people attending the E2 club in Chicago panicked and started a stampede that killed 21 people. Five days later, an accidental fire engulfed The Station

on

club in West Warwick,

R.I., killing

pyrotechnics, which set acoustic materials around the stage fire.

Patrons had less than 30 seconds to escape the building.

98 people.

The first of the two accidents occurred in the early morning hours, when a fight erupted on the dance floor. Hundreds of people flooded the narrow stairway leading out of Chicago's E2 nightclub. The crowd struggled to

The

escape the pepper spray used by club security guards to

denied Great White's claims. According to authorities, the fire burned rapidly because of the acoustic materials near the stage that were made of extremely flamiiiiil-iic

subdue the

fight.

People piled against the front doors of

jamming the one unlocked door. Minutes later, emergency workers pried the door open and freed the people inside. Twelve women and nine men were crushed to death, while 57 people were injured. The club's south side had two other exits, both blocked from sight. According to authorities, E2 had been operating in violation of building and fire codes for more than seven months. E2,

^6:1

after the Chicago disaster, The Station The '80s hard rock band Great White was performing and allegedly used unauthorized

Less than a

over 110 nightclub patrons.

flames and smoke claimed 98

lives,

including the

band's guitarist Ty Longley and injured 180 people.

Great White claimed they received permission from the Owners from The Station

club to use the pyrotechnics.

polyurethane foam.

both accidents, cities all over the country clubs. Kansas City stepped up random inspections of area clubs to supplement annual inspections

As

a result of

cracked

down on

and .30-day follow-up inspections. :

ww w. usatoday.com

:www.kcstar.com


prisoners by Tow«r Staff In hl^

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in i4fWe, a |^lvc^vlr tparcd

tiruil dii>'s

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lllintii<>

Oeorge Ryan ctrnimiiu-J

io\'.

the dciiih M'niencc>>

«>•

the ininaic* after

rovifwingtapiiiil puniNhineni pmccdure*. R^an't

.iecisum fi>lkm«.\lihcn:lca!iciif informitikinthiU

I survive

the state had almost executed three wnmgly-

convicted people.

7 7-hour

Ryan halted

executitins

all

and crrated the

C^HnmlMion on Capital Punishment to identif>

ordeal

httnl Inni; ihr hole

Nine Pennsylvania minen were rescued

the chamber and water

after

The men

Late July 24. miners workiitg in the Black Wolf Sipesville, Petui.,

• wall into an abandoned

trapped by the floodwaters.

nine-hour delay occurred July 25, when a used to make the escape shaft hit a hard

was flown

A week

stales

connection with the

and the

District of

Muhammed.

string of killings

shook the

killings.

41,

Columbia and claimed 10

and Lee Malvo,

Muhammed

17,

were

that

lives.

arrested in

trained as a soMier in the military first

i

fin( strudi

=

Oct

'

i

2. killing

lames O. Martin

in a grocery store

pariangkA

killing home

Fear struck close to

One of the wounded was a

1

3 -year-old boy, arrivif>g at school in

BowievMd.

when

I

first

heard tbout

»-.ls

fired

internal police investigators ftxind evidetKe

H.' student

dUnI itiink anybody would do something like Itiat.'

Adam

Leslie said.

:www.foxnews.com

1

by Jason Price

for Leslie.

One of his

*l

friends visited the

and

killed

same gas

Dean Meyers,

the

The sniper's final victim was Conrad k>hnson, a 35->«ar-old bus driwer wlto was shot in the abdomen Oct. 22. Authorities

and

first

stopped the pair on Oct.

Mohammad were

apprehended

8, for

at a rest

a minor traffic violation. Malvo

stop sleepiiig in their car, which

had been given to authorites through an anonymus lip. Police also found a .223 rifle, which was held by officials in Baltimore Md.

caliber

Muhammed

allow an Individual to lay After the

men were

down

and Malvo's vehicle had been modified

in the trunk

and see out through

to

a small hole.

taken into custody, debate raged over whether Malvo

should be charged with murder as an aduh. MaKt>'s preliminary hearirtg in Virgina began )an. 10 as the de<ertse argued that

shock

Burge. Burge

ninth victim.

According to police.

Ihenexiday the sniper killed five people from 7:1 5 a.m. lo 9:1 Sp.m. All victims were shot w4ule in public places. Ffom Oct 4 to Oct 19, the sniper killed four more people and wounded

in

G>mmander Jon

:www.washtimes.com

'

^

was

commit urvJcr torture h\' former QiKago

physical abuse.

>>f

:www.usatoday.com

i

^

1

.ifter

family and friends to thank their rescuers.

WW » can wled MusUm. Maho was Muhamraedi stepson from his "'«'' '.'. "•"""gt '*'

three Others.

Police

after the accident, the miners

October brougN chaos to the eastern shoreline with a shooting spree

The sniper

Jid not

he believed lhe>' confessed tocrimcs thc>

station just hours before the sniper's bullet struck

)ohn

and hkc.

gathered at a church service with hundreds of

nations capital.

and

(because

with only mild signs of hypothermia.

Sniper suspects cauglit after spanned over two

i>n inctMne

Ryan pardoned four death row inmates

and food. Despite hunger and dehydration, men in good condition

While working to free the miners, rescuers put an air tube through the ceiling of the chamber to the men. Hot, pressurized air was forced into

24.

were based

doctors pronounced the

to the site by helicopter to start another shaft.

On Oct

ct«nvictions

men were alive. The miners were administered warm blankets

drill bit

11,2001 a

recognixd some

the

miners had to be driven to Peniuylvania.

A year after tfw icnorisi acts of Sep.

might lead to mote accurate

ludlcial rulings. Tlic repi>rt also

Pennsylvania Gov. Mike Schweiker announced to the public July 26 that each of

rescue effort staned 20 hours after the

bit

.ind training )udges

were hoisted above ground.

accident. Rescue equipment needed to free the

replacement

suggested videotaping

intenogations, carefully examining c>'ewitncsses

Rescue crews began raising men, one-by-one, shaft. In less than two hours, all nine

meigenqf crews rescued the men.

A

The commission

The group huddled

from the

trapping the

miners in a four-foot shaft for three days. After

rock and broke.

f\ entuallv pardoned.

of a sandwich and a bottle of Mountain Dew.

with

who wa*

survived by finding a pocket of air

mine

filled

wronuiiil conviction of Antlvmv PotttT.

to

together for warmth, sharing one man's lunch

new mine,

water rushed into the

pumps were used

punched through

ground water. Sixty million galloiu of ground

A

group of college studen(!> frtim

a

ifter

lower the water level in the chamber.

of an abandoned mmeshafi.

The

pn>bleins dealing with the Illinois death penalty-

the

NJorthwcstern University Investigated the

being trapped for three days in the crawl space

77 hour*, e

ii

Inpped for three diy\, shaft. APhtm/Ott, (.Mr. POOL

fairLKeyBi^ey

Mine near

to shake hands with the fourth nuncr » he u Quecrcek nuneon Sunday.July 28. 2(X)2. Nine miners, were pulled one-by-one from a watery. 240-foot-deep

Miovfv oa tlw iar&c« nmeh out

he was urwluly influenced by Muhammed.

As of March

1

,

Muhammed's was scheduled

nwww.utatoday.com

rwwwxnnxom

for

Oct. 24, 2003.

:www.cbs.com

niyww.fdxnews.com

:g7


I^flWlTiTr^TA^

Issues facing the

United States hyI.arpyRaglpy

A tense House and Senate waited for President

George W. Bush

Murr

said.

"Everyone

in the

make the annual speech about the

of the world understands that

status of the nation.

be done peacefully."

On

President Bush began the State

of the

Union Address

world

wants to see Iraq disarmed, but most

to

Jan. 28 by

it

can

the domestic front, Bush

proposed that tax reductions be put

outlining domestic reforms and

into effect ahead of schedule.

focusing on the possibility of war

Assistant Professor of Political

with

Science Brian Hesse believed Bush's

Iraq.

on War on Terror, Saddam Hussein of

In Bush's report

would only create more

strategy

economic problems

he alleged that Iraq was evading United Nations

for future

generations of Americans.

inspectors. He also claimed Hussein was developing a nuclear weapons program and was hiding chemical

Hesse

and biological weapons. Bush

energy independence for the nation

announced that Secretary of State Colin Powell would present evidence to the United Nations explaining why it should support the

were also on Bush's

invasion of Iraq.

Threat Integration Center.

"We

continue

to

"It is

an irresponsible policy,"

said.

Affordable health care and

He

reforms.

list

of domestic

proposed funding for

the Emergency Plan for

AIDS relief.

Project Bioshield and a Terrorist

see

a

Assistant Professor of Political

government that represses

its

Science Robert Dewhirst said he

people, pursues weapons of mass

destruction and supports terror,"

was surprised when Bush proposed the Emergency Plan for AIDS

Bush

Relief.

said.

Campus

reactions

varied.

Bush asked Congress

$15 billion in the next

to give

five years to

Student activist Jed Murr believed

nations in Africa and the Caribbean

Bush

to help fight the spread of

failed to adequately

make the

case for war.

"He has

AIDS.

Hesse said he was surprised Bush

offered

no

and

substantial

his administration

evidence that Iraq works with Al

on such

Qaeda or that

:www. whitehouse.gov

Iraq poses any serious

President Bush addresses the United Nations General Assembly Sept. 12, a day after the first anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks. Leaders opened their annual debate with United States threats of action against Iraq. Forty years after John F. Kennedy sured down the Soviets on the Cuban missile crisis, President Bush reasons for attacking Saddam Hussein had more to do with his past actions than

would take

a big issue.

what he might do

rwww.cnn.com

threat to the rest of the world,"

next.

AP Photo/Doug Mills

MTSSFNG^CAnFORNTAWOMAM mSiS^."

by Tatianna Johnson and Betsy Lee

MISSING $500,000

REWARD

Police searched the Calif.,

man

home

of a Modesto,

alive

looking for clues in the

2002,

in

ModMto,

•OldMl

NCK ppent!. Hm • MMiflmMr laHoe •oeenharWInkto.

San Francisco Bay area where Scott was

not have a suspect but were not ruling out

friends

her husband.

appearances to plea for Laci's safe return.

when

a Fresno, Calif.,

Since her disappearance, family and

On

have

Laci's

made

several

due date, Feb.

10, the family

asked area hospitals and clinics to keep a

Amber Frey,

sharp eye out for her. Laci's family had

affair

with

woman.

Scott denied the

affair until

publicly stopped supporting Scott.

Frey

came

forward; he then said he had told his wife

Police also questioned a $250,000

www.lacip0torson.com

public

police discovered that he

about the relationship.

InfonnatkNi ahould call th* Police Dept at (209) 342-6166

in the

fishing.

Laci was 5-foot- 1 -inch; about 140 pounds and last seen wearing a longsleeved white shirt and black pants. There

1Mi>14(k(.

AnyoiM MociMto

Modesto

have scoured an area

months pregnant when she disappeared from Modesto Dec. 24. As of Feb. 28, police did Laci Peterson, 27, was eight

had been having an

nyCrMk^MMM imt tt wnf MMv# enin mm

a solo fishing trip.

area, police

Scott Peterson became a central figure

IMI MWi on ChfwtmM tn,

left for

disappearance of his pregnant wife.

in the case

Laci (Rocha) Peterson

when he

In addition to searching the

life

was

a

$500,000 reward

for

anyone having

insurance policy that Scott took out on his

information about her disappearance.

wife after Laci found out she was pregnant.

:www.cnn.com

Scott was the

last

person to see Laci

:

www. modestobee .com


Manhattan by Undnif

Crump

.Ntiiring 1,776-fiHtt archiiccturc

stxm iKcupv rhc

JcsiKTi wotijd

arcsi

where The WiwIJ ThkIc Ccnrer tince stixxJ.

IVsiKiied by Daniel Liheskirki, the

plans for the World Center site incIuiieJ a pit

30

feet

below Kroumi

where the memorial of the Twin Tt>wers wiHilJ

a>si«Je.

The

pit w«HiUi

also expose the original fixinJation ot

the crumNc\l

towxt^i.

As an iidditional

memorial, a "wedge of lisht" winiUi dir |i><<h bmixliy o«'Vt>. Soom Tliunnond, R-SC. u ihr While Houic wth. frimi left. Vice IVudmi Dick Cbmry. Vti Timi Loa, R-M>«.. femxr Prnidcni lK«i{tr Btnh, md hu iliughirr jube Thurmond Whitmct. Fnday.

be created so that a

I

W

^ 2mj

I)k

ixn made conuiicii(» >*j<^ Sumr. AH%m'^

Ac the biTtlkijy pafty,

poHtKn M itujxrm

cbe

le.>drr »<

him

thit ignited i t:cmtnv,xrn thit forced

encompass the

to step dt-m-n frvim hit

rinj; t>f light

could

area. Plans also

inclu<.ied office space.

Comments

successes of racial immigration," Assistant

lead

Professor Russ

Northrop

"I

to resignation ^Xf'hile

time."

Lott said his comments were inappropriate.

apologized publicly, even appearing

cdebranng cKe

a Republican senator

life

made comments

cvcntuall>' ertdeJ his leaduig

iv>le

that

and

Thurman do not

insefLsitive,"

but as a

When

result

ran for president, he ran on a

in hts heart a( hearts

was a

it

racist

at

the

of his

comments

In reponse to Lott's

comment,

America was

he was commenting on the

pniject was originated by

New

former

York Mayor Rud<ilph

Guliani with the

Lott was pushed

gt»al

of bringing

people back to Manhattan.

comment. Bush

The

said that

ilevelopment was phinncd to

be finished

in 2006.

unfaithful to our founding Others.

rwww.msnK.OMn

www.washingionpust.com

h-

Mosquitos induce Midwest epidemic A strain of virus, spread primarily by mosquitoet. swept through the Midwest, affecting both animals and humans. While only five Missouri cases proved faital. nationwide

1

West Nile

virus.

reported 169

87 people died at a result of the As of Dec. 31, Missouri

human

cases of West Nile.

case was reported in

Hones and

birds

likely to

carriers o< the disease. In Missouri.

and 277 St.

One

Nodaway County. were more

biriis tested positive for

sleeve shirts and pants

also

recommended

that residents spray

To deal with the epidemic on a national level, the

Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention allocated $6.3 million aid

money

be

819 horses

the virus.

people to wear long

when outdoors. The city

by

in federal

to support attempts to research

and

Gnny

Francis

and Betsy Lee

outbreaks of the virus. Officials were unable to detect exactly

clothing with repellents.

where the U.S. virus

originated; they delected that the virus

was

genetically similar to strains in the Middle East.

With only one human case

in

Nodaway much

County, the threat of West Nile was not

of a concern according to student tared Smith.

fight the virus.

Mosquitoes became infected

Joseph officials issued warnings to

rrsidcnts, encouraging

site."

Lott said.

everyday our nation was segregated was a day that

believe that

said. "B»it

to resign.

K|!rc|pinoiust ticket. "1

The

Lott was elected Majority leader in November,

1

off.

going to have a memorial

"My choice of wonJs were totally unacceptable

in the Senate.

the country would ha\-e been better

on Black

remarks.

Adtkcamg tKe Cfowd gathered fior Sen. Strom Thuraans 00^ biithcby. Sett Trent Lon said that if Thurman had been elected president in 1948

Smith

I'm was glad to hear that they were

He

Entertainment Television to make amends for his

of a political leader,

would K* scared to work

I

there," stinlent Tnicy

comment he made was very ir\appropriate (or the

bfitsonPnct

think

"However, the

said.

after

feeding

'I'm not worried,* Smith said.

The

actual

on birds with the virus in their blood stream. According to the CDC, once an infected mosquito bit a human, the virus had a high

odds of transmitting the virus

to Maryville,

Missouri

more worried

likelihood of transmission.

:newsb'ibune.com

Areas

in Africa, Eastern Europe,

and the Middle

East

were prone

West Asia to larger

about

is

my

so slim. Honestly. I'm

lest

on

Friday.*

n«rwwxihss.siate.mo.org

:www.cdc.gov

'

'


.

^=l8|;lg^M.^^^^feg^;^^Ali^^

into reality Television offers insight Kj J

hvIindsavCnimn

Television programming on

network included the reinvention of reality TV. Twenty shows were introduced, dealing with themes of marriage, challenges and celebrities. virtually every

The

creation of the

modern

began with the

reality television

2001 sensation. Survivor. Survivor

entered

it's

"Survivor:

MTV in

sixth season with

The Amazon."

sparked the newest trend

2002 with the introduction of

reality based television

about the

life

MTV released "The Cameras followed the

of celebrities.

Osbournes."

family of The Prince of Darkness, Ozzy

Osboume, during their move into their Malibu residence. This show opened the door to celebrities catching the

Anna

reality television hype.

Nicole

Smith began her own reality based television show by streaming video of her everyday life on E! Entertainment Television. Previous reality shows began celebrity versions such as "The Mole" and "Survivor." The Warner Brothers put 10 former celebrities into a house, imitating

MTV's

the "Real

World" concept to exploit

their

new

lives.

Another common trend among the shows was the marriage of strangers. "The Bachelor" allowed viewers to watch a single man select a bride from 25 women. The reality television

original bachelor chose a

The Osboume femily poses as they arrive at the 54th Aimual Prime Time Emmy Awards at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles.

show which attracted an average of26 milUon viewers,

AP Phalti/ICidtY WiUm

Ozzy, Sharon, Robert Marcato and Jack.

While many saw reality television some viewed it as a

10 contestants trying to sing their

way

the show, which broadcast the breakup

including pop-artist Paula Abdul,

FOX also featured reality

Randy Jackson and English record producer Simon

phase, but there

Cowell to search out the newest "American idol." Cowell, known for his brutal honesty, often remarked on

said.

FOX

into a recording contract.

as exciting,

put together a panel of three judges,

passing trend.

think that

"I

talent scout

"Bachelorette" fervor with "Married by

moments of the

arc Kelly,

had a bachelor from Springfield, Mo. Both bachelors were followed to recap

America."

Eluterowicz, in the closing

left

an 18-year-old friend of Kelly's

woman from

shows about marriage, premiering "Joe Millionaire." NBC continued the

poie for photographers after the final episode of 'The Bachelor." Buerge proposed to

is

Kansas City, Kansas; the 2002 version

of the couple.

Aaron Buerge and Helen Eksteromcz

From

who recently moved in with the &imily after his mother died of the same type of cancer afflicting Sharon. AP Pholo/Lmtn Raudi

Marcato

showing people

with reality television, more shows

voice of a contestant. "American

caused

theme of The summer

Idol 11" premiered in 2003; over

their

70,000 vocalists auditioned for 30

reality television.

the

overcoming challenges. sensation was American Idol, featuring

on the show.

spots

creation of reality shows

Emmy Awards to revamp show to include a category for

www.realitytvlinks.com

\ 1

I

Anaheim Angels capture The Anaheim Series

It

Most

the championship

Bophy after the AngHt defeated the San Francisco

World

Series. Oct.

27

The Angelt won to

1

i

first

was the

'

i '

battle

by the Bay.

!

j

I

|

I

i

j

I

1

I

game

against the

games

to capture their

first

World

i

i

i

i

I

i

I!

and took the

games

i

1

:

f

i

r

of the series

'

>

I

i

i

M

I

seven

series

won

the

Most Valuable Player Award.

Though Giants' Barry Bonds holds the

Series in

and a 3

!

I

(

t

win

to 2

I

1

;

4-1

Major League home run record, he has yet

'

I

i

Angels third baseman Troy Glaus

a

World

Series ring.

:www.usatoday.com

game lead, San Francisco looked to be on their way to a World Series title. The Angels :

M

in game six In a thrilling game seven, an Anaheim crowd

win game seven

the franchises 41 -year history. After five

i

defeated the Giants

and Minnesota Twins. The Angels then in

[

of 44,598 witnessed the Angels convincingly

New York Yankees

defeated the San Francisco Giants

M

6-5 finish. In

and shocked the baseball world by easing through

!

4

Kriet. APVUÂŤlo/Amy

*?0:|

>

I

franchise history

title in

The Anaheim Angels overcame the odds

Valuable Player

Troy Glaus holds

Series

by Clark Grell

Angeli World

in the

> I

i

I

World

Guncs

Gumm

die."

The

with

be a

are driven so far as the ultimate

physical appearance rather than the

continued

just

"They are going to go until they

a hot subject

While marriage was

would

only so much you

could do," student Bobby

I

!

it is

:www.foxnews.com j

I

f

j

-I

i

I

i

i

I

I

t

I

to


SPORTS IN BRIEF XXXVII

l-rf^maJAMBS URASFS UQLD OF THE BASKETBALL WUBliX.

-L

LrlViin

jomn. JuhKrd

K

ii\anv a> (Ik tP«>tc»t hi|{h schiK)!

hmkrlball player evo;

by Clarfc Gr««

I

jiMi rn>)cxwJ to he the tir«

NBA Jmh pK-k.

The aetuw (ran St. VuKxnc-SL Mary s high school in Akron. Ohio, helped lead his '

mm

to the

Na

ranking in an eariy

I

XXXVII.

NBA

James avetaiied tnore than )0 points per game and was compared to I

f

Bowl

Ruccaiteers win Super

USA TixJay's National Top 25 poll. star

For the second straight

Kobe Bryant. ContToveny ainounded the supentar durir\g his senior season. Investigation* questioned the fact that his mother purchased a $50,000 H2 Hummer. James artd his mother were cleared on the purchase after investigatun (bund James' mother took out

season, the Super Bowl

came

underJof!

out

I

.a kian fot the vehKle.

Several weeks

later,

The Tampa Bay

victoriiius.

James was suspended

jcneys worth more than $800 as

for

two games

after accepting

two retro

Buccaneers defeated the

gifts.

j

end of the season.

St. VitKcnt-St. Mary's retired James' jersey at the

TW:« Wonre (XINTINIIES TO lyiMINATB

' t

Oakland Raiders 48-21

in

ir-y'^^r"''^^^^^^^

San

Woocb continued to establish his reputation on the PGA tour. After iw hmii g the 2002 Masters, Woods racked up wins at the U.S. Open and Buick Open. Sufgery oo his knee kept Woods ixit of many end i)< the seasons toumamencs.

DicKti

bring htime

t»>

Tiger

their

i

The Las Angeles Lakers won

their third consecutive

New jcney Nets in a fixir-game sweep. The 13-107 Game Rxir win gave the and

their

14*** title

siiKe

unsung hero, defensive back

NBA title after defeating the

Dexter Jackson, won the Lakers their

1

history

first finals

sweep in franchise

game's Most Valuable Player

moving to Los Angeles.

game with 34 points and 10 rebounds, while O'Neal's peHormance gave him his third consecutive

Shaquille OT^ieal dominated the final

Kobe Bryant added 25 points. fmab Most Valuable Player award. Head coach Phil Jackson became the coach with the most wins htstory as he secured his ,

tied

24'*'

award, picking t.|uarterback

in

NBA postseason

consecutive playoff series victory and his ninth

title,

which

The

Detroit

Red Wings captured

their thiid Stankry

Rich Gannon's

twice to win the honor.

Gannt)n

NH1, Finals

Oakland

»>ff

i

him with Red Auerbach with the most championships.

^t_

An

in franchise history.

NRA C!HAMPinN?aiiP

J

Limbardi Trophy

first

L

threw

interceptions in the game,

Cup championship in six years three

with a 3-1 victory over the Carolina Hurricanes.

five

which

of

the

j

Brendan Shanahan scored twKe while Dwninik Hasek stopped 16 shots to give the Red Wmgs the wiiv Head coach Scatty Bowman joined the NBAs Phil Jackson and Red Auerbach as the only coaches in major professional sports with nine championships. After the celebration, the 68-year-okl B»>wman announced his retirement. Carolina

split

the

first

two

^mes of the

devastating tnpte-overtime k»s to the \

The

wm marked Detroit's

lO''

five-game series

Red Wings

Stanley

in

{

Buccaneers returned for twt)

touchdowns; any hopes the Raiders had of winning their

m Detroit, but suffered a first

Game Three.

Cup championship arvl

the elusive

first

for

Super Bowl since 1984

were drowned.

Ha«k after sn Veana Trophies, two Hart Trophies and 678 regular-season games.

The game was .www.e3pn.gDxafn

especially

:www.foxnews.com

rwww.usatoday.com

TOUR 'STRONG'HOLD bTCIvkOrcll

interesting,

Tampa

Biiy's

considering

head coach John

Ciniden was Oakland's head

The United

States'

Armstrong won straight

Lance

his fourth

Tour de France

in July.

coach the

previtxis year.

Tampa Bay came

into the

Armstrong won the event handily, keeping the yellow jersey the final 10 days of the

He covered

the entire

disutKe of the tour

in just over

event.

82 hour*.

season recotd of 1 2-4. whereas

the Raiders were 11-5. It

Armstrong started trailing in the first

Super Btiwl with a regular

W.1S

the third straight

off slow,

few stages of

the event, before dominating

season atvl the six

years

that

the final stages of the tour.

'It

1'

I

Armstrong, a testicular cancer survivor, announced that he will take pan m at least the next two Tour de FraiKes. :

www.cspit.9oxain

fifth

repa"scntati\c

of the

an

last

AFC

won the Super

:www.espn.go.ct>m :\\-ww.ii«.attHlnv.cf>m

:5t


Without water by Betsy Lee

Smells of unflushed toilets permeated the residence

halls.

After a water line break caused a

citywide

boil

order,

campus

residents lived for 12 hours without

running water in their

toilets, sinks,

fountains and showers. Tlie water line break occurred east of Maryville early

Aug.

Monday,

The break caused

26.

contaminants

like dirt, fertilizer

and

nitrates to enter the water supply.

According

to

Environmental

Services Director Jeff Barlow, the university formed a crisis

committee

to deal with the problem.

At

their

meeting, the committee decided to rely on the campus first

reserve water tower.

"By

1

p.m.

Monday the tower was

half full," Barlow said.

"We had

a

truck of water coming but we couldn't keep

enough water pressure

to keep toilets flushing."

Even

after a

6,000 gallon milk

Residence Hall Assistant Nick Boden distrubutes required to boil

all

Browning

said.

with

mad people was stressful

all

we

the

"Having

to deal

purchased two-liter bottles,

be providing three bottles of water

countries must go through. Luckily

pop.

we

"It was nervewracking for employees and customers," McDonald's Manager Christine Standiford said. "Employees couldn't get away from it. They had to deal with it at home and at

to

each resident. TTiough students

shower facilities, they had access to drinking water.

not use the

still

"It's a

toilets or

bunch of crap because

we're paying for shower facilities

the Olive DeLuce Fine Arts Building, which received water from

and we're not using them," Andy Pierson said.

While on campus water, off

had

their use of

campus residents dealt

with the boil order on their own. "1

morning the

crisis

Residence Hall Assistant Whitney

buildings to city lines, a decision

campus

it

was definitely worse

for

declared

the

contaminants on

on

Aug.

students."

CAR^ARRELSINTO

filling

cups with store-bought

Maryville Public Works officials

1

"But

own

work."

probably took a drink of water

couple times before remembered," Raven Hemer said.

team decided to switch campus

it

residents

committee managing

was crazy,"

just say

said.

a

Early Tuesday

their

got potable water right away,"

Mikayla Chambers a

water to all campus buildings except

me

restaurants struggled to continue

business as usual. McDonald's

by 1:30 a.m. Tuesday. University

"Let

Throughout the community, area

that would allow students to shower and use restrooms but not drink the

"The situation gave us a new view on what people in third world

university water supply was drained

city lines.

Man Frye

water.

got through the day."

could

were forced to turn off the

of water meant to aid students through the Maryville boil order. Residents were

phoio by

By Tuesday afternoon, university officials announced that they would

but

truck full of water arrived, the

officials

bottles

drinking water for three days in August,

PHILLIPS

water free of late Wednesday

28.

HALL

by Jason Price

heading to morning were caught off guard by the sight of

Phillips Hall residents classes a

Jeep Cherokee resting inside the building.

The owner and

driver of the vehicle,

Nathaniel Oster, crashed into the building after returning

5:43 a.m.

Oster

on

fell

from an after-hours party

at

Unntnity wocken cninpletrd

the

The

Maryville Public Safety officers forced

Oster out of his

car,

gave him

a sobriety test

then and arrested him.

County

jail

where he spent 12 hours

bench.

and administration sanctions.

He

in

faced the possibility of both criminal

After demolishing the bench, Oster

Possible administration sanctions ranged

crashed through three feet of the building's

from a conduct warning, paying restitution

coming

thought Pendleton

I

to a rest in the middle of

I

I

said. "It wasn't until

figured out

1

saw the

and seen the flashers before what happened."

tracks in the yard

fees, or

expulsion from the university.

If

required to pay for the damages the estimated

woke up and was dreaming," McKiniie

heard the crash

I

recommictiondutaftrTnaon. plw/ohyMtitHryr

n\

on the scene

Maryville Public Safety.

detoxification.

"When

Feb. 6.

first

Oster was transported to the Nodaway

Friday, Feb. 6.

asleep at the wheel of his vehicle

the front office.

thu dfxwc into the fttnc office ofPhiUipf Hill,

Safety was the

and accelerated into the building at a speed fast enough to destroy the outside smoking

wall before

A worker endotet the lK>le crratrd by a car

Campus

shortly after the accident, followed by

cost could be $15,000.

A

student/faculty committee would

determine Oster's future with the university, as of Feb. 28, a

established.

meeting time had not been


S

.

small Nebraska town

b« Be<5> Lee

Reeling from 2002 budget

The cuu came

after

2002-

Northwest and other

200) budget was dlready sLuJied

higher education iiutitutions

by aliiKwi $3.2 million. North-

acroa the state prepartd to deal

west also faced additional cuts

cues,

mu

Bank

Budget concern mounts I

'

Throe Ktinincn sprayed I

with a

2. )

percent midterm cut

Accordiiig to the Northwest

Financial Aid offices North-

compromise between the

west dealt with the budget cut

''

ti

Donocno and Republtcaitt.

by a 9.6 percent tuition increase

"We're happy with the compromise," Director of

for Missouri residents

Communications

Officials also voted to impoae a

the

for

Missourt Dep«rtment of Higher

Education Chris Kelley

worked well

uiiliied

department appropr iations

Based iwi the

term budget. "It's

hard to belic\-e that we're

actually

happy

cut but

we

'I'out a

are,"

$675,000

Vice President

for University Relations

Tom

son agreed the

would have

Northwest.

for

aeven

He

years.

K-lieved the in^jedy

w.is iin isolated incident

and

hjtd n«>

i-ustomer was sht>t in the shtuilder

apprehension about returning i"

while leaving the hank.

Norf.>lk.

any money, they

The diiy

tleii

after the

gunmen

fired

on

The

tKcupjints

a resident's sport

^t^>le

gunpoint and

It

left

utility

comm;indeered a

Three

vehicle

tr(x>per ticketed

gunmen

weapon, hut

gun

state trooper suicide.

The

one of the suspects f»>r

fjiileil

a

concealed

to recogni:c the

as stolen.

With a trial diuc pending, the cixirt

police

later,

Kmk,

the week before

fiirm truck.

hours

the

Mark Zach committed

H)wn. AKnit 10

miles out of town, the

«if

think about the students."

ipprehended suspects Jose Sandoval,

Northwest students had the

opportunity to voice their opinions March 1 1, Northwest Missouri State University Lobby Day. Students traveled to Jefferson City to voice

"We need

lorge

Vela

to

make

higher education

is

it

a

Fernando

The county

70 miles from

Norfolk.

was

them

clear that

set

them

men.

public defender budgci

10 days before Feb. 28.

The

trial.

Knh

prosecution and defending,

com

amount needed

to the

M;idistm Qxinty Jail and held

pnonty for

app«>inted a lau^cr for all the

Eric

Galindo and

.\uthorities took

legislators.

their legislators," Kelley said.

million. This

Kreizin^er lived in Norf«>lk for

'.gunman broke into a nearby home,

"I'm hoping that legislators will

^ed a cut of itearly

meant $2.9 million cut

violenci

said.

Amnher

a castomer.

(he bank after the shiHitinK-

effect

"Students need to be calling

$350

one was

Ni>t taking;

Doug Sudhoff said. Though student Lacey Jack-

Onginally. Missouri Higher

Education

ind

Communi-

Professor of Mass

coiKctns to

Vaiisaghi said.

fire in a

Four victims were Kink empKjyees

cation

afford tuition," Jackson said.

compromise. Northwest would

Kunmen opened

immune from

is

increase in tuition," Assistant

1998 settlement alliKating $4.

building-

in St. Jnc or Miiryville. N<»

AikstKiatc Professor joe Krei:int;cr

26,

Norfolk, Neb. hr.inch of U.S. Biink.

the

Funds from the tobacco Mcuntuation plan came from a

M issoun at Katuas

Cty pharmacy

cut $675,000 from their raid-

'

like

feel

on students was limited, she remained concerned for the upcoming year. "If the tuition keeps increasing, 1 won't be able to

billKwi to the state.

<

really

impact for students by not coming out with a horrendous

$150 million from a tobacco settlement, money from cuts in

three

9 a.m. on Sept.

hour surcharge.

pncfc*

University of

>

credit

a good job (^ minimizing the

and funds from the delayed coiutruciion of a $)0 million

:'

"I

happeneJ

one

Minutcri befiw

2.79

administration to date has done

state

J,

1

to-

The compromise

<

and

gether in a difficult aimos-

"Legislators

,

said.

hnHiKh a Nebr.LsLi Kink, killing five

ix^iplo.

percent for non-residents.

$10 per

ctiulJ just a easily havi

"It

fiscal year.

verted larger

a

f,

2004

higher education cuts through

Stale oH'icuU

}

for the

h^llicI^

fi>r

the

without Kind. Later that day, police

taxpayers aKiutS I million.

caught the ftxirth suspect, Gabriel

:

www.cnn.com www.usitixlay.com

l<.odrigiic:

Missounans."

Poy-phone wires cut byTatiannia Johnson

On a white wall wires stuck out of a blue and pink striped space where a pay-phone was once located.

Northwest

officials

decided to remove 29

pay-phones from campus because of low usage.

By choosing

remove the pay-phones.

to

Northwest saved $45, J69 annually. 'Ifs

good

for tl>e

Roberts said.

phones opposed With

cell

ecorwmy.* student LarKe

'I'd rather

to

ttie

pay-

phones, calling cards and phooes

installed in almost every halls, tt>e

they take out

doing a surcharge.'

room

of the residerKe

use of pay-phon«s had decreased.

Many students did not know that there were payphones available on campus. t'f

.-.z-u

fxf^wcd wur% and

reaped

i ilttrr

oftkr

mfcniuoanil :

huww.w.1

th*

*lf

it is

not being used, cut

it

then.' student

lamie l^llock said. There are other methods of using long distance.*

n


Murder trials Alleged murderer pleads guilty by Abby Simons

Days before standing murder of a Maryville

trial for

the

toddler, 22-year-

old Michael Beattie changed his plea to guilty Jan. 23.

Nearly two months

later,

he was sentenced to 25 years in prison by Nodaway County judge Roger Prokes. Beattie was charged with second-

degree murder and two counts of felony

to causing Boatwright's

head to

strike a

trial,"

Baird said. "With this

plea of guilty, there

death.

so

Nodaway County

Prosecutor David

Baird said he prepared approximately 15 witnesses for the case

when he

learned

of Beattie 's wish to plead guilty and have

punishment

his

set

by Judge Roger

child endangerment in the January 2002

Prokes. Despite his surprise, Baird said

death of 2-year-old Dayun Boatwright.

he

He originally pleaded not guilty.

circumstances.

According to court documents,

though the

wall or flat object, resulting in the child's

was

with

pleased

the

new

it

when

is

no right to appeal,

the judge makes the sentence,

will be the final point of the case."

Boatwright's mother,

Amy Clark, was

sentenced to three years in the Missouri

Department of Corrections

after

pleading guilty to five counts of endangering the welfare of a child. In her plea, Clark admitted to leaving

her three children in the care of Beattie,

"Obviously when a plea change it allows us to obtain a

her boyfriend,

knowing he had

Beattie admitted that he hit, struck or

occurs,

previously subjected the children to

shook Boatwright and two other

conviction and avoid the necessity of

physical abuse by hitting, slapping or

He also admitted

family and witnesses having to go

striking.

children, ages 4 and

1

.

Michael Beattie looks to his demise attome>', jim Stevens, as questionable inibmiation is debated. As ofpublication date Beattie awaited a March 10 sentencing, photo by Matt Frye

Jury 'Tripps' over evidence by Betsy Lee and Ginny Francis

Accused of murder, a 16-year-old awaited a new the Buchanan County Jail. Anticipating a trial set to begin in May, Zachariah Tripp was charged with the kidnapping, rape and murder of Sarah Beth McCoy in October. Authorities had detained Tripp since his initial trial resulted in a

"I've lived in

anything

trial in

"It's

own

hung jury. McCoy, from Easton, Mo., disappeared after riding the bus home from East Buchanan High School Dec. 3, 2001 Her body was found in a stream not far from her home. .

Gower all my life, and I've never seen

scary to

John E. RobirMon was sentenced

to

Robinson's

death on Jan. 2 1 in Johnson County,

Stasi

Kan., for the murders of Suzette

battered

,

varied and compelling evidence resulted in

McCoy's hands and home.

:Maryville Daily

feet

and the cables found

remained in until his

at

for

would

resulted in safety concerns.

killed the

An

accident at the intersection the

LisaStasi, 19.

believed she was going to Chicago for

student, Daniel Irsik

The bodies of Lewicka and Trouten were found inside metal barrels on

a job opportunity. Robinson gave

Illinois resident

Robinson's property in La Cygne,

and

According to authorities Robinson lured the

women to Kansas City over

the internet with promises of jobs, travel

sister-in-law,

brother

convincing the

couple that they had legally adopted

2000.

and sexual encounters.

the child.

A

trial

was platuied in Missouri

where Robinson

will

be

tried for the

deaths of Beverly Bonner, 49, Sheila

lives of University of

collided

7

1

took the

Missouri-RoUa

and Granite

Emily Douglas.

City,

Two cars

when one driver failed to stop at

the stop sign.

To

resolve the problem, the Missouri

about the new

signals.

"We were considering an overpass as

Robinson had

were found in Cass County, Mo., in

the best solution," area engineer

promised her an internship in Kansas

a storage locker rented by Robinson.

Soehren

telling her family

City that would abilities.

^^:|

utilize

her

artistic

Trouten, a nurse's aide.

:

45 and Debbie Faith,

www.Courttv.com

:www.kcstar.com

in 1998.

Crews worked

to

expand

the highway from a two-lane to a

divided four-lane highway. great," student David Smith "The four-lane saves me a lot of time on my trip home." "It's

said.

The construction took

place

South Business 71 street. Set to he completed by Nov., the road would not be fully completed

traffic

a possible solution but the lights were

Faith,

two students.

Construction the highway began

would inform oncoming

signs that

15, the

Purdue

from

drivers

between where U.S. Highway 71 Interstate 29 meet and Maryville's

daughter of Sheila Faith. The bodies

at

protect

accidents similar to the one that

Department of Transportation decided to install traffic signals and warning

University, disappeared in 1997 after

Lewicka, a student

Press

Controversy arose after the completion of U.S. Highway 71

highway and south Business

3,

Forum

News

I

women when she vanished. Her husband's family says Stasi

on June

5 trial.

by Betsy Lee

at a shelter for

Stasi's daughter. Tiffany, to his

Joseph

without the possibility of parole

jail

May

CDHELETION OF HIGHWAY 7 DELAYED

father.

was staying

:St.

Trouten, 27, Izabela Lewicka, 21 and

Kan.,

a rapt-

17 hours of jury deliberations and a mistrial. Tripp

Tripp's

ill

were not McCoy's. In addition,

The

Kansas and care

to

Tripp's car

not link Tripp to the sexual assault of McCoy.

disappeared in 1999 after agreeing to

move

Fingerprint

kit did

by Tower Staff

one-man cell, a Linn Mo. man awaited execution.

McCoy.

experts also testified that fingerprints found in

classmate in such a small town."

TJEKTH SENTENCE In a dark

failed to link strands

of hair found in Tripp's car to

Prosecution witnesses placed Tripp's Ford hatchback at McCoy's home shortly before her disappearance and in the cornfield where her body was found. Also during the trial, forensic experts confirmed a match between the cables that bound

ANTLCIRariHGA County,

However, forensic experts

happen before," Adrian James said. think that somebody could murder their

like this

Shawn

"1

said.

Soehren believed the new scheduled to be installed in

until the intorseciion

signals,

May or June

problem was

solved.

was happy that they

at least

got the road construction (lanes)

done on time," Smith

said.


"

I

Those who passed before Robnt Haichcr May. 21. 2002. Student. BwmW Haailiw latwm June 10, 2001 Conception Abbey Monk. The Rrv. Philifi ScbuMr June 10. 2002. Conception

AM«v KVmk Lk>vdJrfff«Mjinel0.2002.

Ala OitacJmiany

16. 2003.

AwxiMe PtD^Morof

National and International PiM Weaver Died Miirch

IS.

Show and the Toni^ Show. Roicaa LOiein Died Match "Mother Nt^tawkn/*

Creued

2002.

in Fanui>

Moore IVd March

s.Mulm

uroriM rlrtiion ni^t iikinK ':!4Hi« "li wat hic vkiiching ihc

h»U''

yomupwiytepct MWilinJ inihculoalpohno,''

Soadcnmd

f»i«»trOUj»iCi^.*..ii

Elections shift

17, 2002. Best

known

Monen

political t>f

Elisabeth

balance of political control.

Missouri voters also sent 90

newcomers to the

state legislature,

treasurer of dieScieiKeFict km

Tony Mardnei Died September

Diiector.

Some Lifcf

2002. Pepino on

La Mdncho. 1

7.

2002. Toymaker who

created the Spirograph in the '60s.

IXinkin' Diinuu.

atChaitw."

Walter Annenberg l>ied October 16. 2002.

A founder of

S«Kho Pana in 'Man fl^

Denys Flahar Died September

Died March 30. 2002. Queen

Utich Died Apnl

Baktmoic

Wmets of AmetKa.

16.

William Rosenberg Died September

Actor m 'Spencer

Htk,' Soap.

"Otep

19.

2002. Started

2002. Started

1.

TV

"

Gtudt-

Bruce Paltrow Died October 2. 2002. Produced While Shadow and Soini EbeuAeie."

The

1 3. 2002. Wiote mny books specializing on war "Bond of Brothers" and American ptesidcnis "Eisenhover: SoUer ami IVeadent.

Stephen AaOwose Died October

Eye" Lopes Died April

ofTLC. Rudi Handler Died

25. 2002.

Member

April 27. 2002. Invented Bad>ie.

cofounded Mattel, and

pmMhedc bieait. Dave Berg Died May

later

helped to develop a

Adolph Green Died October 23. 2002. WiDte die icnpt for "Smgin'

m die Rain" and

Mome."

"Auntie

Richard Harris Died October 25. 2002. Actor widi a 16. 2002.

Mad

artist

of

The

Lighter Side."

Stcpiiea Jay

including Republican Brad Lager.

2002.

12.

Eliabeth Us mother.

Lisa -left

newcomers, shifting the

Hnic Died September

'The Real McCoys." played

Tkmat.'

Cmf frtrtca

in favor of

first

Link Lovebce Died April 22. 2002. Started in

Missouri voten ousted incumbents

Lkyyd

II, 2002.

'60i.

Laync Staler Died Apiil S. 2002. Lead silver for'Alice

far

power

Apes."

Johaay Unita* Died September

the Sciettce Fiction Oral History Ajsociation and the

27. 2002. Starred in 10

Bdly WlUer Died Match 27. 2002. it Hot and The Lou VCeelcenl

Roiicrt

the balance of

River" in 'Shovihaiu.''

quarteiback durii^ the

and Arthur

Queen

Man

Kka Haaiar Died September 1. 2002. Stella in 'A Streetcar Named Desire" and Dr. Zira in die 'Pkiwqf die

the Today

Milton Berle Died March 27. 2002. I>>iJlcv

helped get nd of the 'go-to' sutemcnt. Galen Rowell Died August 11. 2002. Leading photographer for 'Nattond Geographic Magavnr" Ed Haadrick Died August 1 2. 2002. PtafNilartiad the Frisbee attd invenicd Due Golf. WiUiam WarficU Died August 25. 2002. Sang "OU

1

Afftcukuie, Dinctar of Alternative Crop Cemcc

as

us...

and "vcx'tiK." iiiiipliticJ pfiJtsramnunji alyucithnu and

Local

Bri> k

' " '

.

wide-tangiiig career, played

Dumbledor in the first two

Harry Potter movies.

GouU

Died

May

20. 2002.

Harvard

James

Cobum

Died November

18. 2002.

Many

piofcaiui who champwned evolution and baseball in doKftt of books, fiiushed and published his magnum

Glenn Quinn Died December 3. 2002.

opus 'The SmicturtofEv6luaonary Theory.'

in "Roieartne,'

Sm Soead Died May 23. 2002. Won die most PGA

Wilhaa Benson Died December

improve transportation and economic

events.

"Chip and Dale" and "Rocky and Bulhraikle."

development

TiawdiY Fmdley Died June 20. 2002. Major Canadian

Roonc Arkx^ Died December 5, 2002. Created "Wide WoM of Sports," "NFL Monday Night Foodxi," and PrJmeTime Litie, president of "ABC News" when he

Lager defeated Larry Dougan in the

Nonhwest Missouri. One of Lager's main goals was to race to represent

in the area.

Lager said he anticipated working

with the new group of representatives In a close electioiv Republican Jim Talent defeated Detnocrate incumbent

Camahan. Talent defeated Camahanbya ~2 percent margm. giving jean

I

the Republicans control os the U.S.

Senate. bt addition to influencing which patty controlled the Senate, the iiKumbents

unusual situation

made the race

unique.

Camahan was appointed to office after her hwfaand, fanner Gov. Mel Camahan,

Voter Ashley Joslin said Camahan's appointed position had a large impact

on her dccuion. Other Maryville voters chose to base

on the

issues the

candidates sifiponed

Landers Died June 22. 2002. Wrote an advice 27. 2002.

Member of -The

of the education

CXemociat. but

c HKM

I

'I'm a

abo vote on laues

that

ini|»nant to me and education

and minimum wage were my main ooncems."

4.

Ian

McNaughton Died December

10. 2002. Directed

o and marketed toys like the bulla hoop atvl Frisbee. Roacaary Cloooey Died June 29. 2002. Big band

Oadi." and The Mescakros." George Roy HiO Died December

singer from the '40s. Coronet pusher in the '70t,

'Butch Casady" and 'The Song"

cante back in the "90$.

Jean Kerr Died January

John Gotti July 10, 2002. Mafia Bon. General Benjamin O. Davis. Jr. Died

EatdieDoisaes." July 4. 2002.

StmauMr

5.

2003. Wrote 'Please Dbn't

Maurice Gibb Died January

12, 2003.

the Air Force.

Michael Anderson Died Febnaiy specialist

.400 for a seaMMt in Major League Baseball.

David Beown Died Febniay

on

9.

2002.

"On the Waterfront."

"Die Pawtifcroker" and won an Oscar for "In the Heat o/AeNifhiJthm Wailach Died July 10. 2002. Slatted a luinmer caap called Seeds of Pfeace for Israeli and Palestinian

YoomI Kanh Died

Hemingway and Eiiwein. AleaaHdw Oiatbaiv Died July 19. 2002. Wrote

1.

2003. Missionipeaalist

KalpaiM Chawla Died Febniaiy Indian

woman

1,

2003.

First

in space, payload specialist

Asian

on the

Cokanbia Space Shuttle. Laorrl

CWk Died Febnwy

1

.

Cokaabia Space Shunle. Rick HosbMd Died Febnaay

2003. Physician far die

1.

2003. CommMider of

die Cokaabia Space Shuttle.

Space Shuttle Ilaa

Ryan Evaaa Died August 5. 2002. Actor who plai«d a doll on A( soap opera "Passiom.* B il|i r DVkafta Died August 6, 2002. Leading

parttcipalad ai the

paognauBcr who fMc nanct to concepts like "stack"

baa the PBS chddienVdiow.

Ramoa

in the "SOk.

I.

2003. Cokaabto

pikit.

inror of haaan lights. lorfi

2003. Paykad

the Columbia Space Shuttle.

Wa^ MeCool Dkd FehnMy in

1.

Pan of die "Bee

on the Columbia Space Shunle.

Rod

Died July

Of "The

27. 2002. Directed

Gees."

July S. 2002. Last person to bit

*

Died December 22. 2002.

A black pilot in World War II. first black general in

Steifler

*Ai^.

2002. Aninuned

Joe

portraits of

lot

Becky's hiafaand

season of

Arthur Mebi Died June 28. 2002. Cofoiaided Wham-

wanted to cut a

budBet," Sabrina Maiquesi said.

fiist

episodes of "Monty Python's Flying Circus.

July 13. 2002. Took Mack and white photo* of famous people: best kitown for

because she

Doyle on the

Who."

stands for education and jim Talent

*I

supportitig actor Oscar foe "A^bction.

died.

Jolm Eotwisde Died June

teen* to meet.

Camahan

voted for

Ann

coiunm. "Attn Landers."

Ted WilbuBs Died

died in a plane crash two yean ago.

their decisioru

writer "TJie Piano Man's Dauffuer.'

Wesiems. won

Died February t. 2003. Pilot who bumbmg nf sn Irsqi nuclear piatt

An*

Israeli

m space.

Fred Rofcrs Died Fefaraary 27. 2003. Mister Rafen

:^S

S


lefsfil

New establishments pique interest hy lason Price

"We chose Maryville because we didn't

Three new businesses expanded what Maryville had to offer the community and

feel that the area

student body.

this

Shuwen Ye said. "We try to offer the same food as The Mandarin, yet the location of Happy Garden is closer to the campus."

Located on Main Street, Beeing Creative supplied Maryville residents with specialized stamping

and scrapbooking

Owned and operated by Sarah Arnold and Connie Fuller, Beeing

focus of the restaurant. Ye said the

Creative sold items residents once had to

season would be slow and that the store

travel outside of town to purchase.

could close for a few weeks during the

Because college students were the target

materials.

right now," Arnold said,

One

"We want to keep

Red

people's business in Maryville."

The owners

pride themselves

on

The Red Lantern opened Feb. Owner Di Liu said Maryville was an obvious choice for his American and 14.

customer-oriented.

"We do our best to locate whatever the

Chinese restaurant.

The restaurant had the seating capacity

said.

Customers for the new business ranged

to serve over

00 dinners at a time. Unlike

Lantern did not want to focus primarily

Beeing Creative had

which already

on those who enjoyed Chinese. "We know that we're not in China; this is America. Our focus is on serving a wide

roots in Maryville, branched off into

variety of food to our customers," Liu said.

more customer-oriented store. The Happy Garden authentic Chinese

provided speciahed products to students.

who wanted

items for anyone a special

had

to capture

moment.

Another new

business,

The

a

restaurant, operated by

Mandarin chinese

owners of The

business additions to Maryville

Regular customers Krista Mardne and Sarah

restaurant, shifted their

Johnson

sit

down

to enjoy a

meal

at

Happy

Garden. [They're] so great about getting what you

focus to satisfy the hunger cravings of the

want," Johnson

college crowd.

supplies

1

other Chinese restaurants in town, the Red

from grade school children to the young at heart. Fuller said

of the newest additions was the

Lantern, an American and Chinese

restaurant.

keeping the atmosphere of the store

customer needs," Fuller

summer

summer

"People are really into the scrapbooking

Jayna Vaccaro and Rebecca Homuth purchase

provided anything like

toward the college kids," owner

said, photo by Tenyn Lindsey

&om Saiah Arnold at Beeing

Creative. Vaccaro bought personalized graduation announcements, phao by Dpew Battkson

CANCER PATIENT RECEIVES SUPPORT mm by Jason Price

Digging deep into hearts and wallets, Maryville residents came Natalie Caton was diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer called primitive

chordoma

at age 3.

When

Last September 4-year-old Natalie participated with her

grandmother, Cheryl Peterson,

together in support of a young cancer victim.

her family began to

struggling with her medical expenses, area residents held several

fund-raising event. After surgeries and chemotherapy, doctors said

fifth

annual Relay

According to the St. Joseph News

The auction included from several members of the

tumors are chordoma.

Mayo

"There was never

and

1

felt

we needed

to help Natalie, so

we

all

Cancer Information

a prognosis,"

0.2 percent of cranial

a prognosis given to us

know

friends

track.

that only 12 children under the age of 20 were diagnosed with

Tara Lapinski.

"Some

Press, the

chordoma between 1902 and 1982. Only

were told was that the cancer was

pitched in," Lisa Josephson said.

High School

Clinic in Rochester, Minn., indicate

Winter Olympics team, including gold medallists Katrina Witt and Students also contributed to the cause.

also a cancer survivor, at the

survivor that attended.

Service records at the

autographed pictures and posters

is

Natalie was a special guest at the event, being the youngest cancer

Caton was in remission. To assist with the costs of her brain surgery, Bank Midwest in sunounding areas setup donation buckets and Younger Auction Gallery hosted a benefit April 13, 2002.

who

for Life at the Maryville

toti rare

about Natalie;

all

we

and they (d(Ktors) didn't

Tausha Taylor said of her daughter.

Natalie had her brain tumor removed at the Le Bonheur Children's Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., Feb. 27, 2002. The operation lasted over eight hours and involved five surgeons.


Holidays

ILLUMINATE Maryville BY Betsy Lee

and Matt Frve

Spirals of colorful lights covered the

lawn, culminating with a 20-foot tree of lights that dominated the display. Passersby were drawn to the illuminated trees that dotted the side yard of Ken Schauer's home at 1605 N. Ray Ave. According to Schauer, he received comments from strangers everyday about his Christmas decorations. Also drawn to the impressive display, members of

theTower Yearbook staff named Shauer the winner of the Tower Holiday Lighting Competition. Shauer started his display with the large tree in

honor of

his son's first

Christmas. "I'd take him out there and he was just fascinated by the colors," Shauer said. He added the small trees this year in order to enhance the decorations. "It wasn't bright enough with just the

"The smaller trees brighten up the whole yard." Shauer said the larger tree was

big tree," Shauer said.

constructed with piping, rope, stakes and hundreds of yards of lights. The Shauer cost entire display approximately $200 and days of work. "It's time consuming but it's worth it," Shauer said. "It's a chance to share the Christmas spirit with the community."


iK^fU Daitf .\>mkU'M-^

CAunJ^

.SaWl

UUUo^

.R<u<eK

HÂťmvÂŤ

ftWKifw C^k^/um

Replay memories of athletes you watched and cheered for. Illuminated scoreboards reflected the art athletes perfected over 6 a.m. practices

and team dinners. Remember the sounds of skin screeching across the arena floor, a whistle cutting through crisp fall air, the snap of a baseball landing in leather and the

jolt

of a

gun starting a race.

The football team won the Ml AA Conference championship for the sixth time in seven years but suffered 11

an upset in the NCAA Division

Quarterfinals.

The men's

success

was

offset

by Athletic Director, Bob Boerigter,

announcing the termination of the head

The head

softball

Oregon and was

volleyball and soccer coaches.

coach resigned after the season to take a job in

replaced by Susan Punzo.

During the spring season national champion discus thrower Clint Prange led the men's track team to a meet.

The men and women's

Ml AA

10'*'

place finish at the national

tennis teams simultaneously

Conference championship

for the

won

second consecutive

the

year.

Wliether you were sitting in the stands or competing in the games,

it

was a year of championships and comradery. Ruwiiit)i Ikick CA'wiiiy Scui^s stflf-amis

a Missouri Southern State Colkfic (kfaukr Sciif^slhul 18 yitnk in six carries in

tlie

28-7 win

.

nlioio

hy Matt

h'ryi'


Game

day excitement

built as fens

anived

at

Rickenbrode

Stadium two hours eariy to claim limited seating. Nervous chatter ech<xd through makeshift seating and ainstruction, bass

until

somewhere

in the distance die feint

thumping ( )f

:i

drum began.

The glitter of brass filled onto the

overcame

the stadium, lead by

fieU, raising the spirits of loyal

limitations posed

ailorfiil flags

Northwest

fens.

In

and sparkling dancers. Cheerleaders tumbled its

quest for

spirit,

the Northwest

auxili;iry

by the stadium renovations to create an atmosphere of excitement.

The Bearcat Marching Band kicked off the year with a routine one-hour five-minute practice on the first day of classes, but attempting to preserve such traditions proved to be a challentji^ throughout the season. "This year with

all

the changes in the stadium,

we got

bit distressing to

some people," drum major Nicole Ryan

this close to the

game."

put on the endzone, which said.

"But

it's

i^

a little

really exciting to be

Even though moving out of student seating gave the band more freedom of movement, members could only sec one side of the action. Continued page 102 Greg Pfancz wjuintt lo rcid hi^ nuiMf while ^jMHi ji Mn- first home ffMrthjIl kjiiic Sept. 7.

700:1

pcrforiniiig. Tlic hjiid litmlo

hy

\1,ttl

/f>r

kukcd

ofi'it's


il


_# "After they scored in the

first

game,

it

took us 10

seconds to realize we had to play the tight song," Brice

Willson

game we had

The

Whoookkaa cheer went on

normal. After

as

Meyer to

leader Jeremy

director

but

it's

Whoookkaa

initiate the cheer. Traditionally,

the second day

non-freshman members.

all

"When somebody new comes just start

for

Whoookkaa on

the band elected the

of practice from

and waited

Al Sergei

"But

said.

it is. It's

just

is

crazy!'"

answered Meyer's repeated "Whoookkaa"

pump

To continue the

the squad. the reason

why

the fans, and

"It's

"Hey Baby."

Rituals were

add another year of tradition to the

books. niont^ ct Mii'-io

Movements of the Bearcat Steppers and Northwest Flags created a visual

accompaniment

As the colorful accompaniment to the band, the Northwest Flags practiced daily to perfect their

The

3:15 p.m. to 5:15 p.m. practices in

College Park provided time for five seasoned members

mentor 10 freshman "They're

performances began with several weekend practices

Once classes began,

Epperson

girls

Steppers

Braving the sweltering and freezing weather of wore black half-tops and pants

extreme

temperatures. Steppers kept one philosophy in mind. it,"

Amy Meyer said.

and hope

for

"You

very important with the cheerleaders,

it's

and to help motivate everybody

Haynes

as

much

as

spirit

we

can,"

said.

significant part of this quest for motivation

tell

just

good weather. The

kind first

of having

all

in the fans

the Bearcat fans

1

see

on the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

is

the noise le\el

east side,"

Bobby

Bearcat

"If they do any of the songs we stand up, or if we make a touchdown we stand up and yell," Epperson said. Watching games, making friends and having fun

Bobby,

No matter the weather, the suit was always ridiculously

were perks to being a Northwest

hot.

Flag,

Epperson

said.

said. "It

While it

can get very loud

really pays off,"

of it," Bobby Bearcat said.

said.

"You can't see much,

a pool of your

renovations

left

the

Northwest

Cheerleaders where they wanted to be for the season.

Makeshift bleachers on Rickenbrode's west-side track prevented cheerleaders from

are a lot

like

making the

between west-side reserved and

"It's

kind of fun to be over here cheering

for the student section."

Atmosphere improvements coincided with overall to this year's team, Charles Haynes said.

improvements

"We're great

this year,"

partially

suit.

because the sweat runs

and sometimes run into things because 1

own

"It's

kind of like jumping in

sweat."

Even these limitations did not stop Bobby from dreaming of how to inaugurate next year's new Rickenbrode Stadium.

"A

zipline

from the roof of South Complex onto

the field," Bobby Bearcat said. "Or actually, any sort of parachuting would work."

being over here because the students

more responsive than the paying people," Amy

Schuster said.

like it!"

was a whole different world inside the

into your eyes,

Jorgensen

1

fans saw only the glamorous side of being

The best aspect was performing for enthusiastic fans. "We put all the hard work into it, so the performance

"We do

dealing with

think

with the band.

east-side student sections.

practices to perfect their routines.

In

said.

relaxed and enjoyed cheering

Martindale Dance Studio, often attending band

performing.

"1

"The only change

During games the

traditional rotation

it

fun and crazy and ready to

said.

practiced everyday from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the

football season. Steppers

to the effect of the

the band and the Steppers to help with team

A

flags.

all just really

Stadium

For the Steppers, the long road to game-day throughout the summer.

so exciting."

to the Bearcat

Marching Band.

of deal with

it's

Their diligent work perfecting pyramids, stunt

and basket tosses added Northwest auxiliary. lines

the bright side.

of the day, the band serenaded exiting

signature tune

"Grin and bear

really like it," captain

season kept members' stress levels high, co-captain Tara

during the game, the band

preserved despite a season of changes, and the band

while

1

three days of practice and two days of weiglit

shows and several solo performances throughout the

the Bearcat Steppers dance team.

to

skills.

is

Chrissy Carlson said.

to

With

training each week, the squad continually refined their

with

calls

themselves up.

spirit

members of

tuiiibicrs,

going goixl."

Preparing routines for pregaine fanfares, halftime

performed 20 to 30 cheers, usually in conjunction with

marched on

for Bearcat fans

for the 16

work," co-captain Charlotte Jorgensen

shouts of "Hey" to

its

dance and perform

It's

members

crazy,

positive."

At the end

desire to

"This

awesome. We've got better backflippers and

upon the two anonymous men that dressed up and played the role of Bobby Bearcat. While stadium changes had positive and negative effects for most of the auxiliary, Bobby only looked at

kinda

Raising their instruments and voices, band

fans with

getting sick because of the hot

just better people.

routines.

into the band, they

laughing and saying 'Oh, this

girls

outweighed the disadvantages

parading into the stadium, band members formed a tight circle in the endzone,

page 100

weather."

said.

Despite changes and worries, game-day rituals like

the

Coiiliiiuc'il from

Haynes

said.

"We're

The echoes

of voices, cheers and music soon

dissipated from Rickenbrode Stadium, replaced only

by the occasional pounding of a

hammer or buzzing of

machinery.

A season of change came to an end for the

Northwest

auxiliary.

renovations in

its

Each component handled the

own

way, contributing to the

collective spirit of Northwest fans.


Band metnben perform IimhKiII gifitr j^taifut

t'ni\rr%irv

ji

ihr

(

Kt

12 Ikhik

Mnuturt Vmihcrn Suir

Ilw hjiul prjitiirJ

the imi»u iiul tuniiJiunu

pfu^io

lijilv

!• (KTlrtl

hy \fan jryr

Bobby playi the druiin with iJk- rest of the hand. 1 wti men jv^utned the nilc ot li»»bb\. attending uiuvefMn' c^rnts in t<>\tuinc pkcto hy A/j/i

f-ryr

Bfvcing thciiivKr^. dxnVjdcn nwiie dimii Inim pyramid duntig the honK tc^iir j|(iiii«r Uimmit>-

J

tiTNcboUu it (

>inahi Sept. 7 Kven- chccrtc*ier on

the Hjujd retcivrd

j

v^»Unliip

fAi««' fry

A /.iff /t^t

Mjndy Dvcirr. Lindbry Knishc Mid Sarah Rk* thr iTnw^

X

the hiinic lixictuU

Mbwan Souchrm

Sccppcn

gunr

pt i lin iiied jC

»>rfir<fTng."Ni^;hrran"/*^a»^y.Vfaftfi7r

The only change in the fans I see

of having

all

is

the noise level

the Bearcat fans on the east side. -.Bobby

1:703


lil-HjHnfthP Qiampions by Ashlee Erwin

For one cool and crisp October evening, students, professors,

employees and community members shunned their individual responsibilities

and stood united

as the

Northwest Family.

What had originally been a regular conference contest between two heated rivals turned into a steady line of vehicles down I29,

an excited mass of

tailgaters in the

parking

dream of a football team on a quest for the

lot

perfect season. â&#x20AC;˘

firarcat fan phi^ :

", St.Ul

hryv

-

Mill

\

JIJ'

and the

Continued page 106


^irKwm I

r


m

CLASH

of the

Champions •

The Clash

of the

Conlinued from pa^e 104

Champions

featured perennial

|Xiwerhouses Pittsburg State University and Northwest Missouri State University in an unprecedented event at

Kansas City's Arrowhead Stadium. Initiated hy

Athletic Director Robert Boerigter, the event was organi:ed in response to the capacity limitations posed liy

Rickenbrode Stadium renovations. Makeshift seating

could not accommodate the thousands of expected tor the

"This

and we want

a year of transition for us,

is

May

be a memorable one," Boerigter said at a conference. "Pitt State to

fiins

grudge match.

a big rival, but

is

to

it

21 press

we still wanted

keep our home-field advantage." Transforming Arrowhead into home was no problem

for university

and community members who planned

tailgating activities

months

The afternoon

in advance.

of Oct. 17, fans clad in Bearcat apparel skipped work

and

classes,

packed their vehicles with

and drink

fotxl

and headed south to begin the Bearcat invasion.

Truman Sports Complex parking Rob Eischen flips a hamburiicr \\ cardboard spatub.Eischcii and

itii

.i

nukcsliift

tVictids tailyatcd

Arrowhead Stadium \\ith a tapped loud music, and a smoking grill, flioio hy Mjii

outside ot

keg, Iryi

lots

opened

p.m. to lines of vehicles awaiting pre-game

at

4:30

festivities.

Green and white balloons. Bearcat flags and homemade signs staked out tailgating sites. More extreme fans, like Brian Jewell and his friends, parried in a van they spent

hours painting a Bearcat green.

"We've always wanted

my

from

to paint

With music

and I got permission

it,

parents to actually paint

it,"

Jewell said.

and the barbecue

blaring

grill sizzling,

students ttxik the opportunity to drink with friends and

play games like football or washers.

The Alumni

Association hosted a tailgate party in the Arrowhead Pavilion with a live band and plenty of fixxi.

The

Bearcat

Marching Band and Northwest Cheerleaders performed

game time

prior to

outside the stadium.

"To walk into that Pavilion and see

jammed

wall-to-wall

I've

it

just absolutely

never seen so

many Bearcats

one place so tightly packed," University President Dean L. Hubbard said. "It's going to be a great night." in

Whether the

tailgating

succeeded in pumping the "TTiis fcxnball

Steensen

said.

was high-class or ordinary,

team has done

"We've been

it

of faithful fans.

spirits

sii

much

for us,"

Troy

to Florence (Ala.) twice,

now we ct)me down to Kansas City Chiefs Stadium. This is

unbelievable."

After stealing a 35-3

1

victory from Pitt State in 2001

and sporting a 6-0 record coming into the game, the nationally-ranked No. to protect against the "I

5

probably won't sleep

John

McMenamin

Bearcat squad had a reputation

No.

it's

1

Gorillas.

said after the Oct. 12

Missouri Southcm."I told

week

1

much next week," quarterback

my girlfriend

win versus

ifl'macrabnext

because of the Pitt State game, so don't be

mad."

The

feelings of indescribable excitement created by

the opportunity to play in an

somewhat overshadowed by the

NFL

stadium were

pressure to win.

• Continued Collin Kicci and friends play t.iilg.itiii^.(i

iHiiii' I

\\.isIuts uhili-

Arn'\\lHMi! r.iim.iilg.iicJtT<iiii4. Vip

until the ^JMlc Ixyjri jt 7:

Vlp.tn

OS

i<lh4,'

ly M.iir

I ly^


Ploying

M o m«morablt

Arro^h^od Slodium

in

improiuon on •och m«mb«r of lh« B«orcot foolball

On«

t»om. tl>«

ploy«r r«cord«d hit f^^lmgi during

244iour period before the big gome.

My words by Mitch Herring

tV«</n*s</ay's arrival

When we oil

OS

fell

jerseys

we were

if

o doy.

o feeling

just

that

we walked around dream, and

I

was

on

some

bed

'This

me,

I

went

not wait

o

like

hod

I

to

night

of the guys, they could not get

Some

soid they did not get to

3 a.m., and

till

it

for real.'

is

some woke up

and did not go bock

a.m.

was

it

sleeping.

Wednesday to sleep.

the

oil

that field,

cannot explain. As

I

the field

still

soy to myself,

For

to oil the

games and seeing

Chiefs

professional athletes ploy

was

the NFL, but

in

growing up going

kid

of our

were hanging up.

playing

just for

As

the locker room)

in [lo

names were on top

and our

lockers, It

walked

of our

to sleep.

to sleep at midnight

the next

till

5

at

But for

and could

day where a dream

would come

true.

Thursday's pre-game I

got the chonce to talk to the NFl's

leading rusher

Priest

Holmes. That was

unbelievable. The one thing that

mind was Nathan Lanr tj*i- pjiiit I

Hit!

the-

pn«»f

let*

Mikr Hutchinson

til (ht-

lt\^iHti^tt>lx

gJtiK-

"AfcVn-

.in*jI^H>d^iw

fintsh htN

thinking M«n\ ..Wcn-liriti^in

come

to

maybe hove a chance

that

I

because we were looking eye-to-eye. He

was

just

OS

toll

OS me,

all

5

feet

9

inches.

ixnv!.* HiitihiitvHi vaid. r^^^t'tj \Utt Hyr

Torn and Becky (>hyyu. 1967 and 196H alumni, rctpcctivcly, enjoy jm outJtHtr mcA in the ArnftKtirjJ parking

It if

Jikl J «ciitcTpictC

Game

waiting to

Tim9

come onto

the

nx'ir Ic4*t itK'hHnl i'i*nii\h

gjiiK- hi'ti. p«itJi*K-\ aiiJ diitiJCT

ihuu

7:30 p.m. As we were

n4K

nHiipk-tc with

field,

we

could

just

hear everyone

;A.*'*7 V/un/T)*

cheering for

us.

ron out onto the shot

off.

It

As the bond played, we field,

was OS

if

ond

fireworks

we were

the

City Chiefs getting ready to ploy.

game

time,

and

I

could not be

ready to ploy.

were

Konsos It

was

anymore


CLASH

Champions •

"The it, si)

fear that

many

had

1

is

we put so much vvcirk intci much and we had such a fjreat

that

people did so

crowd coming, and

1

Continued from pane 106

thought 'We don't want

game,'" head tlxitball coach

ti>

NFL

Chris Greisen, former Northwest and current

quarterback and Walter Abercrombie, former Pittsburgh

to the IcKker ro<im to prepare for the task at hand.

down

boiled

and

to the

fireworks,

there,

just

and

'Oh yeah,

standing there in the tunnel;

expect the fireworks.

just didn't

1

this

is

cixjl,'"

on the

grass part,

You

business right now.

ran out

was

I

like,

running back Geromy Scaggs said.

"Everybody's cameras were flashing.

stepped out

we all

1

But as soon

thought,

'It

as

we

time for

is

even think aKxit that kind

can't

Comerback Jason Chin he makes halftiitic.

his \va\

The

glances up

at tins a^

towards the locker rooms

Bearcats were ciefeaimg the

19-0 alter the secoiui

<.|iiartcr.

phow hy

C

Mm

at

iorilbs

Driven to accomplish their mission, the Bearcats received the kickoff and drew 3:28 later

first

blood nine plays and

when mnning back Mitch Herring drug two

Pitt State

field prior to

"I'd like to

all the people who put this game McMenamin said at the press conference

thank

following the game. I'll

It

"It's

was a

lot

who dedicated over half a year planning the

"Everything went off without a hitch," Sports

Andy Seeley said.

Information Director

team

effort

All

I

don't think

when McMenamin

scored

on

a 2-

yard run. TTie two-point conversion failed, hut the offense

was riding high

completing four third-down

after

it

could have gotten any better."

members of the Northwest and alumni

students, townspeople

II

Arrowhead event

keeps our offense

Wide

Adam Otte capped

receiver

touchdown

catching his

first

remaining.

Ibarra's extra

off the

first

halt by

pass of the sea.son with 1:15

point put the Bearcats up a

confident 19-0 at halftiine.

Meanwhile, the rowdy Northwest crowd the entire

first half.

failed to sit

Tlie excitement continued through

the Bearcat and Pittsburg State Marching Bands' joint

halftime show. Individually, Nt)rthwest performed the

music of "James Bond," complete with 007 formations. Tlie Stepix-rs, clad in iridescent tops and feather K>as,

perfonned a routine to the music of "Lidy Mamialade." Tlie team did not miss a beat starting the third quarter as defensive

end Josh Honey recovered Pitt State Phil|-Kit's fumble on the first pl;iy ot thr

quarterback Neal half.

The

ensuing 27-yard drive ended with ilerring'v

(juarlerbark John lo .u.ml p.iNsft!

.1

tor

I'ltt.

M

.^

McMrnamin

St.itf di-fcruiiT

y.irds

-iiitl

tcraniblrs

Mi

Mt-n.iiniii

tnslu-tl

lin

one

played an integral II

football history. set

established a

new

record

A once-in-a-lifetime event came to a close as players packed bags to return

home

in triumph,

out of the stadium in amazement.

and fans

filed

The Bearcats left Kansas

City that night with more than a Division

II

attendance

record and an untainted 7-0 season mark; they

left

with a

legendary accomplishment. "I

don't

know

if

anyKxiy

will

that's braggin' rights for life."

it

athletes,

by Boise State and the University of Nevada-Las Vegas

"When you get the third downs converted, that makes those long drives, those scoring drives," McMenamin said. keeps our defense fresh, and

attendance record of 20,575,

stadium again," Scaggs

confident."

NCAA Division

conversions in the 87-yard drive.

"It

family

coaches, trainers, auxiliary, professors, employees,

in 1977, the

horizon. Northwest increased their lead to 12-0

was a major

"It

with everybody involved in the athletic

department, as well as some other departments across

of 26,695.

second quarter

something

event, the result justified the work.

"We obviously wanted to come out and start fast," McMenamin said. "1 think Mitch's first touchdown mn dictated the game. He bulldozed two guys."

in the

It's

of fun."

For those

the Gorillas.

on the

something special.

never forget, and the crowd was amazing on both sides.

Breaking the Division

Ibarra's extra-

returned an interception

Two Pitt State fans rushed the

joyously celebrated their 29-7 victory.

Even though

blocked kicker Eddie

third quarter

was spoiled in the

the interception, causing a delay in action.

part in the creation of

Pitt State

it

Despite the fourth-quarter interruptions, the Bearcats

defenders into the endzone for a 28-yard touchdown.

No one suspected it in the first quarter, but a rout was

Sports

when

47 yards for a touchdown.

l-iy,-

point attempt. Herring's touchdown sent a message to

70g:

fourth quarter

campus.

of stuff"."'

end of the

Ibarra field goal near the

but sealed a 29-0 shutout victory;

together for us,"

the fnxinding of music and the emotion of intense rivalry.

was

An

team headed

Steelers ninning back. After warm-ups, the

"1

26-0 lead.

all

To ease tension, players arrived in Kansas City early Wednesday evening to become familiar with the field and stadium. Tliursday aftemcxin, the team met with

Months of preparation and hype

a

lose this

Mel Tjeerdsma said.

roar of 26,695 fans, the flash of cameras

second touchdown of the night, pushing the Bearcats to

said. "I

ever play in Arrowhead

think for

us, against Pitt,


KunninK back Milrh (he

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DcfVntivr coordinaior/linrbackcr roach Sc<Mt Bottwick occupiet Uw dctcn\ivr unit^' jitcnnon whilr field. tirtjl

I

was

there,

just

and

sfonding there I

just didn't

in

thi*

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all I

ran out

was

like,

99 Ctrowy Scoggs

Arrowhead |:;o^


BEHIND THE SCENES by Ashlee Erwin While other college students were sleeping relaxing atter classes and partying

on weekends,

in the

athletes were rising

early for training, preparing for afternoon practices ,

busses for

mornings,

and loading

weekend competitions.

Carrying on such routines behind the scenes of regular college life,

the volleyball, soccer and cross country team

atmospheres that were exclusively

(cheir

i"*H

members created

own.

Preparations for competition kept teams together for several hours

a day. Athletes were often fj^nd in the training

room before and abundance

after

room and weight

two -to-three hour practices.

as a result of training or

Injuries

were in

competing nearly every day

from August to November. Time spent getting whirlpool, ultrasound or compression treatments in the

Lamkin

training

room took up

valuable practice time. "It's

horrible," volleyball player

ankle. "You just

want

Megan Danek

said of her sprained

to be out there. Instead, you're sitting there

with your foot up."

The one

room was being

positive aspect of being in the training

bond with other athlet^.

able to

"Socializing

is

really

good down here because we get

to reflect

on

the practice," cross country runner Rachel Jenkins said.

The

relationships built during training

include pregame traditions. "Secret Sister"

home

gifts in

and practice extended to

Volleyball players gave each other

the locker

room

warming up

prior to

for

games. Gifts otten were based on players' nicknames. For

example, April "Ape" Rolf once received monkey socks and Allison

"Bean" Hyland received chips present, "Ir

each

girl

at\d

bean

By the nature of the

dip.

had to guess the identity of her "Secret

takes our minds off the

mto concentration

game

a little bit,"

Hyland

Sister."

said.

"We go

right after that."

('i)tiiiiiiii ,1 1'lific

112

Ashley Ciro\»c braids K uhcl Jenkins h.itr <>u iho bin rule n>.nio>si> Mil my meet ni Balilwin. Kjn During lni\ ri<lc» the team exchjii^-cd "seL ret \isfer'* gift\. ei)iiverse«l mu\ watclu-i! Mi'

<'y

\f,tll I'tyx

\


RFHWn The

THF SCENES

soccer team also had inspirational pregame

traditions. Jill

Anderson wrote

a Bible passage

on the

back ot her hand to read to the team before every match.

ixrcasionally played a card

playing

included

"Do or do

not, there

no

is

Common sayings

try"

and "Put one

"It's all

to figure out

who was

trips for

iKcupy their minds.

about eating, bringing snacks and sharing,"

quick energy

fixes.

on

all

bus

Cross country parents often

added to the junk-food frenzy by furnishing cookies,

on

cupcakes or brownies, while the soccer team frequented

their one-mile jog,

accordmg

to

Jamison

and

Phillips,

would ask random pedestrians to throw the

ball to

team. Half the team waited for the pass and the other half guarded the thrower.

Some

healthier establishments.

"We're pretty

the

in time,

but

it's

the team.

college students. it's

really funny,"

makes running a

lot

more

Zach Edwards

at

Closeness of fall sports teams intensified on bus lasting

anywhere between two

"Bus

"When

trips

the

to five hours

VCR breaks,

said.

like all hell breaks loose."

While movies and magazines were the common entertainment choices, each team had its own way to survive long road trips. The cross country team

^^

the

easy,"

Subway

Wallace

J.W

at this point said.

and road trips, the

and soccer teammates

ate lunch together

Jones Student Union, socialized at each

other's houses

and went out together on the weekends.

Cross country teams planned more elaborate events.

one way.

can be pretty chaotic," Wallace it's

trips

athletes

Volleyball

said. "It just

lighthearted."

sick of

managed to find time to socialize like normal

fall

think

all

In between training, competitions

pedestrians completed

the pass and were awarded a photo opportunity with

"I

much

cheap and

The women

think

we have one of the closest knit teams because

the same 16

McKee

Dia

girls,"

said.

"We

just

have

The men bonded off the course by hosting the "Beei Week" taste test every Monday night. The team picked a new beer each week and rated it on a scale ol of the

one

said.

To entertain themselves during practice warm-ups, the men's cross country team carried a tennis ball

"1 it's

the chance to really get close."

Crackers, chips and candy could be found

the Internet and

Kxiks," Wallace said. "Not real original."

had

When usual tonus ot entertainment lost their appeal,

Hyland

"We get them from fortune ctxikies,

players

called "Mafia," a role-

athletes lixiked to another source to

in

the back of the net for your mama."

game where

game

the "killer" of the group.

Sarah Wallace and Jennifer Gnefkow wrote sayings on each other's ankle tape before games.

IIP

(^(}nti}iiif(l fr'i>ni ntn>:

I

hosted a food night

at

the house of a

five.

tti

According to

Phillips,

Budweiser had one

of the team's best ratings.

No matter what the event,

team bonding away from on competition. "If you're not close with somebody outside the field, you're not really sure how to play with them on the the sport had an impact

field,"

Wallace

said.

While volleyball, cross country and soccer team members succeeded in personally knowing each other, many said the public lacked knowledge about their sport, "I'm surprised it even has us on the Internet," Dia

McKee

said of the lack of cross country support. "Bui

we're one of the hardest working teams."

Even without major recognition, and

volleyball, soccei

cross country athletes ultimately continued in theii

routines, finding satisfaction in the competition anc

teammate almost every week. They visited Kansas City's haunted houses and went to Pumpkin Center to pick out pumpkins to give to the men's team

team bonding that occurred behind the

before conference.

could do

different

"Nobody would ever make

it

scenes.

through without youi

teammates," Jessica Lane said. "There's no way anybody it

without them."

If you're not close with somebody outside

the

field,

you're not really sure

play with them on the

how to

55

field.

:Sarah Wallace

After a meet, cross country teams make Mo| at runner Betsy Lcc\ home tor a late dinner. Tli .1

meal included enchiladas. Mexican Rice.

and cake

112:

Sports

as dessert,

f/io**)

hy

Mmi /-ÂťjÂť

sal,i


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Trunun

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vullryball

Jg^y** ttir

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j

prp

tIllIlK^iu(^h k>Ut>^Mil^ihl\.(tir){uiiuiil4 ifUKk

During "lecrrt

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exchange outside

hictcr

April Rolf rece tv i «ock% drcontcd with bttk nkHikr>-\ [x^ luiiK

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BONDING

m


RETURN TO THE TOP

University of Missouri

-

Rotla

BY ASHLEE ERWIN

34-9

Southwest Baptist UnrversiCy 28-7

Washburn

University

REDEMPTION FOUND IN TURNAROUND SEASON

Fviu lunger for redemption gripped the team as two-

31 first-half points en route to crushing the Lions 47-

a-day practices started in the simmering August heat.

3.

Starved for the reputation

48-13

it

once had, the team began

rebuilding the dynasty that shpped through

its

fingers

only one season before. Mssouri Southern State College 47-3

Painful reminders of losing the Hickory Stick, the

Pittsburg State University 29-7

Iruman State

University

running back Geromy Scaggs

provided incentives to improve on the 7-4 record from

the Pitt State

NFL-

venue game provided the opportunity. Ranked No. 14, the Bearcats opened their season

No. 23 University of Nebraska-Omaha amidst Rickenbrode Stadium renovations. Northwest jumped out to a 16-7 halftime lead, holding off several versus

Central Missouri State University

10-7

surges by the Mavericks to secure a 23-10 win. 13-10

Wand

"We

said.

keep on getting Empona

started off right.

better, take

it

We

have

just

to

game by game."

Bearcats' ability to focus

on the game

at

hand.

'Cats led 35-7 early in the third quarter but Urmersicy of Minnesota-Ouluth 45-41

The

had

to

survive the Mavericks' 24-7 scoring barrage in the

*

second half to pull out the 42-31 victory.

Climbing University of Northern Colorado

12-23*

Division n playoff

7 in the polls, the 'Cats faced the

on Family Day,

Sept. 21.

Bearcat defense carried the struggling offense

through the

NCAA

No.

University of Missouri-RoUa

The *

to

first half,

allowing

UMR only

1

2 yards.

Running back Mitch Herring's two touchdowns

games

in

the second half provided the necessary spark for the record: 9-0

Overall record: 12-1

:::Klcker Eddie Ibarra tied the 54-yard field goal school record

:::Quarterback John McMenamin's 3.583 total yards broke the Bearcat singleseason passing record of 2,937 held by Chris Greisen

6 225 career yards broke record of 5,731

Greisen's career

"The

D DC

<

two

offense

to," said

is

going to

come around when they

comerback Darryl Ridley, who blocked

kicks. "Defense

is

just

doing our job."

Another defensive outpouring

led the Bearcats in

stomping Southwest Baptist University 28-7 on the road, but the offense did not find its rhythm until the

Division

II

at

home

against Missouri Southern State

came out

in

tandem.

thought that was probably the real defining

moment

for this football

Tjeerdsma

said.

team," head coach Mel

"At that point,

after that

we can do

game, those

it.'"

The confidence booster could not have come at a The next three contests were marked for

better time.

revenge, beginning with the Hickory Stick

Truman

game

at

State University, Oct. 26.

Determined to bring the stick home, the 'Cats tied game 24-24 in the fourth quarter with kicker

the

Eddie Ibarra's field goal. In the final seconds, McMenamin, who previously threw three interceptions, connected with wide receiver

Mark

Stewart to win the game 31-24.

"We

called

and

it,

I

was thinking,

On

'Jesus,

don't

McMenamin said.

the other side of the ball, Stewart

knew

that

winning the game hinged on catching the pass. "I was just thinking, 'I was so wide open, I didn't

want

to drop the ball,'" Stewart said.

Bringing

momentum

home

the Hickory Stick gave the 'Cats

entering the

Homecoming game Nov.

2

against undefeated No. 6 Central Missouri State

The

Bearcats broke a scoreless halftime

field goal in

the third quarter and a

Stewart touchdown reception in the fourth quarter.

103 yards rushing in 22 carries.

Back

record crowd of 26,695 watched the

Northwest offense and defense work

relentless

with an Ibarra

ID

firing to score

Strong safety Damienn Chumley's two interceptions helped notch a thrilling 10-7 victory.

â&#x20AC;˘ Continued page 116

A

mass of defenders against Missouri Soutlieni State

College, Nortliwest's ofTeiise prtxluccd 17

downs on

Sports

A

University.

Running back Geromy Scaggs breaks thmugli

11U:\

Pittsburg looked to spoil Northwest's perfect record,

record with five touchdowns, while Herring racked

College, the No. 6 Bearcats

We just

but the Bearcats exploded to whip the Gorillas 29-7.

48-13 drubbing of Washburn University, Oct 5. McMenamin passed for 358 yards and tied a school up

:::Left tackle Seth Wand earned a unanimous selection to the First Team All-MIAA Conference for the second

consecutive year

have

"We're going into

get to our heads."

throw another interception,'"

34-9 win. MIAA

it

said.

game with good momentum.

players realized, 'Hey,

Minnesota State University-Mankato tested the

State University 34-5

can't let

"I

relieving, very relieving," left tackle Seth

"It's

Missouri Western State College

Arrowhead Stadium, Oct. 17. "We've probably exceeded everybody's expectations as far as the level we want to be at,"

MIAA Conference championship and a playoff berth 2001; playing nationally-ranked teams and an

31-24

The win prepared the team for the anticipated match-up with Pittsburg State University at

Its

way

fipit-

to a 47-.^ victory, photo by Man Fryf


S

Wide r*c*ivrr Jatiiaira Rector \my% out. faiUng to rrtiinl hit litth tiKululm^ii

ttt tlir

MitMHin VHjrhcni Sutr (j>Ucj{r ( Kcttiif iju^clu 7M pi\\c\ K»f 1.242 the tcJin \%ith ninr tinu

^aiitc j^jintt

>ii

the 'tctum.

vaitl* iiul led

hii(ni^7i« pif*' hy

.\Ua

t^

A

Univrnity of Minnesota- Duluth defracWr >*ndc rctctvrrjohn Ottc in an unuut nihil jttrinpt t4> ijtih i ttiuchdtni^'n pi\\ During thr leveb

pLivxitf t(uiv thr Ucan, Jt t^irnv:

i>rtcnM\T ViTiU in

Football Frow/

K*i«';

J

|>ixxkurd S7'y tucal

4^-4] nrtors' /Jut-^y KUtt

Milch Herring. Pjul Ottc. Adjin

(

>ttc.

I

)irr\

I

Kidlc\

.

r~f^

>anicl

I

Mornv White. Diezcat CaJbcn. Bart Hard>-.Jaton Chinn. Vince Buie and Joel Mathew\ RmwZ: Pat Whm. Scan Shafar. Kyle Kai*er. TmW Wewl. Tyler Martin. Chad Bou^ick. I>arrell ClUrk. Ewa Smith. Gcromy Scaggi. Dannie McNeally. John Wood. Brun lonui. And>' Hampton and Kenny Davn, Rew 3: (iabe Middleton, Rjchard C.'ronk. John Tatum, Charlie Flohr.J«*e Jone*. Bart Tatum. Jim Svoboda. head coath Mel Tjecrdtma. Scott Bo«tu*ick. Clreg Bonnett. Will Wagner. Wc» Simmon*. J(»e CJlab. Wjtkjn\. James Martin. Scott Prtivaziuk. Shon WcU*. Zat h Sherman.

L^StV

Jon

C*iu«tafion

and KelK- WiUiain«

Rew

4:

Nick Tone%. Marcellu*

C'a*ry.

Oxvtd

Hambhn. Jamaica Rector. Tony CiUnrr, Ryan Miller. Andre Rector. Marcel Smith. Damienn Chumlcy. T.J. Tobin. Ricky Quackenbuth, Daren Robert*. Jo%h Lambenon. Jeff Netohcky. Gabriel Helm* and AndrriA- Hutton R«ir S: John Edmondt. Adam C'rowe. (trant Sutton. Nitk (Uatnapp, Ryan Bouer*. Steve Morrison. Mike Nanninga.Jarrd Findle^.Jtx' Holtzt law. Ben Hunter. Ben HarT>e*». JoahBeagle\.Jo\h I>rrwT*and And>' t'reger Jtetri; Kurt BerteU.Jame* Wiegand. Mike Tiehen. TJ Mandl.Seth(*iddtng>. Travi*Ja*kw>n. Mark Stewart. John (>fte.

tWar Robert*. Jordan Wilcox. Eric Htni and Brandon Rogers Jt#v 7; Ciabe Frank. BtU t'onrry. RavnK)r>d Fonoci. Rvan Water%, Heath Finch. Jon Akin*. Matt John*ton. Eric (*oudge. C'hri* Burke. Mike Sur>dernun. C'ckH- Campbell. Ju*tin B<»w*er. Troy Ty*<iahl and J»>*h Honr\ B*(k Rmt: (krrtd (k>o*.Ja*on Yeager. Mike (ioymerac Joel (iivrn*. < ieoft Bollinger. Brad Schneider. Scth Wand. Aiex Turtle. John Mc Menamin. Aaron Froehlich. F.ddie Ibarra. Kenneth Eboh. Ju«in L»cv Mnd Mikr Betnnga Brian Spale. Ryan Me>Trkorth.

^mf'^'i 2^'^^'^'^^

,

111


RETURN TO THE TOP

REDEMPTION FOUND

TURNAROUND SEASON

IN

• Continued from page 114 Bearcat players, coaches and fans tasted

a

conference championship, which was almost spoiled at Missouri five

Western State College, Nov.

kind of struggled

With

9.

seconds remaining and Northwest clinging to a

13-10 lead, linebacker John Edmonds blocked

a

bitter cold at

really

up

for this

lost last year,

1

game because

wanted to get

of

this

all

the

one back

the most," linebacker Troy Tysdahl said.

The Bearcats captured

their sixth

MIAA

Conference championship in the last seven years with a convincing 34-5 victory against No. 23 Emporia State University. Short on celebration time, the team immediately began preparations to face No. 1 1

University of Minnesota-Duluth in the

first

round

as

in the quarterfinal contest.

Whether

defense, the 'Cats were held nearly scoreless after

touchdown touchdown 12,

ending

as

all

time expired, but Northwest

Down 41-38 in the fourth quarter after

UMD touchdown, the Bearcats scored on a 4-yard "It

Faces filled with mixtures of shock and sadness, seniors and coaches were forced to look loss

Onstott.

On

T.J.

the season, Stesvart averaged 46.8

yards-per-game.

photo by

Man f-ryr

Outiide linebacker Grant Sutton takes Unlvenjty<»fMlluievKa-I)uluthiiturterbacicKjtIcy

Fntz to the ground. Sutton )ud

.)S

tacldes

season. 2t) of svhicll were «»lo. phoio hy Matt

on the

t-ryr

beyond the

and focus on the team's success, especially

after

the 7-4 record the previous season.

"We were

probably not the most athletic team or

shows everyone what the offense

Ryan Miller

said.

is all

about,"

"They thought they've

said. "I'm proud of how well we did." Redemption was theirs; with mediocrity staring them in the face, they triumphed to regain their part of the Northwest football dynasty. "They always believed; they always felt like they could get the job done," Tjeerdsma said. "Somehow,

someway, they got

it

done."

WWU^ZkJKM^B

Missouri Southern State College'safety

lost 23-

hopes of a championship appearance.

McMenamin

free safety

of

a

in the first quarter. Stewart scored a

No. 4 Northwest led 17-10 at halftime but traded touchdowns three times with the Bulldogs in the

run by Scaggs for the 45-41 win.

pa^s after struggling for possession with

was the

smartest team ever, but this team had a lot of heart,"

third quarter.

2

it

Rickenbrode or the tenacious Bears'

of playoffs at Rickenbrode Stadium.

a

Wide receiver Mark Stewart gains cuiitrul

Northwest

took on No. 7 University of Northern Colorado Nov.

30

was

all

National championship fever began spreading

the previous season's overtime loss to their rival. "I

season. Defense played well

through the campus and community

Griffon field goal to preserve the win and avenge

ones we

all

season, but the offense picked us up."


Quartrrhack John MrMenaniin M-rmnibl*t ti* tirul A rcicivrr j% Central Mi\touri Stitr Univcrnty defender Aaron Urich cloieÂŤ in.

McMenimin

completed Vi pj\tr% for i total of ^SH yird\ agjinw the M\i\c\ i^wip t>f HiB KnMit

Delciuivr end Joth

two at

Honey rrcovm one of onK"

l*itnburg State Uiuvcruty tiinihte^ in the {pine

Amwhcjd Stadium The ( kInUa^' nflcnv entered

the

game

held to

a

j^rrafcing

^caw>n km*

.^W \"ard\-pcr-^jme. but wrrr I3'J

yjrd%

;Wi.<.i

h^

Man

l-ryr

Football

111


LOSS OF KEY RUNNERS

EQy/vLS DISAPPOINTMENT BY ASHLEE ERWIN

T

Central Missouri State University Mule

Men

Run

4th

Women 2nd

-

hey put more mileage on their

legs in a

day than

most college students put on their car in a week. Hot or University of

Men

8th

Nebraska

Women

-

Open

Lincoln

-

cold, rain or shine, they criss-crossed the

9th

community on University of Missouri

Men

Invitational

1

Rolla

Women

st

An

Miner

3rd

hampered the men's and women's

MIAA

Invitational

Men

1st

-

Conference

fell

in the

Baker Wildcat Invitational primed the Bearcats

for the

MIAA Championships in Joplin, Oct. 26. placed seventh at the MIAA meet

The women

an inter-squad meet, Sept.

into competition the next

7

and

weekend with the

Crosse led the women to continue her previous season's

MIAA Conference Championships 7th

South Central Regional Championship Men 6th - Women 9th

three of the top women's harriers sidelined.

:::

Jamison

the

Phillips'

8K

time

was 26: 1

MIAA Championships

;::Dia

in

1

.

9

McKee

number No 2 spot on the Northwest women's 6K all-time

moved up

to the

leaderboard with a time of 23:

MIAA Championships

in

1

Q

McKee. Despite women's top runner Betsy Lee suffering an injury, the team placed second, relying on youth

injuries to

2 at the

<

Joplin

on the Northwest all-time leaderboard with a

said.

"We

one of my goals

The men placed

The men had

don't have a lot of upperclassmen,

is

to build

0)

team

fourth at the

Head coach Rich Alsup

unity."

praised the early-season

experience.

21

said.

in front of us.

how we

could run

"So that helped a

lot."

more intense competition for the Lee returned behind McKee and Crosse, with a ninth-place team finish, and the men

we

well,

with the

men winning

we

women

Injuries

4.

The

it

pulled together," Kyle Daily said.

members of both teams said they

season could not guarantee.

the success of the teams "They're brothers

clamped down on the teams to a greater

made

gained a unique bonding experience that even a winning

placing third.

extent at the Emporia State Invitational, Oct.

just

was a horrible course with horrible conditions, but

all just

Injured or healthy,

the meet and the

we

better races. "It

Kasoa finishing a close second. University of Missouri-Rolla Invitational and performed

rosters, the

The men placed sixth, two places from qualifying for what the team felt may have been one of

its

rosters to the

and injury-ridden

times."

harriers.

team and

spirits

weren't one of the best teams, so

more about

nationals, in

Both teams took mostly in-tact

"We probably

women finished in ninth place. "We depended on each other a lot more toward the end of the season," McKee said. "We just decided that

Woody Greeno/University of Nebraska

finished in eighth place with Heil pacing the

Heil said.

least

Entering the South Central Regional meet, Nov. 9

with dampened

Invitational supplied

assisting

lot,"

one of those teams that were We ran as good as we could have on tired

could have caught at

Mule Run behind the

kind of got a better feel of

due to the nagging

legs."

condition of the team, which Heil attributed to

"We

similar frustrations

Kasoa and Busieney.

"That kind of hurt us a

of Jamison Phillips, John Heil and John Kasoa.

The Sept.

tied for eighth

women's 6K time of 24:14

so

with one another," Heil

Lane

:::Jessica

Wooton

efforts

that

[placed seventh] but

stepping up to the challenge.

at

Joplin.

"The biggest disappointment was not that we did

dominance, followed closely by upstart freshman Dia

;::John Heil's

season-best

's

Sexton during the race kept

injury to

what we could have done had we had Ashley [Crosse] and Betsy [Lee]," Sexton said.

"We're a really young team," head coach Vicki

season-best 8K time was 25:50.1 at the MIAA Championships in Joplin.

An

place finish.

Central Missouri State University Mule Run. Ashley

Men 6th -Women

McKee 20*

behind tough conference squads, led by

harriers held

jumped

2nd

A men's first-place and women's second-place finish at the

through as injuries spread

Invitational

Women

moving up

goals such as

cross

through the team.

The Baker Wildcat

Team

women managed third place

without Lee or Crosse. Toni Sexton helped fill the void

by finishing second on the team.

six-to-ten mile runs.

physical strain

placed seventh in the absence of John Kasoa and

Ezrah Busieney, while the

inevitable plague of injuries from constant

country seasons. Emporia ^ate University Men 7th - Women 3rd

campus and

men

"I

The coaches agreed, noting

on more

it's

personal levels.

a very close team," Alsup said.

think our kids have worked harder than any team

since '98

and had more fun."

Fowler, John Hcil, Kyle Daily, Brad Trcdc and Derick Matt Nippcrt. Kyle Keraiis, Mark Aubrey, Andy Lemons, Brad Elliot and Ezrah Busieney. Back Row: Nate (.:hri5tian«)n, Zach Edwards.Jamison Phillips, Danny Burns.John Kasoa and head coach Ruh Alsup.

Men'i Croif Country From Raw: Chad Hclanry.

m-

Sports

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SPIKERS BLINDED

Washburn

Uraversity

1

-3

.

BY YET ANOTHER LOSING SEASON S

1-3

Missouri Southern State College

BY ASHLEE ERWIN

30, (>3

'tretched out

Prttsburgh State University 0-3, 0-3

on the cool

tile floor

with eyes closed,

Every

University, Central Missouri State University and Truman

bump,

minds

State University

set,

spike

and block passed through

their

during mental preparation for the actual competition.

The Central Missouri State University

03,

03

volleyball

in their

warm-up

team members practiced

visualization

routine, setting their sights

on being

we needed

we

just

to push

overall

and 3-13 for eighth

place in the conference, almost repeating the previous season's 7-23 record.

Three

early

tournaments provided

:::Middle hitter Heidi Hoffert finished 5" in the MIAA with 402 season kills and an average of 3.87 kitls-per-game. ;::Middle hitter Leslie Junker MIAA in biocks-per-game. averaging

led the 1

36 bpg

think

it

prepared us for the season," outside

:::The

[Sarah Pelster] purposely put us in those to get us

against

Washburn University,

two days

came

in a

home opener

Sept. 18. TTie Lady Blues

later to

pick up

was good

come out and

conference win over

for us to

be able to pull things together,

play like that and be aggressive," middle

hitter Heidi Hoffert said.

Beatxats

turn

ranked 2 in the MIAA for team blocks, averaging 2 81 blocks-per-game.

its first

Missouri Southern State College, 3-0. "It

it

around

"It's

nice to

come back and

ID

"It's

high and primed the 'Cats for success. important for us to be home and do well at home,"

head coach Sarah support here, and that."

kind

just

of,

I'm not

it

said.

"Mentally

we

just

broke

and 24

their best

matches

at the

Back in the

assists

Drury Invitational

line-up,

Danek recorded

and Hoffert shined with 20

digs in a 3-1 loss to host

kills

team Drury University.

"Heidi [Hoffert] came in as a junior college transfer

up in her

The Night

at

home this year and made a big step

ability to contribute," Pelster said.

team's final

win of the season occurred Senior

Arena with a 3-0 tromping of Emporia Ending the season with two losses on the road at

at Bearcat

Missouri Western State College and Truman, the players reflected

on surviving an

"We had

unsuccessful season.

great unity," Zacharias said.

"We had

a fun

we just didn't win. We had a great group of girb, but we ju5t didn't click together on the court." With the team collecting a 15-46 record in two consecutive seasons. Athletic Director Bob Boerigter year,

announced the termination of

Pelster's

contract at the

end of the season.

like that."

The victory and upcoming four-match homestand kept spirits

we

Picking up intensity and consistency, the 'Cats played

State.

Northwest's conference debut

defeated the Bearcats 4-1, but the team bounced back

<

Hyland

and really felt more

ready for conference play."

[ÂŁ

hitter Allison

a season-high 55

Coach

line,

down."

AlabamaHuntsville, Grand Valley State and Emporia State

"I really

D

for three weeks.

"Somewhere along the

despite finishing 1-3.

hitter April Rolf said. "There's a lot of tough competition.

on the Bearcat career assists record.

assist

University, Pitt State, Missouri Southern and Washburn.

beginning of the season. Compiling a 4-7 record against

abilities.

:::Setter Megan Danek's 1 ,039 season assists moved her career 5.064, securing her second place

on the sidelines

some of

tournaments, players remained optimistic about the team's

total to

kept her

the 'Cats with the opportunity for improvement at the

talented opposition at the University of

8-23

the team's

going to say gave up, but we kind of just plopped," outside

The Bearcats finished 8-23

Overall record

leader,

the lone bright spot in the two-week stretch, only to be

harder."

MIAA Conference record 3-13

Megan Danek,

went down with a sprained ankle that

and dig

followed by a 0-4 road trip with losses at Emporia State

a losing record for the second year in a row, but

Missouri Western State College 1-3. 0-3

blanked Northwest 3-0. During the

setter

was disappointing since we had

"It

didn't follow through at the times

Emporia State University 03. 3-0

all

match,

"Obviously, that didn't follow through," outside hitter

Melea Zacharias said.

Truman State University 0-3. 0-3

Pitt State

A 3-0 win over Southwest Baptist University provided

MIAA conference teams.

one of the top three Southwest Baptist University 3-0. 1-3

Reality overruled expectations as Pittsburg State

teammates envisioned the upcoming contest.

Pelster said.

"We have a lot of fan up when we have

gets us really fired

"It's

a tough situation to be in," Zacharias said. "She's

a great person, and she loved us That's really basically

all

But

it's

you can say about

it."

all.

TTie team's vision of a winning season

business.

may have

fell

through, but players never lost sight of the unity and

companionship found during a season of struggles.

Volleyball From Row: Megan llanck. Hcidi HolTcrt, April Rolf and Mariah Clark. Rou'2: Kara Akcrs, Carrie Johnson, Kern Stcflfcns, Leslie Junker, Leah Day. Stephanie Fcldnun and Holli CJiUetie. Back Row: Head coaeh Sarah Pelster, Came Blcvins, Mikala Vandenbroucke, Sara Jonei, Allison Hyland, Melea Zacharias, Terri Ccrlach,

7

20:1

Amanda

Seahrighl and Molly Saiidwell.


Middle

hitter Le«lie Junker

MiwHin *

iVTrogcJ i

%

*

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LOSSES MOUNT

COACH'S FINAL SEASON

1^

BY ASHLEE ERWIN

A I

Southwest Baptist UnlversiCy 2-4. 4-5

team

who

of triumph and defeat, the soccer

and coach the hopes for a

said farewell not only to a senior

started the

program but also

to

winning season. "It really was a tough and humbling year," forward

Emporia State University 1-4. 3-1

Jill

Truman State

fter four years

University 0-1, 1-4

Anderson

but as

far as

"We had

-

Ptolta

Finally breaking the losing streak, the Bearcats

avenged an earlier loss to Emporia State with a 3-1 win, Oct. 9. Cabreros scored two goals, and

State University-Mankato, Sept. 6 and 4-0 loss to

Anderson contributed her first goal of the season. "We've been in a slump, and we needed this just to carry out the rest of the season," Anderson said. Three more conference losses over the next two weeks to Central Missouri State, 2-0, Truman State, 4-1 and Missouri Southern, 2-0 may have dampened spirits, but the Bearcats dug deep to gather one last

the University of Minnesota Duluth two days

win.

forecast

Missoun Southern State College 0-4. 0-2

was brighter than the team's 3-15

The Bearcats

hit a

beginning with Central Missouri State University 0-2.

D4

finish.

nine-game losing streak,

a crushing 9-1 loss to

Minnesota later.

The MIAA Conference schedule proved to be just as rough for the 'Cats. They dropped games to

MIAA Conference record 2-10

Southwest Baptist University, 4-2 and Emporia State University, 4-1. Forward

3-15

Overall record

first

:

"Defender

Carlie Hoskins

scored the team's

Truman State

the Bulldogs. Oct. :

first

goal ever against in a 4-1 loss to

17

DC

"Forward Kapua Cabreros

tied for 5' place In the

game average

Q

University

with a

MIAA

goals-per-

0.33 gpg average

<

Kapua Cabreros scored her

goal as a Bearcat against

SBU

Sept. 13, the

first

of six goals she scored throughout the season. spirit kept Cabreros and her teammates going through tough losses. "We just had to keep our mentality up, and we just had to keep focused," Cabreros said. "1 think our whole team knew we could do it, and we just

had to keep practicing hard for it." The sweat and toil of intense practices almost paid off when Northwest faced nationally-ranked No. 24

:;:Goalkeeper Michetle Goold

Truman

ID

On Oct.

home

State at

Michelle Goold's

Sept. 29. After goalkeeper

six saves in the

'Cats forced the scoreless

TSU

goal in the

90'''

game

second

half,

into overtime.

minute ended

all

the

A

"Even though we them," Cabreros

was a good

An

effort,

we played really well against "They didn't expect it. It and we clicked really well." lost

said.

home

the inaugural 1999 season, scored her second goal of the season in the win.

"We came out with high

intensity,"

Gnefkow

"Every player wanted to win that game since

home game. The

the last

The

said.

it

was

seniors were all fired up."

'Cats closed out the season with losses to

Southwest Baptist, 5-4 and CMSU, 4-0, finishing the season 3-15 overall and 2-10 in the MIAA conference. Days

later.

Northwest Athletic Director that Wolf's coaching

Bob Boerigter announced

contract would not be renewed after four years as

head coach. The news caused mixed

feelings

among

players. "It's

kind of a

bummer deal

her job, but maybe

Anderson improve

said.

offensive drought continued for Northwest

Tears

it's

"You can

as a team.

for her

having to

lose

what the team needed," just hopefully look

We are sad

go because we had a

lot of

to see

good times with

may have been shed

up and

Coach

[Wolf]

her."

in a season of losses,

but they could not drown athletic optimism.

The losses were the first of games in which the Bearcats were held scoreless, causing mounting frustrations.

said.

Pusatcri, Ken Schwcigcl, tiina Christianson. C'hnsiinc C'ollins, Rcncc Judd, Angela Hainmon, Jennifer <inefkow, Jiil Anderson, Brandy Sonnichien and Sarah Wallaic. Back Rom: Kapua C^abreros,

Becky Marston, Carlic Hoskins, Rory t.>kcy. Hcatiicr Kolbo,> Michelle Coold, Danielle Lawless, Raheema Qureshi. KriJti Potee, Stacey Yainamoto. Caitlin Hoskins, Kathleen Ames and Dana Biiresh.

"1

Missouri Southern, 4-0.

Soccer Front Row; Join

Sports

finale for five seniors. Senior mid-fielder

with weekend defeats by Missouri-RoUa, 1-0 and four

722:

team mustered a 3-2 win against a memorable

Jennifer Gnefkow, the only remaining player from

hopes of the

Bearcats' second win.

27, the

Missouri-RoUa on Senior Day to make

Relying on team

ranked 7'- in shots-pergame with a 2 33 spg average

ranked second in the MIAA for saves per game, averaging 7.41 spg

players, especially in the goalkeeper position."

winning, that stunk big time. People

kind of accepted the fact that we kept losing, so we didn't really have to prove anything." With a 3'1 win against Wayne State University during the team's first weekend of soccer, the season

0-t, 3-2

was a disappointment

fun together as a team,

said.

just Univ^'sity of ^4issouri

for me and I know for we know we're a better team than that," head coach Joann Wolf said. "But in certain positions that we have, we have some very young "It

the players because

all

think

we accomplished other things," Cabreros

"We became

a lot closer as a team, so

it

didn't

go to waste."


Midftelcter Sarah Wallac* tmndt ic-jMiituic- ilotig (lir ri^hi «ulclinr

MuMHiri

Stitc UniVTr\ir>-

K-itiiuJ in giul«

with thrrr

i

\u\\

vrrvut

Wilbir wj*

(

c<>

hrr

cntrjl

tird (or

Mtirrd throu)^itHit the %cjw>n

;^'#.' hy

KUtt

t ryr

Forward Kapua Cabrrrot antkipatct i thniw in 6tini i

Ontral Mi^vxin Suic Univmin- inKlTickicr.

C jbnmn pbxrd the trarn with

m

vx

all

I

K f^tnrv »il"thc vavm jnd

^uK

f^*> hy .\Ua

Midfielder Becky Martton fpunt the ball in Univcr«t\*,

Unva,

uud

air agaln^t

W

Iryr

{'H>\%c\M<>n

of

Emporia State

Manton. a trnhinan from ( >dar FalK,

uw Uf^ifK ant pU\-ing time thn>u^<Hit her

fllV «-a«>n

ffc.*' (7

Man I ryr

Soccer

)23


Front Row: Matt Brownsherger. Victor James, Javcm Perkins, Scott Fleming, Floyd Jones III, Jesse Shaw, Ben McC^illum, Kelvin Parker. Brett Peterson and team manager. Back Row: Skip Slicar, Steve Tappmeyer, Austin Meyer, Derick Worrell, Joel Yeldell,! Kcanan Weir, Brian Carson, Brandon Rold, Byron Jackson, Jelani Walker, Steve Rold, Mike Morley and Darren Vordcrbruegge.

Missoun Western 8a74. 65-77. 67-76'

Pittsburg State

67-81: 92-64; 95-73*

Truman State 71-83; 60-56

Missouri Southern

75-78; 93-92

Washburn 59-58: 52-62

Southwest Baptist

84-71:80-74

Central Missouri

78-56: 80-59

Missouri-Rolla

70-58: 75-54

Empona

State

89-109; 92-82

Regular Season Record:

20-7

MIAA Record: 12-6

* Indicates

MtAA Tournament ganies

:::Scott Fleming earned MVP honors at the Ryland Mllner Classic Tournamentranked third

in

the

MIAA

regular season

assist-to-turnover ratio (1 .94). fifth in scoring (17 ppg] and eighth in steals in

(1

81

spg).

became the fourth Bearcat in history to reach 1,500 career points in the 10989 loss to Empona State Jan 29 He scored season

458

points during the regular

:::Kelvin Parker ranked second m the MIAA regular season in free throw percentage 897) and seventh in assists (3 96 apg) (

,

:::Bearcats

Q

broke their single-season record for U"iree-point field goals by scoring

No 224

Empona State Feb 26 The 'Cats scored 231 regular-season three-point against field

goals

new

school record for margin of the 109-28 win over Calvary Bibte College Dec 5 The previous record was 66 points over Graceland College in set a

i/tctory in

1999

X 72^:

SPORT'

DC

<


THE SHADOW^^™^^^

IN

BY ASMLEE ERW1N

R

mcaaon hope»

he

first

lime in

teach the

.tiled

:jme but

still

six years,

MIAA

the men's Kiskeihall team

light

Tournament championship

secured a regional pi»tseason berth.

team, emmiiwis regarding (he squad's potential

We've got a goal

for the

MIAA

aitd o( course, a national

onrard Joel Yeldell

nuch

like to get

will

said.

sum up the

rest

Championship goals pretty

of the season."

Western three-game road trip brought hard times for the team, beginning with an 81-67 loss to Pittsburg State University that ended Its five-game winning streak. In Kirksviile Jan. 8.

Truman

Seniors Yeldell. guard Scott Fleming, guard Ben

A

State University pulled off an 83-71 upset;

^IcCollum, guard Jelani Walker and forward Floyd

three days later, the Bearcats

ones joined key returning guards Kelvin Parker and

Southern State College, 78-75. Northwest dropped out of the Division

e«e Shaw in trying to improve their 29-3 record ran the previous year. The (oal looked within reach as the Bearcats, anked No. 12 nationally, defeated No.

>ilKXa State UniversitY 7 1 -69 in the Ryland Milner

foumament Nov. 23. Quickly compiling a 3-0 «catd, Nonhwest suffered its worst loss in more than icvcn years to the University of Minnesota-Duluth, >7-67.

With

six

games

left in

the non-conference

the 'Cats rebouruled to win in 8-1 record

all six,

posting

to Missouri

fell

for the first

time in 71 games and

place in the

MIAA

facing No. 6

South

3

said.

seas<in, defeating rival Misst>uri

State College, 80-74.

championship,"

Those two

through that undefeated and go into

"Wc made it through with one loss. We had to get to know who the team is, define roles, try to find out how you can contribute to the team." The "Cats turned their attention to the MIAA Conference

lured.

lin.

you

conference with a pretty gixnl record," Parker

For the five returning seniiws of the 2002 Elite

.>

"When you're playing a non -conference schedule,

of a national championship

laAheJ with the reahtv of unexpected setbacks. For

fell

II

Top 25

to seventh

with a 1-3 record. The task of Washburn University became a

daunting challenge.

"We're coming off dropping three in

a row, so

we

need to find some way of getting back," head coach Steve Tappmeyer said. "Our guys are continuing to practice hard

and play hard, so we

just

need to hang

in there."

# Continued page 127

by the end of December.

]M

\K<

M RMlKr

MlWOKk

During » fourth-quarter time-out against Southwest Baptist University, head coach Steve

Tappmeyer

defensive prr^*urc to defeated

ihrf^ta Kvng dkc na inn VvBnm viniiji Cmi^Kini. Tdc tlBnW-M.,*i»>rD— an

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12

jc

iat Cofcy

drlmdcT

pom >i (hr

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KeKin Parker Northwett pKtc hf

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€x>tk Rabwt

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SBU 84-71

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BASKETBA!

\:12S


Sports


IN IVicrmmcd

MIAA

Conference ice, the XIms defeated No. 6 Washburn S9S8 after -!>jw hit one o( two free throws with H seconds to stay in the

on the

strutxied earher, but

all

three games were

road," Fleming said of the prevuHis losing

streak. "I think a lot of

people really blow

it

(the

losing streak) out of proportion. Southern and Pittsburg are very tough places to play. Granted,

we

didn't play our best at any of them, but a lot of people

said

we were down and

Truman

also felt

the wrath of revenge .is the BearcatJi stole win from the Bulldogs in Bearcat Arena.

a 60- S6

Feb.

to start a three-win stretch.

I

"Everyone else seems to heal Truman

remaining in the irame.

'We

THE SHADOW

out,

and to come back and

beat the No. 6 team in the country

is

very big for

It's

like pulling teeth for us,"

were

really fortunate to

The Washburn triumph winning fiaptist.

sparked a four-game

State, but

momentum on

"We

Northwest continued

streak against Missouri

its

Southern when Yeldell hit a free throw with 0.4 seconds remaining to win the game 9J-92. No. 23 Washburn handed the 'Cats tine of only two losses in the final six regular-seastm games, defeating

62-52 Feb.

them

12. 1

5

kicked-

The

the road to Emporia

Night, Feb. 26. Fleming, Walker and Yeldell scored

streak, including victories over Si>uthwest

'Cats took their

said.

win that game."

winning streak that included wins over Central Missouri and Missouri-Rolla. A gratifying win came against Emporia State on Senior

Central MissiHiri and Missouri-Rolla.

ESU's Robbie Ballard stopped the winning

MIAA-record and 49 points en route to

streak cold by pouring in an

1

point field goals

a

3 three-

109-89

off a four-game

21, 17

and 13 points,

Hornets 92-82

The

respectively, to defeat the

in their final

game

in Bearcat

Arena.

oi the conference schedule but were

still

tied for

ended both the regular season and the ensuing MIAA Tournament with losses to Missouri Western. The Griffons had kept Northwest out of the conference championship game for the first time in

third in the rankings; the second round

was a chance

six seasons. Despite a season of stuggles, the 'Cats

improve that mark and gain redemption.

were selected for postseason play in the South Central

win.

The

to

'Cats had lost four

Northwest Jcnlt

n

games

in the

first

round

92-64 pounding to Pittsburc State

# Ciinunued fntm pagf J2f

easily, but

Tappmeyer

Beating Southwest Baptist 80-74 Feb.

us."

OF THEIR PAST

'Cats

Regional Tournament.

Guard Scott Fleming puts up i \h<>t aver the Emporu Sute Univrruc\- defcme in t 92-82 ^hln cm Senior Night. Hrminii; earned All-MIAA fuvteani and All- South Central Region second team honors at the end of the reason. fJk*' h^ Man Fryr

JeUni Wnlkcr tcont rvm of his i'l points against Washburn Univer%ir>' in a 59-58 sii-tor>-. Walker iseraged 9 9 poiniv-per-game during the rrgiiUr scas<in

f^K*i

fry

Matt

f'ryr

M.BASKETBAU.

â&#x20AC;˘121


Megan Morrow, Dana Lade. Jane Chalmers, Laura Friederich anÂťi Row: Brooke Hogue, Brooke Brown, Tanesha Fields, Jenna Wolfe, Kati'!

Frcnt Row: Ashely Poptaiiycz, Erica Hatterman.Bdcfc Scherer,

Missouri Western

72-87; 79-86

Pittsburg State

44-65; 71-69

Truman State

63^2; 72-74

Missouri Southern

72-68; 66-37

Washburn 58-72; 55-63: 52-57

Southwest Baptist 7067; 59-55; 64-57

Central Missouri

69-64; 63-70

MissourhRolla

51-37: 86-56

Empona

State

69-85: 60-50

OreraN Record:

16-12

MIAA Record:

108 :::

Jenna Wolfe

scored a career-high 35 points against California State-LA at the Hoops-n-Surf Oassic in Hawaii Dec. 20.

:

"Sarah Vollertsen

ranked third in the MIAA in field goal percentage (.500) and blocked shots (1 77 bpg) at the end of the regular season She also averaged 13.9 points and 7 3 rebounds-per-game

:::Erica led the

Hattemnan

MIAA

in

three-point

field

goal

percentage [466). She averaged 1.64 three-point

:::The

field

goals per

game

Bearcats

defeated Southwest Baptist for the first time since the 1 997-98 season in the 7067 victory Jan. 18 set a new team record for the least amount of points allowed in an MIAA game in the 66-

37

victory over

72?:|

Mtssoun Southern Feb

Sport^

8,

Corey Van Dine, Charleatha Rhodes and Sarah Vollertsen


JNEXPECTED SUCCESS THROUGH^^^'^^^^^ VASHLEEERW1N

A

^^B

ftcr

three siraiRht Kwing sca«>ns under his

women's head

raich,

(r inmeyer led hts

{U»»ea3<>n berth

h

b<isketball

team to a 1 5- 1 1 overall reci>rd and his way to being tiamcd MIAA

ol the Year.

IS.

Nonhwest

tell

Jan.

72-S8dcspitf Vollertscn'5 23pt>ints

and nine rcK«unds.

The

(bearcats

rebounded by defeating Southwest

Baptist University 70-67, led by Harterman's after

Steinmeyer s team

MIAA reci>rd atul MIAA Tournament.

secured the No. 4

i»ted a lO-!< red in the

Washburn University

nationally rankcil No. 4

iw

The announcement came

"It's

coach Gene

beciHne," Steinmeyer s;nd.

don't want anyKxJy

"I

3

Ginference standings.

what we eventually want

a small step toward

1

They topped SBU for the first time in ten games and positioned themselves in the MIAA points.

It.

"The big difference in our team is everyone is doing Any given night, someone else steps up, and thai

having a .500 season,

helps so much," guard Katie Scherer said. "They can't

what building this pn>gTam is all XHit. IVit It's that step you have to take." The Bearcats began their seasim ht»ting the annual

on Sarah |Vollertsen); they can't just focus on Erica [Hattermanj. They have to guard all of us." Throughout February, the 'Cats withstixxl ups and downs while maintaining pt»tscason hopes. An 8569 loss to No. 24 Emporia State was followed by a thrilling 7 1 -69 win over Pitt State Feb. 1 in Bearcat

think we're satisfied with

>

ause that's

just

itot

The

ybtKl Militer Clas&ic recording a

1 - 1

am won four of the next SIX games,

including a 106-

\ t

record.

win over CaliK.>mia State University-Los Angeles Honolulu. Hawaii., Dec.

Arena.

.K).

"CXiT season, bctiwe ctinfererKe, was kind

center Sarah Vollcnsen said.

"We

up and were still t>f

ytng to figure out our roles. Hawaii was a big pick-

IW

us.

We

kind of staned to uiKierstatuJ

how

to

Although the 'Cats dropped

their first

two

JoferciKe games to Missouri Western State College

iw

and Pittsburg State University 65-44, the team

newcomer guards Laura

Friederich, Erica

attcrman and Jane Chalmers making an impact, ledench scored 14 points agaitut Missouri Western,

The glory, however, was short-lived as Truman

stole a 74-72

win from the women

home.

at

"We

were pretty much speechless," guard Jenna Wolfe said. "We thought we were going to pull it out,

and the buzzer went

A

in."

7-72

just fixrus

off

and we were down by two."

29-point rout of Missouri Southern healed the

wound

left

by the Truman

regular season

loss,

but eventual

champ Washburn

stole

MIAA

another game

from the 'Cats 63-55. Defeating Southwest Baptist for the

second time Feb.

headed into the

1

5

gave the

women

a boost

A 63-42 win over Truman State University Jan. 8

games of the season. In the final stretch. Northwest went 2-2, including a 60-50 upset of No. 20 Emporia State Feb. 26 and a 86-79 loss to No. 24 Missouri Western to end the

ve the 'Cats their

regular season.

hile

Chalmers collected eight rebounds. first

conference win. Beating

StHithem State College 72-68 Jan. 1 1 gave team momentum, but not enough to top

tsiHMin

ic

With the No. 4 seed

Stale

in the

MIAA

tournament,

the 'Cats overpowered Southwest Baptist 64-57 to

earn their

Mimomi Sumlxi u

CoIWk* <Mraw, guard nntta FwlAKOn* ooc r< hcT iu tVU tpub >n ihc lU)^ hrUt i>>innm die 66-37 dclirjiot the Lnm\ phito hy Mjit l-ryr tb*

final four

1990.

A

first

conference tournament win since

57-52 semifinal

women's season

at

loss to

Washburn ended the

16-12 overall, their fint winning

•*ason since 1997-98.

The

Bearcat bench rises

i\ Erici

HiRcmun

drains i fhrcc-poini field goal over

Miiu>un

Southern State College defender Jacquie Rietzut;

Hattenrun a%uued

in a

h(>-M vKfoi-y over the

Lionf.

Hanernun helped Northwetf rank iccond

in the

MIAA in three-point field goal percentage

(Mi) phuohySUnhyr

Guafd Jane Chalmers attempts field gtul in a

Wl-SO win oXTf

a

ihree-poini

Enip<iria State

Univen«>' Feb. 26. Chalmen a\'eraged 4 1 S atu«> 1,81 iteaU-per-game during the regular

and

%eaMin

i^tetf

ij

Mm hyr

w. Basketball

n'i


4

Cyclone Holiday Classic

Men 2nd

Iowa State Universfty Open

MenAxh Jayhawk

Invitational

Men 2nd

Missouri Southern State CoHege Invitational Men 7th. Women 8th

Praine Wolf Invitational Men 5th

CMSU Classic Men 2nd

MIAA Championships

Men 2nd Women :::

4th

Women

Jenny Stmnxins set an MiAA meet record MIAA Championships in at the

Warrensburg March height of 11 feet.

1 1

1

with a first-place

.75 inches.

Absha Samuel led the MIAA in the 60-meter dash with a time of 7.72 seconds before the conference meet; she was also ranked 15^ in the nation tn the event.

Dens McMuUen

led the

MIAA

in

the high

jump before the conference meet with a height of 5 feet, 5 75 inches, which also placed her 18^ in the nation.

:::Men McKim broke hts own school record the weight throw three times before conference, including a throw of 58 feet. 1 in the natjon. inches, which ranked him 1

Daniel

Q

in

'

Jamaica Rectors school-record )ump of 49 feet, 2. 25 inches in the triple |ump Feb. 8 ranked him seventh in the nation,

Q[

<

Gsbnel Helms school-record time of 6.82 seconds in the 60meter dash pnor the conference meet secured htm first place in the MIAA rankings and 1 1 th place in the national rankings.

ID

Tiflfany Zarling (in

the second

grimaces js she nniiuis the curvv ot her WKI meten at the Io\v.i

bp

St Jte University ( A

noA

SPORTS

time of 2:21

.

)pcn Zjrttng pLiced eighth

pitolo

.

by Matt

I

ryr

witli


^° nationals

SELECT FEW MAKE THE LEAP BY ASHLEE ERWIN

c

ompctins tm imall 200-mctcr tracks and ind«x>r jumping pi'^- 'l^^ men's unJ winnrn's mtitx>r trick tcaim tiHi^hi

ihn<winK

jivJ

the ngi>r>

cramped <)uartcn and hard

i>(

up the experience:

«uin

surfaces.

One word

The women started their season Dec. 13 at the Iowa State Hohday Classic and resumed after winter break with sprinter Alishu

o('

Samuel ln>m Trinidad. Samuel had

II

to

making

a

N('A.A Ma»., March 14-15.

final qualifying cut for the

in Bostim,

started a breakthrough year by qualifying for

nationals in K)th the >hot put and weight throw at the Iowa State

University meet held IVc.

1

3.

Clint Prange joined

been in the United States for three da>-5 when she won the 55mcter dash aiul ttxik third In the 200-meter dash at the Ward-

Jamaica Rector's qualifying leap of 49-2

NeK,

Feb. 8 broke a 22-year-old schixil triple

tinlv

Hayleti InvitatuHial in Crete, It

was very inierestinc;

Samuel

me

said.

because

"The

I'd

track

h.Kl

I

Jan. 18.

never run ind<x>r (track)

seemed so

small. But

been running well back hi>me.

I

think

It is

just a

it

in

matter of

coming here and tr>ing to adjust." By seas«.in's end, Samuel had provisionally qualified for nationals n the 60-incter dash and ranked first in the 60 meters on the Ml AA PerfonnaiKe List. Kadie Campbell followed in second place on the oO-meter

list;

m the 60-metcr hurdles.

also ranking second

"They were neck-and-neck most have them challenge each other

each Vkki Wooton

iiKhes set at the

ot the time,

s»i it

led the

Ml A A Qmference

with her national qualifying mark of

CMSU Classic Feb. 22.

Jill

The

1

Prairie

Wolf

1/4 at Missouri

jump

own

broke his

58-4. Gabriel

schix)l record in the

1-10 1/2

Fisher also pawisionally

jump competition at Missouri 1/4- Dena McMullen made a the high jump Feb. 22 to take the lead

Helms

also broke his

own

school record and

Kcraus and John Heil added their names to the

meter run with .second and third place finishes

the

the

women

tixik

Simmons set a meet-record mark of 1 3/4 in becoming an MIAA champ in the pole vault. Her height ranked her sixth nationally and made her the only both the 60 and 200-meter dashes. 1 - 1 1

cfagrd

H-7

l;4incfac<ootf»c vault

np: jJKcd bnnii).

Z^ch Edwirdi.

the pnlr

v.iult

i

iimpctltion.

y*» ty ItM fr)>

MiA

Aubrry. Pete Puikcu. John Hnl.

EBall.DinrMC>llirrf.J«iu<«nPhtlfaf>t. RmiHuningriindJctT('jm|it>rU TkiiJ

MtmdmiPaagic. Damd McKun. Kym MiUrr.JnrI Trrry. jr>«c Fiihrr. PjuI Mi«rr. Knin Krno. Chock Abdr ifid Ptn% Ncl«w FMrtk Xmp: Mjtt Kbrnm. Brandon Sdncn. MiA Swwan. Conrxi Wno«tc>. Tvirr VUnn. C IhtT Mclntt><h. Paul hioufrk. TlOTit Bnmnlcy ami Chrn NkHoIi Batk Mtm: head coacli Ruhard Aluip. Wn Flowa, ^Mon Surnn. Stcte MilWr.

Hut Chriuumon.

Matt Abrlr and wr>m»n'«

1

5-5 vault ranked

sixth.

"We weren't

expected to do a whole

of a sudden we're seeing that

lot in

we have

conference, and

now

talent in every event,"

Heil said.

At the

MIAA Championships, Helms won the 60 and 200-meter

dashes to help the Bearcats finish second overall. relay

team of Heil, Kcraus, Chad Fowler and Brad

place, as did

field to

put,

Ckad Fohan. KyW Kmm. AiMhony JjcIlmhi. Pm jnfdin ind C:hm H.ur» SarmJ Mtm Danm Burm. Eznh Buwmcy. Bnd Tmlr.>xi Houtc. Adim Millri. Brid

head nacb Vkki Wo<iton

minute

and some of those have been taken care of." Pat Jordan and Ryan Miller provided a boost prior to the conference meet by provisionally qualifying for nationals at the CMSU Classic Feb. 22. Jordan's mark of 6-8 3/4 in the high jump

Four

Rjna Mill«r duc tpdi to thr mil in

1

"We had gixxJ performances," head ct)ach Rich AIsup said. "There in my mind for the conference meet,

fisunh at the meet, led by Samuel's individual championships in

his pal*,

in the 800-

were some question marks

all .

list

in times of

ranked him third in the conference, while Miller's

1

McKim

provisionally qualified in the 60-meter dash in 6.82 seconds. Kyle

him

MIAA Performance List. At the MIAA Champumships Feb. 28- March

Southern

weight throw with a mark of

Southern Feb. 9 with a mark of 18-5

I

by

Invitational at the University of Nebra.ska-

qualified for the national long

L]ualifying leap of 5-5 3/4 in

1

record.

Lincoln Feb. 14 produced the most success for the team.

was nice to

competition and practice," head

Simmons

Feb.

53.17 seconds and 1:53.34, respectively.

said.

In the field events, Jeiuiy in the pole vault

in

him

qualifying in the shot put at the Jayhawk Invitational. In the jumr>s,

hefi>re,''

have

I

end the season

four representatives to nationals to

nin for the conference champion.ship.

McKim

l>aniel

make the

t'hampionships

The men sent after

Univ«rsiiy

the addiiK>n

l")ivision

cixild

»ur\-ival.

woman

Bearcat

McKim

men were

included in the

in the

Elliott

took

yard first

in the shot put.

NCAA Division

end the season, including

Helms

The 4x880

McKim and

60-merer dash and Rector

II

Championship

Prange in the shot

in the triple

jump.

Fml R»m:

Mcathrr Brokaw. Jrnnifrr Heller. Rachel Stark*. Kadie c:ampbell. Fuher. Jenny Simmon*. Sara WolfT. Mariah C'lark, Ashley Cirot*e. Je»«ca Monteuno and Kara Pohlman. St€»n4 R»w: Leslie Lober. Laceyjackuin. Betty

Jill

Lee. Megan Bauman. (tara Lacy. Erin Reed. Carrie Jo Moe, Bridget Shieldt. Athlcy Nally. Tiffany Zarling. C^armen Cox and Tom Sexton. Third Rmw:

Megan Hamilton.

l)ia McKee. Julie Toehben. Aluha Samuel. Heather RobertHvn. Abby Van Syix. Renae Miller. Blaire McC'uen. Monica Perry. Mary Wirt and Abby l>i4*elhotT. Bmck lt«fr; men't head coach Richard AKup. Erin Parneil. Wet Florea.Jaton Slarnet. Steve Miller. Nate Chnttiant<,n. Matt Abele and head coach V'icki Wooton

\.ni


2

Pitcher plate.

Jimmy Elam fires a 2.74 ERA and ;i

Elam had

pitcli to

led the

with three saves during the season,

lUc

team

pfwio by

Diirrcti iniitley. i'nii'ersity PlwlOj^riiphcr

After being thrown out on his way to second

liase,

Chad Mci )aniel turns to see ifa double-play occurs. McDaniel had a .216 batting average and scored 2 runs on the season for the Bearcats. /)/Âť(() ^ytXimi/ 1

Mtitiey, Uniivrsiry

vVashbum

University 14-0, 12-8. 4-3. 4-7

Missouri Western State College 10-5. 10-5. 2-4. 7-1

Emporia State University 3-0, 1CW3. 1-7. 8-7

"ThJiman State University

7-9. 2-5. 9-4. 6-3

Missouri Soutlnern State College 8-9. 1-6

Pittsburg State University 1-3. 6-8. 13-10. 5-7*

Southwest Baptist University 11-7. 4-1, 20-13

Untvers^ of Missouri 4-3. 2-10

-

Rolls

Central Missouri State University 5-4. 3-6. 6-7, 0-4-

* indicates MIAA Conference tournament games

MIAA Conference record

Overall record

1

7-1

28-26

:::Right:fielder

Ryan

Ellis

set a single-season school record with

79

hits

led the

team

with a

416

batting average.

:::Short stop Willie Ciaramitaro team m slugging percentage 607],

led Lhe

[

runs scored [56). runs batted

homenjns(12) and

nz:

total

bases

Sports

in

(1

(56).

19)

<

Ptjoi(H<riiphi


CHANCES AT SUCCESS OVERTHROWN T BY ASNLEE ERWIN

.J

he haschill (cam had its i;l«<vc txitMrctchcvi, poucJ i>n the vcrKc heci>mmg ii t'orce in the Ktl AA C'onfcrencc. In the cruJ, the ball

Jnif>pcvl.

and the team

fell

»ht<n

i>l

m f^MU.

"When

Kame» were M:hoJuled to prepare the team conference competition, but playinK in February had its

Early luici-ctwJerence lor

JuadvaniJKeii.

The

Bearcats traveled to Arkadclphia. Ark., to play

Ouachita Riptist Uni\"erMty and Hcnder>on State University, teams not hiivJerevI by coKJ winter weather.

The

OBU but went 0-2 agairtst

Stale.

(oueh

"It's

fi>r

as

t»i (jet

Henderson

a lot

i>f

i;et

I-

1

against

practice in because we're always

inskle becaiLse o» the wx-ather," third didn't actually

'Cats went

baseman John Sipes

live situations, to

when we

tiut

said.

down

"Wc

to play a

i;amc everyKxIy was kiivJ of rusty."

LcK>king to

warm

up, the

TvHimamcnt

State University 6-5 0.

.\

team headed

to the

Savannah

Socthwest. the

last

in

and Armstrong Atlantic State University

20-9 pounding of

Gannon

With improved

1-

(Pa.) University finally sparked

offensive pnxJuction, the

team won

three tiMimamenl games.

"We dug ourselves a hole, and that's probably attributed to new who were tK>t used to playing with each other," head coach Dwin Loe said the slow stan. "But having a lot of games in a <.>f

raw just got us into the baseball nxitine." a hot streak that carried

"We

were playing good defense, scoring runs, pitching was strikes.' pitcher Brett Jones said. "Everything was just

throwing

kmd of going The

Truman

home, followed by Splitting games with Washburn University and losing two out of three games to Pittsburg State University left slim chances of Northwest making State University beat the Bearcats at

two

los.ses

the

MIAA

to Missouri Suithcrn State C^)ilcgc.

"We got

pt>st-scason tournament.

to the

end of the

sea.son,

into a lag at the end," Lik' said.

and

it

"We were

was disappointing to go fighting for our lives to

toumament|."

The 'Cats needed a fourth-place conference finish or better to make the tournament, so they pulled out all the stops to sweep Truman and Southwest Baptist University. The team alst) picked up wins against the University of Missouri-Rolla and nationallyranked No. 2 Central Missouri State University.

"We knew

to get in

Facing

CMSU

it

was do-or-dic, and we put

again in the

when

team's hopes deflated

it

tt^ether,"

it

first

round of the tournament, the

the Mules

won

With the

4-0.

drive

end the season. was very disturbing knowing we beat these two teams

gone, the 'Cats

fell

to Pitt State 7-5 to

in the regular season

and knowing that we should have won and

could have won," Sipes

said.

Northwest finished with

MIAA record.

Rightfielder

a

28-26 overall record and a 17-12

Ryan

Ellis

was

into place."

The

early.

MOMii Joha Sip** mthii tn inlVU tty ifutnt Picnbucg Suir Unnrrun' oun jnd jn 8M firUing pcrccnugc on the vaion. pkm hj

S<pr> hid 41 put

^Bwball Ff^mt Amf:

Bearcats began the

including

team's focus dissipated over Spring Break, which Loe and

pbyers attributed to the team peaking

and catcher Mike Ruff were Second Team

a First

Team All-Ml AA

}ot An<JcT*on. Krnion KUvp^n««rin. Brrif Ruti. John Hotbof. EdK^r J<inri ind John Sipc « Html: Wtn Rivt». Brrti J.»n<'«. Kalrh M«, /jc Ruff. Efu Bjrtinf. Jimmy El»m. Kvjn F.lln. Muhjfl t rrjmn. Wilhc

Ellis,

fall

selections.

season after losing several key seniors,

second baseman Michael Creason,

first

baseman

Zac Ruff and pitchers Jimmy Elam and Eric Bartine.

"Wc pretty much lost the right side of the field," Sipes said. "But Coach Loe did a great job replacing those guys." Several new faces added stilid defense and depth in the lineup for the inter-squad

build

'

could

Conference selection; Sipes, Jones, short stop Willie Ciaramitaro

cloae.

.^f(fl 4.

When wc

hit.

We ju.st cmildn't get both sides of the ball to

pitch.

click."

"CH'erall,

them into the ctmference schedule, winning 1 2 ot the next 1 4 games. Sweeps over Washburn Univenity, Missouri Western State College and Emporia State UnWenity established a 6-0 confereiKe record as March came to a

hi»

we couldn't

little bit," Sijx's said.

Sipes said.

>;uYs

The 'Cats hit

hit,

of found aKnji two to three weeks ot bad

out of the race tor a

ttH>k us

our pitching was giH>d, wc couldn't

get in (the

Savannah, Ga., March 5-10. The chill remained, hv>wevcr, as the EWarcats dropped games to Grand Valley Invitational

we kind

"After that,

Kuvball that

on the

it

accumulated

in the spring.

VHm jr/

B*tk H»»: tlritl voith I >jrin L«x'.JtK'l t)it\rnjn. Kvjn /.ink. AiUin Thompvn. Hrvin ( VfKun. Wr*t. Shjof Rrnilcv. Chad \t»l>inicl jnd \tir\ (^crlith

('Mr>mttjrf> ind llrad

Will Mjvlr.

Mjfun

scrimmage season, and the team continued to

success

Itill

R.»T

Milir RutT.

BASEBALL

n3


5

WashDum

University

1-4. 1-2

Pitcher Alison Adkins releases a pitch at home against Pittsburgh State University. Adknis was 9-8 on the season with a ].H(< earned run average, phony by .AmiUidii HyUt ^ylc

Centra) Missouri State University a-0. 30, 4-5*

Empona

State Universtty

5-1. 6-0

First

baseman Erica Hammontree is called out

xs she slides into

outscored Southwest Baptist

Missouri Southern State College

04,

3-4, 3-6*

Truman State 5-3.0-9

University

Southwest Baptist University 2-0. 2-0

University of

Missoun

-

Rolla

S0.9S Missouri Western State College 1-0, 0-2. 7-a'

MtAA Conference tournament games

'indicates

MtAA Conference record 11-7

Overall record

29-1

::;Left fielder led tJne

Angie

McCoy

team with a 387 batXmg average

and 10 home runs broke the single-season homerun mark of four set by Lindy Tomttnson in 2001

:::Pitcher Alison Adkins'

Q DC

<

35-inn)ng scoreless streak ended May 3 in a 7-4 win over Missouri Western

:::Pitcher led the

team

Morgan McGinnis with a

1

24 ERA and 61

ID

strikeouts

n^:

Sports

second base against St^uthwest Ba prist

University. In the double-header, the Bearcats

Pittsburg State University 2-3. 3-0

4-1). plu^o hy

AnunuLi

li)'{n


.

WINNING SEASON ENDS eaRIY^^^^^^^^ BY ASMLEE ERWIN

D

cM and wind>'

unng the

d.'i>'s

irf

February, the

s»rftKill

"Morjpin did an awTSomc job

team

"IVfcnsc did their job,

hifccmaicd in the mrnratKvi area underneath Bearcat AaTta, prcpanriK

s;iid.

far ihc sr"i>K xasiin.

our job and overcame

The

Pc•a^t.^t^ finiilh' tired iip (or a

"When we came

Wa

in wt:

wwr very >\xins." shunstiifi

whi>ie idea was to cutne

ll wxked rcalK- hard because we

tiifjether.

thuughl

Nimmn

Mclissi

it

H-memher «quid dmninaied

In the

March 5Winona State

quelled at the Emporia Slate Univrrsity Truslcr Tournament

Northwest pisted four wit» hefixe losing against the

tounwment game, the team bounced back

Univcniry

3-2. In

ID trounce

MIAA conictence foe Emporia State University 8-

final

1

1

*As a team, we played really well together," second baseman Erica HMUnontite said. "We wetc )ust there fur each other, we pumped each Takir^; their H-5 lectvd

on the

winning sneak highlighted by a icfiienon

tvad, the Bearcats hit 5-1 finish

an eight-game

m the Big Tiger Classic

The conference

With the

final

ttximamcnt. Northwest upended

1

think

Finishing

wkh Truman State Umvrrsiry and

it

just

kind of stomped on

all

2 in Warrensburg. Pitcher

After six seasons, head coach position at Western

1

5-inning 2-0 shutout of

Morgan McGttmis struck out

11-7 conference. Catcher Megan

McCoy were

lot

Pam Knox

se;ison.

resigned in July to take a

University.

from

Hammontrce said. "As we could do bener."

us,"

In August, Susan Punzo took the

players, she

helm of a softball team dreaming of

a confererKe championship.

"She wants to win as much as we do," Nimmo said. "She wants to get us there."

The

Bearcats posted a 9-1 recoid during the

start for

a team acquainting

itself

season, a successful

Softball.

Ktipipcr. Krily

Spring. ShcDy \ 1

fall

new coach. A stri>ng spring work made for a successful year in

with a

season followed by hard off-season

Soriball From!

I

Oregon

cared entxigh that she thought

Northwest

a complete game.

fcic

games

5-4.

of us."

awarded Second Team All-Conference hon»)rs following the

Pittsburg State Univet^iry.

A prominent confiemKe win came with a

O^U Apnl

splitting

'Cats 4-

winning

to Missixiri Southern 6-3 to end

lost

The 'Cats finished 29- 1 5 overall and

m the MIAA, Northwest swept Emporia State, Southwest Baptist

UnivenHty and the University of Miaouri-Rolla while

CMSU,

to the Bearcats, provided

securing five runs, eventually

gone, the Bearxats

fire

l<»,scs

on the bracket. The Jennies eliminated the

"She expected a

schedule proved challenging for the "Cats with

month

16 giimcs leading up to the

"We wanted to go further in conference than we did," Nimmo said. "We had one bad inning that put us in the loser's bracket, and after that,

game.

VtoKUi Southern State College battling for the championship.

df^M Kwter*

i>t

the season.

curucndets Central Missixin State University, Washburn University and

-7

out

1 1

MIAA

of the

6* inning by

lead in the

in

City Match 22-23. Avila College ended the streak, defeating

Northwest 6-2 in the

1 1

the next

Spring, second baseman Tara Risetter and ixitfielder Angie

adwrift."

Nimmo

game we did

was huge."

kxiking to avenge two regular-season

Eady-5eseun jitten led to a mediocre 3-4 starting iccoid hut were finally

16.

nxmd

first

the next challenge

trcshmcn.

h>' m.y

of the

ML<Bixin Western 7-4, avenging an April 24 loss to the Grifforts.

all."

T»\^ kwie scnhirs, pitcher Alism Adkins ;ind >iutfieldcr Jessica Rupiper, led a

It

end

conference tournament.

play wvll, w\>rk hard. Wi-

we ciNiki win

it.

tixjgh pitching dticl,"

'Gits a confidence boost entering the final

won

of the sciison; they

luckv Mart in the hcKtnning i4 March.

mki.

Winning gave the

winnii\g scasim hut only after a

was a

it

Finally, at the

tix).

C

Row: Tarj Rivttcr. Lmd^y jrtcr

jnd Kntciiu

l)ill<>n

Mclnvj Ninim«>.

jctfii-j

Muricin Milnnnu.

Mrgjn

t'r<)Uvc.

Btk Rmt:

MKlXnuld. Anpc McCoy. AInnn Adkim. Jjcqui Hjndlm. Enci

jmnwinlrrc *nd T»nijj RiirtlcT

Tmb RiMOM atHidb ready

•opmiicfffinibMe Rncnrr Kovrd Z7 the lOMa wA hrt 477 i

mm on

snrTRAi

1

ns


Truman State Open

Men 2nd

Matt North

starts his spin in the shot put

competition

the Northwest hivitational. North

at

placed fifth with a toss of 51

teet.

2 inches; he also

placed sixth in the discus, photo by Am.ituli ByUr

Northwe^

Men

Women

3rd:

Empona

invitational

8th

State University

D-ll

Kadie Campbell out strides an opponent in the lOO-meter hurdles at the Northwest Invitational. At the MIAA Conference meet, C^anipbell placed

Challenge

Men 9nd

third in the event with a time of 15.08 seconds. photo by Anuitida Bylcr

Doane Relays Men 2nd

Simpson

Men

Twilight

Open

1st

Drake Relays Men 18th

Missoun Southern Men 3rd

Twilight

MIAA Championships Men 3rd: Women 5th

NCAA D-\\ National Men 10th

Championships

:::Men Matt Fisher ran a 52.49 seconds at natjonals in the 400m hurdles, the best time of his collegiate career. Fisher also set a Northwest Invitational meet record in the 400m hurdles with a Lime of 52.97

seconds

Conrad and Tucker Woolsey placed fifth and sixth in the shot put, respectively, at the Drake Relays Apnl 26 and traveled to the Simpson Twilight Open the same day to place first and second in the shot put. Qint Prange. Conrad Woolsey and Tucker

Woolsey

earned Ail-America status at

all

the national

meet

:::Women Jenny Simmons set an MIAA meet record 1 1 feet, 8 inches in the pole vault at the MIAA Championships May 4-5 April

House ran

seconds

m

the

a personal best

100m

12

at nationals-

Jenny Simmons and Jill Fisher received academic All-Amencen status in outdoor track and field.

The

women

nrtaHcs at the

736:1

extablished

25 season

MIAA meet

Sports

best

<


FIELD EVENTS DRIVE SUCCESS

^R outdoor teams

BVASMlEEItWtN

T

rack was ihe

common

reference for the

forgtuien tielJ athletes guiJeJ the track .inJ held

men\

.ind

spitrt,

hut the

women's outJiHir

teams throughout the season. women dealt with a lack oi runners and an

In the spring, the

abundance of iniunes on the team. *Our strength* were pretty much in our field events and short jprmts," head coach Vicki Wooton said. "Aijain, we were homharded with in)uries and low numbers in the 800 meter on up. n> we had some events we didn't fill anyone in. That makes 11

wanted

Simmons and

thri>wer

Mary Wirt consistently finished in the top three places at the Truman State Open, Northwest Invitational and I\>ane Relays. With the MIAA Conference meet on the horiion, the team pulled together at the Simpson Twilight Open April 26. Kadie

m the discus, Sara

Prange shincd

but did not aitd

make

Wirt placed

Simmons placed H'** hammer and

finals.

14'^ in

both the

in the pole vault

discus to

end the

reason.

Tf«k .M«a ^F•« «»».

C

.* h

*iik. J«mion Philip Sejn

(

h*l

F.

~

let.

\Un

Nippcrt.

1

Vnck

I

VUirt>. ItiiUip

Oxmy Burnt jndjon

Hoinr Rmr f^Emh Boaniry. jori Ttmr. jewc hJwi. Wc« FVwrj. Ptnbp Ndnm. Shjwn Vjcknun. KirW KcOBiaidjMn C.~htnn Rmt J:Jnhn K»nj. Chm KamvJ<ff tUmptirll. j.>ck IjcbcMrin. Pwl Mncr. Jnmiy SHhrrmnLJcff Shipley ind Mttt Rihrr Rtw 4: Pjul H<j«*k. Klmm. C'rnn Fkmiranici. jjnum Rrctor. Conrad W<xiim. Miit Sirmn. Man Nnnh jnd Ryan MtOcr Btttk Kmr: Vatch Rjctunl Alwp. Aw<un< ( OKk jann Scjmcv Man Abck. Nate i:hn«umnn. Brad Elkic. Irn-n Mavm. John |l

Brritn. jnhn Hot.

Mm

at

the meet, winning the

May

2^-25. ("lint

NCAA

Division

II

eighth in the event, but his biggest success was a second-place

with a toss of 59 feet, 6.25 inches. His Tucker WiKilsey, tiK>k fourth place In the shot, while

finish in the shot put br<ither.

McKim

placed

12"'.

are," Prange said.

The

Some

how good we really "Our throwers are recognized across the

"That's one thing people don't realize

of the runners are just waiting for their time to

thin field of Bearcat runners struggled for top places

throughout the season. Joel Terry won the llO-mctcr high hurdles at two meets and finished second at the MIAA

Conference Championships in a national-qualifying time of 14.58. Matt Fisher won the 400-mcter hurdles in 53.78 seconds to help the team finish third at the MIAA meet. "We were hoping to get second, but things just didn't happen to

work out that well," Kyle Keraus said. "It was we were happy with the finish."

a little

disappointing, but

Terry and Fisher were the only Northwest runners at nationals, Fisher ran a personal record 52.49 seconds in the 400-meter hurdles; neither athlete qualified for the finals. Travis

Mason

and Jamaica Rector rounded out the national competitors in the long jump, placing 16'*' and 17''', respectively. The men's team finished lO**" overall in the nation to conclude a successful season. "I

"Overall, most people looked back and saw that they improved." Wixiton said. "Whether they placed as high as thcv

iranslorinod p>>tential into success with nine

Daniel McKim, Matt North and C'onrad Wot>lsey also Woolsey placed

all )ust

.1

the

qualified for the national discus competition.

shine."

wanted to prove that we were doing well and for conference," Campbell said. Despite setting several personal records at the MIAA Conference Championships May 4-5, the women placed fifth as team. House won the 200-meter dash in 24.66 seconds, and Simmons won the pole vault, clearing with a meet record height of 1 1 feel, 8 inches. 'You've just gtn to do it the day of the conference meet, which IS really hard sometimes as a young athlete," Wooton said. "We did have a lot of personal bests at conference, and that's all you can do." By the end of the season, three athletes qualified for the NCAA Division II National Championships in San Angelo, Texas, May 23-25. House ran a personal record 12.0 in the lOO-mcter dash

iliat

the season to qualify for outdoor nationals."

country.

we were ready

enough and

championship with a throw of 18? feet, 'J inches. "Our thri>wers were definitely the strength of the team," head coach Rich Alsup said. "All five were solid performers during

Wolff in ihc shot put and Simmons in the pole vault aided a

"We

athletic

discus

strong finish.

that

knew they were

The men's team

Cunbcll's first-place finishes in the lOO-metcr dash and 100-

meier hurdles led the runners. Wins by Wirt

I

athletes qualifying for the national meet.

difficult.*

Sprinter April Hinise, pole vaulter Jenny

to.

potential w.is there."

enjoyed fielding this team that challenged the

MIAA

nation's best in the outdoor championships," Alsup said.

and "The

general work ethic of the entire rcnm \\n^ nmnrini;."

Track Wotnro fraur Jl««r.Jciiii\ Suromwn. Sara Wiilff, April Home. Kim V artx >niu(ii. Rachel jenkinA. Kadie ( amptx-Q and CVuch V'ickl Wimmiii) R0m 2: tnn Reed. AMwVan Swx. Renee Millet, jenniter Mellcr. A«hlcy tmnte andjetuta Mimlrtaixi Rtm}: Ondfen ShieU«. Enn PameB. ( iara I jo. Beiw Lee. Biaife M»t luen. Mefana i ilaiavapp. Sarah Swrdhet|t and Titlanv Zarfan|(. fUdk Rsmr hleathet Riihettvwi. Tiwii V^itfi. |<^«k a lane. (;wm Se*»*. Rachel Seaiiv I)etu McMuilen and Manah < bri

ChMprmntandDamdMcKim

OUTDOOR "n»C3< ••737


'

J J.

Mulwanda

after a successful

congratulates match.

Citirka

Sanchez with

a

handshake

Mulwanda and Sanchez were No.

3 doubles

partners, photo hy Dam-n WhilU-y, Utinvnity Photof(niphfr

Zach Keith

hits a forehand shot to his opp<>nent versus Baker

Universitv'. Keith photo hy IXim-n

:::MEN Southwest Baptist University 5-4

Empona

State Unruersity 8-1

Truman State

Washburn

Unrversity 6-1

6-3

University

University of Missouri

-

Rolls

9-0

Uncversity of Northern Colorado 4-5

'North Central Regional match

MIAA

:

record: 5-0

Overall record.

16-5

"WOMEN

Missouri Western State College 8-3

Southwest Baptist University 6-3

Truman State

Empona

University 4-5

State Universrty 6-3

Missoun Southern State College

Washbum

University

Truman State

3-1

5-4

University 5-3*

Q

University of Northern Colorado 4-5

DC

'North Central Regional matches

MIAA record ::;The

5-1

Overall record:

15-8

<

Bearcats

have stmuttaneously won the MIAA Men's and Women's Conference Championships five

times under head coach Mark

Rosewell

7

3g:|

ID

Sports

was 14-4 after his first season

liliitlcy,

Unitvrsity Photogtiiphcr

as a collegiate athlete.


DOMINATION CONTINUES

"'^

'^'^'^

BY ASHLEE ERW1N

n a campus ahsorbed

in the nrpucatinn iit'fuocball

and haskctKall

trams, one pn>gnim continued to work quietly, receiving

Few

recoRnitifin.

m-ouKJ have guessed

to be

it

little

one of the top pw^rams

m Ntifthwest's athletic history. The men's and women's 14*

tennis teams brvHight hi>mt the 13* and

him the wirmingest

'M^vich RokcwtII better,"

Niv

I

men's

alwa>-s trying

is

plaN-cr Jiwi

civMrh in Bearcat

hard to make the tennis team

Sanchez

said.

"He always

gets a really

Tough cixnpetition thnxighout the seasi>n prepared the "Cats to smmg, beginning March I - 5 with matches in Ti>peka, Kan. The .trvJ

"It w-as

wixnen

eiich

went

2-1

over the weekend.

rough in the beginning because cveryt>nc was getting to know

Re^idy ior in-er

first,

MIAA

topped

Sara Lipira and

and Washburn University.

Truman

but eventually

said.

"Some

Washburn, 62-49

wc got through everything."

more competition, the women

reeltnl off six straight

wins

the next two weeks. After defeating conference teams Missouri

Hcmer led home the No.

all

my

The men

?

Western State College, 6-3 and Southwest Baptist University, 6-3,

doubles championship, dc-feating

faced

stiffer

competition posed by Southwest Baptist. 2 player,

8-5, to bring

was probably the most exciting match "There was a huge crowd there, and

hundreds of people Uxiking on

a shtxking 5-4 lt»s to the University of

includittg

a seven-game winning streak of their

own,

an important 5-4 victory over Southwest Baptist March 16

that iiKreased the intensity of practice

"The work

ethic this year was different than the past because

knew we wrre really good," No. chance to go was a great

and competition.

teally far, so

5 player JanxxJ

Smith

everybody was working

1

said.

we

"We had a

10 percent, which

With the season's competition heating up, the women suffered losses to Mem> State UnK-ersiry arvJ Truman State University but reKiundcd to H'ln the

men

in

sweeping

Wimma State Universiry, Emporia State

the 69-64

in,"

really special

happen very

Smith

because

often."

May

3-4.

The men suffered

Northern Q)lorado

in the first

round, ending their hopes for the season.

"We beat ourselves," Smith said. "We pit very overconfident because we had a good tournament draw. We were looking past the match that we were playing to the next round." The women advanced to the finals after defeating Truman State, 53, but a 5-4 loss to Northern Colorado in the finals kept them one step away from

feeling."

ever played

was

that dtxrsn't

the regional tournament in Greeley, Gilo.,

The men matched

I've

it

home

Visions of a trip to the national tournament carried the teams into

champions

end of the season.

Michal Zamiatala; No. 4

Mulwanda; No. 6 player, Zach Keith and Smith, Northwest slim 59-58 lead over SBU with one doubles match remaining. J.J.

No. I pbyer Rosa Tapia stressed the importarKe of early-season success but said the main priority was repeating as MIAA Conference at the

had

Hemer said.

Smith and Jon Sanche: defeated SBU, conference championship win. "It

Individual

years of playing tennis, the most fun I've ever

Behind individual champu>ns No.

said.

for the title.

Adrianna llcmiindc:; No. 4 player, the winning effort. Hcmer and p;irtncr

2 player,

State, 9-8.

"Out of

held a

Both

MIAA conference titles.

CThampion.ships in Springfield April 18-20, the

rival

champions Tapia; No.

player,

each ocher," No. 6 women's player Raven Herrier personalities cla^ted at

defend their

was the conferetKe championship,"

tintsh

men

At the

set to

Nicole Berger brought

histi>ry.

schedule dunrtg the season."

k.ixxJ

teams were

women

MIAA Conference championship titles under hciid coach Mark

Roaewell, making

University, Rixrkhurst University

a national berth.

"In the finab for regionals said.

"For

we

lost,

but

it

was really

tight, 5-4,"

Tapia

my team, we were improved a lot from the begiruiing of the

season to the end." TTie teams' accomplishments outweighed the disappointing season

Jan* Mart*

Ottk od S«s Lipin take the cuun igainu

Thr\- pifucd i 12-17 record

dunng the

seaion

Jt

Wiiluin Jo^rll College No. 2 doubles ind wen 2H-27 in

finishes.

They had brought home

under the leadership of a 16-time

the

1

3'*'

MIAA

and 14* conference

Coach

of the Year,

titles

which

secured their place in Northwest's athletic history.

Womra't Ttona Ftmit Kmr. Kimel Rmudi. R<nj Tjfu. Nictitr Beiyirr. )enj I j>idie> jnd Mnr S\mk Clirit Bk* Rmt: .Mtchxl Roticm. Re,txi Dodd.Jjn tVixlrjk. .VIrunru ^VT^Jn(ir7.

PmcnAi Ljnu. Kjvm HemcT. \jn l.if«n jnd hrjd ciuch

VliHi

Riwwrll

M«n*i T*nnis Frcni Rmw: ]^^n Sanchcr. Mikr Ko^cwcll. (iorki Sinchej jnd Tim Bjuer Bmik R»m: Heid coach Mirk Kotev^Tll. Michal /.amutiij. Zach Keilh.J J Mulwanda. Jarri>d Smith and Korncl Romada

I:;?*?


GOALS DRIVE ATHLETES TO

COMPETE AND EXCELL BY CLARK GRELL

s to

'trength, determination, and the will compete were not limited to varsity sports;

many

students participated in intramural

other intramural sports such as

five-on-five basketball

sports.

skills

were especially needed

"It's

play.

Wolff said.

full-contact, but they won't

making

when

the largest intramural event of the

it

year.

AKL

Chain

Tuggers proved superior to the other competitors.

AKL

dominated by taking not only

first

place but also runner-up honors with

its

second team.

Though his team did not have the same success, Tony Dubolino was happy with team finished. "I've been here for four years and never made it past the first round," he said. "It's not painful at all. We came here to do what we needed to do and got it done." Even though "Battle of the Beef seemed dependent on strength, contenders said the event also took determination and strategy. "You've just got to keep your weight low and all pull as a team," Mark Calcote said. "Just get your legs strong and start into it." Calcote found the event to be the best where

his

among "It

is

that."

enjoyed the

fall

Mu,

event but said her sorority

took the competition seriously, especially it came Sigma Alpha.

"This

seems

is

to a

matchup

against

a big rivalry because

it

Alpha always

Alpha Sigma Alphas and Phi

like the

Mus are usually meeting each other in the championships of intramural sports," Wolff said.

At the season's end, Wolff and the Phi Mus took home bragging rights by winning the sorority championship in flag football.

Phi Mu and runner up Alpha Sigma Alpha were two of 57 teams that participated in flag football.

Flag football was not the only sport the

Phi

sorority also

won

softball, walleyball

and

Mus conquered. The

championships in racquetball.

Much

like the sororities

and

fraternities,

the intramural competitions.

the non-Greek members also fought it out on the field or court for bragging rights. "The Greeks are going to have more intense games in the fact that they want to be the better sorority or fraternity," Renny Vandewege said. "But I think there's a

my favorite

higher level of talent in the independent

"it's just all

done out against each I've

so far," he said, other.

You can

see who's the strongest team."

The

do

Wolff, a key participant for Phi

Sixteen teams took part in the fraternity league, but in the end, the

game, so

one of the most

successful years in

there's

going to be just as

Vandewege had plenty of intramural experience

as

a

participant in golf,

intramural participation.

basketball, three-point shootout

"We've had more entries this year than we've had in several years," recreation director Bob Lade said. "It's a stress release for the students. TTiey enjoy coming out and

football.

seeing their friends."

sports with others

While "Battle of the Beef had high many students took part in

participation,

much

competition."

"Battle of the Beef" helped to

establish

Sporis

1

"We get out and wish they'd pad me up and let me play

fun," Sara

come out on top in the annual "Battle of the Beef competition. More than 400 students took part in the "Battle of the Beef tug-of-war in November, to

moA

softball.

bringing out team camaraderie.

competitiveness and a drive for success. Every fall, those

and

Flag football stirred up excitement,

Intramural sports, such as flag football, basketball and sand volleyball, required

golf, tennis,

sand volleyball and cross-country. The largest entry numbers came in flag football,

"For those of us

who

and

flag

don't have the

athletic talent to play varsity athletics,

it's

good opportunity to play competitive who are on the same level of talent," Vandewege said. a

9

Continued page 143


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144.

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WUM

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;ik*t h^

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fc^Arf A

Uk

Eptilon**

Toby Craig breaks

j

Kjppa Signu The h\ Kjppj Signu and went

loiK hdtiwn against

TKE* were

clctcjtcd

2-4 on the *cj«>n

piM<4f (7 l)*n*

rtiMtww

INTRAMURALS

\:m


7^2:

Sports


GOALS DRIVE ATHLETES TO

coivpgTE anp

excai

# Cimlmurd fn>m puge HI ttflM S%nw*« Awoa Todd t wmp* j ihmfHHtti tlK« \rruit

N<|piu Phi

u» kiinvrn ihr Kiiiin

kfHtkm

I'ihU liUrd

" t'hnHj|chiHii ihc ic-uik,

1

Tylor Hardy played in the independent

men s basketball

league his entire colleKiate

career. Intramurals helped

Hardy keep on

his feet. "1

participate because

1

like to stay in

shape

and get sotne exercise," Hardy said. "It also gives you a break from school work and gets you away from studying." Hardy was no pushover when it came to competition; he played basketball at Maryville High Schcwl. Although he never came close to his high schtx^l days, where he scored 47 points in one game, Hardy made an impact on every team he played on in the intramural ranks.

His team

won

the league championship

the previous three years. However, Hardy said

would be

it

a challenge to

make

it

a

fourth.

"There are some pretty good teams out he said. "But I think we can do it

there,"

again."

Sara Lantz's three-on-three basketball squad, like Hardy's team, tasted victory as well.

Her team won the

fall-league title.

Lantz played intramural sports because she

enjoyed the competition. "I

do

obviously because

it

basketball," Lantz said. "I'm

recreation center]

Though

love

(in

the

I

the time. I'm not on a

all

just

slightly less popular

number

large

I

want to compete." than team individual intramurals also drew a

varsity team, so

sports,

down

of competitors. Individual

drew participants like Vandewege who had few opptirtunities to compete in a sport he once relished. sports, like golf,

"It

was nice to win the tournament," he been a few years since I've won a

said. "It's

competitive golf tournament.

be handed the It

looks good

It

was nice to

baby-blue T-shirt.

illustrious

on me."

The competition was

intense, but at the

end of every intramural season, competitors enjoyed the opportunity to meet new people. "I just like

Mafc CdcoM awhon the wfcammihrinnuil-BaBlrof mt chomacd n ihc «rmd I'l

tpYcKTi'im d* BrT Tht

II

mm

Rmdrfitit (Wrrk oam. ^*»tr Mk ry

Sigliw KMpfm't

IM VoiUvs fMs in pounon lu

rmim "I

j irrvr "\ Unx pnft-pnnf(. " Vomer «yi. uvJ In pliy i kit »iih im- c<HiMn wficti wv i»ttt

wiunpr "

i*i«*

^ \Ua fry*

the competition," Joel Miller

said. "|I like) getting to

guys.

1

have

a

group that

know some of the always come here

I

to play ba.sketball with."

INTRAMURALS

;if3


.•KUtU St^-all^

P«^

sjAitM

-.MJiof

NiM

Matt

Regroup the knowledge gained while interacting

and participating

You ran

-.K^Mm ta^Ui

Patj^h^

in the classroom

in organizations.

to catch the

end of a meeting on campus, studying

late

the night before, the weight of your eyelids was the only thing

holding you back.

You gathered because of

similar interests or stood together in

opposition. Bearcat Voice was introduced as a to discuss

on-campus

issues

and ways

new

organization

The

to address them.

Northwest Dance Company was declared an independently run student organization and separated from the Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance.

Dan Ayala

resigned

from Student Senate in order to avoid impeachment after a conflict with Jen Seaman the government

Your learned the

affairs leader.

while balancing

art of responsibility

organizations and academic achievement. Riiitdy Tilh tuldwssvs the tOiiiicsts of

Fouti:

the Kiitfiand

/-/(/(//)(•(.

5-7,

in;.< i>»\'ii/i(C('(/ />)'

iihhuUu^

()

Christiiiii

n(lc.< ofvliijiictit

Qiimi

f/ic ^

\ iilciuk /•(VbVii

colkvlioii oj \\;miip:

Civnpiis House aiu

the MiUintUen. pltoio hy hUiii

1k^'.

'.<

///<•«'(/(•

l-r)i-


Alpha C^amma

l-<ho (Active)

Fnml Row: Jitna Hardee. Lucas Carlson, Brian Ornie, Tyler Williains, Lowell Busch, Kyle Pierce and Scott Winkier. Rx)w2: Lance Williams, Shannon Jesse, Darin Ornio. Mark Mather, Chishobn Nally, Nate Schroeder, Jason Richards and Tom Campbell

Row

3:

Tyler Rolofeon, Brian Schumacher, Jeffrey Gatrcl, Joseph Bilka, Justin

Moenkhoff and Josh Kempers. Row 4: Barton Damrow, Jason Vandivort, Brandon Schake. Joe Parker and Clark Heman. Back Row: Brandon Schaaf, Rick Aspcgren, Jason Gregory. Mark Hungate, David Gomel, Casey Flinn and Rich Thomas.

:

:

:

Green and Gold Classics Preview Steer Show Pink Rose formal

i

1 |g

Alpha v:?amma Plio (Mew) Cody and Matt Schreiner. Row Row: Remington Pierce, Ryan Lockwood

Front Row: Chris Kauffinan. Jake Dalton, Justin 2:

Kevin Miller and Brice

Ball. Bacit

andjarrett DePriest.

Alppha Front Row: Erin Knotts. Kristie Hurt. Nicole Foy, Keri Kemmerer, Jamie Knerim and Nicole Bowers. Row 2: Stacy Jo Viditto, Rebecca Crane, Shelby Barrels, Lindsey Knight, Amy Vetter, Enza Solano, Krystin Stubblefield and Christi Thoni. Row 3: Mary Lenzen, Jennifer Louk, Sara Booker. Megan Prescott. Alyson McGinnis, Lindsey Hunken, Jen Anderson. Ginny Francis and Joy Hayes. Back Row: Lindsay Wittstruck, Anna Ashbacher, Kristen Decicard, Kristy Arkfeld, Mikaela Koile. Sarah Caldwell, McCarten Delaney, Sarah Baumgartner,

:

:

:

Amy Especr and

Carla Pollard.

Bowl-a-thon for S.June Smith Center Special Olympics Outstanding Greek Organization 2002

jiqma Alpha (iiew) FrontRow: Amanda Wilson. Ashley Brumbaugh. Lindsay Young, AmyStonum, Brooke Tccza, Kara Dark, Rachael Cnase, Adrienne Wood and Sara Row 2; Jill Richardson. Jill Reiley. Qumn Sheek. Shawna Kennedy, Mary Verbeck, Carly Spydell, Leslie Wilkinson and Amy Smith. Row 3: Holly Grefe, Lisa Kelley,

Young.

Stacey Sabsbury,

Abby Stephens, Erica Heermann, Megan Quinn, Megan Miller,

Lindsey Henning, Erin McPherson and Jess Sciortino. Back Row: Allison Forrester, Tiffany Fixtcr,, Stephanie Ridens, Susan Short, Traci Eggers, Stephanie Smith, Geniayel Floyd, Mchssa Worley, Michelle Eischeid and Colleen Cronin.

SCJCIAL GRFI K


Joxph

Hcrnandaz tbools

during the l)rhj

Signu Phj «pnnK ruth pool tuurlUIIKTlt.

The

fr>.

trmjr>' hjd ihrrc

mm ptracipatr m Ruth

ittivitict

chinn(t the

wrck.

photo by Mrtiita

Break into brotherhood by Melissa Galitz Pool

balls

cracked signaling fraternity rushes to break

into bnyherhood.

Delta Sigma Phi

Camp

Quality through an annual softball

tournament. In addition to their achievement, the

heU

the "They're

No Sharks"

Tournament Tuesday January 28 and

"Grillin

Pool

Accotding to active member Ben FiekJer. the fraternity "firat life"

fraternity also

and

Chillin" btobecue January 27 as spring tush activities.

was more than

and

and more about academic

wanted to secure new

Accotding to

Fielder, the

would provide the raised the

living quarters.

alumni of Delta Sigma Phi

fraternity

with a

new house

if

they

number of members aivd improved their living

conditions.

The

brothers worked toward that goal by

achievement, meeting r>cw people and having a good

laying

time.

entertainment center in the basement. Previously the area

"We don't want guys that

ate really cocky, guys with

had attitudes that think fraternities are all about parries,"

Three men rushed Delta Sigma Phi

in the spring,

walking toward nvembership of an ocganiiation that took

"We

for

brotherhood arvJ service.

are always doing somethirtg together,

we make

The btothen won float

fourth place in the

an

pool table and cement walls. to have

enough guys to

live in

the house and get enough guys that

fill

worry about mottey anymore," Fiedler

High expectations

pbiw once or twice a week," FieUer said.

coaches and adding

had been used for parties and had nothing but a bar, stereo,

"We want

Fiekiersaid.

time out

carpet, adding

active

for their house,

the house,

we don't have to

said.

new members and

members created a stereotype for Delta Sigma Flii.

"Everybody calls us the nerds and we really aren't nerds,

homecoming

competitian and raised $3,800 for David S. Payton

we

don't believe that

and make a

Uflfci Oicjmi

we have

to

go out

atkl get

diut^

fool out of ourselves," Fielder said.

Phi

Km

Mm

Stuck and MiUrr Rmp 2: Dithnun. Ryan Moorr. Ben Fiedler. C:hrii Emiton andjcnh Boh'jrd lUtk R»w: Tnnv Sjcrnnun. Tre%i»r Heiner. Trtn' Gih^on and Brad White.

Fnul Rtm: Amhr Wilwn. Nirk Linon. \.ct

Annual

softball

tournament

to benefit

Camp Quality

"Delta Sigs in Sp««dos" car wash fundraiser

Greek Week

DELTA SCMfVPM

.ni


Alpha Ka Front Row: Aaron PoUan. Joe Tronipeter. Ryan Gray SB, Dan Jurado and Luke Guetterniann. Row 2: Utkarsh Bansal, Jared Weber, Ozden Erman Gokboga, Jeremy Eginoire, Peter Solin, Kaan Ozdemir, Jordan Logston and Matthew Knop.

Rvw 3; Mike Kirk, Curtis Feather, Dustin Ackart, Kerein John Suer. Andy Shields, R>-an FeUner and Grant Parnian. Row 4; Josh Roincy, Jercniie Picard, Melik Ercanli, Jeff Armstrong,

Nathan Moycr, Chris Smith, Richard Asmussen and Ashish

Kapoor. Back Row: Christopher Battiato, Matthew Armstrong, John Southard, Ni2ar Azarkane, Ryan Goddard, Matt Frailey, Dan Weeks and Adam Knapp.

2002 The Most Outstanding Fraternity Cystic Fibrosis Philanthropy

"These Hands Don't Hurt" fundraiser

Delia Clii (Active) Front Row: }3son Anderson, Mike Tipton, David Whitacre, Vinny Giambrone, joe Ramsey and Eric Koehler. Row 2: Daniel Beasley, Matt Callahan, Steve

Anderson, Ryan Gilbert, Stephen Cassidy, Jeremy Smith, John R McLaughlin, !ohn Hiatt and Dan Bradley. Row 3: Alan G. Hargreaves, Charles H. Skelton, Kyle Jensen, Stephen Terry, Bobby Cardwell, Mike Bailey and Kyle Duer. Row 4: David Burroughs, Brett Stauffer, Scott Griffin, Joe Prokop, Jake Kite, Lance

Matthew Moore and Dakota Glasscock. Back Row: ]oc Cox, Roddy Jasa, Bryson Edwards, Mike McMurtrey, Jeff Harp, Jason Eric Taylor, Christofferson,

Justin T. Winter, Josh Shields and

:

Intramurals

:

Community service

:

Philanthropies

Delta

Ck

Derek

Fricke.

(Mew)

Front Row: Hugo Ortiz, Zach McCoppin, Chris CuUen, Nikhil Budhiraja and Gaurav Khanna. Rou> 2; Jacob Richie, Mark Euston, Aaron Switzer, Brett Davis, Jake Albanez and Shaun Rice. Back Row: Josh Welch, Pat Kies, Paul Combs, Mark Holthaus, Ryan Armstrong, Gabe Carl and Daniel Whitacre.

InterlrnfcpniflJ C/Ountil Front Row: Chris Holder,

Andrew Roth, Dan Weeks and Tony Saccoman.

Back Row: Ricky Boedeker and

:

:

:

luQ.

smMssm

Virgil Eadcs.

MGCA leadership and review Greek male governing body

Judicial board


f^:'

Centennial rooted in sisterhood hv Michjela Koilc ram

poured on girU celebrating the newest tie«

The tree was planted in the Dogwood Cove on the west side of the Admin-

planted in the Northwest ArKiretutn.

istration Building.

Cluuiii huni; low and frretin^

The women

of Delta Zeta (rathered in

Delta Zeta member Heather Schmit said

the gloom of October to celebrate 100

Delta Zeta pOMOwd the basic qualities that

years of sisterhood.

ensure success.

Delta Zeta was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio in 1902;

not just one big clique,

Northwest established a chapter in 1956.

is

To

"We have

a really great sisterhood, it is

like

it's

everyone

Delu Z«ta mv-

looking out for everyone," Schmit said.

bcrt rvcognix*

celebrate the centennial, the

In addition to the tree planting, Delta

Natioixal Board of Directors asked each

Zeta sponsored an Alumni tea during

donate an item to

Homecoming, a centennial brunch Nov. 3, and the Big Man on Campus contest.

bypluitniKapuik

These events promoted sisterhcxxl as they worked toward larger numbers. Delta Zeta was one of two sororities on campus that

Northwett Atboretum. The

chapter of Delta

21eia to

their campus. Centennial

Wittmeyer

Ashley

Chairman

believed

that

contributing a pink flowering dogwood tree to the

arboretum was the best way for

mncMuJ ufr> HKHh year

thrir

t»nty'%

flowrring dog-

wood

trer in ibr

Mirorit^'

choow

the tree becaute

Delta Zeta to give bock to Northwest.

"We

thought that the pink flowing dogwood was appropriate because pink is

one of our pnmarv colors," WittTne>-cr said.

participated in

fall

and spring recruitment.

their flower

"Being able to see new members growing aivd progressing into sisterhood

Schmidt

is

was

the pink KiOame)-

ro»e

amazing,"

.

photo

by

UtalhnMidt said.

DfHa Fn ml

Caue McCrfe. Vanae Cooper. Stephanie Swift, Rachelle Wright. Marlenc CiuUick and Laci WiUiamion Htm 2: Cryttal Rmt:

Anfcie Gehring.

McArdle. Katie Behon. Aihley Wittmc>Tr. Heather Schmidt. Becky Adain», Kan Fretking and SadK Mullen R»m }: Amy Kephart. Thereu Murtha. Came Bayvien. CoUeen Ohen. Kn%tin Larten, Ku Gibler, Samantha Fox, Tiffany Twombty and Amber Solomon Rmw 4: Caroline Gro«», Kim Hermreck, Amanda Berg. Joyce Martin. C^hrutine Miller, Jill Luetkenhoelter, Tracy Sweanngin, Lindiey Frerking and Sarah Baivel. Bmth R»m; Megan Bernhardt, Megan McCullough. Rachelle We», Katharine Periu. Tonyce Welti, Laura Scfawar7, Amanda Jonev. Rxnee Wicker, Jami Wildt and Kaycee Sandndge.

:

Speech and hearing impaired philanthropy

:

Homecoming

:

Region weekend

iqma FrmnI Row; Brian (^xley. Jon C'arlin. Jarrod Smith, Jamei Pate and Jame% Pankiewicz Rom 2: Ben Wattt,John Stacry, Tim Kitzing.John Williami,Jcnhua l> Royeton and Pat Ji>hnw>n. Rom 3: Mike McMurren. Aaron Todd. Alan CjiUing.

Rob

Timothy

Park.

Man Shipfrrling and Ben Stone

Boek Rom: Paul Houfrk.

EUrank. Michael Long, Matt Corrrll. Kevin Rolen andjoih Frrguion.

Dream

Girl

Relay for Life #1

GPA

UtLiA ZETA

7^^


PluSiqmaT^;TT^r;s) Front Row: Zackary Hull,

Andy Johnson, Dustin

Griffin and Chris

Owen.

Row 2: Chris Inlow, Kris Gurley, Nick Watson, Marc Buxman, Aaron Wilson, Nick Schmeltz and Justin Craig. Row 3: Adam Lybarger, Travis Schneider, Jeff Dahni, James Sondag, Tom Parkin, Mike Degraaf and Zacli Middleton. Back Row: Derek

Gillespie, Brent

Pankan, Brent Scarbrough, Shawn Myers, Steve

Hart. Grant Erickson, Daniel Ayres and

Oz

Sheley.

qmo

rXoppa (Acfive)

Megan Thole, Stephanie Spencer, Jamie Albright and Anne Koerten. Row 2: Stephanie Doolittle, Sherry Bowen, Katie Hansen, Liz Vostrez and Rachel Manners. Row 3: Jill Awtry, Kelly Hucke, Anne Liebhart, Kiley Nissen, Desiree Campbell and Amy Milligan. Back Roiv; Jessica McCunn, Karen Knight, Sarah Cole, Sarah Swedberg, Jessica Carter, Jennifer Mains, Laura Spiegel, Jennifer N. Poulsen and Jessica Scheuler.

Front Row: Keely Burns,

:

:

:

Philanthropic

Most Spirited Sorority Most Improved

oiqmo tXappa Front Row:

Dawn

Rochelle Frost.

Kreikemeier, Ali Byers, Ashley Hoyt, Jodi Robinson and

Row

2: Christy Galate,

Kerry Kimbrough, Shanna Black,

Kristina Russell, Kelsee Guest, Crystal Leonard and Jen Healy.

Row 3: Megan

Luethje, Laura Harris, Erin Selgeby, Cierra RJchey, Jenna Dey, Juhe Hiatt,

Katie Knobbe and Stacey Shanks. Back Row: Kristen Finke, Rebecca Baxter, Shawna Drake, Alicia Eisaman, Kalee Shelwell, Ashley Parks, Kristin Baker, Leigha Hoover and Katie Carter.

(i'^vv}


Jacklyn Baktr, Danielle Storm and Kiinberly

Dimmill

talk

jKiut tlic pirvHiut

wrakmifi cvcntt over

a

dinner

poi luck

The

por

luck ^»r pcicmtui

tomnt)' mniibrn the ctuiKc tn gft

to

know

Sigttu

Alphas, plutc

^

rtwuHmlrtai

Agricultural family bond by Tatianna Johnson and Melissa Galit7 Smells of spaghetti, hash brown casserole and

room

desserts filled a

women

of college

seeking

Adopt-a-Highway and the American Cancer Society's Relay for Life Walkathon.

"We

sisterhood.

During their Rush events. Sigma Alpha hosted a

are really close," Lori Fordyce said. "Smaller

sororities provide a closer relationship

amongst the

informal dinner to recruit membership. The organization was established at Northwest in 1995.

members."

NatH>nal requirements stated that 70 percent of Sigma

first

Alpha had to be

and gatherings before going through a formal interview

"We

are

agriculture majors.

known

as the form girls

and that we have

Sigma Alpha took

part in formal recruitment for the

time in 2002. Rushees attended informal dinners

process. After interviews, the sorority extended

cows at home," Recruitment Chair Raivia Brunkhurst said. "I don't think that bothers most of us." Academically, the 30 members of Sigma Alpha led

accomplishment," Ashley Hickman

the overall grade point average for sororities

learn a lot

last fall

3.2. The organization also placed Homecoming banner competition and

with an average of

second

in the

held the

The

title for

"Ag

in the

members.

"Starting formal recruitment

more about

was a big

last fall

said.

"We

got to

ourselves."

According to Fordyce,

this organization

was

a family

away from home. Several members emphasized the importance of gaining lifelong friendships.

Battle of the Beef.

soronry also taught

invitations to prospective

Classroom" to

students at Eugene FieM elementary, participated in

"We just have a bond," Brunkhurst said. "If you need a shoulder to cry

on someone

is

there."

iqma Alpna Fnml Rmt: Tarryn DKkc, Lon Foriyre. Beth LiDy. Heather LaShell andjeimifrr Jeiwen Hfrnl: Ah Parkhurst. Erin Linet. McKinzie Pendleton. ChrHty Hockei. Heather Vogler and JackJ>'n Baker. Rpm }: Shannon Shineman. A»hle^' C^'Bnen,

Came SuUivan. Anna Nabors. l-ac\' Friednch, Tamnry Kreifei«. Danielle Storm and Christy Cummale. B«cJr

Jleir;

Laura Rotterman, Jackie Juhl. Ashley

Hickman. Randa Brunkhortl. Kimberly Dimmitt. Nicole Menefee. Cara Wicie. Ashle>- Lyie and Kellie Blume

:

:

:

Relay for Life

Adopt-a-Highw«y Greek Week

1S1


Front Row: Beck)- Adains, Tiffany Bamiann, Enza Solano and Ken Staack. Row 2: Kari Frerking, Bridget Divis, Canssa Kalkbrenner andjaniie Krierim. Row 3: Einily Short.

Megan Thole. Jake

Manners and Terry

M(x>rc, Beth

Pfaffly.

Row 4:

Lill>'. Lisa Josephsen, Jodi Victor, Rachel Karen Knight, Lori Ford^-ce, KeUi Rowlands.

Kim Lainberty, Michelle Wiesner, Ken Kenunercr,Jessi Jacobs and Sarah PfaltzgratT. Back

Roi*'; Justin Ross. Sarah Zienier. Jarrcxl Sinith,

Dicke, Robin Sol. Michael Hicknun, Rich

:

Lnidsay Wittstnick, Tarryii

Thomas and Logan

Lightfoot.

Leadership training

:

Service

:

Community activities

Front Row:

Summer

Cradick, Mclanie Siedschlag, Crystal Cole, Lori Fordyce,

Row 2: Megan Wliitten, Jessica Dowd, Jennifer Mains, Ashley Wittmeyer, Katie Belton, Jamie Pollock and Jodi Victor. Back Row: Laura Spiegel, Jessica McCunn, Lindsay Wittstruck, Cara Wiese, Karen Knight, Mehssa Wilkc and Megan Quinn. Nicole Foy.Jenny Brunker and Crystal McArdle. Iklmeicr, Jamie

:

Foster interfraternity communication

:

Assists collegiate chapters

:

of the Governing body of sororities

Pki Front Row:

Summer

Cradick, Jessi Jacobs,

Kim

Drummond,

Mu (Ad

Lamberty, Shelby Schultes, Jill

Dauner, Sarah Pfaltzgraff.Juhe Victor, Nichole Gottsch and Jill Hecker. Erin

NPC

Row 2:

Elizabeth Sexton, Melissa Panis, Heather Berry, Holly Miller.

Row 3: Kristin

Helmink, Megan McClain, Niemcyer and Heather Tillman. Row 4: Kelly Swope, Amber Blancliard, Tiffany Criner, Marsha Brown, Kadi Willining, Michelle Wiesner, Carla Keller, Laura Ginder and Kylie Watts. BociirAtfu'; Jessica Irlmeicr, Alicia Shirk, Jen Seaman, Sarah Ziemer, Lindsay Geier, Sara Wolff, Sarah Zimmerman, Ton Warner and Shawn Logston.

Brooke

Sasscr and

Marhna Howe,

:

Molly Gianchino.

Jennifer Keller, Emily Short, Lindsay

Kickball tournament and 3-on-3 to raise

money for Children's Miracle Network :

:

Intramurals Mixers

Plii

Mu

Front

(Mew)

Row: Lindsey

Arthur, Nicole Orrell, Erin Lundei^an, Shannon Randall,

Natalie Blanchard, Tiffany Baur, Jessica Gritton, Lesley Svoboda, Christina

and Aryn Lewis. Row2: Apryl Gratopp, Lacey

Fitzgerald,

Funk

Amy Harris, Tracy C'lark.

Emi Spivey, Alessia Neville. Katie Miller and Heather Ingram. Back Row: Stacy Theulcn, Melanic Hodges, Marcy Jackson, Emily Dix. Heather Weeks, Lauren Hicks, Abby Dissclhoff, Cortnie Meier, Becky McLaughlin and Lauren Ransom.

Social Greek


Sron

hkI

Siiili

Mada* F*rgmoa watrh rxp«vUBily tiic

M

bowtng btO

RiDi

mmRi

liw

IDC Si|pra EpilMtnt Pki nutcd Beverly pwfc-

H«khCjtri>« charity

during

event Rutll

wrrk fkt H .\lMlFrw

t]r

Rush

Alternative by Cjinny lT.incis A three-week itinerary made up the LaFranca recruitment plan for Greek men seeking fraternities, potential members.

The men

at the Bell

To

Tower on Aug.

include the rushees, the

potential

members

29, allowing rushees to form a general idea of

weekly

the fratemiry. Later in the week, the Sigma Phi

nursing home.

Epsilon Executive Board participated in an allGreek forum to entice potential members. Open house began the second week of recruitment activities. Though other fraternities hosted several events, Sigma Phi

Epsilon kept

it

go

,

as casual as possible by hosting

for a real laid back,

hang-out kind

of atmosphere," Rush Director

Randy Calvert

"^e want to get to know the rushees and them get to know us in our typical

"We

;

I

nightly informal dinners.

'We

"We ;

environment."

The

visit to

seemed to work according to potential member

men

invited

them

invited the rushees to

come out

look at a lot of aspects in the rushees list.

We

"The most important

if

known some members

Phi

in it,"

'

Classes had

dogi,

Puinh uun|^ and

hatnburgcn as Ryan Milcr awan dinner ai a St^^na

look at grades,

Hickman

aspect, though,

is

the guys are being themselves." Invitations were

Oweni

ClifT

cooks hot

Phi Epokwicoakciut

ThccDokoul

gave

ru»hee« a

dunce ;

|

heard some really great things about Sig

in their

the Beverly Health Care

to determine our bid

said.

Pete LaFranca. "I

to join

leadership activities and hobbies,"

informal yet personal rush process

Ep, and I've

in with

I

because a big part of our fraternity is community service," President Michael Hickman said. "We wanted to be sure they would be excited about doing that." By the third week of recruitment, the fraternity handed out bids to selected rushees. Active members met to discuss which men they would like to have join the fratemiry.

said,

let

fit

really feel like

these guys."

of Sigma Phi Epsilon started rush

with a casual forum

I

checked other

"I've

said.

but

hand delivered

with

to pledges.

no quota; however, they

keep numbers anywhere from 25 to

to sitenct

memben

of

the fraennity. ^ba»

liked to 30.

xbiqitM iVippa (Atfivc)

Fnml Rxr: Brrnt Caitillo, Shawn Adet, Logan Lightfnoi. John Pretiavento And Rohm Sol. R»w2: Nathan Wotxiland. Nick C'hapman. C!hru Name. r>ave Hum. Nate Mitchell. Juan Villalobo*. Jmtm Rm». Matthew Moncivaii. jrrcmiah Button. Chad Baudoin and Mike Blair Rnr 3: Richard Fither. lonaihan Vaccaro, Brad Woodard, Anihon>- ITuboltno. Adam P Eimer. Lon Num. Nicholas Boehrr. Nick Waldo and Jebediah Josepi Bsek Rnr: Sam Woodland. Scott HiU. Rjchard Peeper. Jack YehofT. Andrew Roth. Ben York. I>on Key, Phibp Roth. Chrn Stewart and Weston Sharp.

Special

Olympics philanthropy (Trivia Night)

Relay for Life

BRUSH

7S3


Oiqma Phi L Front Row: Kenny Benedict. Wes Starlin, Justm Cook, Pete LanFranca, Brian Hoberg, Nick Talone and Tyler Tapps, Row 2: C'ody Crawford, Jeff Shipley,

Trevor Myers and Brett Petersen. Back Row: Grant Neckermann, James Roberson, Mark Calcote. Josh Balwanz and Brock Freeman.

oiqma Oleoma

(ActivG}

Front Row: Lauralyn Sullivan, Terry

Barmann and Bridget

PfafFly, Tiffany

Divis.

Row 2: Lisajosephsen, Brooke Klotz, Katie Shaffer, Carrie Lane, Carissa Kalkbrcnner, Danielle Patee-Merrill and Jill Webster. Row 3: Amdia Helberg, BrieAnn Oxford, Clarissa Palmer,

Kristi

Cuda, Aiigie Ashley,

Row 4:

Terra Dale, Florence

Mehssa Glasnapp. Faline Rickerson,

Sara Shepherd, Sarah Colter and Kerry

Thompson.

Mancuso, Krystle McCarthy, Nicole Goldstein, Jaime Woolard, Jill Boeshart, Stephanie Aiiello, Alexis Hart, Cara Thomson and Lauren Schafer. Back Row: Amy Lockard, Kate Dickens. Stephanie Mcints,Jordan Starr, Barbie Bishop, Kristen Tracy,

Reba Korthanke, Carolyn Tidd, Laura Meek and Melissa Wilke.

:

SOS Walk

:

Robbie Page Memorial Foundation

:

Community service

s iqrnci Oiqma W Front Row: Kayla Fuller, Julie Lawson, Suzie Schuckman, Katie Mead and Hayley Leopard. Row 2: Kassi Koerner, Diana Schultz, Tricia Rankin, Lisa DiGiovanni, Sarah Barmann, Suzanne Pritchard, Melissa Nidiver, Ashley

Row 3: Sheena Claxton, Courtney Kuhn, Webb, Susan Henslee, Stefani Askey, Sarah Otte, Shannon Mark and Jami Longenecker. Back Row: Erica Gutelius, Casey Rickerson and Cassi Vorthmann.

Tiffany Withrow, Falohn

Schwisow, Kalyn Carpenter, Julie Stith, Julie Garrett, Suzanne Hurst, Mehssa Davison, Jennifer Davis and Meredith Bell.

1^:111

iXcippa Lpsilon (Active/ Front Row: c:hris Holder, Jamie Liehr, Brian Carroll and Nathan Welch. Row 2: Jason Oacraft, Tobby Oaig, Taft Burnes, Adam Rohncr, Danu Dill, Evan

Martinez and Nick Brummel.

Row

J:

Jeremy Dulle, Ben

CJreen, JetTZcllcr,

Jason Mehrhoff and Joel Goodsell. Row 4: Brian Duering, Kyle Lynch, Justin McAlecr, Ricky Boedeker, Patrick O'Hair, Jeremy Barlow, Michael Welch, Michael Voris and Ryan Kuecker. Back Row: Josh

Bo Brown, Ben

Taylor,

Elliott,

Landon Stewart, Adam Zolonowski, Keinon

Nathaniel Oster. Dusty Rhodes and Aaron Jones.

:

:

:

Social Greek

Greek Week winners Concert for Special Olympics

TKE Sweetheart Pageant

Perkins, Ross

Crunch,


A> nmr pbdcM run «l4»wn trmn iIk lililttM411^ M>-

rurity

nirmbrrt

mi mhrr frtrmh gfthn iHicudr of

W

ihr J Junr> Snuirnl Union, Afirt

ill

of xhe

pledget joined riinr Hiconiy <m-

len, the (t^oup*

powdfbrptcluin. )*«»ty.Waifiy

Rush

I

to Bid

Day

by Betsy Lee and Keri Williams Rushing towanl ststeihoad, prospective scxuritv

members

strove for personal and

community

throu^ 'Rush' anymore," Rebecca Baxter said. The pressure

was off."

After the preference parties, the rushes wiote down

rebtiunships.

Beginning with an infixmaiional session during

their top

Week arvJ ending with a bid session in

discussed

Advantiige

ttteJ.W. Jones Student

the sorority were entered into a bid-matching

six sonirities.

After n*v> Greek fiwums, somrities kicked off ofiicia]

who they would invite to join. The choices of both the prospective member arvJ

Union, Ru^ resulted in 225

wonten lecei^ing bids to

two choices while sorority's active members

recruitment at the Sorority Tea, Sept.

5.

Members bitxight computer matches to the

computer.

Bid Day party, Sept.

10.

G>Chair of Recruitment Crystal McAnfle, 257 women began the rush process. At

bids in the Ballroom of the J.W.Jones Student

the tea. sivonties explained the recruitment prtxess

Each Gamma Chi group opened their bids at the same

Acoxding

sffid

bftike the wvimen

up into "Cjamma Chi" groups

of lOrushees.

"Each group had two

could

g[;)

tune and then joined

rfneir sisters

Unioa

outside at the Bell

Tower. adviseiB,"

McArdle

"Tfou

said.

"Gamma Chi groufv served as peer group that the gills

Accoidir^g to McArdle, the women received their

to

McArdle

through the rush ptixess with."

Over two days, the women attended parties heU

fmd your place ar>d the girls youll click with,"

McArdle said.

by individual sororities. The parties ^ve (he women

of having

opponunities to k^am more about each

process,

sorority.

After each day of parties, both the tushes and

the sororities were nanowtng don-n their ofWons. I^ior to bid day, the potential

members attetvled a

said that the Panhelienic

instituted several changes in the

Rho Chi

lead the

Council

Rush pttKess.

lr\stead

women dirou^

the

each Gamma Chi group had two advisers. In

addition to changes in leadership, McArdle said Rush

was changed to emphasize the history and philanthropies of the individual sororities.

maximum cf two pRfeience parties. "Pref-parties arc much more relaxing. They

of the deairations," McArdle said. "We hope

already want >x)u so you weren't having to go

it

"Rush this year was more focused on the girls instead

more aKxit the

pollen

it

made

sisterh<xxl."

(hew)

1

Fml R«ir: Adim Rohncr. Joel C'loodvll. Ben Ellioit. Evan Mirnnei and jaton Rmv i: Jeremy

DuUe. Nick Bruinmel. Ryan Kuecker. I>ana Hill. Bo Brown and Ben tireen B4uk Xmv: Jmh Taylor. Aaron Jon«. Nathaniel (>«ct and Landon Stewart.

Mcrhoff

7SS


Riuhee TiSany Baur converses with

her group prior to

entering Sigma Alpha's sorority party. Signu Alpha's invitation to attend their part^- the next day

was one of six

that

Baur

received.

Tiffany Baur reflects in her journal on the third day of sororit)' rusli acavitics. Each Gainma Chi group met to do a journal writing in order to record their thou^ts throughout the weeks events.

On bid day. Tiffany Baur opens a card from a Gainma Chi group leader saying they

i5aur's

choice

would make the

riglit

choice. Baur said she continued friendship with her group

leaden throughout the year

1S6:\ Social Greek


ill

-I

TUTany Baur cmbncM frtcnd ud feUuw i%i Mm KiiMiK l{clmakdbrnnivti«lwrbid. Hdniak'i IririHlthip

lo )tnn

wM oar ofliir mam maam I Mu

IMii

K

Baur

finds

friendship formula by Matt Frye

A gleaming smile hid underlying nerves and apprehension about upcoming events. Tifiany Baur's

fall

Sororiry

felt

Rush kicked

off

were awesome

arul there

At

unsure what

members were broken into group* of ten called Gamma Chi groups at the Perfbrmtng Arts Center. While rushees looked on, each sorority performed a song relating to what made its organuation unique.

turned to her

"Soronty tea was a good chance to get a first look and said. *1

initial feeling

of each soronry," Baur

then knew that I couk) fit in with a few

wrarities

and that

i

wouldn't mix well with a

sororit>'

she wanted to rush. She

Gamma Chi

it,

weigh her options and then return the

next day with a gut feeling.

Gamma

Baur took her she returned

the second day of Rush was what

whole process,* Baur said. was very v-erwhclming. especially kiMwing you have to

really started the

all six sororities

few days."

After attending four open houses, >utth 111

'

When

was 100

After four days of parties, the sixth and final

women

groups, soon'to-be sororit>'

'

said she

percent confident in her decision.

equation of selecting an organization.

'

Chi's advice.

on bid day Baur

Jones Student Union.

riake a lifetime decision in a

and was to steep

for support

suggestions. Their advice to Baur

The first day of son>riry open house brought many new and different people into the

'Experiencing

advisors, Sara

VanMeter and Diane Davis,

on

1

day of Rush brought Bid Day.

couple of die othex*.'

"I felt like

each one, but

the end of her preference panies, Baur was

Thursday. Sept. 5 with the annual "Sororiry Tea." Potential sororiry

girls in

those two best suited me."

day of Rush, rushees met their

on the

Gamma

group* to record a daily ioumal entry.

At

5 p.m., the

their top '1 felt

two choices

Still in their

I

went

to,

Gamma Chi

my 1

choice because of

couldn't

fiiKl

being cilJcd.

mv

anticipate

C*jnuiu Chi groups were

anticiptKm gmv." Baur vud.

1

had with

Mu was a positive one."

Approximately an hour

later,

the third floor

ballroom's silent rows of chairs surrendered to

the clattering of laughter artd conversation.

A

panics went with each otganizaaon

numbers from a microphone positioned on the

««DritT and narrowing choices," Baur said.

west side of the room.

Preference parties took place the ftfth day of

VanMrter and Tiffany Baur

all

>nd any potential feeiinci of joining a particular

how our

leader Sara

iiiv-iut»-m tn ji»in » \oTKttit)-. *A» the (Hhcr

a negative

hush then came over the room as Gamma Chi groups were called according to their preassigncd

*Evctyday we woukl write our response to

Baur\

members wrote down

thing," Baur said. "Every experience

Phi

j.W

in order.

confident in

the parties

Ganinu Chi

gathered in the

After peeling open the envelope, Baur

Rush. With only bid day to come, sorority

revealed an invitation from Phi

hopefuls narrowed their choices to two.

sororiry.

"I felt more a part of Plti Mu and Tri Sig: I had really good convcnotion with those girls,"

within moments

Baur aaid. 1 did enjoy the other soiority parties.

begin." Baur said.

"When

I

Mu to join their

opened my invitation

ikw

I

knew

that

friendships were about to

11 SI


Financial Eric

officer

Willis proposes a

change in Bear-

cat

Voice policy

about

how

stu-

dents get selected for the

Governing

Board. All seven

mem-bers present at the meeting voted to change the policy- photo by MattFrye

Student opinion voiced by Dan Sanders and Melissa Galitz Three students decided apathy was a at Northwest and set out to do

problem

something about

to speak out

Ryan Bauer, John

and resolve student and

Bearcat cards to the Student Senate. According to Zaroor, Social Security numbers

They developed

a website,

would not be printed on newly issued

Lakebrink and Janson Thomas formed Bearcat Voice, an organization that gave

joined the

students an outlet to voice opinions.

Student Union, Bearcat Voice sent

"We

stand for every student

new

organization.

During weekly meetings

in the J.W.

Jones

bearcat cards "I

fall

2003.

wanted to see more

student's issues get

want to

on campus,"

resolutions to Student Senate, stopped action

solved," Bauer said."Student's don't

"We

on an impeachment trial and were working on adding awnings to the modular classrooms

get involved with certain organizations such

to protect students from the elements.

issues

Outreach Coordinator AUie Zaroor said. are

Bearcat Voice was also voiced concern regarding social security numbers printed on

within weeks approximately 25 to 30 students

problems.

it.

In January 2002,

Bearcat Voice wanted to give students a

way

more of an informal organization-people

can voice their opinions about anything."

'.'â&#x20AC;˘'(ircat

as student

on

government, yet they have so many

their mind."

Voir( Front Row: Sarah Swcdbcrg, Janson M. Thomas, Ryan Bauer, Zach Middletoi and Jordan Orscheln. Back Row: Ashley Allrcd, Chris Pelham, Eric Wilhs

Alhc Zaroor,

:

:

:

7S?:|

Speciai

Wendy Shoemycr and

Chris Dunn.

Comedy show Promote empowerment of students Insure that the student voice was heard


AllkiiK*'

Fnmi

1

1

I

Dwoyonr Johnu>n. Jimic TincUll, Atiti Hinry, Millrthu MiiikntKO utd Mir> t 'ampbrll JImt 2: RtuuM Smiih Jr M«>-»\<oJ Jjt kuxi. H»ir:

,

burnr'a Cochrmc. Faiitrruu i\4Un%, jciimi Brj^vn, Kclh' IViriMtii. Krtulij O \Uxifr uid Sbrtffu Ikn'xl ll#ir J; MK'turl Cochran, Titunnu Jtihiitani. Moryw l\iciyrn, I'ynihu KWkluU. IXi Mt'Kr<, VlurnrttJ Vit<t And Altvi StrwMf JtMv4.' Nkkiri Prjti.JiunimtuChnxun. RiShondti Binkt. Tuu F«^. ttrtut iMHiiil. HAnir«Ki jMku^n, Sturrvr J4«ku>n «nd Britruc HirvTV B«rA Jl«v.* Surj\^ F^y^, BruKii Muruiictiin, C'hirin IHiwr. Lv\lu IXmtbnn%-\ki. K<TK"> f'I'kiU. VbrUrk'k (~<1UJ>. Krnttw Kikr iml Urn Furnirt

:

SoiiUbod Dinner

:

Kwmnzaa

:

Martin Luther King Day

Anini

sill lnl<

iiuticn

and

v^lufJenJi hir

FrvKl Jt»a>:

Trent.

rpc lil*!

Megan Tidy. Lora Modlin.

C'arr.

Stull.

Kevin Kline. Soraya Fay*. Matt

Sarah Nicholion, Chriuy Campbell,

c:mdy Poindcxirr and Ja«>n Sheet* (larrett

Bae/b Jtmr: Jed Murr. Trav>» and Kayt Wahleri

Activism

:

Letter writing

:

Benefit concert

Deopcaf XMrrJenn Ham«>n. Heather Wnunger. Dawn

I

Amy

:

f

cj

-3'

Megan Henning.

jamK R.on and HoUy Ellis. JImt 2: Trina Riegel. Danelle Kneyse. Heather Bo>*duon. Becci Reinig and Steph Smith. Rmm S; Laritu Watvw. Stephanie Hauinfp, Ciara Goldtmith. Jill W»c, Nickara Pratt and Ma\-ie Daugherty.

AnfEeb Davii Bmtk Ram: Starhlh Adam*. Jube Plager, Came Gerken, Keltey NKhoh. Truh Lr\her, Jenna Banurd and Maegan Irwm.

:

:

:

Recruiting process Provides communication between parents Arrange send-ofTfor football team

I

Uw

l\eu \ei| rlt i lonor

Rrw: Kim Lamberty. Kelly Carter. Bridget I>ivn. Ken Schwngel and Barmann Btk Jtvar: Amy Meyer. John Ote. Ryan MiUer. J Patrick McLaughlin and Megan Mcl.aughhn.

Fnrnl I

:

:

:

iffany

Homecoming Blue Key Tower Queen Treat-or-Treat for United

Way

|:7S5


Co mpiis Row: Becky Marston, Crystal Kimrey, Amy Craine, Jodi Victor, Amy Wchrenberg, Shanna Rowan, Damcllc Donalson, Braya Hicks, Julia Kitzingand Front

Malinda Bartholow.

Row 2:

Shanna Lansberg, Jill Anderson, Valeric Hoakison,

Jen Anderson, Melanie Lyon, Gena Lindsay, Megan Koeteman, Karla Pmzmo, Carrie Moe and Rebecca Dunn. Row 3: Lisa Doudna, Jenna Bessler, Jenn McCatTertN-, David Ford, Jesse Fisher, Julie Martin, Mindy Leatherman and Clinton A. Fisher. Back Row: Mitch Hiscr, Derek Steffen, Rory Arnold, Sean Berger,

Shawn

Hess, Sara Young, Natahe Alden, Kelly Smith and Justin Talley.

:

Bible study Retreats

:

Weekly worship

:

Front Row: Shawn Stetson, Katie Mosby, Pamela Marticke, Danielle Lawless,

Brad Hall, Chad McDanel, Drew Keirsey, Miranda Smith and Tiffany Baur. Row Amanda Umscheid, Renee' Wicker, Matthew Moncivais, Stephanie Bizal, Bobi Bender, Desirae Baye, Nicole Meinke, Elizabeth Huffman, Teresa Cable 2;

Row 3: Lauren Skoch, Zach Keith, Aaron Wilson, Ashlee Cooper, Tiffany Gale, Lesslee Laber, Kathryn Jensen, Michelle Goold and Dayna Rohr. J?ÂŤii' 4: Megan Bernhardt, Mike Wemhoff, Bryan Becker, Daniel Jeppesen,

and Chris Dunn.

Agnis Retenais, Shane Albertson, Andrew Barth and Q.C. Jones. Back Row: Daniel McKim, Ryan Meyerkorth, Clinton Woods, Andy Schmuck, Brian Vrbicck, Aaron Froehhch, A.P., Jamal

Warner and Andrew Jackson.

CL Front Row: Andrea Croskey, LaeyoungKim, HyeryoungLee, Kala White, Kristen Wyblc, Rob Ahlrichs, Carly Michael, Rebekah Hopkins, Jenn McCafferty,

Nathanael Schmitz, Katherine Strauch and Carla Egeland. Row 2: Angle Van Boening, Sondra Nickerson, Stephanie Wallace, Kelsey Nichols, Leah Koger, Nancy Charley, Roger Charley, Brian Graves, Jerma Bessler, Brad FuUbright, Stefanie Meighen and Lindsay Morrison. Row 3: Jenelle Malewski, Maryarm Campos, Amy Carr, Karissa Schroder, Sarah Baumgartner, Heather Quaas, Whitney Hollinger, Megan Moore, Aimee Masten, Angela Hartle, Lorelei Plummer, Kari

Ron Jackson,Tara Phillips and Erin McKilhp. Row 4: Emily Dennis, Leigh Stock, Jason Thompson, Jason Nickerson, Lesley Lober, Alicia Evans, Mary Ward, Jeremy Rector, Matt Burns, Ashley Grosse, Rachel Starks, Malinda Bartholow, Katy Dockus- Ahlrichs and Julie Flynn. Raw 5: Masashi Obata, Michael Renshaw,

Duggan, Chnsu Small, Jamin Howell, Maricia Weis, Cory Collins, Kim Weis, Andrew Samp, Lacy Derr, Junghoon Park and Goshi Yasuda. Back Row: Mike Jenkins, April Hunt, Travis Jenkins, Ryan Diagnan, Jonathan Cook, Jonathon Mitchell, Kyle Dignan, Katy Krause and BUI Felps.

:

:

:

Bible study

Worship Mission trip

'

ssociaiion ^jtudcnt Associaf

Nang Tan, Sachie Handa and Montavee Hongsyok. Row 2: Shu-Yun Chen, Hitomi Koyama, Rieko Nonaka and Phan Nguyen. Back Row: Shean Yi Chan, Minoru Sneyshi, King Kwan, Tan Tze Liang and Nobutalu Nakamura.

Front Row: Yao-Chieh Young, Seoh

:

:

:

760:|

Special

Moon

Festival Dinner Chinese New Year Dinner Missouri Adopt-a-Highway


Kerry Baldwin

ml

PhUUp Mr-

Ctary <W«cib* the ciiujt

ituuul

gnim

ihry

ded

pTi>*

menbeing

after

dugnuted wiih juvenile dubctet.

McCiry

»•»• Ufe-

flighted to Children'!

Mercy Ho»-

piul in iCan>MCit)r after trvrrr

going inco dubrcK kr-

UMcetoui.

fh*

^

TmynLmSry

Key

to the diabetic

life

by Ashlee Erwin

A v-ouni; man and a grown woman stood at a (xxlium: they had

no

relationship other than

ih« cotiunon disease that bound their

life stories.

selected through a yearly induction process,

including

that

an

included

"We're taking some of the best students on

speakers at "CXir Story: Living with Diabetes,"

campus and using their talents for a greater good," Cardinal Key President Adam Kneisel

McGary and Kerry Baldwin,

related their diabetic challenges to over

60

people in the j.W. Jones Student Union BaUtoom.Nov. 21.

Cardinal Key National Honor Society coordinated the event to spread information

about the dangerous, incurable disease. In

said.

"We're hoping that by supporting JDRFs

search for a cure, kids won't have to experience

what

Phillip

and Kerry

Middle School, was diagnosed with juvenile He was flown to

diabetes in September.

collected donations for the Juvenile Diabetes

Children's Mercy Hospital in Kansas City after

Research Foundation, its philanthropy. Throughout the >-ear, members also held a raffle, a bi^ sale, a benefit cotKert at the Pub ai>d a fundraiser night at Burger King throu^wut the

his blood sugar level soared over 800, far

money

for

Cardinal Key's 25 members held a 7 a.m.

Wednesday meeting once

a

exceeding the normal range of 90-140. After his blood sugar was controlled,

McGary

adjust to living with diabetes,

which

included coiutantly checking his blood sugar,

JDRF.

month

to plan

fundnWng and social events. All membets were

countiitg carbohydrates

houn a day.

level of 1,280, twice the

LxipdirKil

10.

She

a bl(Kxl sugar

amount doctors had

last rites, as

she grew older she said she

felt

God gave her a second chance for a reason. adult,

counselor for

Baldwin became

Camp

a volunteer

Floyd Rogers, a diabetic

camp she participated

helped

in as a kid that

She said her experieiKe with diabetes only made her a stronger person. While most of Cardinal Key's efforts were focused on JDRF, the group also participatedin the Adopt-A-Highway program, cleaning up a rwo-mile stretch near Pumpkin Center her live a normal

life.

each trimester.

Members to nursing

he looked forward to getting an

coma with

ever seen. She woke to a priest administering

and giving himself six

to 10 shots per day. Phillip said

into a diabetic

As an at Maryville

addition to raising awareness, the honor society

year to raise

fell

did."

McGary, an eighth-grader

had to

24

Baldwin, a 1999 Northwest alumna, developed juvenile diabetes at age

application and interview.

featured

Phillip

pump to administer his insulin

extensive

also distributed Christmas cards

home

residents as a yearly holiday

service project.

r\i

*M

Fr»ii< JtMr:

Athlee Erwin. Brandon Deeti.

Duna

Sihnarrenberger.

Barmann and Rebecca Dunn Jtmr

Adam

Knbin Sol. Nikki Mullint. Jeiuca Cbu>en. Liu Jo<eph<en and Athlee Jamei Bstk Rtw: Nick Wemunonl. Brm Kukrr, jamie Knienm. Laci Ann Fiala and Lori Fordyre Kneitel. TiiTany

2:

Highway cleanup Raised inoney for juvenile diabetes Christmas cards for the elderly

CARDINAL KEY

IGI


Cc

1

Amanda Byler, Katy Hawley, Ashley Cunningham, Scott Ware and Jen Walker. Back Row: Soraya Fays, Allyson Largent, Heather Lafon and

Front Row: Lindsay

:

:

:

''^'r^«?*S3p?

on vrrnund "

'1

Crump.

Annual Drag Show World Aids Day Matthew Shepherd Vigil

dT

L.'hpistian Athlete

Front Row: Chad McDaniel, Gena Lindsay, Jill Anderson, Erin McKillip and Jesse Fisher. Row 2: Sara Kerkhoff, Julie Toebben, Suzanne Von Behren and Bone Hall. Back Row: Andy Schmuck, Brian Vrbicek, Daniel Jeppesen, David Ford and Marcellus Casey.

:

:

:

Weekly worship Athlete dinners Athlete Bible study

Ipankcn Mall V^ ounci Front Raw; John Starke, Steven Hart and Hannah Gansen.

Row 2: Kelly Armstrong

Theodore, Keri Williams, Ehzabeth Woody and Kristin Jackson. Back Row: Christy Crownover, Cindy Poindexter, Michelle Brockman and Kevin Kopp.

;

;

:

Hall Discipline Committee Mardi Gras events

Acoustic Cafe

nir ArtiGPican

Leadcpship

C Vqanization

Zeeb and Monica Marcolino. Row 2: Paco Ada Lucia Gonzalez, Laura Kennish and Marcella Trujillo. Back Row: Stacey Rucker and Ashley Hackler.

Front Row:

Dan

Ayala, Laura

Martinez,

:

:

:

Special

La Fiesta Latina Festival of Cultures Midwest Regional Hispanic Empowerment Conference


Rock

of

faith by Betsy Lee With damp grass underfcxit, students danced to ruck miuic infused with a spiritual message.

Sponsored by the Baptist Student Union, Building Christ's

Kingdom (BUCK)

Enterprises performed

Turulra Sept. 6. In order to draw

Campus

Up

on the

more people to the event.

Minister Jasun Vamell wanted to host the concert

in a secular setting. "1 felt

the Tundra was a perfect location because maybe

some of the students who wanted about going, could

still

to listen, but felt weird

stand back and listen to the music

without "actually" being there," Vamell

Vamell

first

said.

heard the band at a coiKert festival in Lampy,

He said the band was extremely enthusiastic about The ska-style band composed their own music, singing about their own experiences with Jesus. Missouri.

Christ.

Over 100 students attended the concert. Vamell hoped some of the students heard the underlying spiritual

that

message In addition to the concert,

BSU hosted other events with

The organization's 50 Monday evening Bible study. here to help people get away from

the goal of spreading fellowship.

members met weekly

"We

are just

for

everything," Michael Lovelace said.

Lead vocaiiM fi>r BUCK Sc(h Mercer pcHbntii iruaJ

^ptr-

rtKk on the

Tundra, Aug. 30.

ThrBipBt Student Uiuon sponiored the coacert, whidi

drew

i

crowd of

jp|>roximateK- SO

«udcntv;A»lT.VUt

n holl

-S^ff^ l^i;

Cc FrmI ilmr: Stephanie Hitnnp. Been ReiniK. I>jve AUi»on Jt ind Sarih Man Jl»ir 2: Heilher Quu\. Dam Demklau. Naiahe Chawi. Danielle I>onalton. Meghan ( ialvin. Mary Fti>ment and Sarah Zuertein Rmp J: KriMopher OTixJ. Juhe Toebben. Lori Stumine. Sharrre JackMin. Zackar>- Hull. Nickara Pratt. Tara Condion. Tiera Ownbey-lrwin and Nick Bnimmel B«ck Jtmr: Keegan PalzkiU. I>rek Shepherd. Matthew WiUon. Tony Kreikemeier, Adam Lejie. Joe Harm. Br>ve Lemke. Travtj Knepp and Matt Sthnier.

Hudson Hula Mr. Hudson contest Trash and vacuum patrol

:763


Ministry

^

spreads

word

by Betsy Lee Offering fellowship and prayer, a local church

expanded

mission to include student

its

ministry.

Sponsored by the Assembly of God Church,

Chi Alpha formed during the fall trimester. TTie 25'member group met on Thursdays

to praise

God through music and scripture study. "It gives me time during the week to

spend

time with others seeking God," leadership team

member Jackie Clark said. "It's also a chance to focus on anything but the stress of school.

I

love

Thursdays." Jackie Clark and

According to Clark, the organization's goal

was to spread the word of

God

convey

campus. Chi Alpha Pastor Dena Wagner

ssion

believed that the word of God was missing in

many students'

their pa-

for

God

while singing with Chi Alpha members. Clark

lives.

"We want to see students save their salvation

and Sliull were two of the found-

and form a real relationship with God," Wagner

ing

said.

Wagner hoped Thursday night

Shull

Phillip

throughout

members of

Clli Alph.L plwto by

ministry

Mitl Ftyf

would continue to expand, reaching more students. Chi Alpha also encouraged its

Chi Alpha mem

members to feel comfortable sharing their love

bers join in sing-

of God with others.

ing

hymn of Chi Alpha Pastor Dena Wag-

"We want to tell people about God and how different, how much better life will be if they allow God into their heart," Clark said. Although Assembly of God Church

a

praise.

ner said

Thurs-

day niglit ministry usually

drew be-

tween 15 and 20

sponsored Chi Alpha, Clark said the service

students, photo by

was nondenominational. Wagner said she did

Matt Fry^

not consider Chi Alpha a church, she viewed it

as a ministry

with the goal of reaching

students, not just those

who

all

regularly attend

church in Maryville.

"Our world

is

campus," Wagner said. "We're

trying to reach our world."

m

socialion Front

Row: Mayank Kapur,

Sreenivas Kaligotia, Virabhai Kharadia,

Rayonun<

Gupta and Tarun Aggarwal. Row 2: ShaUni Wilfred Mohammed Zainan, Gaurav Khanna, Tsering Panjor, Vandana Sharma, Visha Sethi, Shectal Chopra, Bjtu Jain and Viraj Kothari. Row 3: Deepak Sasi, Gnan: Prakash Israel Peter, Hunain Khan, Divya Chadha, Sujit Misra, Keerthi Avula Gulshan Lakhani and Akshay Kamath. Back Row: Akshay Anand, Kunal Kapur Dhiraj Khanna, Ameei Sawhncy, Sanjiv Kumar, Sutnit Chopra, Puneet Barual Buhariwalla, Puncct

Kshitij

:

76^:1

Special

K

Ray and Surya

Prakash.

The Diwali Function

:

Flag raising

:

Began in fall 2001


InicrnaikMKil Fmml JImk Rtsu T«pu. Moaka Mu<ii1»hi. MAfyrrt

l)r (tuxitun,

'Slutit'iti

C

Hik Cunoi

V Kiiun, Alr)Aiklri KtijA«, LukIct KAiwra «ixl {Unv Ntiviu 9t»m WUtrrU, IVk> M^rtincs. Ai Ktihtyathi, Eun-ju Irr, UMih^l llcnnjiiri, Vutduvi Sturiiu, Ttrntiic I'lii^^v, Vkuv CKiiuiun Hurlr «ml .Nt*fiiilu» N«>di lt«r Jl: SjkhK Htmli. AiHlfr> Miy, NKkirt Hiii. Fihirrnu ( ollint. Yi-Jimi ^NlK'hcUc) Tui. Nitrun Scrvm, AnitC'ljurr i'jKanu, Shhwi Mi»ritj, Hifiuiu Kuyuiu. Njftiin N\ivim, Ailyn Nm\u aikI lii>x> <>luila|j R0m4; lraiu(iniutuik, JunidKHH) tVk. Niituiurl VhiiuQ. VLkiitLiv T> luuttvk hr\', Shitub ShjDio. \k4ununrd ^JLuivui. jiniah Ndiniu, Kiihc Kwvn ami Akihjy Kanuth B»fk Amt: Naifc-y HmlcT. Minuru Soryoihi. Vkj Mtcxla. VbJ Kvdui, ( '•roixr Wann. Anvir liabttVHiDtnr. Riincn Wi|Ernknrfh(, Flurajtvun and l>iqp> Larrra YiUu, I uJtvinr

i; SKUini

Hag raiting

:

Internationa]

:

International dinner

:

Homecoming Parade

I

inhrinn

C 'pqanizalion of C^nriitian relluvvship Fnmf Jl»i»: Brcky Troycr. Vilcnc Hoakiuin. Linduy Smith and Sarah OanirU Ba(li Raw: C^hnstophcr Thoma*. Tristan Twntihcll and Evan t'locpfil.

:

Benefit banquet Scripture reading

:

Youth church

:

services

p Miiii...H.iir,...ui Th««a Murtha. Rebecca GnflTin, Amy Stonum, Enu)y Walkrr and Came Clcland R»w 2: Kylie Kaipuu. Aihlry AUrrd, MiUic Seek. Knuin Lanen. Noetic Jagger. AUi Bmwn, and Kryule Smith. Rmr J; JiU I

JtMr: Juh» Graber.

Rnlry. LeJie Wiikinion. Amber Willumv Marcy Hatfield. De«ree Campbell, Btk Jtmr: Brittany Fischer. Stacey Davidwin. Scephanie Thomas. Ashlee Cooper, Crv-stal Benton and Amanda Beim.

Jeuica Eagen. Athley EKkhoff.

: :

:

programs in the hall Sponsored campus-wide talent show 3rd place mini-float award for Homecoming 2002 Social educational

Vloi^ar Boopd R0m: Carissa Kalkbrenner, Stephanie Spencer. Kim Kogert. Sarah Carver, Lon White and Libbyjean Whittle Jl«r 2: Jayna Vaccaro, Alicia Shirk, Ken Kemmerer. Jennifer Louk. Jeuica Clausen. Kara Karsscn and Ken Fairchild. B<iWk Jimr: Justin Ross. Justin Corbett. Lo((an Li)(htfooi. Mary Beth Russell. on FordsTC. Emily Dw. Jeremy Barloss* and John Otte.

Frvnl

1

"Reading

is

Leading" program

Homecoming jalopy Faculty tea

76S


Mewman

t

(^pni

oiholic

Front Roiv: Jacqui Handles, Nick DelSignore, Anne Gordon and Allie Zaroor. Row 2: Claudia Molina, Victor Chininin Buele, Shannon Rcbori, Olivia Barrett,

and Mikayla Chambers. Row 3: Michelle Marquis, Scott Ada Lucia Gonzalez, Adam Lybarger, Analiesa Joyce, John Prezzavento and Kate McLellan. Back Roii>; Julie Toebben, Sara Kerkhoff, Adam Ewing,Joe Park, Justin Heinen, Mike Wemhoflf, Phil Koehler and David Farmer. Lniellis Santiago

BraiA-ner,

Wednesday night dinner

:

Trick-or-Treat for food panty Mission service trip

:

:

KesidencG

I

lall

I

lonoparij

Front Row: Kristin Jackson, Christy Crownover, Noellejagger, Jackie Clark, Janson Thomas and Rose Viau. Row 2: Keri WiUiams, Ashley Wittmeyer, Jacque Serflaten,

AUison Brown,

Wendy Kay and Kim Rogers. Back JJow; J.R.

Justin Corbett, Nicole Strong, Michelle

Brockman,

Kurz,

Jessica Clausen, Taylor

Harness and Neal Davis.

:

Hall of the Month Fundraising for Leadership Scholarship

:

Awards

:

Peep

Lciucafi)

Front Row: AHison Bro\vn, Tara Mullock, Betsy Burgess, Katrina Streck, Renee

Keeton, Emily Dettmer and Macgan Irwin.

Row 2:

Marcella Trujillo, Aaron

Waldo and

Brittany Fischer. Back Row: Shannon Reborijoe Stock, Scott Rivera, Adam Zolnowski, Bryce Lemke, Cindy Poindexter and Anita Wilson.

Westlake, Lori Jensen, Desirae Boye, Nick

;

;

;

Sexual Responsibility Week Body Image Awareness Week Alcohol Awareness Week

hall A:ssociaTion Front Row: Paul Klute, Abby Galbraith, Jodie Hitz and Jacque Serflaten. Row 2: Amanda Wilson, Amy Stonum, Lindsay Young, Kim Rogers, Kitty Nixon

and Olivia Barrett.

Row

3:

Sam Jennings, Nicole

Strong,

Cindy Poindexter, Row: Brandon

Bradley Sparks, Whitney Hollinger and Carrie Ivcrson. Back Stanley,

:

Halloween dance "A Night Out" formal dinner

:

Cotnmunity Trick-or-Treat

:

Spccia

William Elum, Skylar Rolf and Megan

Fisher.


Pin

down

residential

life

by Betsy Lee With a

ilighc lean to the left, she

tned to

ditect the roll ol the hIiKk Kiwling hall,

A yell

a( triumph k>lluwe<J the crack ui piiu hitttnc

the hardwood "1

love to bowl.' Holly Miller said. "But

1

erf'

tree

Kiwling at E)earcat Lanes courtesy of the

Residence Hall Asaociatum. the event

hop ini;

RHA

sponsored

to encixirage students to find

dlcohi>l-trec »»>•» to

meet new people.

a boring way to spend the evening but all

together, bowliiti;

is

when fun."

"You need organiutioiu people grow," Podach

RHA alst) provided free Mr. Gcxxkents

sandwiches

for the Ktwirrs.

t>ff

i«>

E^rrett, the free lx)wling kicked

an eventful trimester

for the organization.

RHA

planned to sponsor a Dance-a-thon, I and an event each day during Northwest Week.

March

organizations like

RHA smooth

President of

of

like

RHA

to help

said.

RHA Paul Klute agreed that one

RHA's primary

responsibilities

was to help

students feel comfortable in college.

Dieterich Hall Director Kelly Podach said

"Students sometimes view bowling as sort of

you get 90 people

Programming Committee

Using approximately $500 from the activity

According

it.'

Miller jnd 90 other students enjoyed » night

RHA

Olivia Biirrett said.

budget,

floor.

don't like to pay fvw

Chairman of

the transition

"The goal of atmosphere

and educational pn>grams," Klute said. met on weekly on Wednesdays. The group was open to anyone who lived in the residence halls. "1

joined

alcohol-free sixial events.

seemed

RHA for something to do," Barrett live where felt safe and RHA

wanted to like

Dl« trich roidvnl,

group ofRradract HaB A>wicuoon mcm-

the ball cm hn way to«rcufr a

hcn Mcmbcn

mann't group o( (m bowlfd two gamrt in (h< I6ih and final lane of

am

W houn pre-

parmf for jfrtr bowfang

ni|[)u.

Ca<*)r

tparr

I

the organization for me."

Kriident AsTaylor H • r a• • • bowti with a

oon ipcm

to provide a friendly

RHA

said. "1

of the avgintxa-

is

and to educate through

stKial

from high school to college by providing

«iilanl,

RHA

for living

K*rk-

Krrli-

Bearcat Laaet.

Hhtf>trU«nyr

1:767


oiippopf jtudenf lenl oiippor

O epvices

Front Row: Tabitha Simpson, Fahteema Collins, Robin Moser and Rachel Judah. Row 2: Ashley Knapp, Amy Stonum, Heidi Packard, Krystle Smith, Brant Miller and Mike McMurtrey. Row 3; Nickara Pratt, Lois Hart, Eddie Graves, Elizabeth Hart and Brandy Salisbury, Jeannie Schaffer,

John

Back Roiv: Jacquelyn Loghry, Stacey Brandon Heck and Curtis Gegen.

Pitts.

Piatt,

:

Community service projects

:

Social

:

Fundraisers

and cultural events

oouth Mall V^omplex Front

Row: Joanna Townley,

Tiffany Anderson, Brant Miller, Evie Baxter, Julia

Row: Derick Ackerman, Derek Woellhof, Nick Wemimont, Nick Boden, Adam Zolnowski, Brandon Stanley and Keith Sandrock. Kitzing and Carrie Iverson. Back

:

:

:

Socials

Educational programs Discipline cotnmittee

lassaaops otudcnt Ambassad

Front Row: Tiffany Barmann, Jodi Victor, Megan McClain, Carissa Kalkbrenner, Shelby Barrels and Michelle Forsen. Karssen, Jesse Fisher, Angie Ashley,

Row

Row 2:

Keri Fairchild, Kara

Megan Whitten, Alane Dotson and Burne'a

Logan Lightfoot, Robin Sol, Betsy Williams, Back Row: Brett Kisker, Ryan Miller, Nathan Lane, Randy Calvert, Jamie Buchmeier, Emily Dix and Carrie Johnson.

Cothrine. Jessica

:

:

:

3: Justin Ross,

Miesner and

Campus

Jessica Clausen.

tours

Spring Fling Sneak Preview

otudeni 0â&#x201A;Ź Alicia Shirk, Kara Karssen, Emily Dix and Taylor Tholcn. Row 2: Hehnink, Ehzabeth Sexton, Jennifer Seaman and Mhaleena Mansoor. Row 3: Janson M. Thomas, Jordan W. Orscheln, Ashley D. AUred, Tiffany Barmann, Sarah Barmann, Tiffany Baur, Juhe Victor, Megan McClain and Sarah I'faltzgraff. Row 4: Sarah Swedberg, Kara Ferguson, Zach Edwards, Wendy Shoemyer, AUie Zaroor, Matthew Moncivais, McCarten Q. Dclaney, Carol Cowles and Dan Ayala. Back Row: Dan Nowosiclski, Steven Hart, Ryan Bauer, Eric Willis, Michelle Eischeid, Chase Cornett, Scott Rivera and Robert Dcwhirst.

Front

Row:

Kristin

Speciai

:

Legislative reception

:

Tower

:

Voter registration

Service

Award


CymU*

Smail IJtK-

uci from

N«w

ABKudtBndrof VJoacph. Smul

WU

WToivcd

iIk

pnunt

ID

cit-

owbMm

Bridal fundraising by Betsy Lee Transformed into

a

showcase featuring

major events; committee members began planning

ever>'thing from cakes to entertainment, the

the event

Performing Arts Center was decorated with

50 hours planning the show.

flowers

and

lace.

The Sigma

"It

Society Bridal Show, Jan. 26,

was probably one of the most lifelong

will take

within 45 minutes of Maryviile. According to

with

Show Chairwoman

Betsy Burgess, the

Burgess said she invested over

learning experiences of

fmtuitd over 35 vendors o<fenng wedding services

Bridal

last fail.

my

life,"

Burgess said.

the planning and organizational

"I

skills

me forever."

In addition to the Bridal Show, the

50-member

vendors covered categories including decorations,

organization participated in

many community

catering, disc jockeys, independent bridal

service projects including

highway cleanup,

comuliants and, a ne«' addition,

nursing

lingerie.

"^e thought the lingerie vendors added a new rwBt," Burgess said, lust to kittda spice

it

iq>

a

at its

home visits and

Tuesday evening meetings.

"When you joined Sigma Society you become on making Maryviile

littfc.-

focused

Sigma Society memben modeled over 50 dresses from two area

just for you,

In addition to the vendors,

dressmakers. Bridal

Show Co-Chairwoman

Lmdiey Lxwiey said that one of the organiation's mam gnob far the show was to represent the area.

"We wanted to let people fnxn noal areas know (hat there couki be services in their

hometown."

Lowreysaid.

The Bndal Show waa one of Signta Society's

weekly donation baskets

but for those

a better place, not

who help make

it

home

for you," Burgess said.

The

organization planned one major charity

event per month. Burgess said that the community service efforts set

Sigma Society apart firom other

Palmer

Jim

pUy* during the Sigma Society Show. Bridal Looks, R.od$ Hallmark and other

organizations.

also

"Sometimes all-male or all-female groups focus of

why

lose

we're here in this community,"

buunrsm

pmentcd

in

the Performing Arts

Onter. ^JM»

BuigesBsaid.

iqma Ooctei\^ F mmt ttmm: Rnbyn McC'oOum. Tfutich.

Kara Hcgru.

Vaknc Hoakiwm. L»ck Hcnkc. Niki

Mcbtu Hihn. EnuK- IVttmcT. Afn>' Baxic>' and Autumn Spirit R#«» 2:

E\-an». Kitic Pctcnon. Bctt>- Bui)cr>\. Tabitiu Simpwo. ljnd*f%' Uiwtc>-. Ambrr Yancr. Kjt>' Hjw1c>-, EmiK Kmir andJoAnn Minon Jt#«r J: KcIK Hcrnck, Sjn Mjgnm. Cortncr VoAm. Mqc>n Snrll. Um Whitr. Sarah BrgjE^. ShrOv- ( iuhdr.

Wcndv'

NkoJc WcuncT. C'j\i> Bhjnk. Kathr>Ti Waifcand irtd Michelle Harm U^m 4:\cnt\At Marm Hocjch. Mcjcan Lrrf. Erwa C'-<irkm. Aiutra Cicrmcr. Shannon Ztq^lrr. Slrjchan johmnn. HoBy MiUrr. Kam Martin. Kam Martin. Laura Har«ry and Enn hmtt^m- RmmS: MachrOr Sth-m*. L>7Ki«r>- HKkman. Anpc ShicUt, Camro Hotpar. Tiffam- Hodkin. C Jth>- hiricy. TnUi leihrr. Enn Mukloon and Tiffany C'>«n:Hki Vi«t.

B«dk Rmt.* Juiir Knapp, C'.ath>- M< laughbn. jcnnifrr t^laaiKm, jmnilrr Birrr. janr%%j Krrvn. Kcmhi Avub. jiO Barinw. Erm FrrdrrKk. Rachd Lnf^and NiUu Mulfam

ihow

:

Bridal

:

Community service

:

Formal

1:^6'?


laii

I

ni I

'I

silrn

Front Row: Sarah Winecoff. Kortni Norgart, Andrea Croskrey, Karen Beeny and Virginia Herbert. Row 2: Megan Burnett, Andrea McNeil, Callie Coleman

and Eniily Murr. Back Row; Erin Frederick, Tegan Mullins, Stacey Briannc Knilans and Bess Grame.

:

Trick-or-Treat for Lupus Sisterhood Camp Out

:

Founders Day

:

Salazar,

loo Late Paintball V^lub Front Row: Chris Nelson, Tony

Sasso, Brad FuUbright, Julie Flynn and Tyler Young. Back Row: Daniel Ayers, Matt Newcomer, Nick Waldo, Rose Parmeter, Michelle Brockman, Rosetta Ballew and Bonnie Bisbee.

:

Game playing

:

Fundraisers

:

Competition

trips

lupkish otudent Associatii

Front Row: Faik Cuneyt Yildiz, Kaan Ozdemir, Ozge Unsal,

Mehk Ercanli

n\

and Kerein Can Suer.

:

:

:

f^

n ^ &^'

Annual dinner Flag raising Soccer games

U.SiS Moflfiwni^ Mopthwt'st oiap Ipek Oocieiij Front Row: Mary Ward and Rita Roberts. Back Row: Jason Michelle Marquis and Matt Burns.

:

:

:

Speciai

Watch

Star

Trek

Discussions Star Trek Conventions

W. Thompson,


M

i

I

t

WDmM. Pftr Siroburf sad Cachy Paotdbruti the ii'vm !

An^

in Non-

linamlSOKl-

ANTS hem

aBowcd

to build

tricndthipi that

would be othrr-

WMc miucd.

fJtiMfi

Common concerns by Betsy Lee

Between

bites of lunch,

women offered each

spring.

for their

for their fall first meeting.

"We're trying to get the word out. Right

now

we're son of a loose-knit group," Paus said.

"It's

connected.

Sharing lunch at a table designated

A.N.T.S held an open house to welcome

members

other an empathetic ear and a place to feel

use, the Association of Non-Traditional

hard to find a time to meet."

Students (A.N.T.S.) convened every Wednesday during the lunch hour. President

the schedules of their members. To work around

Paus and Stroburg struggled to accommodate

medium through which nontraditional students could feel more

this problem, the organization had a table set up outside the Student Affairs office in the J.W. Jones Student Union that was specifically for

connected to the

A.N.T.S

Peggy Stroburg founded the organization year,

hoping to

last

offer a

university.

"We wanted to network with people our own age," Stroburg said. "We can talk about issues specific to us.

It

makes us

feel

more

like part of

:

the student body."

Stroburg worked with Public Relations Director Cathy Paus to obtain official organization status through Student Senate

last

use.

Though the group

'

participated in the Angel Tree holiday charity, Stroburg said the organization was primarily social. "It helps to have a group where you can meet

people of your background," Stroburg aren't in sports, in the

said.

"We

dorms or frats or sororities.

We just d<in't have access to those stxiai groups."

Women s I

v?cll

R0m: LjurK WhimngTon, Mrgjn McLaughhn.

Bccin' jutti cr, Kiin

1

CUnrr

jnd Anne Rc>lioldi Bsck Rmw: Mrgin Ellwangrr. Sue Scholtcn. Rjkk) CTaton. Mand>' EUit and Pal McLaughhn

:

Golf matches and tournaments tst team at Graceland Golf Clatiic

:

First

:

women's

golf program in history of Northwest

m


103

R

Front Row: Nathan Woodland, Alane Franken, David Easterla, David Farmer and Benjamin R. Heaivilin. Row 2: Dee Cole, Amy Rowland, Bethany Bins,

Brandy Ragar and Krystle Smith. Back Row: Kenny Elder, Andrea

Estes,

Jennifer Jaques, Laura Seek, Stacey Davidson and Callie Coleman.

:

Highway cleanup

:

Nature Preserve maintenance

:

Wildlife Refuge volunteer activities

ctounTinq oocietij Front Row: Sarah Carver, Lindsey Downey, Jennifer Zwiegel and Kitty Nixon.

Row 2; Jenna Row:

Dey, Blythe Reynolds, Nicole Miller and Sabrina Marquess. Back

Alyssa Welu, Malea Yount, Stephanie Meints,

Nick Waldo and Chris Holder.

:

Accounting Day

:

The Volunteer Income Tax Assistant

:

Guest speakers

ACM Front Row: Nathan Lancaster, Ben Coffman, Derek Eye, Rachelle Wright, Adam Kneisel and Darrin Collins. Row2: Gary McDonald, David Reisig, Victor

Chininin Buelc, Keysto Kelly, King Kwan and Merry McDonald. Row 3: Ryan Hance, Corey Swope, Robert Vandermillion, Nathan Owens, Adam Minx and Sheena Lloyd. Row 4: Shawn Bussey, Brandon Rockhold, Kshitij Ray, Mike Vertako, Dustin Sapp, Josh Stephenson, Brandon Wright and Josh Ferguson. Btuk Row:J3Son W. Thompson, Brian Quinlan, William Rottman, Kevin Kelly, Ryan Blair, Allen Lode, Grant Howard and Scott Reynolds.

:

Book

:

Company speakers

:

Discussion over computer topics

sale

Aqpiculfupe qpicullupe rAmtassaaops Ambassadc Lilly, Chrissy Cuminale, Randa Brunkhorst, Lori Fordyce and Shannon Shineman. Back Roiv; Jennifer Jensen, Josh Kempers, Tyler Williams, Joel Miller, James R. Penn and Corey Neill.

Front Row: Beth

:

FFA contest National FFA Convention

:

Iowa Pork Congress

:

DEPARTMENTAL

JM^


RobrrI Pangburn tervvt up 1 )i(X iJitg 111

linti'

dim Wright during AtuKiation of Computer Machincry*% fint innua] ccxiluxii.

ACMs mcmberwent from 30 in one year, photo by thip

13 to

Shll Fryr

Membership explosion By Jeff Rix and Betsy Lee

A new set of goab sparked a membership tiKrease that changed the identity of an organization.

Over the fall trimester, the Association for Computer Machinery doubled

their

Though

membership; a goal

set

by

science majors with additional information about their field.

ACM president Derek Eye. "I really

ACM

wanted to turn the club

consisted of about 10

members

arouiKJ,

the club focused on hosting more social

events, the group continued to provide the computer

it's

only

planned to

the Wal-Mart Headquarters

visit

in Bentonville, Ark. as

one of their learning experiences.

"We want to view their I.T

in the past," Eye said.

[information technology]

This year we actually have girls in this nerd club." To increase membership. Eye focused on

system," Eye said. "They're the biggest distribution

iiKorporating activities that appealed to the entire

Balancing between a social organization and an academic organization, Association of Computer Machinery's new philosophy gave the group

student body opposed to just computer science majors.

ACM

hotted an X-Box gaming system in Colden

Hall during their

first

meeting. They

set

up the game

system in the world."

opportunities to continue expanding.

on rwo televisions, allowing eight people to play at once. In addition to sponsoring the X-Box gaming opportunity, ACM held a cookout at College Park

classes," Christine Miller said. "I

during the

more about computers."

fall

trimester.

"I'm a computer science major and is

going to help

me

get to

1

think this club

kiww more think

1

people in will also

my

leam

AqClut FrÂťM

JtMr: Aihley Lyle.

On Wiew.

Ome

Liuri ChjmberUin, Sullivin. ttmwl: Brand>- Ragar.

Tammy KreifrU. Jennifer Jenwn and Randa BrunkhorM-

McKmne

Anne Liebhart, Niki Baxlry. Cavla Blunk. Hickman Bsth JImp; Jeremy Lacy. Cura C*oldtimth. Rolofion. Elizabeth Lamken. Jackie Juhl, Tarryn t>Kke. ChnI MrCtra,

Heth LiUy.

Pendleton,

xcy Fnedrich and Athley

I

I

yier

laton Vandivort

and Rjck Aipegren

Barn warmings

Alumni Showrcasc

Cow Chip Bingo

|:;73


lai

Lacy Friedrich, Megan Snell, Carrie Sullivan and Shannon Back Row: Randa Brunkhorst, Rich Thomas, Clark Aeman and Travis

Front Row: Beth Jesse.

Lilly,

Stokes.

:

:

:

Ag Week Ag Alumni News Ag Banquet

^^^HpK~-


Technology drive by Betsy Lee Pina

(MTtirs,

mfivnudi'mal guest speakers and

field trips

drew iKw mcmhers out lium hchmd their computer screens. The IS members of the Association of Information

Technokw IV^fesshinab club spent the fall trimester trying to rebuild their "It's

member

base.

a sk>*- growth." President

ScMt Reynolds said. "But

our members are up from the beginning of the year."

IXinng the fall, the organiaition held a pKnic and hosted a panel of speakers discussing careers in the information

technology

field.

ReyrH>lds said (he group was attempting

to sponsor events for those in the

depanment. "The goal

is

computer science

do things

to provide opportunities to go

we, as a ma)(W. are interested in," Re>'nolds said.

One o(

the events planned was a

visit

to the

headquaners in Bentonville, Ark., March "I a-ant

to be an

I.T.

Wal-Mart

8.

professional," Jason

Savage

said.

"This will help with netwiwking." In addition to trip aivJ guest speakers, the club also offered

its

services to students struggling with

computer

scieiKe curriculum. Savage said he was drawn to the organization because of 'I

me

it's

tutoring program.

en)ov tutoring others," Savage

said. "I

think

it

helps

learn too."

Scon Reynolds â&#x20AC;˘ad ZachRuir

go through agenda

ihr

for the

Student Tint AffUutei of the

American Chemical Society meeting.

The

organizaprovided 6ce pizza lo ention tice

new mem-

bcn. fkttth/iAM

fV

'Xsscckifkjn cl

InuTm

ilit

n Itrhnolcx^ij h-'rokssicnals

Fmi Rrnm: Jo<h Wherry. Derek Eye and Altihay Anand. Btk JtÂŤir; Willum Rottnun and Scon Reynoldi.

:

:

:

Contact with industry companies Hosted guest speakers Explored subjects of interest to MIS/CS majors

ins


Alpha

Ten. AlrJr

Fnrnf Row; Jessica Basinger, Erica Scott, Stephanie Schuinulk, Marvin Hoskey, Chrissy Cuminale, Jennifer Kleeschulte. Nalhanael Schmitz, Nicole

Bloemendaal. Lac>'. Jennifer

Mona

Baker and Kristen Rhodes.

Row 2:

Cara Wiese, Jeremy

Spreckebiieyer, Jason Vandivort, Michelle Burkart, Josh Keinpers

and Jennifer Carpenter. Back Row: Rjch Thomas, James Penn, James Figg, Ryan Morris and James Hardue.

Joel Miller, Brian Tarr, Matt Schroer,

ATA Conclave

:

National National

:

Highway cleanup

:

FFA Convention

ot

ramilu ^c ocienccs imilij and Vvonsumer Oc

Front Row: Kara Steele, Valerie Hoakison. Katie Peterson, Emily Dettmer and Heather Dennis. Row2:]i\i Stiens, Jenny Adams, Ashlee Roberts and Suzanne Pritchard. Back Row: Stephanie Meinke and Melanie Lyon.

:

American

Bizal,

Peggy Bruck, Angie Mutz, Nicole

WIM Conference FACS

Faculty

:

Breakfast for

:

Operation Shoe Box

IVlapketinq Association

Front Row: Jamie Knierim, Jessica Miesner, Mehssa McQueen, Keri Faircliild, Jenny Coffey, Emily Dix and Deb Toomey. Back Row: Robin Sol, Jessica Clausen,

Megan

Prescott, Christy Galate,

Tami

Sychra, Jodi Victor, Tiffany

Baur, Paul Miser and Sara Wolff.

:

:

:

Date auction of athletes Conference in New Orleans Guest speakers

?>e\a

Beta Beta

Front Row: James Rice and Alie Monnin. Row 2: Kim Scarborough, Jill Fisher and Suzanne Von Bchren. Back Row: Thad Dean and Sarah Zimmerman.

:

:

:

â&#x20AC;˘''1^ .

i\^'/

776:

'/

Departmentai

'

^

^

.i

mn 8 i

I

Science Olympiad

Fun day at Mozingo Roadside cleanup


Sam

CravM

csplaiiM ihr cit-

mrntt

of

(be

Farm Uitl to the Collegiate Farm Itumu. The btll. national

in part, locreated

agricultural insurance

co-

verage, phcio kf tltjln

Grave discussion by Trisha Thompson The Farm Act fueled an open forum of and debate sponsored by

others be able to get the perspective of what

discussion

is

Northwest's chapter of the Missouri Collegiate Farm Bureau. Drafted in 1996, the Farm Act was drafted

Graves throughout the semester, the Collegiate Farm Bureau included local and state business representatives. The bureau also planned a trip to Jefferson City to meet legislators and learn about the legislative process. Collegiate Farm Bureau President Lori Fordyce said she thought the legislative trip was a great experience for her because she wanted to pursue a career in lobbying after graduating from Northwest.

to decrease federal farm subsidies over seven years, reduce crop price manipulations

and

push the farming industry into a reliance on the economy.

The

act failed to

drafting of the

bill.

meet

its

goals after the

Subsidies increased and

the reduction in federal budget caused concern. Sen.

Sam

give a general overview of the

bill

and answer

questiofu.

"We decided to have the farm it

bill

Sponsoring speakers

The group created

Graves, an active proponent of

the legislation, visited campus April 2002 to

(Graves] speak about

because Collegiate Farm Bureau

so legislative-oriented.

We wanted to have

going on," Kristen Rhodes

said.

like

a legislative bill in

2003

Farm Bureau. The Collegiate Farm Bureau met in Valk the second and fourth Tuesdays of every month and was open to agricultural majors as well as anyone interested in agricultural government issues. and presented

it

to the State

arm Uuivau B R»m: Corey Netll. Sera Stetnpel. Lon Fordyce. Lacy Fnednch and Abe Sjndqunt tt»» 2; Greg Lally. Trina Riegel, Chrnty C'uminale and Beth LiUy. Btk Rrw: Jennifer Scon, Kanda Brunkhoru. Clint Prange. Jamet Hardee and David McCool. FrvNi

:

:

:

Attend the Mittouri Farm Bureau meeting Food check awareness Legislative

Day in Jeflferson

City,

MO

Farm BUREAi

;77


Delfn

Mâ&#x20AC;&#x17E;

Prlh

Front Row; Nick Glasnapp, Sarah Carver, Jessica Miesner, Alyssa Welu, Stephanie Meints and MoUy Case. Row 2: Cindy Kenkel, Sabrina Marquess, Jessica Clausen, Sibel Deinir, Amy Milligan, Enza Solano, Stephanie Spencer and Joni Adkins. Back Row: Levent Durmus, Renee Wilmes, Alisa Schieber, Heidi Fuelling, Jamie Buchmeier, Paul Miser and Sara Wolff.

:

:

:

Junior Achievement Awards Etiquette dinners

STAR Chapter Award

Delta Tail

AlpL

Front Row; Beth I^^^anda

Lilly,

Heather LaShell and Tarryn Dicke.

Row 2; Amber Taylor,

Brunkhorst, Lori Fotxlyce and Nathanael Schmitz. Bddle Row: Tyler Williams.

:

Provide donations to agricultural organizations Display show for Missouri products

:

Cattle sale fundraiser

:

inancia

Front Row: Jamie Buchmeier, Kari Frerking and Danny Harding. Row 2: Alyssa Welu, Ryan Weibe, Nicjutgens and Blythe Reynolds. Back Row;].K. Houchin.

:

:

:

Free tutoring for students in Fundamentals of Business Finance Class Hosted practicing finance professional guest speakers

Fellowship activities

Front t:lay,

Row: Sandra Douglas and

Ulankenship, Laci

:

:

:

Departmental

Pat Johnson.

Row 2;

Tatiannia Johnson and David Tibbies. Back

Ann

Fiala

Lindsay

Row: Kevin

and Heather Simms.

109 tournament finalists

20 events qualified for national tournatnent Travelling for speech tournaments

Crump, Dena

Rotert, Derick


Alumnus | adds passion by Jaclyn Mauck Fred Clark, Ninthwcst alumnus and

Omaha

Federation of

Advert utDK 9 Advertising Person of the Year, was a man who Mmply loved his profession. Hiisted by

Ad

Ink, Fred Clark stepped

up to the podium

in

B of the J. W. Jones Student UnKm and addressed

Meeting Rixxn

a Kti^>up of future advertisers.

"He is defmitely passioiÂťtc about his work," Ad Ink member Mike Patterson said. "It seems like money isn't even hit goal. it'Âť the quality of his work."

Clark was the president and fourkJer of Claik Creative Gnxip,

an advening agency lO""

in

Omaha, Neb. The agency celebrated their With only 1 3 employees, Clark Creative

anniversary in 2002.

Group worked

primarily with kx^l clients developing logos

print, television

and

and radio campaigtu.

Clark was one of many Northwest alumnus who jourrieyed back CO Maryville to educate business.

Ad

Throughout the

Ink students about the advertising

year, several

alumni working in areas

from television productitm, radio advertising design were

"|Ad Ink] Chair Mike

welcomed by Ad is

great because

Blair said.

and you get to

talk to

it

and web

site

offers so many resources," Campaign

"You have people

him

sales

Ink.

like Fred

Clark come in

instead of just getting your degree

and

being thrown out there."

Ad Ink also organized transportation to and from Kansas City Ad Club's Career [>ay and the Omaha Federation of Advertising's Meet the

Pros.

Both events were designed to allow students to

meet professionals and gain opmions about resumes and portfolios.

Ad

Ink met every other Thursday in the

Union.

J.

W. Jones Student

Some 40 members participated in a variety of educarional

and social events including

week and

Lattes After

M idnight Yo^ the Sunday before finals

Dark

at

Main

Street Coffee.

Advertiiing executive Fred dark DhaMralM 1 point ipcalung to the advrrtumg

nu-

From C^tiuhj. Ncb.CUrk'ivuH

jofv

was sponsored by

Adlnk.fkwtr*"

(-

irnina

I

hplci

Upsilon

Front Row: Jared Bntz. Marrn Hoegh, Jenny Schell. Steph Smith md Jill Kloppenhurg. Bstk row: i'effff Stroburg. Mart Wilson. Leah Manos and Michael HickiTun,

:

:

:

"Bookf for Africa" book drive Geography Awareness Week Geography banquet

:)?'?


Front Row: Angie Van Boening, Malinda Grant, Diana Schnarrenbcrger, Staci Ensminger and Karina Walker. Back Row: Karla Strain, Laura Villines, Andrea Harrchon, Rachael Collins and Joey Rosenfelder.

:

ENsplay at Rock and Mineral Show in Kansas City Group for people interested in earth sciences

:

Field trips

:

r

ntaptland View LJnIine Front Row: Angela Trower, Olivia Barrett, Katy Hawley and Mary Jesaitis. Row 2: Nick Larson, Amber Brazil, Lisa Josephsen, Amy Carr and Mike Patterson.

Back Rout Jordan

Starr,

Josh Hutson and Julie Miller.

:

Road trips

:

Seasonal travel e-zine

:

Pacemaker Award Nominee 2002

to

Midwest

attractions

h.opTicu

Front Row: Wally Cottrell, Travis Stokes, Jason Eaton, and Ronald Portridge. Row 2: Nancy Krieftmeyer, Jennifer Kleeschulte, Carrie Sullivan and Alex

Ching. Back Row: Heather LaShell, Trina Riegel and Jennifer

:

Plant sale

:

Field trips

:

Scholarship fundraisers

Blair.

hPREDClub Front Row: Angie Shields,

Kim Lamberty and Amber Blanchard. Row 2:

Boye, Shelby Schultes, Heather Berry and Richie Marsh. Lipira,

Leif Back RoiiÂť: John

McLain and Ben York.

:

Health fair Recreation and Physical Education Conference

:

Ushered home basketball games

:

7^o:EB3SIlB

Cameo Hofpar and Megan

Desirae

Row J: Jamie Liehr, Sara


Ceramic I showcase by Mikaela Koilc Excited chatter of eager artists and potential buyers echoed through the basement of Ohve De Luce. Artists within the Art

Department had the opportunity

to sell their wares at the biannual Art

Dec. 6-8. Artists worked

shapes and

all

Club pottery

sale

semester creating pots of all

they perched on stools and chairs

sizes;

throughout the door, waiting to see

who might

purchase

their piece.

"The

best thing about putting this type of display

on

is

the ability to showcase your work and to see what people

want to purchase," Caleb Taylor. Taylor had been involved with the An Club for two years. He said that each student had about 300 pieces of work ready to sell at the end of each semester. "it is really beneficial to us because you always fear becoming one of those starving artists, so this helps us pay for

all

of the expenses that goes along with our work,"

Taylor said.

Art Club sponsor Russell Schmaljohn began helping students showcase their work in 1969.

He

said this type

of experience helped students prepare for the future

if

they wanted to work for a gallery.

"Shows, such as

this,

allow students to become more

comfortable in exhibiting their work and to find out what the public

is

interested in,"

The show took

Schmaljohn

said.

place at the end of the spring and

fall

Schmaljohn the regularity of the event brought alumni and others from Kaiuas City and semesters. According to

Omaha. In de*p thought, Arika Vadasidccidtt to purchase i pair

of cUy cupt.

There wu a total of 13 artnn invohird with the An Club pottery ule.

piioto

by Trrryn Lindiry

r

n

f,

n''WM

If f'l

r

(XI

4

Psi

Fr»ml Rmr: Brett Kiiker. Mrlitu EUiott. NichoUt

Ron.

Omr Shurk. Ru>t>

Ethridgr. Kent Pierpoint. JiU Klopprnbutjt and Rachclle Wright itmr 2: Tara

Epperw>n, Eliu Adki«on, Emily VanBuikirk. Am^* Kunkelnun, Sarah WiU.

Rmm S: Mebtu Mane\t. Amanda MiUer. Samara Emily Heiuerkamp. Jamie Witt. Jamie Swan. C;harlo«teJorgen«en and M Sergei tUth Rmm: Nie Vatquet. Tom Brocknun. Jared Kirk, Kn« Coodall. < raig Buhman. Jennifer Davenport and Elgin Smith Nicole Ryan and jamie Botvrt.

r.ilgour.

:

:

:

Serve university bands

Midwest District Convention Host District Oflicers Meeting

mui


Ka ppa Frpnt Row:

Ken Crawford,

Katie Peterson,

Amanda Moser,

Katie

Andrews and

Heather Dennis. Row 2: Ciehna Fontaine, Kristi Wendt, Emily Dettmer, Jill Stiens and Bridget Divis. Back Row: Vicky Hilsabeck. Jacki Peterson, Alane Dotson and Karma Godsey.

:

:

:

Nut fundraiser FACS Weeks Honor Society for FACS

KMWI Sara Magnus, Michelle Stacy, Maura Horton, Back Ron'; Justin Ross, Josh Murphy, Garrett Kingston, Dan Sanders, Bobby Gumm. Matt Sanchelli and Bill Felps

Front

Row: William Mvirphy,

)ennifer Wells and

:

Kim

Ernst.

Won Missouri Broadcast Educator Awards

:

Television Channel 8

:

Produce own

TV show^s, commercials and movies

KZLX Front Row: Chris Baker, Amy Kern, Christina Campobasso, Tatiannia Johnson, Jamie Bossert, Ashley Nuss and Thomas Thrall. Row 2: Caroline Gross, Dustin Wasson, Sara Magnus, Mike Ritter, Tim Ramsey and Christine Ahrcns. Back Row: Nathan Chervek, Gina Tominia, Travis StuU, Ryan Delehant, Cameron McCoy, Nick Wetzel and Joey Stokes.

:

Live 9-11 broadcast from the Bell

:

Concert

:

Tower

giveaways Live football broadcast from Arrow^head Stadium ticket

lUn Pi

Eta

Front Row: Angela Davis, Marlina Howe and Dawn Trent. Back Row: Derek McDcrniott. Kara Karssen, Mary Beth Russell and Bayo Oludaja.

:

Community service Inducting new members

:

Theatre/Communication Banquet

:

Departmental


K7.I.X

Inni

nirmb«r

(vrant

Ncclccrmann announc«t upcnttung broidcatti

of Bnnat Bnlirt-

on

garnet

ball

KZLX. nunn

Neckfi-

wu pwtaf

pbyby-pby broadcaK team dunng die V .thai) and baslEthe ttjoont

•^

"

iilteaxmLffc* '.,:,F,yr

KZUCpjGnnt

Low power strength

Ncrkcr-mann filb tn

inoodie 10

nwlnighi

<hift

Friday, Jan. 17.

by Ryan Delehant and Melissa Galitz

Neckermann ufually

The

ScuJenaswanned around the Bell Tower for free

Federal

Communications Commission

buBcn, cake and the opportunity to watch the X

granted a low power license to

tiarafann with low power.

2002, enabling the campus station to be heard in a

KDLX

flipped the switch April 11. 2002.

Scudent* turned off cable channel 9 and tuned in

KZLX-LP Ken Finnegan

cm the aval 1 :06pjii. a* the (int official voice of KZLX. "We had a countdown from 1 to one, and when we oounied down to idD and tKxhing happened," to 106.7

signed

OentnJ Manager DUKinWawen wad. Accanfaig ID Watwn, dte aatian staff waited a mofnent bcfare going on air, to play a joke on Jccpcical liatencn

who

questioned the station's

i

i

imicduccd the fmt scx^ Teach

Tiger," which pbyed every time that

Me

K£)LX signed

had the equipment and call

power

letters to broadcast

Teach The song

Me Tiger" onginated in the 1960s. was requested 33 time* in a row, resulting in the 1963 shut down of the station. In 1964,

students succeM^uDy fought to allow the station

its call

leners.

to Stadlman, the

laist

picked from the

Roman numeral

three call leners,

carrier current station

nighti;

he

taid

enjoyed the

because

hun

a

it

he

ihili

gave

chatKe to

what the propk wane /ihao play

According

DLX, were

for 560.

560 a.m. picked up

The

in on-

campus buikiings, but the D]s had hopes for a wider broadcasting area.

was a dream of ours

in 1965,"

Stadlman said.

To have that come true so many years later, it's

wondetfuL

fow-power

I

di ink

Good dreams die hard."

license, rather

the

KZLX

than the university.

A

low'power license brought new programming reapofuibilities. After flipping the switch, the

stotian soki sponsonhips rather than commercials

and had to provide the community with

1

5 hours

of news and sports per week.

to continue broadcaating.

Abnoat four decades later, the station brought their brawkaiting to new level*.

p.m. on Friday

A station in Hawaii owned the call letters KDLX,

The Nkmhwest Foimdation owned

station manaiieT. the tradition of playing

low

in Mar^-viile.

forcing the station to alter

tm,

Acccirding to Rollie Stadlman, a former"X"

in January

seven-mile radius. By trimester's end, the station

"It

r ni ieya

KDLX

worked

the 8 p.m. to 10

"There IS more thmgi they have to pay attention

now than before," General Manager [>isnn Wawe n said. "It's iwt just playing music anymore." to

•.m


V]*i

^ Mafional Aqpi-maFketinq A: Front Row: Lacy Friedrich and Chrissy Cuminalc.

Row 2; Laura Rotterman.Jackie

Juhl and Tarryn Dicke. Back Row: Chris Rc^TioIds, Daniel Comes, Clark

Heman

and Brian Hula.

:

NAMA National Conference BBQ

:

Annual

:

Highway cleanup

rwr—r

I

— —I I

Mopffiwest

j^»

IM

^

M

lissoupian

Row: Maijie Kosman, Kara Swank, Julian Kussman and Ann Hannan. Row 2; Abby Simons, Clark Grcll, Trisha Thompson, Sara Sleyster and Pete Gutschenritter. Back Row: Chuck Enderie, Joe Knust, Bill Knust and Scott Reynolds. Front

Served as informational source for campus and community Provided forum for campus and community opinions

Served as learning environment throu^ e?q}erience in production

riopthwesf

M

issniipin n r\lvprlisinr

Meghan Johnson, Melissa Gilson, Rachel Manners and Brooke Back Row: Nick Thurber, Matthew Moore and Paul Miser.

Front Row: Klotz.

:

Sell

and advertise

for the

Northwest

Missourian and Tower Yearbook :

Interact ^vith clients

:

Service accounts

^WMSU Rodeo Team/Clut Front Row: Duane Jewell. Randi Conard, Brandy Ragar, Jake Dalton and Erin Roberts. Row 2: Michelle Burkart, Ashley Lyle, Ashley Obrien and Bonnie Peterson.

:

National Intercollegiate

:

Ed

:

Departmental

Back Row: Megan Wiemold, Tyler Williams andLindsay Henke.

Rodeo Association

Memorial Rodeo Competition in rodeos Phillips


m^ ^^1 I ^^i


C Vqanizational Lxommiinica lirn

'In

l<

iil

Assrri iltrn

Front Row: Heath Turtle. Keely Burns, Marlina Howe and Bayo Oludaja. Row 2: April Warneniunde, Renae Kroll, Dawn Trent and Tami Sychra. Back Row: Jessi

:

:

:

Newer,

Tricia

Rummer and Lmdsay

Greier.

Field trips

Grad school information/helps grad students prepare Theatre/Communication Banquet

Plii

Mu Alpha Sinfonia Row: Nathan Brooks, Brice Willson, Nic Vasqucz and Tom Brockman. Row 2: Travis WilHams, Patrick Hedges, Justin Babbitt and Phillip Holthus. Row i: Scott Johnson, Adam Ewing and Jeremy Barlow. Scott Harvey, Benjamin Front

Kurzava, Phillip ShuU and Paul Mashaney. Back

Chris

:

:

:

Little,

Row: Gary-Paul Robinett,

Nathan C'hervek and Miles Lutterbie.

American Man of Music Concert Serenades Sweetheart of the

month

Pi Beta Alpha Front Row: Keri Fairchild, Alisa Schieber and Megan McLaughlin. Back Row; Katie Tnpp, Yao-Chieh Young and Patrick McLaughlin.

:

Business speakers

:

Field trips

:

Social events

Pi C 'meqa Pi Front Rou>: Jennifer Brunson, Nancy

DLPAKIMLNIAL

:

FBLA judging

:

4-H computer workshop

:

Suit drive

Zelifif,

Taya Moore and Jill Jackson.


Jutlin Bo»rtna

diTM* thr

rite

a(

TitTiny Hartnn*«

mylar balloon. Barton

won

ilv

balloon rare in H 22 iccotufa by calculating

much

how

Wright

would ilow the balloons rate of

awcntion. photo by Mall Fr/e

Network opportunities by Danny Burns and Betsy Lee Inside

Colden

Hall, a group gathered to prepare

students for a career in the chemical science

second year of existence, the Student Affiliates of the American Chemistry Society (SACCS) was one of many chapters nationwide. "Our goal is to present the world of chemistry, In

its

options for jobs atnl educational t>pportunities in a light

everyone can understand,"

The

local chapter paid for half of the conference

One way made money was through mole doll sales. "We're trying to develop new ideas for fiindraising. It's hard to pay for stuff like that when you're a poor travel costs through fund-raising efforts.

field.

Web Director Emily

students

college student," Burdick said.

Students in the group had the opportunity to share

knowledge of chemistry with younger students

their

Buidicksaid.

by volunteering at the Regional

The group anended confererKes held regionally and nationally. In October, members traveled to a

Olympiad.

conference at University of Kansas. In March, five

members Orleans.

traveled to a national conference in

At both conferences

New

leaders from different

scientifK communities shared their knowledge aiul

experience with students.

"We done

Burdick

It's

a great networking opportunity,"

"A

lot

of times

learning. This

is

we

get caught

up

in btx)ks

said.

The commonality of chemistry brought

SACCS

and

an opportunity to give back to the

community," Secretary Kendra Hines

students of

together. For them, the organization

served as a worthwhile group. "I've

met

a lot of people.

It's

really

opened my eyes

to what's out there," Hines said.

said.

Pre- law

'i^M'

HM

Oociett|

Fr*nl

K«ir.- Jennifer

Van Der Steen. Matthew Rrne and

Row Eiwheid. Row 2: Harm

Jamie McLaufihlin and Jeremy Pettinger B4uk Row: Kirk

:

:

:

""

High Science

Jr.

members welcomed the

oppi>rtunity to help with the event.

the

learn about graduate school ai>d what's being

in the fieU.

SAACS

Practice LSAT'i Debate current issue* Tour law schools

y

SAACS

|:7?7


Ts.n Front Row: Rachel Manners, Suzanne Von Behrcn, Courtney Jacobsen and Jaime Van Horn. Row 2: JacquE Serflaten, Cayla Blunk, Carrie Artman, Lori

White and

Lisa Baumli.

Back Row:

Amy Strough, Melanie Burris, Laura Stueve,

Jared Watson, Jarrod Smith and Sarah

:

Pet therapy Children's Center

:

Aluminum can drive

:

Zimmerman.

Pstjcholoqq / oocioloqq oocietij Front Row: Carla Edwards, Lori White, Lisa Baumli, Alicia Shirk, Katie Malloy and Holly Ellin. Row 2: Cayla Blunk, Carrie Artman, Kinsey Acklin, Rebecca

Crane, Shelby Battels, Liz Vostrez, Rachel Manners and Niki Baxley. Back Sarah Zimmerman, Suzanne Von Behren, Laura Stueve, Carla Keller,

Row:

Tara Mullock, Jenna Barnard and Sarah Hitschler.

:

Fundraisers Children's Center philanthropy

:

Speakers

:

PRSSA

A

Front Raw: April Warnemunde, Derek McDermonrt and Renae KroU. Row 2: Kcely Bums and Mary Beth Russell. Back Row: Jessie Mower, Dawn Trent and

ft

Lindsay Geier.

:

:

:

Design department brochures Ro^van Campaign Host etiquette dinner

Mr ^.

'/

^

Kolir

Tiid

IclGvision

Mgws

Uipectops Associaiion

Front Roiv: Jessie Jacobs, William Murphy, Sara Magnus and Jennifer Wells. Back Row: Matthew Armstrong, Bill Felps, Matt Sanchelli and Justin Ross.

:

:

:

DEPARTMENTAL

Taping of Homecoming Parade and Dance Show Annual convention Television station job shadow


Andrea KnowIn. Kjttic MiDoy

and HoUy ElUt Ustati

ti

\\iut

>

UnivtTuty

ii(

tltr

Af-

kanut rrprctcn* ovr J^SCy Wham.

uyi about

thrir

graduace pcnpam.

Wham

taid

Ar-

kanvat (trove to graduair

all

itu-

dents in two yean.

Education after Northwest by Jason Price Student} traveled from table to table gathering

The Psychology and Graduate Student

Fair,

society included a major or

January 30. Eleven programs

sociology and a 2.5

night began in the J.W. Jones Student

Union

Ballroom, where the society provided refreshments for those awaiting the presentation.

move

minor

in psychology or

GPA.

The group met weekly to plan service projects, listen to informational speakers or develop various

benefits of their graduate programs.

students could

interested in the fields of

Sociology Society hosted the

from various universities offered information about the

The

composed of students

psychology or sociology. Requirements to join the

information about various graduate programs.

At the conclusion,

across the hall to speak directly

fundraising projects.

"Our main fundraiser was

leaf-raking.

It

helped out

a lot," Baumli said.

Alicia Shirk said the society provided students in

with irtdividual graduate schools.

related fields

Accordii^ to member Betsy Burgess, the goal of the confercTKe was to allow students the opportunity to

learn

an opportunity to meet one another and

more about

their career fields.

learn

The psychology department worked with the society to offer a scholarship for freshman or sophomore

procedures, such as the Graduate Record

members.

people atteiKkd the event.

related experiences

more about graduate school options and Exam and the interview and application processes. Over 80

*We had a lot more people than expected, especially for a first year thtitg," Lisa

The Psychology

Baumli

said.

attd Sociology Society

was

Other member benefits included actual careerand community support. "The organization allows the members to feel that they have a sense of the job field irutead of just a bunch of classes," Burgess said.

oiqma Alpha

loia

Mary Cntc* and Ebony IV Pcnita I>>o. Libby Jean Whittle and Tracy Ward Rmr ): C'.rrtrhrn L. Whitman. CIrcfthen Englc. Amanda MiUrr and Becky Barton R»» 4: Jrniu Cook. Marlciu Cuhwr, Emily Dennn and Chntanc Grabowiki Bs<k Il0w. Samantha Hildrrth. LaciAnn Fub, Liu Davidson andjnuca SchmaUFr»mt R»w: Sjbrin^ Ncm\Tr. Sjlh- rhinn.

Ktw 2: Jimif

:

:

:

Music Festival Sigma Alpha Iota Philanthropies, Inc. Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia Benefit Concert EHstrict

VW)


Oic iqma Front Row: Karla Strain, Rachael Collins, Angle Van Boening and Joey Rosenfelder. Back Row: Malinda Grant, Karina Walker and Staci Ensminger.

:

Annual plant

:

Biennial

:

Rock sale and "geek"

sale

SGÂŁ Convention card sale

oiqma Pi Oiqma Front Row: Nancy Mayer, Jamie Knierim, Brett Kisker, Lindsay Wittstruck, Kristin Helmink and Steve Shively. Row 2: Kerra Siefering,Jen Anderson, Jon Clay, Keely White and Rebecca Schelp. Row 3: Dianne Schlomer, Amanda

Duncan, Michelle Eischeid and Chris Pelham. Back Roiv: Justin Healy, Skylar Rolf, Chase Cornett and Wayne Frederick.

:

:

Celebration of Quality Fundraising for Autism Research on

Oiqmo

I

Talley, Chris

Campus

an UGlfa

Row Two: Dr. Chanda Sam Farr, Laura Pearl and DaNelle Brouse. Back Row: Amanda Huhmaim.

Front Row: Keri Williams, Kerre Heintz and Jed Murr. Funston,

:

Book and bake sale Round table discussions

:

International Conferences

:

joriefij oi

ProlGssional Joupnalists Front Row: Abby Simons, Lisajosephsen, Matthew Daniel, Marjie Kosman and Jody Strauch. Back Row: Kayt Wahlert,Jennifer Martin,Joe Kiiust, Mcbssa Gahtz and Sarah Smith.

:

:

:

7'?0:B

Women in Media Panel Rake

leaves

Panel discussion regarding the media impact of the Conception Abbey shootings


Company keeps students in step by Blisiered feet were shites.

crammed

Sam

into dance

Eight weeks of practice, costume atuJ

makeup had all heen for one night. The Northwest Dance Company cotuisted of 35 dancers

who performed

harr

According to Hurst, if a student wa* not quite the type to join a sorority or

them

Besides an opportunity to meet people and stay healthy, the Northwest Dance

Mary Linn Auditorium show

Company provided dancers a place to learn

in the

at the

trimester.

fall

Dancers practiced

at

different times during the week.

valuable skills for

company provided an outlet for

dancers' abilities. According to Northwest

iiwlinnilw

Dance Company vice president and

dwDtace Com-

choreographer Julia Hurst, dancing at Northwest provided student dancer

itinn

benefits such as physical

^ ""'

<(tnni

"It's

uni-

on your

vmity tiunn a

way

and

a way to stay in shape. toes.

for

Hurst

me

social health. It'll

said. "I love

keep you it

and

it's

to be involved in the

univenity."

Stucknl Fr*M

Jtvir:

Bahrani-ahi

Manan Scrvtn.

AHIilial, tales

life

outside the

university.

Since Northwest had no dance major or minor, the

pany (how. At dw tunc, Hta•oa wat ptv-

to

twice a year. Each dancer performed in two

dances

Ca««ic Sabftia

dance company allowed meet people.

fraternity, the

"It's

me to open up and do wouldn't normally do,

allowed

things that

I

now being put in charge of so much more," Hurst said. "It's teaching me

especially

a 1

whole bunch of management never thought

1

skills

that

would have to have."

The Northwest Dance Company had no restrictions

on

dancers' size or ability and

wished there were more

men

involved.

Auditions would be for two nights during the

first

week of the semester.

l,S,<i.l

I

Mrgha Mchu and Enuly Hodkin. Truh Lcihrr, Micharl

Kathr>ii Walkini.

ll»w 2: Aihti Novoa. Tiffany

HtKlnun and Ami Mfhia Kami: Brrnt Rrvhitr. Kara Akcn. Krndra Hinc», EnuK ButdH'k and Michael Blum. Bttk R*ir: Michael Puffry. Rick Toomry. Kyle Dally. Travn Knrpp and Juuin In^h :

Professional service oi^anization

:

Regional and National meetings of the American

Chemical Society :

Assisted with Science

Olympiad

!

iipfi|

for fiiimon kesouire Vlanaijenitnl

Frmt

Jtmr:

Kmty

levtK J Mietner

Arklrld. Carrie Lane. Sarah C'aldwrll, Jeiiica Clau<en and

Bsck R»m: Cindy Kenkel. Brett C>Ufgftcnmm and Adrian jatim.

Study sessions Job shadowring Speakers

.--„v,E

CC

^^7


Oludent Fnmt Row:

Alane Dotson, Karina Godsey,

Jill

I 'i('|pTi(

Avsi

(i

Sdens, Bridget Divis and Stefanie

Meigjien. Back Row: Grace Johnsonjadd Peterson, Megan Brown and Khsti Wendt.

Community volunteer activities Missouri and American Oietetic Association Conferences Cappuccino fundraiser

:

:

:

'indents in Ppgc Lntcpppisc Front Row: Ryan Wiebe, Kari Frerking and Nic Jui^ens.

Row 2:

Alyssa Welu,

Danny Harding, Jamie Buchmeier and Blythe Reynolds. Back Rou"; J.R. Houchin.

Access 2000

:

:

Seminar on credit/finance

:

Regional competition

issues

Front Row: Keri Williams, Lindsay Crump and Terryn Lindsey. Row 2: Danny Burns, Christina Campobasso, Mikaela Koile, Ginny Francis and Betsy Hansen. Row 3: Kayt Wahlert, Matt Frye, Betsy Lee, April Warnemunde and Mollie

Cusumano. Back Row: Sam Farr, Ashlee Erwin, Melik Melissa Galitz and Ryan Delehant.

:

:

:

Ercanli, Jordan Starr,

Cover campus and community events Annual Holiday Lighting Contest All-American Award winner

lechnoloqij I hcaTpG hcafpG lechnolc Row: Panela Leung, Amanda Backcnstoss and Melissa Owen. Row Kunkclman and Randy Tilk. Back Row: Patrick Immel.

nstitufe Top Front

Amy :

Technical support for Northwest Dance

:

USITT National Conference

:

Technical support for studio theater in

Auditorium

DEPARTMENTAL

Company

Mary Linn

2:


fK^

1

Musical support by Betsy Lee BehinJoneuf the lai|;nt musical gioupi stiHMi

an orKunization dedicated to

The

organization's fundraising also

helped send Kuvl members lo play with

providing social and fiivincial aid.

NatH>nal lnierci>llegu)(c

Fiom hand picnics to recital icceptions, Kapf«a Delta, a Nonhwcsi chapter of the itatHmal iwganuation Kappa Kappa Psi,

the bond sent seven members to Corpus

offered support to

on campus.

organisations "XXir goal

the musical

all

of the ufuvefsitv," Presideni

Caine Shuck

supported the hands and

l>flta

musical groups

h>'

setting

up

for practices

and conceits, hasting hanquets aivJ dinners

and

pro\-iding rcceptuxts

visiting artists.

The

Rk

senK^rs aivJ

grixip also provided

snacks for the Northwest marchirtg hand

and other

that

1

said. "Plus

feel strongly

activities,

Kappa Delta

marketed Bearcat Maivhtng Pandckxhing

and

» Bcarcal

Marching EWwl CD-Rom.

According to Shuck, one of their most profitable fundraisers

I'm serving something

about."

In addition to serving the band, the

also

participated

in

community service events. Each trimester, members of the group volunteered their lime participating in the Adopt-AHighway program. The group maintained a twtvmile stretch

on Highway

Agnit Kririuit

w>rim-up on fhc

71 north

was the

sale of

III

bind prirticc. Kip|M Kipfu Hti

nice to feel like you're doing

rrgubity anmtird

st>mething to benefit the community,"

convcntioni,

it's

Alysha Atkinson

Kappa

Delta's

bringing along said.

ihcir

38 members met

p.m. Morvlays at the Olive

at 5:30

De Luce

Fine

«u6k1

doll

matcoi,

"SiHer

.Mrrgel.'

phda ky

Xluthyr

Arts Building.

kiUipops.

AUrcd begim

I'rofcuot Sergei

of Maryville.

work, but

Mxophonc

while AsMttani

The highway cleanup is backbrt^king

visiting battds.

To fund

year,

"The organization provides us with many opportunities that arc really ccx)!,"

organization

Kappa

This

Chnsti, Tex., for the event.

Shuck

to serve the music groups

is

Riirul.

Univef^ii

l0l|PPS

FmU JtMr: Anunda MaOon. Amanda BackrntUHt and Lindvay Mornson. BMk K»m:

Sic\Tti

Sakedo, Rcid

Amy Kunkelman and Randy Tilk.

shows

:

Lab

:

Star Search

:

Monologue Night

seriet

Kirclihoff.

rinci

Fmit Raw; Oavid Mtirgan. Ray AndcrMin. Juuin Rin». Matt Sanchrtli and William Murphy Jtvir 2: Rachcllr Wright Jtair J: Chrlwa Clark. Gw>-nn Scbolf, (Gregory Smith, Mary Matu>n. Erin BIcenIr, Matt Michch, Hannah Maura Horton. Rmm 4: Kri\trn Edwards. Stephanie Bizal, AUie Mary Schafer.Jcnre Martin. Shannon Braafhart and Undtey rhorv>n B4Kk R»w: [)ave Allium. Matt Hayi. Hon-atd Datlatt. C'hurk Waller. |ohn Prez2avento. Grant Howard, Ben DitK-h ar>d Nick Watv>n.

Ctanten and

Zarnor.Jill Barkn^*.

:

:

:

Northwest's student filmmaker's organization Create music videos, documentaries and feature filnu Showcases student-made films on

KNWT

KAPPA Delta

m


'^mi^

i

7'?^:! Academics


:

Academics

5.1.

Sessions

A chance at academic success Tower Sta»

BY

With the

goal of providm); student!! every

oppi>rtunitv for academic success, student-taught

many

review sessions were offered for education

The

general

For their

scs-sions, S.I. instructors

practice quizzes. Before a student could teach a session, they attended a scries of

classes.

Talent Development Center offered a series

of classes, called Supplemental Instruction Sessions,

The optional sessions were held

modified the

lecture material in different ways, such as creating

offered strategies

workshops that

and techniques to effectively teachw

peers.

might be struggling with the course work. Classes

Aaron Sickel taught S.I Sessions for Mike Steiner's American History course. Sickel said his students' success was what motivated him to keep working in

such as American History, Economics and Western

the program.

or

S.I.

Sessions.

three

times a week and were designed to help students

Civilisition

1

and

II

held

S.I.

who

Sessions to aid in student

success.

Talent Development Center Director Leslie Spalding said the idea for

S.I.

Sessions

came from

the

University of Missouri, Kansas City.

"The goal

is

to create an

"I really

get excited

The

appri»ch and to

S.I. instructor

is

ownership of the material

being covered," Spalding

To ensure covered,

were required to enroll

the class alongside regular students. all

lectures

and took

S.I. in«irtK-tor K#lli tttul

wiuim

(4 the

tjil

in

They attended

notes.

>

qurtnon durinfc her

trimeurr Kin^Urui tcnrd at (he

Muk jeln'Kh't Ecnnonuci 11 cbu. f*a>

Northwest's

have shown

who A's

Rowiand antwvrt tjr

federal funds paid the salaries of the

and

their tuition for enrollment in the

course.

said.

that course material was adequately

S.I. instructors

see a former S.I. student

Northwest used federal grant money to fund the program.

that

I

session," Sickel said.

environment where

students are helped to take an independent learning really take

when

who was really struggling with the class come up to me after the class is over and tell me that he or she did better because of what they learned in my S.I.

.Wan fry

S.l

for

S.l.

program began

a strong correlation

in 1986. Statistics

between the students

attended the sessions and those

and

who

achieved

B's.

ictturci Siiulcnt* v^rrc

mimii un KrUj Ktiwiiiid 1 rncouragnJ but nor required lo Mtmd the

evening <e*Mon» ^*» ^

.Uiir fryr

Efomnnict II tlucWnIs lake rxitrt i\ S

INblKULIlUN

l^tS


QARD Id IE

OF

GENTS

Statewide Northwest alumni

filled

vacant slots

on the Board of Regents. Assorted backgrounds and professional careers formulated the general, educational and financial policies of Northwest.

Gov. Bob Holden nominated Donald Schneider of St. Louis, a 29 year veteran of the U.S. Secret Service,

and Karen Daniel of Kansas City, a Chief

Financial Officer and executive for Black

vice president

and Veatch Holding Company,

to the

Board of Regents in January. Previously, Board of Regents members were required to reside in the 19-county area.

According to Northwest Vice President University Relations

Tom

for

Vansaghi, Northwest

worked during the previous

legislative session to

acquire the statewide appointments.

President

Dean Hubbard

said the varied

backgrounds of the Board of Regents were

utilized

in every meeting while discussing construction,

finance, education, agriculture, leadership,

development and general management. "Successful professionab to

on the board allow me

go to them one-on-one with questions or to

seek advice, something

I

do

regularly,"

Hubbard

taid.

Clockwix from

left: Juan Rangcl, Jim Johnton, Rita Hanlu, Doug Sutton, RoUic Stadlman, Paul Kluu and Marriott form thr Boird of RcKrnli. Kluic, the uilc Jan tnidcnt rcprr^rntjtive, wa\ j non-voting member, ptwta hy Man

^

7%:|

Academics


#

%

11^1


:

Academics

President's Cabinet

Weekend retreat: outside the cabinet :Hubbarcl's

artsy outlet What

started as a college job

blossumed into

a lifetime

hobby

for

mmmiis

President Dean Hubbard. A carpenter's helper during his college years,

Hubbard purchased his own specialized woodworking equipment 18 years ago.

when

"That's

it

really

became

a

hobby for me," Hubbard said. According to Hubbard, he only

serious

tackles big projects during the

when he

he completed daughter.

summer

II

has more time. Last summer,

He

0|

a large table for his

said the table took over

one month to complete. In

summer 2003, he hoped

to create

another table and a playhouse for his grandchildren. Hubbard said he loved giving his family

handmade

"You show an appreciation by giving them a

gift,"

gifts.

for

unique way to do

; ^^

people

Hubbard

said.

"Giving them something handmade a

1 i

is

it."

Not only did his woodworking hobby provide

uncommon

presents for family

Hubbard used it as an artisitic outlet. Long days at the office were sometimes stressful and the and

friends,

creativity the

him

to find

hobby required allowed

an escape.

"It takes all

of your concentration to

work with a wo<xl lathe," Hubbard said. "You can't think about anything else." Taking

his

mind

off

work

for a

few

hours a week, Hubbard enjoyed using

woodworking

as a

way

to express his

creative side.

^:^

7^?: ACADEMICS


;

iCourter finds his Ace

Porter field swings to relax Though Kent Ponerfield spends more time with

golf clubs,

he

still

"I'm a real outdoi>rs kind-of-person;

one place that

I

his

two daughters than

can enjoy a

little

I

love to be iHitside," Porterfield said.

Porterfield finds relaxation

on the greens of the Moiingo Coif Course. have been increasing

says his scores

Ray Courter, Vice President of Finance and Support Services, and his wife Ace when his son could no Umger house the white-haired German shepherd. As his son nears the completion of graduate schix)!, the two debate who owns the dog. "I've sort of claimed him and he disagrees so we'll have to work that out," tempt)rarily adopted

"It's

solitude."

Though he still

his

occassionally hits the greens to enjoy the outdixirs.

steadily, Porterfield said

he

Courter

found solace in spertding an afternoon outdoors and on the greens of the

Gob' Qiurse.

"Even when I'm having a bad day on the golf course

said.

Courter said his affection

on walks it's

a good day," Ponerfield

"I like

for the

dog continued to grow; the two often went

together.

him

so

much," Courter

said.

"Being out with him takes

me away from

the cares of the day."

:

Hickman's hobby on track As the electric

A

train clicked by,

Jon Rickman watched with a contended smile. when his son

grandfather of five, Rickman's interest in trains began in 1972

received a

set.

"As soon as we got that one for Joel, was h<Kiked," Rickman said. "I built a track and went out and started buying 'em." Rickman's interest in trains expanded to include the history of steam engines m Maryville. To showcase his hobby. Rickman participated m the Faculty Vaudeville and Hobby Exposition. He also held lectures and compiled a booklet on display at the Nodaway County Museum. I

Rickman grandfather

said his interest

who was

was funher compelled by the discovery iM a great-

involved in railroads.

ThvHigh he loved the academic study, Rickman said his primary passion was still

"1

electric

tram operation.

love to operate them,"

Rickman

said. "Especially

with

my grandchildren." CAbnSt

|:t^^


:

Academics

President's Cabinet

'.Taylor While serving his wife

in the U.S.

Barnes

Air Force, Provost Taylor Barnes and

began a collection of Middle Eastern

artifacts.

Barnes studied the Middle East at the collegiate level before serving as an intelligence officer for the Air Force from 1971 to

1991. During this time, Barnes and his wife spent two years living in Turkey. "It

took

me

to

many

villages

where

their looms," Barnes said gesturing to

The from

intricate rugs

all

caught Barnes'

women weave one of his

interest;

these rugs

on

pieces.

he owned 27 pieces

over the Middle East.

"My most

prized possession

Hereke region," Barnes

is

said. "It

a prayer rug that

was made

was once estimated

at

in the

150 years

old."

According to Barnes, the couple's pieces stems from

"Some

many

interest in

Middle Eastern

of the pieces ages.

pieces date as far back as before Christ's time," Barnes

said.

In addition to rugs,

which were Barnes'

passion, the couple also

collected brass and silver

:Bob Boerigter Pictures and memorabilia decorated Athletic Director

Bob

Boerigter's office, reflecting pride in his family.

With

a grin, Boerigter told the story

behind each of the photos

of his sons. Both played football, one at the collegiate level and

one

in the pro-ranks. Boerigter loved to

catch their games whenever

he could.

"We

were lucky when Marc started playing

Btierigter said.

"We

caught almost every

for the Chiefs,"

home game

last year."

Boerigter and his wife sometimes attended three football games

during one weekend.

He

said they

would leave Maryville

after

a

Northwest game to catch their younger son John playing at Willam Jewell in Liberty. The couple would then end the weekend at

Arrowhead Stadium on Sunday. "Watching your son play at Arrowhead is almost the same as watching them play when they were younger," Boerigter said. "The only difference is that every once in awhile you pinch yourself and say, 'This is Arrowhead Stadium.'" Boerigter's passion for the game began with his own career. Boerigter played f(X)tball, basketball, baseball and track at Central Univeristy in Iowa.

Academics


.Tom Vansaghi From the campaign

trail

to

an

office within the President's

Tom

C'abmct, Vice PrcMdcni of UnivcrÂťity Relations

Vansaghi

(.imiinued to pursue his interest in politics.

For Vansaghi, his interest in the

young "I

mc

pj)litical

arena began at a very

age.

don't

know what sparked

it,"

Vansaghi

said. "It's

always kept

intcre-sted."

Vansaghi graduated from Northwest with a degree in political science in 1991

.

He

volunteered to work on Mel Carnahan's 1992

campaign earning himself a

full-time position after

Carnahan was

elected.

President l^ean lobbyist for .ilina

Hubbard

Northwest

mater, agreed.

He

offered Vansaghi a job working as a

in 1999.

Vansaghi, happy to return to his

spent about half his time

on campus and

the other half lobbying for the university. In 2002, Vansaghi

moved The

into the University Relations department as vice president.

position allowed

him

to continue his political career while

participating in Northwest's future. "It's

.ilwav>

;

|

As the 5un gliJcd i>ut t)t sight, beautiful colon lit up the Missouri Advancement Lance Burchett

was part of what he loved aKiut Missouri. came to the northern end of Edwards Street by a MKcr tower to watch the sutuct. "You can see for miles across the hona>n," Burchett said. "It's an said the vision

Burchett often

unimpeded view of beautiful Missouri

sutuets."

Burchett said he foutKl relaxation while watching the sun slowly

docend. After a U>ng day him m touch with future. "It's

a wonderful

the office, watching the sunset kept

way to unwind while keeping you

the smaller things of \

at

life,'

in touch with

Burchett said.

our favonte spot in Maryville." Burchett said.

Taking in the sunset became another way their active lifestyle. Burchett said the

for the family to

^mily enjoyed

all

-nFpo of sports.

As a way ik foffiily

to gain exercise

foutvJ a break

Vansaghi

said. "I've

and

spertd time together. Burchett

from everyday

life

I

growing up, Thrt>ener rarely visited the public

and

watching the sunset.

library,

but took

advantage of a book mobile that visited her neighborhood once a

week during the summers. "Every week I would check out five or six books and read them before the week was up," Throener said. Throener read st) much growing up that when she entered her first collegiate literature course, she had read every book on the list.

"Needless to say that was an easy semester,"

Throener said she spent over 1 5 hours had two or three Kwiks going at a time.

'location.

:antmuc

lives,"

Almost every evening, Director of Human Resources Mary Throener could be found turning the pages of a good book. "I'm an incessant reader, guess you might say," Throener said. Throener's passion for reading began at a young age. While

reading

Burchett. his wife and two sorts rode bikes or walked to the

'It's

macro way of changing people's

vicwcJ that as a positive thing."

:Mary Throener

H.ance Burchett

[â&#x20AC;˘hncbcape. Directs of Universiry

<

a

An

avid reader of

all

a

ThnKner

said.

week reading and often

types of writing, TTiroener said all-time

book was "Michelle Remembers." For Throener reading was a way to relax. 'It's an escape," Throener said. "It's enticing because you can put " yourself in the book and lose yourself in the story and the message

favorite

CABINET

1:207


Geology students Kortni Norgart and Angela

Van Boening trek througli a remote area oi" Alaska during an educational excursion. The trip was ftmded through The National Science Foundation. Emmmger

phony ittbmiflfd by Sltui

Geo Club and 102 River Wildlife Club sell in Garrett

rocks and books

Strong as a tundraiscr during Earth Science week.

A WEEK OF ROCKS by Betsy Lee and Alexi Groumoutis

One department rocked Northwest in

a quest

educate students.

The Department of Geography and Geology sponsored Earth Science Week, Oct. 13-19. Incorporating the theme of national parks, the week's events included a display

Owens

Library and a rock and

at the B.D.

book sale

at

Garrett-Strong.

Geo Club President Malinda Grant hoped the display would spread knowledge about rocks in

various national parks.

"They can mix, intermingle and form new rocks," Grant said. They give you a record of the past."

Students and professors from the department donated rocks and books for the sale at Garrett-Strong. The sale featured rocks from around the world, many donated by

students

who had

internships in the geology

field.

Many donating students were Sigma

Gamma

also

members

Gamma

of the hosting organizations

Upsilon,

Theta

Epsilon and the

Geo

Club. In addition to students and professors

Involved

in

the department, other

campus

organizations, like the 102 River Wildlife Club,

donated and aided

Cllacier as part

program

photo by Christina Campobasso

to

Students record and analyze rock data in Alaska, Students spent five weeks at the Matanusk.i

in selling

items for the sale.

"Money raised during the

sale will

go

to

Improving our facilities," instructor Jeff Bradley

"We need new equipment and we need to be able to provide additional learning

â&#x20AC;˘aid.

opportunities for our students."

Raising money for the Department of Geography and Geology, Earth Science Week activities educated the student body. The library display gave students an opportunity to learn

about native environments, while the rock and

book sale Introduced natural formations from around the world.

.

of an undergraduate research

photo by stibmitled by Suui Ensmitigtr


:

Geology /GEcxiRAPHY

College of Arts and Sciences

Learning applied in Alasiian countryside BY BirrsY Lee

The unttXK'hcJ beauty iiAfrrrd a

unique teiichmK

i)f

tundra and

tilacial

formatiorui

atxl learning opportunity.

Kortni Norgart and Ancela Van Boenint; pursued irtdivhlual research

pmjects

at

the Matanuska Cilacicr, 100

miles rk>nheast of AnchoniRe, Ahuka.

AvMstant

oj

Profess»>r Staci

Under the

direction

EnsminRer, the two .students

.ipphed for underKraduitte research grants with the National

Science Fixindation. NorRart, July

Money from

the foundation paid for

Van EVwning and Ensmjn(»er

to spend five weeks,

8 to AuR. 1 S. studying in Alaska. them a hands-on opp*)rtunity to use

"It ("ives

arrival in Alaska, the students

Vie of the

the top "It tirst

t>f

first

a

days the students were there they climbed to

mountain called Lion Head.

was exhausting hut

really fun,"

Norgart

was the

time we accomplished S4.>mething tt)gether."

their individual research project; they spent the next three

collecting

and interpreting

data.

Van Boening studied the distribution of different rock types on the lower part of the glacier. Through her research she hoped to be able to map rock types on parts of the glacier that couki not be reached.

s;iid

the project to build

siiid.

that she thought the experience

would help

"1

my

can show

students

how

to

work

in the field

and how

to gather data," Norgart said. "That's stuff you can't

really

learn in the classrixim."

students

in a

on

Alaskan experience was beneficial

said the

a personal as well as a lot out of

it.

They

academic

for

level.

get the experience of living

remote area among strangers," Ensmmger

personal gRiwth experience as well as giving

said. "It's a

them professional

tixils."

Providing the students with experience was Ensminger's favorite task as a teacher at Northwest. "It's

said. "It

After orientation, students had one week to develop a thesis tvir

Norgart

Wiis using

Ensmmger

her become a better teacher.

"They get

met up with a group of students from ariHind the country also funded by the tiHindation. The group went throuRh a one-week orientation in which they got to know the area and fellow researchers. I.

"As an education major, she a professional portfolio,"

Ensmmger skills that

they can't apply in the clas.srix>m," Ensmmjier said.

Upon

Norgart collected data on the glacier melting pnxress and

developed an inquiry -based learning model.

the best part of

my

job because I'm r«t constrained to a

classnxMn," Ensminger said.

"It's

a much

more interactive learning

style."

Norgart and

Van Boening returned to Northwest with research

experience and an appreciation for the Alaskan landscape. "It's

so beautiful up there," Norgart said.

Students take

i

brcjk while on

jnd An^cU Vin Buriiig spent

want to go back"

Northwest vuidcnt\ Kortni Nttrgjrt week* in Absk^i drvclopin){ ind i ollci ting

i liikc.

five

ditJ for tllJlVullu] rrsCJrch nrOICCtS- ^4.> lutmiHtrJ

:

"1

t-y

\Ia.i / kim,im^vt

GEOLOGY / GEOGRAPHY

Kmt: John jactibs and Ridurd Fclton Jt«ir Kirrn Htnkcy. Patricu I>rcw*. Leah Manot and Kmcc Koht. Bstk Amt: C^rrgon* Haddock, Frvmt

2:

jcflTBradJc)'.

Ted Gout^c. Mark C?or*on and John

RESEARCH

:203


Jason Mannino aims at aii electronic clay pigeon during rapelling and

Military Science

:

inarksn unship. Students enrolled learned the four fundamentals steady position, aim, breathe control

College of Arts

and tngger squeeze,

ptu^o by Melissa Galiiz

and Sciences

Aim at

new skills BY Position, aim, breath control and

A

squeeze.

man

in fatigues stimulated

first

Marksmanship, required

and

Rifle

for cadets in the

Reserves Office Training Corps

(ROTC). course,

it

Classified as a high adventure

taught students useful recreation

and rescue

The

"But

do

it

for the

initial fear,

was not limited to ROTC students; anyone who needed an extra course credit In the

could enroll.

skills.

James Schreffler,

fall

trimester, not

one of the students enrolled was a part of the

ROTC

program. While looking for

class openings,

instructor,

after they

time and get over that

Rappelling and Rifle Marksmanship

Military Science Department

offered a course in Rapelling

Army

Schreffler.

they don't ever want to stop."

student's physical capabilities.

The

GiNNY Francis and Melissa Galitz

said

he came

freshman

Adam Smoot

across the class

and thought

would be an interesting elective

educated students on the intricate details

it

of shooting and descending from high

because of his hunting background.

elevations.

Once

Schreffler taught the

"We have

freshman

all

the way up to

technical aspect of marksmanship and

seniors enrolled that are just looking for

rapelling, students used a range in St.

a class to have fun with," Schreffler said.

Joseph and a rope course at Mozingo Lake. Before the Mozingo course was

"It's

constructed, students rapelled off Hall. Tlie course

had

after the building "It's

the

Colden

new home

was remodeled.

interesting to

first

to find a

watch them rappel

time because some of them are

pretty scared to go

down

open

The

to

anybody who's

interested."

relaxed atmosphere of the class

brought in a variety of people looking to

improve "This

gonna

skills

and overcome

isn't

a normal class.

sit

fear.

We

aren't

around and take notes over

boring things," Smoot said. "This

is

hands

the wall," said

Janwi Schrefln«T holdi j pi«c nf paper up to )aiiicllc HJuxIcs c>t id ««si licr Ml aimm^ Snidcim niioUcd iii ra))rlliii^ jiu) mjrk«iuii\liip I

pUyrH

20U:

Academics

i

nintciulo ^ainc to prjcticc \hoobiig. pimo hy ,\Muvi

( Hthi.-

Paul Aichenian practice* hn breathing technique in rapeUing ami iiurkMiumhip. Wliile each member of the cla« received oneoii-onc training, trthen watched a imivie. jjk*} hy Mrtnta f AtJi/j


ROTC TRAINS OUTSIDE THE

CLASSROOM BY EMILY DAY AND BETSY LEE For a group of ttudenta,

puÂŤh-upt. sIt-up* and running were eimply part of the curriculum.

order to graduate, platoon membera balanced a regular course In

ROTC

load, three

hours per week

of physical training,

lectures

ROTC

and weekend

military exercises.

According to Maj. Brian Stackhouse, graduates of the program became officers in the U.S.

"ROTC

Army.

attracts those

who want to excel. Those stu-dents who are willing to take on more than the average college student,"

Stack-house

said.

"Physical training

is

Just

one of the challenges." Cadet Platoon Leader Jared Watson said the schedule, which often included rising before 6 was difficult to handle

a.m.,

at first.

"The beginning of the semester was murder," Watson said. "Now get up I

that early anyway, so

it's

easy now." Another challenge for

fairly

the students was a rigorous academic

schedule that stressed leadership

skills.

"The students are the future leaders of America,"

Stackhouse said. "They are learning organizational skills

and

analytical

thinking." In spite of

the program's

Watson said the advantages outweighed intensity,

the disadvantages to iMing involved.

iNSIRUCriON

â&#x20AC;˘zos


GREENHOUSE OPEN SPACES BY MELISSA GAUTZ After three years of renovation,

department moved out of cramped spaces and into new a

facilities.

Karen Schaffer shared General Botany, Local Flora, Taxonomy and Evolution with General Zoology Professor

lab teaching space for

classes.

Space and time constraints

created problems

when scheduling,

setting up and tearing

down

experiments.

The green house used Schafifer's classes

by

was located on top

of Garrett-Strong; renovations eliminated the resource tool. "It was a real hassle, but we had no place else to go," Schaffer said. "With the renovations came the

opportunity to

split."

Construction crews built a new

greenhouse and laboratory behind

Garrett-Strong. Original plans allotted for Schaffer's lectures to

take place

on the

third floor of

Garrett-Strong.

When

plans were

drawn up

to

recreate the green house, Schaffer

shared concerns for bringing plants to the lecture hall inside Garrett-

Strong from the

new greenhouse

during winter months. Schaffer said

tunnel connecting the a greenhouse to Garrett-Strong would have to be built. With her influence, plans were redrawn to

attach a lab to the "I

new greenhouse.

wanted a greenhouse that was

not like any other greenhouse on

campus because our purpose is classroom teaching, hands-on experience and display, Schaffer said,"

The new greenhouse was constructed with a different shape

from other greenhouses on campus,

was specifically designed for and display. Students began the fall trimester in a new it

instruction

facility consisting

of a spacious lab,

an automatic shade block to control sun in the greenhouse, a

room to prepare classroom specimens and a patio with a cement drive to unload botanical potting

examples. "I

whoever made

credit

decision

for

the

department," Schaffer

complex was

really

said.

needed."

206:1 ACADEMICS

this

biology "This


:

Biological Sciences College of Arts

and Sciences

\

V

Gross class, a cut above the rest BY Betsy Leb Slicing gingerly through the skin, the knife sunk

deep into the

Assistant Professor Peter Kondrashov's Gross

Anatomy class spent each class period throughout the trimester pouring over the muscular and skeletal

systems of a dog.

"The

dog's

"1

want

to be a surgeon, so

instruments similar to what

flesh.

on humans

I

after graduation,"

it's

will use

Dean

neat to use

when

I

work

said. "It's also

really neat to kx)k inside a different species."

The only thing l^an disliked about the course was The scent of formaline, a chemical used to

the smell.

anatomy

humaru," Kondrashov

is

very

much

like that of

preserve the dog, often clung to the clothes of students

long after they

said.

the dissection lab.

left

Anatomy met from 10-1 1:50 a.m. Monday, Wednesday atKl Friday and on Tuesday and Thursday

"The whole room smells like it. There's nothing to compare it to," Dean said. "It kinda makes your eyes

from

water

Gri'iss

1

1-1 1:50 a.m. in

Garrett Strong.

In addition to providing knowledge about the animal's anatomy, the class gave students exposure to dissection procedures.

"All students gain dissection said. "I feel that that

is

skills,"

Kondrashov

very beneficial."

if

you get

much

tcxs

Despite the smell. great deal.

of

Dean

it

said

too quick."

he enjoyed the

class a

According to Dean, most of the students

became so involved in the class that they named their Dean and his lab partner named their particular

dogs.

dog, "Bags."

Thad Dean believed the class would be extremely profitable to him when entering medical school after

Dean

graduation. Kondrashov said pre-medical students

her Bags.'"

needed to become comfortable with the tools they would be required to use with human dissections.

Dean and his partner identified the parts of "Bags," working throughout the semester to expand their knowledge base.

Thad Dean luct h» ki]{uI iu gcnihf icpttiU the Uun from the Irg K>nc Mhi\ di\*cct3<w tubjrct Studcnn in (Iro** Aiutomy d»*cctcd the uuniAlt thTou)(bout the wmeAter. ;^*>fcy.Vf«n Fryr

came up

"1 just

said. "I just

"1 find

down and

my

head,"

said, 'We'll call

but

I

know that

it

will

be useful

in the future."

rBIOLOGY

SCIENCES

Mjnlohmcin. Mxlud Smner. Dmd McLa^ibkn. Jjmcr Fiiroot. Ptoma Headky jikI Rjck fnniiL Bmr 2: Tom Spencn. Jon Emmt. Rjchud FwM, jorl Bcmoa and Adam Kn^ip B«ft JImr RjdaanI i=ahoo. Bran HoK. jaan Stcvrm. Koo remft. Sosth and Robcft tXavtum.

with off the top of

the class extremely interesting," Campbell

said. "It's challenging,

:HISTORY, HUMANITIES, PHILIOSOPHY

AND SOCIAL

it

looked

FwM Rmt: tCaim Sdiafin. Cfirfy l>iti umii and Suaimf Frurhi. Kun Haben-an. janene Vtipn mi Phiftp Luodo.

Bstk ftmr.

Dm

ArjATOMY

1:207


:

Music

College ofArts and Sciences

Madraliers entertain at annual feaste BY Betsy Lee

Gslorful Renaissance-style costumes

back auditions performed again for the

and the harmonies of English madrigals floated through the third floor of the

judges and incorporated choreography.

J.W. Jones Student Union.

other part

"One

The Madraliers, commonly known as hosted the annual

part

about vocalizing, the

is

is all

about choreography and

movement," Lanier

said.

me

"Gives

Celebration,

opportunity to see the

Yuletide Feaste and acted as the primary

people coming

entertainment for the event. Donning

them to showcase their talent." Members of Celebration rehearsed from 3 p.m. to 3:50 p.m. during a scheduled class period every Monday,

Renaissance costumes and fake English accents, the Madraliers served as actors

and

hosts.

in. It's

skill level

of

another way for

one of our favorite events," Sally

Tuesday and Thursday. According to

Dunn said. "We pick out an old English

Lanier, every music major was required

"It's

character and are rude to one another all

to

have a minimum of seven trimesters

of ensemble participation to graduate.

night."

According to Dunn, the group had been rehearsing music

"If you're

going to be a music major

you need a medium," Lanier said. "Most

for the festival

minimum

throughout the semester. Maryville had made

of our students exceed the

costumes for the group for 18

Choir, Band and Celebration at the

because they get involved with Tower

residents Juanita English

years.

"She makes them as we need them; this year she made two for us," Director

"We pay

Brian Lanier said.

amount

for the

same time." The group performed

her a small

new costumes

at several

events during the year, including the Yuletide Feaste and the Spring Show.

but she

out of the love of her

The Spring Show was the biggest on-

28-member

audition-only vocal group. Auditions

campus event for Celebration. "It's a showcase of the entire ensemble, features some solos and

consisted of an open audition and

smaller ensembles," Lanier said.

basically does

it

heart."

Celebration was

callbacks.

Those

a

selected for the call-

going to be cool."

:MUSIC Front

Row: Anthony C51son, Rebecca Duniiell, William Richardson and Ernest

Woodruff.

Row:

20?:

Row

2: Chris Gibson.

Sheib

Phillips

Scott Quant, Ernest Kramer, Stephen

Academics

and Pamela Shannon. Back

Town and

Al Sergei.

"It's


Jazz Eniemblr

drummer Juatin

Babbitt

perfomu

for

high

tchool uudcnti during thcjuz Frstival.

Am high school studmn

cimr

and thr chancr to hrar

Northwest

to

experienced bands

for competition

play,

ptn^ hy

Mm

t=ryr

Festival brings

young talent by Tower Staff Yellow school busses

young musicians Johnson Theatmr.

filled witti

lined the parking lots of Charles

High school and middle schosl jazz ensembles from 26 schools participated Festival

March

16,

in

Northwest's annual Jazz

2002. While providing an

opportunity to share perfonnances with ott>er schools, the festival also offered a chance for t>ands to receive

constructive criticism.

Assistant Professor there were six judges,

Bill all

Richardson said

members

this

year

of the Trilogy Big

Band from Kansas City. The judges commented and ensembles on 25-mlnute performances. "I think It's a good opportunity for high school kids to come out and compete and just to experience tfie rated

and Instrumental music Holthus said. "It's also good for recruitment purposes to have it at Northwest." wt>ole jazz atmosphera," vocal

major

Phillip

According to event organizer Jeremy Meyer, high While performing jn t>ld Knglnh trudrigil. Cdcfcnonn Mukikn nar ihcv Kbncv Oleimaon. a vncjl fcmup in thr muac dcpwonmi. prHhrmcd jnniuDy j> chr Yulctxir Fcasr /Ams fc^ Alio F>)r

school and middle school bands came from

»

Yulmdc Fmtr Acccitdmg SaOy Dunn thr grnup parlvd out rolr« prxir to thr irnijnd jctrd in thr

chjractrr thrnufchnut thr rvmuifc. /<^K«p

fry

Ai**"

f^

over

Kansas.

Northwest students were involved with the in

Chrii LiltU, Sabrina Ncmjrcr and Nicole UrK-h, memtwri of lb* Celebration Madraliera, c ou nern m >ild En)tliih jt com dunng

all

the Midwest, including Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska and

a variety of ways.

the event, and the

festival

Many music majors helped run Northvyest Jazz Ensemble and

Studio Jazz Ensemt>le took

tfie

Unn Mgh adwol

stage of ttte Mary

Auditorium for a noon parformanc*. TIm

and middle school musicians also had ttw oppOftunNy

Band perform at the ertd of the day. was supported by ths Music Performance Trust Fund, ths Oapwlmant of Music and

to hear Tritogy Big

The Jazz

Festival

ths North«Msrs "CuNurs of Quality," a program Itat

providsd

money for campus

activltiss tttat

ths "quaHty" of ths institution.

incrsmd


Stuck backstage during the opening show, Christy Campbell contemplates her next chess move. Campbell and fellow

cast

member Eric Abney played chess while

working and performing the production.

Looking into the mirror, Eric Abney touches up his makeup as Christy Campbell prepares to put on hour of irukc-up apphcation transformed Abney frt>m a 20->'car-old to a !>(t-ycar-old man.

270:

ACADEMICS

foundation. C^ne


One month EXPERIENCE MOLDS ACTORS Matt

BY

Beginning in the J.W. Jones Union, recitation of lines reverberated

and

later

on the

stark stage of the Black

Names", the converutions of the audience First-time director Lindsay

Crump had

On

Box Theater.

filled

off the

Fkye

white walls

opening night of "Value of

the theater pnor to a soM-out performaiKc.

the cast rehearse for three hours a night, four

days a week. Using a $40 budget, the cast and crew created a back porch patio for the

"Value of Names" featured three actors, Christy Campbell as Norma, Eric

and Kate McLellan

The performance was

as Leo.

the

first

Abney

acting experience (of

as

.set.

Benny

all

three

actors.

Rehearsals for "Value of

The

first

show

that the cast practiced

plot of "Value of

Leo named Benny

ruining his career.

Norma decided

A

until the

week

stage.

stars

of

were accused of communism. Long-time theater

in front of the

House of Un-American Activities Committee, life

and did lUM see Leo

until his daughter.

to act in a production directed by Leo.

40-minute production, "Value of Names" was presented on the stage of the Black

Btw Theatre

in the

began rehearsing on

r,>.

was not

on the Black Box Theatre

Benny withdrew from public

Performing Arts Center. After the audience

crew broke down their meager

I

It

opening performance.

Names" stems from Benny's experience during the period

McCarthyism when Hollywood partner,

prior to the

three weeks of rehearsals were held at the Union.

before the

The

Names" began one month

pU\rJ

leaving the stage as empty as

set,

filled

out the cast and

had appeared when they

it.

h\ K^tc \1,

1

rlUii attempts lo cnn\infc IWnm'. pU\rii In Fri* ,\hnr\ that hi* djughtrr •!>»

.Ml ihrr€ act«>n pratiicrxi

R»ch«l Mvllcm pratic*« her bnr* dunng juditmned

it

iot three cKiracter

for the

"Viluf

mh«tu arjiummt*

ot'

Nam«"

bciorr thr ihf*»-

juditniin

T«-cnrv people

mlet during the te^ond wxeli nf cUtieA

Theater

1211


Troy Dargin, as Barney, counts m response to a drag offa marijuanajoint, offered b\- Sage

smoked the

Kinibrough, as Bobbi Michelle. Dargin had never

a cigarette prior to rehearsing for this

Red Hot

ot inhaling,

Lovers;"

phctii

it

scene in

took hun an hour and

"The

Last of

a half to learn the art

hy Amarui} Byirr

Construction workers on a hig^ rise Calk over lunch. Mere Mortals was a show with many diflfcrent components from a sexual golf game to a

Mayfly dating ritual,

photo by Carly SpydeU

During the musical Boyfriend, Amanda Backenstoss, Steven Haynes, Nicole Urtch, and Beau Heyen perform \n Act 1.

Backenstoss,

who

played

Madchne,

dance numbers throughout the

212:

Academics

said she

play, photo by

enjoyed the song and

Amanda

Byler


.

Communication Theater Arts and Modern Languages College of Arts and Sciences :

,

Creativity explored tlirougii

performance Thompson.

BY Betsy Lee. Trisha

Leah ScuJencs transfinmed Northwest stages with paint .uvj creativity, inventing the

atmosphere

for a collage of

stxxJent perfi>rmances.

The

C>> the stage of Mary Linn Auditorium, a love story unfolded between bursts of sor»g and dance.

Boyfriend" treated audiences to a

.ind a

comedic

orchestra

full

with a messenger boy

Comfon,

fell

in love

named Tony, played by

Brice

Willson. Both characters were hesitant to reveal their

Red Hot Lovers The Neil Simon play, "Last of the Red Hot

Lovers,"

chronicled a 35-year-old restaurateurs decision to rebel against his uneventful

life

by entertaining the idea of

On three occasions the straight-laced man met with women but was unable to muster up the courage

to stray from his wife.

a simple yet unique look at

one

how three

light-hearted

comedy with

social

"Parallel Lives

was a combination of comedic yet

sencxjs skits written by

Kathy Najimy and

The two woman show took

Mo Gaffney.

the stage of Charles Johnson

play, actresses

Rachel Verick presented

Amanda Mallott and

issues facing

dating, stereotypes, religion

women, including

and stage

brought up women's issues without being bonng

made people want

close in such

st)

yet were able to deliver a said.

Mere Mortals Interactions between

two couples revealed the

inner-

workings of the male mind.

Mere Mortals focused

lab-series play

TTie show,

relationships.

presented in the black box theater Oct. 10, featured skits

ftxir

and 25 characters.

"1 like

to be in a

comedy because

I'm naturally loud,

and outgoing," Sage Kimbrough

said. "I like to

hear the laughs and reaction from people.

environment of a

live

show;

I

I

love the

feed off the laughs."

Names

one evening, actors examined high school relationships and an era of Qimmunist paranoia. In

"Present Tense," the

first

show of the evening,

highlighted the confusion surrounding high school

The show

centered on character

Norm,

played by Brooks Schroeder, and his difficulty interpreting his girlfriend

Ann, played by Hannah

Barfoot.

Real Slow in Jackson

ChiUren chanting,

"I'm a

little

sex-pot" hushed the

drama by Jim Leonard

to be the

Jr.,

in

2002

Frcshman/Tran-sfer Showcase.

students the

opponuniry to expenetKe Ntwthwest theatre.

dunng the

1950s. Directiir Jas<in

spoke to the town of Maryville

still

helped

if

the audience understood McCarthyism,

for

said. "I

me because it

us

played the

the complete

oppiwite of my real personality*." opposite themes of the pnxluctions contrasted

sharply, easing the audience with laughter

them with

and leaving

a serious mes.sage.

Audience members WTrc traasported to another place as "School for Scandal" absorbed

The play rebted the challenges of livit^ in the small

becauK socKTy was

"It

School for Scandal

The annual showcase gave new

Miss,

Abney and a daughter, played by Christy

but the play was really about a relationship between a

The

"And They Danced Real Slow

said the w»>rk

played by Eric

had girl which was hard

audience in the Mary Linn Auditonum. Students chose

McCarthyism affected the relatiixiship between a father,

daughter and her father," McLellan

to listen."

And They Danced

dealt with the issues the play

them

into character's

lives.

Digging into the g»»sip that permeates small ttiwn

ftmt

tbt •nctd'i fair. •• "Bnnit 1.'

m—cw ifag icywfcihiT oCbtM»% tl JJwu i

Thr ca« pnctkcd Hid >>

nnwc vwntk>fln||Bplonr pmauctKm t wuM immm

i

die oHntttm

<wnwMu

Mao-

culture, "Sch»x>l for Scandal" ttxJt the stage of

Linn Auditorium

for

opening night

No%-. 14.

The show

concluded with an aftertvxm performance Nov.

presented.

fgrt

of us became

Campbell.

life.

or in an 'in-your-face' women's rights way," Mallott said.

town o^^Jackxm,

all

amount of time and

The second show, "Value of Names" centered on how

1 1

Throughout the

Daunter

was amazing that

relationships.

issues.

Jack.v>n," a

coukJ have

it

with the same

the lab senes, tot)k the stage Oct. 24.

commentary, "Parallel Lives" sought to discuss women's

"It

Jeff Rix

"Present Tense" and "Value of Names." both part of

life.

Parallel Lives

theater, April

in Maryville

Present Tense and Value of

black-box theater production, "Last of the Red

different personalities influenced over

"It

"It

a short

friendly

affair.

Combining

and

the 1950s, but

2002

on the challenges of dating

Last of the

Hot Lovers" was

Groumoutis.

Hannah Barfoot said. The cast rehearsed for three weeks prior to the Sept. 26 opening performance. The show ran for three nights,

The comedic

wealthy family backgrounds.

A

set in

set in

meaningful message." Bndget Brown

plot.

Polly Brt>wne, played by Sarah

different

been

Aijjci

Picardi

culminating Sept 29.

tempo of traditional 1920s music.

The

having an

"This play was easily

Mara

messages,"

Bo^-friend

Set to the upbeat

St. Clair.

1

7.

The cast rehearsed for wwrks pnor to the pcrfofmance. allowing them to become a ckwe-knit group.

"We had a very ck»e cast." Jennifer Dnver said. "We woHced very good together."

u^ .-,7 Shows

•in


:

Communication College of Arts

and Sciences

**«'lw«^,

Muslim Misconceptions BY April Warnemunde Curious minds uncovered a culture while gathering

based

"The Truth About Muslims: was designed to dispel

No Myths,

fallacies

All Facts"

about the Muslim

As part of a service learning project, assistant Roy Schwartzman's Propaganda Class joined

culture.

professor

with a Maryville High School English class to present the factual program to the community, Dec.

The panel

3.

Muslim students Maleena Mansoor, Mursel Yuzmec and Kaan Ozdemir voicing facts

featured

about their culture and religion.

Host Lindsay Geier believed the lack of knowledge about the religion was an important issue to address. Sije said the

community's response to the program

made the work worth

"We but

it

it.

started planning at the beginning of the year,

was difficult to spilt up tasks equally because there

many

on information found on the Internet. found a web site to use for creating a

"We each

to learn their differences.

we could clear up any misconceptions people have, since especially September 11," Mackenzie Haynes said. Haynes said working on the project opened her eyes to the equality issues that really go on in the world. Schwartzman considered the event a chance to question so

teach tolerance to

all

age groups.

"High school student involvement develops a productive mentoring relationship with college students," Schwartzman said. "It unifies our students with all levels in our community to combat intolerance and promote respect for others." The 25-member Propaganda Class met from 9 to 9:50 a.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday in Wells Hall.

The

class

curriculum was based on the theory

things to handle with an event such as

and practice of the symbolic means of manipulation.

finding the speakers, a location, cameraperson, etc.,"

Students also analyzed verbal and visual propaganda

Geier

campaigns, emphasizing hate speech.

are so

said. "Tl>e

high school students really helped

bridge a gap between the to

community and the

make the event a success." The high school students were

press releases, researching topics

:

Like the rosary in Christianity, the "tesbih," was draped iwcr the Kuran is used to count prayer. Communications' propaganda class held

in charge of writing

and creating questions

MARKETING/MANAGEMENT

Row: Liin Chj Lo, Cindy Kcndcl and Jmct Maru. Row 2: Linda Duke, Doug Rus^l, Tina

Front

CoffcU, Steve Gilbert and Joonas Kishwar. Back

Row: Tom Cx>alier

2n:\

BiUesbach, Russell Northrup, Terry

and Jim Walker.

ACADEMICS

college

a

forum

hy Mutt

illustrating

I'ryv

misconceptions

in the

Muslim

faith

plititoilliistmtMtt

^^^


BLENDED DEB^KTMENIS BY GORKA SANCHEZ an

In

affort to incraaa* and daal with budgat

efflctency

problems,

academic

two

departments became one. During the

fall

trimastar, ttM

Department of Modern Language* and the Department of Communication and Theater merged Into or>e department "We thought it would be mora efficient to have fewer numbara of larger departments than large

numbers

of smaller depart-

ments," chairman Theo Roas said.

addition to budget woes,

In

another reason for the merger

was

the workload placed on the

Modem Languages departmaflt With only five full-time positions,

was still required do outside duties such as

the department to

committee work, faculty senate

and other administration duties. "Modem Languages has to do

more outside

wori( to represent

Ross said. merger reduced the workload, providing for more efficiency between departtheir department,"

"The

ments."

The merger also allowed both departments to exchange ideas.

"Things that the Modern Languages did helped us to Improve, as well things that the

Communication and Theatre accomplished improved previous practices of the

Modem

Languages department" Ross said.

Neither department had to

move because located on the Hall.

In

While

the

they were both

first

tfie

floor of Wells

merger resulted

termination

of

two

positions, a department chair

and

a secretary, the

Modern

Languages department had only bean using a part-time secretary and Interim chair Ross said his rote as chair of ttte merged departments did not significantly Increase his wotldoad: it allowed him to msat

new students on campus. "It makes sense to have speech communication and

modem Ross things

languages together," "We have a lot of

said. in

common that wa dMnt

even know wa

fiad btffon."

INSTRUCTION

:21S


:

English

College of Arts

and Sciences

Artistic expression fuels future careers BY Betsy Lee

With shadows

cast dramatically

on black

curtains

behind them, two students fidgeted in the bright lights

related Groumoutis' thoughts

with a former

of the stage.

"TTiere

Standing alone in front of over 30 people, senior

pieces,"

is

1

read pieces developed in writing classes.

for other people."

"I

was

really nervous,"

Groumoutis

said.

"Unlike with

my own words.

It's

hard

TTiough extensively involved in performance

arts,

Salcedo also

felt

that the pressure was greater because

the meaning of the pieces was so personal.

"You know the

artists

intent

when you

"That makes

it

their personal experiences. Groumoutis' first

piece, a nonfiction essay entitled

Similarly, Salcedo's poetry focused

had shaped him.

C'rai^

"Holding Fast to April,"

Km

For both seniors, the Jan. 16 readings were the

was an excellent experience

said. "It

made me want

Nrlwn. Kim Spradling and

ACADEMICS

first

for

me," Groumoutis

to write more;

it

gave

me

confidence, without a doubt."

During

a senior reading,

with the performance

Reid KirchofT assists Steven Salcedo Salcedo wrote a dialogue poem

his poetry.

that involved three ch3T3CtCTS. ptwtoby Matt Fryr

Hhil Laber.

Front

Row: Kenton Wilcox, David

Sbtcr.

Nancy Mayer. Barbara

Hciiscl.

Beth Richards and Michael Hobb*. Row 2: Paul Jones, Bruce Littc, Amy Benson, Kathryn Broyles and Steve Shively. Row S: Carnal Fry, Jeff L(H)nns, Craig (load and Wayne C-lundlcr Back Row: Brcnda Ryan, Tom

Hardee and C'orey Andrews.

276:

on experiences that

he selected the pieces because

said

ENGLISH

Warner. Ariiiin Miilivam. Ku^wll Schinaljohn and Paul

Fanlcone Biuk Row:

He

time they shared their work with the public.

:ART Raw:

was not important enough

much more difficult."

Groumoutis and Salcedo both read pieces describing

some of

started feeling like the content

"It

read yourself,

you know what you wanted the intent to be," Salcedo said.

attachment to those

"Two minutes prior to reading

said.

he believed they were the most representative of his views.

to be judged."

Front

a lot of emotional

Groumoutis

reading participants Tina Groumoutis and Steven Salcedo

other performances, these were

throu^ a draining breakup

lover.


*

'^

,A-


21£:\ Academics


.

:

AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

Booth College of

AWAY FROM THE HAY

Professional Studies

BY MELISSA GAUTZ almost

After

dacadaa

manager

university farm his post.

Isft

From

19 years of Farm Manager More retired

After service.

Doug

every angle

two

of ••rvlca, a

January 2002 from the R.T.

Wright Farm, loacted

Just north of

BY Bftsy Lee

Highway 71

He worked on the 520 Pan kI<h of sawdust with sim>ke created

h>-

tliMited thrvHigh

the

air,

Students g-ained experience in basic metalworking,

mechanics

class.

The

course was a

I'll

have to teach a

that this class will teach

me

class,

and

1

the correct terminology

recommended the

Dan Chalfant

cixirse.

95 percent of students coming out of high school have no clue how IiMtrucior

ti>

run .itTicullural machines.

JHhyjnJp»cpinn||i»t)oJfciCifinKhtJptnduct.p<Mipfcy.\tinfTyr

to«d>.

fanminor

metal with

ti>

lirv t\^^>

i

to 5 p.m. Access to

welding machines, four metal cutting ttwches and

eight

woodworking

tables gave students the

During class peruxis, students usually took notes on a brief lecture before dividing to

pKxrv ii4'nictJil vnxh in in>-a(Ct\-ieiic

Dm CJultim irmmlcd vuicnn kx to pick up the

(dwrv but nfher i par (Wpherv ;**» fry .Vluff Fryr

work

at separate

stations.

in the class

have

ties to

to take the basic skills back

to the farm," Chalfant said.

as

education of agriculture students.

"They have to perform and

certain tasks for lab

farm.

More

get

real

said.

"They

hands-on

experience."

Stephanie Shumer said she loves the class because,

Conducting

opposed to most of her other courses, the curriculum

experiments on livestock

was hands-on.

and crops gave students

Shumer said. "One make my grandpa proud by knowing

"I'm so glad I'm taking the class,"

my goals is to how to use the torch and of

acres of the farm, maintaining the crops and caring for the animals that aid In the

actually work on the

"Most of the students agriculture, and they want

said that

Chad Etsis filn »\xxi kv ,\tcrKulninl Mrc)unx-\. tlut hr u-ill bm HPd. The JwyMiKKwaft meant to tunihinzc the ttudcnts with mtnng.

On Vine attvmptt

SIX

believe

and how to use everything properly," Matt Schrocr said. Though the class was only required for the agricultural education majors, advisers of other agncultural maji>rs often

Wednesday and Thursday from

opportunity to pursue several different activities.

re\)uircment for agncultural education majors.

"K>r Ag. Ed.

Thomn>

Ringold Agricultural Mechanics Lab every Tuesday,

wcHxiwtirking and welding thnxigh the multi-faceted

agricultural

Students worked on machines in the

mixing

metal-cutting torches.

hacksaw."

Students in the class said they not only appreciated

knowledge gained but also the camaraderie that developed through working alongside their peers.

enrolled

in

agriculture

hands-on

classes

experience with the farm

More described as a living labratory.

"The function of the really to farm Is demonstrate to the students and also help with

More need for

some research," "However, we

said.

produce to pay

to

it."

During More's stay at the R.T Wright Farm beef

went

yields

up

34

percent, dairy yields

went up 38 percent and a

new complex was built north of Highway 71. According to More, the university farm doesn't specialize In one area.

"We that

are diversified in

we

have

all

[livestock] plus grain,"

More said. "The reason being for that is to

accommodate agriculture

student

that

[agriculture]

ali

any

so Is

In

can get what

tt>ey r>e«d liere."


:

STUDENTS TEACHING STUDENTS

Marketing/Management Booth College of Professional Studies

BY BETSY LEE For 15 minutes each

class period, the In-

Group communication

and let students teach each structor sat back

other.

Taking their turn

for International society

in

front of the class, the 36

students

in

havior were required to

make

BY Betsy Le

Russ Nor-

Consumer Be-

thup's

a

group pre-

sentation over a 30-to-

40 page

Clusters of students pushed their desks together and

Marta said. "You can start a business one day and

grade.

next day

After every chapter, students in Janet Marta's

article.

communication and transportation technology,

debated the answers in hopes of securing a better

the

it

thei

could be an international business. Witl

web you could

get hits

from anywhere

in

th

International Business took quizzes separately and

world."

assigned by Northup,

then in groups of four to

covered

good learning method," Marta said. "They are forced to go through the process more than once."

Marta said the goal of the course was not only ti prepare students for international busines opportunities but also to teach them how to conduc

The

articles,

different

theories of marketing.

Northup

said

the

"It's

six.

a

Marta averaged the two

test scores if

the student

themselves appropriately in

articles mirrored the

scored above a 70 percent on their individual quiz.

topics covered

In addition to helping students further

it

material, taking quizzes in

manner on an

"It

in class.

gives students the

opportunity to be

re-

sponsible for an element of the course," Northup said. Northrup said the article presentations benefited the students

many ways, including the development of in

public speaking skills.

"Employers continue to place oral and written communication as the top skills most absent from college

graduates," Northup said. "This project requires both."

According to Northup the goal of the class

was to teach students how to read consumers. "We study what makes consumers buy the things they buy and

do the things they do," Northup said. Jason Hamilton said the class and the article presentations prepared him for a future in marketing. "In

any business

we're going to have to talk in front of people,

so

It's

helpful to

have

the practice," Hamilton said.

cement the groups also promoted

all situations.

opens our eyes to the international world,

teaches us

how to conduct business international level,"

an(

in a professiona

Tony Glover said Marta requirei

In addition to course material,

teamwork.

"They learn how teams work, which

is

essential in

The method was a change of pace for students who were used to taking quizzes completely separately.

we

more in the end," Lindsay Smith said. "Some might have understood something that another one of us may not "By discussing

it

together,

students to read the Wall Street Journal. Mart; believed that In order to be successful in the cours

the business field," Marta said.

and the business world, students needed to h constantly updating their knowledge.

learn

Dave Wjtacre and Nicholas Verdi search taking their group quiz.

The

for an

answer whil

International business students

taking their second chapter quiz,

have."

The

"It

photo by

wer

Matt Fryf

International Business course's focus was a

requirement for

all

Marta believed the

"The world

is

business and advertising majors. class

was extremely important.

becoming smaller because of

Members of group three ^vork on their chapter two assessment Assistant Professor of International Business Janet

an individual quiz and the group quiz,

phoio by

XUn

Marta average frye


MATHEMATICS Um Chi Lo, Cmdy Kendcl and Janet Mana. Rmt 2i Unda Dulu Doug Ruttcl. Tnu Co<&h. Sirve GUbcn and Joonat Knhwar. B4tdt Fnnt R»m:

.

MANAGEMENT ENCE

Rmm Tom C!aalicr

BUlnbach. RuikU Northrup. T<Tr>' and Jim Walker.

i^iitamimtUimmi^mim

MANAGEMENT -.221


:Mass Communication

Booth College of Professional Studies

TV Practlcum produces experience BY Tower Staff After a one-year hiatus, television practicum students brought hack a

new

set,

game show with plans

for a

format, schedule and host.

Produced by

Nower while Kenton McDonald

delivered the questions,

judged contestant's

host Curtis

is

like the

its

the

a great hiwt," Fclp.s said.

According to

Felps, the

comcdic duo fostered a

lighthearted wi>rking environment in an atmosphere

of total goofiness.

"Even when we have hard tapes and hard sh(x>imgs, it

is

we

the fact that

are all practical jokers

and

Behind the scenes, the show required many hours

pretty simplistic," Felps said.

Newlywed Game, only

for

of preparation. Each student signed up to work on one

roommates."

show and oversaw commerciab, promotions and

show aired bi-weekly, but due to positive audience response and contestant abundance the producers decided to offer a weekly time-slot. The show debuted in the spring with a new

Meanwhile, those

In previous years the

set

depicting a trashed dorm-room.

Roy Anderson

SIX

in charge for

mx Bill Mia laaftu s the hou of the thow cntrrtunt thr

iiKfarncr.

WUc ibooangtfacff in ihow. the cnw went through three

dn'-nim he^hre he^cmning f3nunf(. ^Artk> fry Aiw Fr^

sales.

each show spent about

and a half hours formulating questions, setting up,

taping and editing the show. Despite the hard work, those involved with the show said the experience

was

priceless.

"With TV, the whole thing Prud

all

goofy people at heart that makes even the worst shoots fun," Felps said.

respÂŤ.>nses.

"The show's format kind of

fall,

is

I

and Jennifer Wells, the Rixwnate Game on KNWT Channel 8 pitted three pairs of roommates against each other. The contestants guessed how their rot>mmates would answer pre-

"It IS

"Roy

Bill Felps

determined questions. In the

McDonald

new hoM. "And Kenton has great dry Seinfeld-esque humor, and love him for it." joined veteran judge

experience to

make

Bobby Gumm said. your resume,

it's

it

is

making

it

real,

getting

look real," Station Manager

"If people see

a great thing."

the producer

title

on


GRANT ENCOURAGES RESEARCH BY GORKA SANCHEZ AND BETSY LEE

A national grant gave students the opportunity to determine services the community might find beneficial.

The Department of Family Consumer Science received a National Undergraduate Research Grant

in

the

fall.

National

grants from Kappa Omicron Nu, a national

consumer science

honorary, were used to give students research experience. Five undergraduates used the

what the department could do to meet community needs. "We're trying to determine residents' comfort level with receiving services from family consumer science students and faculty," team leader Kristi $1 ,200 grant to research

Christy said.

The department could

offer

services in the areas of nutrition, child development, parenting

and housing services. According to Assistant Professor Lauren Leach, the students mailed out

500 surveys to the Nodaway

County population. After the were completed surveys returned, the group planned to

compile the data and write a plan

concerning a possible course of action.

"We will

present

of our college

it

to the

dean

(Max Ruhl)

to

support fund-raising efforts," Leach said. "Also, we would like to have our team report this at a national undergraduate research

conference." In

addition to using the

money

for research, the remaining

money from Kappa Omicron Nu would help fund student "This

money

will

trips.

allow us to

•end a couple of students to conferences so they can get information and report

it back to Leach said. The national grant expanded

us,"

student opportunities, allowing a

•mall group to gain research experience and a chance to travel to national conferences.

SiudenU Tyler Sidwellan and Corey Lonjer

Emily VanBiuldrk rhythmically pounds on

harmonize, liclping raise iiu>nc7 fi>r C^np Quality. (tiKJc ( >tit fi*r (!amcr wa\ a benefit event ftir tlie uiiiuner i amp ittt kuK Willi i anccr. iitaAo hy Matt Vryr

bonjfM, accc'oinpanyin^ Shane

Met jisey

her

and l>ivr

t :lislxT im hannoiiK'a. Elevni Kmups tixik tii tlK «a){e for

lUxk Out

for C'aiuer. ptvto

fry

KUtt

l-ryr


:

Family Consumer Sciences

College of Education

and

Human Services

Rock out for cause

and learning experience BY

Tower

Staff

Peep jjuitar riffs and the rhythmic pounJinK of drums shook the Conference Center, Oct. 23. Rock Out for Cancer, an event organized hy a class in the Department of Family and Consumer Sciences, was a showcase of local talent,

performing for

a charitahle

petting zoos and talent shows at

no

Donations from outside groups and companies kept the camp cost.

running.

The

Issues

Family

in

Consumer Sciences

class,

and

taught by

Assistant Professor Lauren Leach,

worked

to raise funds

toward one

charity each trimester.

cause.

"We decided

Bands and individuals reading

to pick

poetry took turns gracing the simple

as

stage.

pain in the butt.

Camp Quality

our charity because cancer

is

a real

We

admire the from it but still

variety of the groups kept things

who suffer move on with their lives," Gelma Fontaine said. "We just thought of

interesting."

the kids."

"1

loved hearing the different local

bands," Kylie Kaipust said. "The

Rock Out

money

for

for

Cancer helped

Camp

Quality.

for this group's efforts

The

raise

goal

was $500.

Near Stewartsville, Camp Quality Northwest Missouri is a getaway for children with cancer where they can enjoy horseback riding, canoeing.

:FAMILY Frmtl

kmw:

France^ Shiplo-,

l.cM h. IcncU ('uk and

Suun

children

Leach said she was excited about the event and

"My

its

ingenuity.

students never ever cease to

me with how creative and adventurous they can be," Leach said. "Every time think something can't be done, they do it." surprise

I

AND CONSUMER SCIENCE

Ann Rfmlcttc and

Pjt (irtw*

BÂŤdk RÂŤv: Drth <ioodgr. Ljurm

Bikrr.

:225


:HPERD College of Education

and

Human Services

1

Group dynamics by learning the ropes BY April Warnemunde

Helping people conquer their

fears,

students

discovered the meaning of leadership, patience and

compassion.

at Its

under the recreation department. The

Mozingo Lake, was originally offered popularity caused

"A

it

held

class,

in the

summer.

to be available year round.

facilitator helps a

get from

one place either

physically, socially or

of the class was to

combine

theories of

NEBS

it

seemed to be

I

signed up

physical, but

and cognitive,"

Students learn to

tie

The

knots, secure in a harnesses

and

climb properly. Students also learned a wide range of social

all

skills.

Dealing with people from a variety of age groups, learning how to encourage people and boost motivation

four

and

it

Jessica

and

would be

it

get out there

trust these

domains

lessons

thought

I

when you

works

later in the trimester.

were needed to

skills

facilitate a group.

dynamics and learning through hands-on-training in

knowledge they would need

local

a purely physical activity,

many mental and emotional

a parks and recreation environment. Dealing with group

class.

class started

through the course.

Although

have to climb

The beginning of the class gave students the technical

the class focused on.

were mastered the

The class set up a climbing wall, climbing tower and rope course. They then guided different groups like the members of the Tarkio Academy and employees

therapeutic recreation and experimental education in

the outdoors were the basis for the

skills

skills

up an obstacle course that challenged

"When

said.

The purpose

these

groups.

from

group of people or individual

emotionally to another," Associate ProfessorTerry

Robertson

Once setting

Starting in 2000 Northwest implemented a facilitator class

were some of the

Tmgwald

you

life it

emotional, mental

said.

learned by students reached

farther than simple knot tying. facilitating class

strictly

realize

people with your

like physical,

skills

and

Members

helped people conquer their

of the

fears

and

discover a greater appreciation for patience. Dcrik Brady. Mitch Himer, Rcnee Wilmis and Erica Gilmorc climb the Alpine Tower which cost $125,(X)(I to construct. "It was nice to sec students in a different setting other than a classrotmi," Associate

Professor Terry Rocrtson said, photo

by Tcrryn Lindsey

CUKKICULUM AND INSTRUCTION FnmlRom: lUunnc Siillicini. Margaret Drew, Barbara C.rossland and I'atru ja

226

Academics

Thoinpvin,

C:arol

I'rccti

Suppal Back Row:

Tjccrdsnu, Shirley Stcffcns, Jacqueline Wilson and Nancy Kilcy.


A LIGHTER LOAD by Danny Bums Students found the new â&#x20AC;˘cadamic catatogt to be a IWla Hghlar as soma ganarai â&#x20AC;˘ducatlon raquiramanis wara cut from ttta 2002-2003. In February, tha

Board of

Ragants approved tha removal of tfiree general education classes. Studentsusing the new catalogs no longer had to

Using Computers, People and Cultures and

take

Lifetime

Wellneaa.

Combined, the classes totaled 10 credit hours.

"The opinion of students that

is

then

It

If it

is

a

Is

easy and fun,

good

class," Dr.

William Waters said.

"It Is

now easier to get out of here earlier;

however, there

Is

a

lot

say about a student

to

approaching

this as a full-

time job and learning a

lot

of

different things In a safe

environment"

According to adminimore

stration, in order for

students easily be able to transfer credit hours from

school to school. Northwest

needed

to

match

their

general education require-

ments with other state schools. Northwest faculty

and administration formed General Education

the

Advisory Group. This group

developed

the

42-hour

general education require-

ments in place. Students had mixed feelings about the reduction

of credit hours

and tha

classes removed.

we have 10 general education classes because it's less "I'm glad that

less

work for me and the freshman," Curtis Kagagan said.

Lisa Slater said the

committee should have kept Using Computers because the curriculum was something that all students will need in the future.

Northwest still offered Using Computers, multiculturalism and Lifetime Wellness. However, the number of aactions avataMa

was

limNad.


:

Psych / Soc / Counseling College of Education

and

Human Services

Learning from the masters BY Betsy Lee Students considering a psychology major had the chance to pick the brains of three individuals pursuing graduate study. Issues in Psychology, taught by Carol Claflin, was intended for

undergraduates considering the major.

The

class

curriculum was

designed to give students insight into the study of psychology as well as career possibilities in the

field.

where you go in and learn about psychology," Keely White said. "We've looked at careers, the APA (American Psychological Association) and what psychology is all "It's

not

just

another

class

about." Claflin said the class was developed through feedback from senior

seminar

classes.

"Students wanted to know stuff like how to prepare for grad school before they are seniors," Claflin said. Inviting three psychology graduate students to attend her 8 a.m.

and 9 a.m.

classes, Claflin

hoped the students would benefit from

the experience of the older students. "It

was helpful because they had people at different stages through Ben Stone said. "She had someone who was working

grad school,"

toward their Ph.D. and another

who was just starting grad

school."

said listening to the panel encouraged her to begin

Keely White looking at getting accepted into master's program. "

I

liked

how

go into," White

they talked about the different programs you could said.

In addition to providing students with information about graduate schools, Claflin strove to assign meaningful assignments like career

development worksheets, resume building and academic career planning.

"We had

to plan out our classes for the rest of college for an

assignment," Heather Ingram said.

work

will

pay

"It

was a

lot of

work, but the

off."

Claflin said classes like Issues in Psychology would be helpful for

students in any major.

White

said she

recommended the course

to

any student with a remote interest in psychology. "Anyone who doesn't know whether or not to go into psychology or not should take the class,"

White

said. "It helps clear

up the

indecision."

graduate panel, April Haberyan addrettei j ihicmkhi yÂŤncii by ntlicr wnnicii iiukinK up the (jrjdiulc panel, thr iimtcd ID sprik tii ( :jrnl C:bfliii's Iwucv in l'\ych<)log>' i bw. yfann hy M.m l-ry

Member of the

Kccly While. Hjlxryjii joincii two

group wn

22g:| ACADEMICS


'iTLniJLUljI

VZl"^


:

(

'1

I

^'

e.%

-J^'

/

J

/

t..

2^!-^ 230;

Academics


:

Horace mann

Education and Human Services

Lab school provides perfect fit

1 BY

Mhjssa Gautz Wt)bhly kinJcr(r<irTncn> wearing roller-skates waited

hy the numbered walls. F(.>am dice determined wiHild get a treat Âť>n breaks

between oldies songs.

education students at Horace

Phy'sical

who

Mann roller-

According to Director of Horace Carole Edmonds, for

who

Mann

School

has worked at Horace

Mann

seven years, more individual assessment and

instruction resulted in the mixture of children.

skated for two weeks as part of their curriculum. TTie

"If you

have a learning

disability,

we can work with

labtiratory schtxil used "rrt)ject Fit," a physical

your strengths and weaknesses and overcome

education program, to build endurance and strength

Edmonds

in the children.

instructor at

Horace "1

love

According to physical education

Mann had

them

never skated before.

to experience

"Because we are a lab

new things," Scott said. we do have a lot of

schix)l,

Horace

community members and surrounding towtwpeople. More than 180 students represented various cultural and stxio-economic levels.

in

Mann students. Juniors and seniors

teaching kindergarten through sixth grade while

"On

i

liiUy

fJttmlyMt^ua<',alu:

Hrafxion Wr\brr\%\ t'Hnncr Jacotnrn, Chri* MdDowvIl, A.J.

MilMiUuntan, and Adani Mc.Manaman Hmbo w lulc ntilcrvlLjtuig niyucal Edtx-jCHNi cbÂŤ. Acciictltng

Viio iium ihikhrn hid

ii>

Htincc Mjjin tcathcr (iiru

ix-vrr Uiatrd hcliirr. iJi*j hr AfWttu

day-to-day basis

a

t

^z.-

1

get to

unique situation for me," Edmonds

new

challenge and a

Eduomwi inonjcitir ( *nu Sam hiird gndiucr

hdp the kindrrycutm cLn\ bcc \lutr%.

a

work with

elementary and college students both. That makes personal satisfaction

Mm mu co puU o(T her ruUrr %lutc wiihout

itiora^ her Ux^. Itn-ucal

in

you want to go."

enrolled in an education practicum spent eight weeks

teachers educated the children of

profesKirs,

nx)cnr\ h>

it,"

take you as

receiving academic credit.

Mann

Sydney Boyle

we can

Elementary education majors took part educating Horace

opportunities."

I

far as

Gma Scott, most of the kindergarten class

said. "If you're gifted,

1

get

said.

from every day

is

it

"The a new

experience."

The National Council for Accreditation and Teacher Education (NCAT) and the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education (DESE) were alsti satisfied with Horace Mann after they judged the teacher education program.

"They came was

in last time

a 'treasure,'"

Edmonds

and

said

Horace

Mann

said.

HORACEMANN :2J1


Exhibit

showcases UNIQUE SITUATION BY BETSY LÂŁE In a rare

instance of role-

reversal, students had the opportunity to view and critique their professor's work.

Seven members of the Art Department showcased their work at an exhibit in the Olive De Luce Gallery from Jan. 1 3 to Jan. 31. "It

offers students a

chance

We

preach

to

see what we do.

to

them

in

classes about what

they should and should not do.

Now they can

see

if

there's

any

proof to what we say," Department Chair Kim Spradling said.

Throughout the display students were invited to put comments and questions in a box; faculty held a questionand-answer reception Jan. 27 to

respond. "It

was good

to give

them an

opportunity to ask questions,"

Spradling said.

"I

think

it

easier for them to ask friendly,

phere In

was in a

welcoming atmos-

like that

one."

addition to answering

questions about their exhibited

work, the professors fielded personal questions about their experiences as an

"Being an

artist.

artist is

one

thing,

but there are no galleries that are going to find you." Assistant

Professor Phillip Laber said.

"If

market your art you're going to have to find It

you want

to

yourself."

Over 50 students attended the reception at the Olive De

Luce Fine Arts Building. Art major Gara Lacy went because she wanted to hear more about her professors' individual art philosophies. "It's so Interesting to see what they do during their own time," Lacy said. "They are in class with us everyday, and we have no Idea about what they've

accomplished."

\


.

Academics

:

Studio Work

Art Students

home BY BETSY Lee Beneath where scons a( students clxtttxxMns, art majors

and minors

sat attentively in

toiled

day and night

Under the Olive De Luce Fine Arts Building was

a

maze of personal studios and worknxims. The basement

became

a

second

home

for art students

who were

required to spend at least three hours of outside

work

a place where

my

up

I

can get creative withcxit messing

house," Michael Poner said.

meditate and get into

my

hang up my pieces becaase

"I

step back is,"

and was personaliied

feet

CD players, pictures and pieces of artwork. wanted to be able to

I

and see how the colors work, where the teasion

Porter said.

In another section of the kisement, itdvanccd cenimic

students had studios with workspace ;ind a potter's wheel.

per credit hour of an classes. "It's

approximately 8 feet by 10 with couches,

seeking perfection.

»%

sectioned off in a cubicle-like fashion. Each studio was

"I feel like

I

can

final product.

art better."

Students, like Porter, with a certain credit hours were assigned a studio.

Advanced Ceramics student Jina Jenson said she often worked with one piece for hours trying to perfect the

number of

The

art

studios of

painting or drawing students were in a large rcKim

"St)metimes

have

I

sometimes the clay will

a notion of tell

jenstjn said. "I basically

me,

'I

what

want, but

I

don't want to do that,'"

the clay talk to me."

let

After shaping a piece, ceramics students often spent

over 16 hours in the basement firing

it.

"You have to check the pots once an

between you

try to sleep

Minnetta CNeil

CNeil

time in the

in

said.

firing

can be exhausting: "But

it

little less

and glazing rooms.

home and spend some said.

st>

often worked with jenson while firing their

This allowed the students to spend a

pieces.

"It

htxir

on one of the couches,"

will all

now,

like right

time with

my

all

I

want to go

husband," Jenson

be worthwhile when we come back

tomorrow and unload." Adjacent to the advanced studios, beginning ceramics students worked

on wtxxlen tables in a

large

open room.

Nick Bn^mert estimated that he spent 20 to 30

week working "It's

fast

just sit,

you're working

work and

listen to the radio."

According to Assistant

"This cat ate

spent

Pnifiessor Russell

Schmaljohn,

students needed to invest the kind of time

spent working

iXb.^

said. "The time goes on .something like thts. We

enjoyable thtxigh," Bromert

when

all art

htxjrs a

ixitside of class.

pot.'

it,"

Bromen

his art.

not the type of thing where you can

IS

my

on

on

It's

very evident

how much

say.

The

time they

Schrnal)i>hn said.

Despite the hard work and k>ng hours, students like Mil

nmir »i>nun vitringon i fril like hn »txKi»o wj$ bcDBuanit Co fed bkc hooir brrjmc of h» pMxn of hung atmnffc I

li.»rl

t

I'ortrr* hruth ttroke painii

"

.

h-iir

Jenson found time in her studio to be therapeutic.

j

Porter uid h*

"It's

my warm fusy.

said. "It's (ust

I

feel

pxxl when I'm here," Jerwm

amazing to take a wet

ball of clay

and

create something."

CNcil Oramirt MtMimI Tammi Smtlh pctpiw

m t«i

c luted

um jad Iqt

to tjurn

>

tbb on

said her time in the

basement of the buikiing

gave her a chance to knead out her problems with "It's

cheaper than a shnnk,

let

me

tell

clay.

you!" O'Neil

/*•» ^J viui hrf.

said.

:233


:

Academics

Academy Graduation

Pathfinders

walk into tiie world BY Melissa

Gautz

While worries of leaving loved ones and carrying full most teenagers, students of the Missouri Academy of Science, Mathematics and Computing graduated with a high school diploma, an

The framework of the academy forced students to focus on classwork. The Pathfinders were required to take chemistry, biology, math and an English course every

and two years of college life experience. The concept of the academy was introduced in the late

students proved themselves with a semester 3.0 grade point

class loads afflicted

associates degree

1980s, but not established until University President

Dean Hubbard presented the

idea to the Missouri state

legislature for funding. Forty-one students enrolled in the

of 2000; 30 remained by graduation on May 25, 2002. According to Academic and Collegiate Adviser Diana Schmitz, names were given to each class entering the academy to differentiate between first and second year students. The first group entered the academy as fall

Pathfinders followed by the Pacesetters to graduate in

2003 and the Explorers to graduate

"They

really

group of students to come through," Schmitz

said.

"They

came unknown, they didn't have other students to talk to, to see what the Academy was like." While the Pathfinders walked blindly into the world all

of college at 16 years old, they found gratification after

graduation. it

was the best decision

she made. She didn't realize what a unique experience the University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

Unsatisfied with a high school degree and an Associate's Degree of Science from Northwest Missouri

went on

to higher education.

first

As

a

graduating class

freshman

at

the

University of Illinois, Askreen reflected on the impact the

Academy had on her

more independent,"

Askreen don't think that I could be living eight hours from my parents if 1 hadn't gotten used to living away then."

23^:1 Academics

Given

1

it

taught

wanted," Askreen

to study

said.

a rigid structure of rules to live by,

academy

curfew, had regular check in times, had to stay within

campus boundaries, and weren't allowed to walk into any other residence halls but their own. just

been given

a lot of

really feel like they've

freedom," Schmitz said. "Other

come in and say, 'Whoa, I gotta check in?'" While the Pathfinders wanted more freedom, breaking the rules did not comply with their future plans. "To do things that you were going to get caught for, it wasn't worth having to leave," Askreen said. "By the time we got there, realizing what a great opportunity it was, it students

wasn't worth pushing

it."

Rules and college level course work proved a challenge

some enrolled in the Academy. According to Schmitz, some straight-A students became B students. She saw the for

possibility of graduating as

with a lowered grade point average

having a lasting positive

effect.

"Our students are so well prepared when they leave here that they can be successful wherever they want to go." Schmitz said.

future.

"I've definitely learned to be said. "1

think that

students had an 8 p.m. weekday and 10:30 p.m. weekend

it

was going to be until she graduated and began attending

State University, 100 percent of the

me how

and how to focus "Sometimes you have to give up things you would traditionally like to do in order to get to things that you want more in the long term." "1

on what

"Some students come here and first

academy

average.

in 2004-

were the Pathfinders; they were the

Pathfinder Mary Askreen said

semester. Electives were allowed only after the

Academy

graduates laugh while the Student Government Association Thomas Taylor spoke of "Pathfinder reflections" at graduation. Of the 41 students who enrolled in the Missouri Academy of Science, Mathematics and Computing in the fall of 2000. 30 students graduated in May of 2002. photo by Melissa dititz President Brandon


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Doctoral expansion by Betsy Lee and Alexi Groumoutis Northwest offered graduate

students

variety

a

of

educational venues by teaming

up

area

several

with

universities

and colleges.

The educational leadership doctoral program at Northwest

continued

its

partnership with

the University of Missouri, Missouri Western State College

and North Central Missouri College. The partnership allowed students to move toward degrees by taking classes in a variety of locations.

Director of the Doctorate

Program, Professor Frank Grispino said the program was designed for students working

toward a degree

in

educational

leadership. Although classes

were offered

Northwest,

at

Missouri Western and

NCMC,

graduate

in

students

the

program were required to spend two summers on the University of Missouri campus Columbia.

in

"They get experiences with students from

which

is

all

over the state

a really rich

rewarding

experience

and for

The program accepted 10 to students each year.

15

Applicants went through a rigorous screening process references,

interviews, a demonstration of

minimum

leadership and a 3.5

grade point average. According to Grispino, students

were also

required to attain a certain graduate record exam score. Participation in the

program

gave students a greater chance for success within the workplace.

"Most of our students are better Jobs

in

once they finish the

program," Grispino said. Giving students an edge on

thÂŤ job market, the doctoral

program offered a convenient opportunity achievement.

for

required his students to for her presentation

make presentations about different cultures;

Gaa prepared muhammara,

a

dip used with

pita bread, photo by Matf Frye

them," Grispino said.

requiring

Maryville High School student Stephanie Gaa distributes middle eastern refreshments during Thomas Alvarez's Human Cultures course. Alvarez, a graduate student and high school teacher,

academic

Graduate student and high school teacher Thomas Alvarez etnphasizes the importance of not plagiarizing. His American History students were presenting their findings on topics covered

m the textbook, photo hy Matt Frye


:

Graduate Studies

Thomas Alvarez

Graduate program offers various options BY Tower Staff

A

pan of Northwest's academic curriculum

since 195),

the gntduaie pri>f!ram's flexibility and expanded learning (.>ptions

allowed students to work on a degree while

still

he laughi

advantage of these opptmunities;

tix>k

ai Mar^A'ille

High Schtxil while working to achieve

his master's degree. Alvare: received his undergraduate

fnive

working students.

"A development

participating in outside work.

Thomas AN-are:

Graduate Pri>gTam Dean Frances Shipley said the graduate program was making strides to he more convenient for of more blended programs which will

be a blend of courses taught on-line, distant education and traditional face-to-face," Shipley said. In addition to

expanding learning options, the program

degree in history frinn

Northwest and returned for his master's

spread into other communities. Helping to increase

after teachit\g in the

Los Angeles area for three years.

enrollment, the graduate program's newest center was in

"I I

was out there, and

came back

and

realized

I

I

liked the

Midwest

here, saw a job opening in Maryville,

got that," Alvarez said. "I also

my master's." He was slowly progressing

I

better.

applied

wanted to continue and

toward his degree, taking one

"I'm just doing the

Wednesday night

than that," Alvarez

1

don't think

said. "I

I

class right

now

could handle more

have to focus on the teaching

In spite of

spending much

of his

life in

school, Alvarez

did not regret his choices.

It

very lucky with

my program

coming from the

the program. Shipley thought the success of the graduate

program was particularly evident

in the educational

leadership alumni. all

the public school administrators in this

geographic area have been graduates of Northwest," Shipley said.

at

Northwest because

kind of works specifically for me, someKxly who's working

as well as

wanting to go to school," Alvarez

program

tailored almost perfectly for

is

is

The graduate program continued to grow as new locations,

"Nearly

part."

"I feel

greatest area of growth

learning options and degrees, were being offered through

class for the year.

because of the teaching;

"The

establishment of new off-campus graduate centers," Shipley said.

get

Wednesday

Kansas City.

someone

said.

like

"The me."

Thomu

Alvarez, graduate tludrnt and Maryville High School War to hÂť Ajiirrican Hntory cUÂŤ. Alvircz ijught cUs^c* everyday until U a.m.. then had lunch duty and later returned to the clawroom to teach one more cbw. pkMo hy SUn I'ryt teacher, explains the Mcxjcan-Amcncan

Graduate 1:237


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;IUtU HAnUUt^t^

:Jt>tL

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fttiJMOfv

React to the people that formulated the

Ja^M*

spirit

Northwest. You interacted with them on a daily

-.MtliMa OavUc^

and attitude o basis,

leamini

and growing together.

Your nerves heightened during a heated debate. Fueled contrasting ages, cultures, interests and beliefs,

b

human interactior

aided understanding.

You created the personality of Northwest by bringing you experiences to campus.

dancing in

Whether your adventures brought you fron

New York or leading safaris in Africa, your aspiration:

brought you together. Working your way through school as

i

waitress you unexpectedly receive a $100,000 tip to put you througt

school.

Your ambitions to grow

Kosovo and helped

as

an individual worked toward peace

ir

autistic children.

Varied interests broadened your mind as you reacted to th< passion of people.

A

line

of

stiuh'iits u'ciitiiiji to rcliiri

textbooks snakes inside Textbool Seruices, Dec.

12. Stuiicnts tvltiriia

books after ioniplvtin\( their finals; last fall final

Dec. 13. photo by Matt Frye

2J2:

tin

was front 9:40-11:40


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V*! l^'^t;:* li^^.

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mm wimoLD bT MIST

lit

Passionate about horses,

Megan Wiemold

loves attending rodeos as

Miss Al<-sar-ben. "I

love the cowgirl v/ay of life,'

Wiemold

said

photo by Matt Frye

Roping in a Rodeo crown BHH

ndemeath a white and pink cowboy hat shone an expressive smile; one responsible for welcoming first

glance,

Megan Wiemold's

striking features

would cause a passerby to take a second look. In the rodeo arena Wiemold's flashy costumes and dominating personality

drew the crowds

It

to the

moment

was not

until her senior

title,

looked like

said.

first

pageant was for the Miss Rodeo Iowa

a competition she decided to enter 10 days before

the event.

Though defeated, she was hooked.

"Most people

start

with

little

with the big dogs. Hopefully

pageants, and I'll

win

it

1

jumped

someday;

Brykon, Kari Annc'Laurc Chopra, Sumit Dotson, Emily

Cabftliis,

FtK>l, Jeffrey

HongByolt, Mfmfavce Larrca. Diego

Lim, Te<li Mararo, Humphrey Otero, Edgar Sharma, Vandana

Vcnkatachalam, Ramachandran Yuzmcc, MurBcl

2^0:

PE0P1..E

I'll

there

crown on her head,"

exhausting."

it

was so huge," Wiemol

responsibilities as

Miss Rodeo Ak-sar-bei

was incredible because

said.

Wiemold's

kept her busy throughout the summer, traveling fror

rodeo to rodeo. Wiemold served as a public relations ager for the 10 rodeos

Rodeo Queen crown, the contestants must demonstrate an ability to work with horses, speak

greeting visitors.

and

her. It definitely

Winning the Miss Rodeo Ak-sar-ben pageant was ai Over 5,000 people watche Wiemold win her crown. "It

effort.

moment you get

Pageant participants competed in a rigorous event

publicly

Wiemold

about the

schedule very different from that of a typical beauty

"You'd always see the queen with her sequins flashing

pageantry.

Wiemold's

said

equally exciting event.

a girl gets the

"It's

To win

fian,"

Wiemold

took a great deal of time and

contest.

and people coming up to

do,"

"You're being judged from the

became involved with rodeo

year in high school that she

in

for pageants

Wiemold said.

to her.

Wiemold, named the 2002 Miss Rodeo Ak-sar-ben,

had always loved the rodeo.

1

prestigious pageant.

According to Wiemold, preparation and competition

hundreds of rodeo enthusiasts.

At

keep running until

a

interact with rodeo enthusiasts.

Wiemold entered two other competitions, the 2002 Miss Rodeo Iowa pageant and the Miss United Rodeo Association pageant, the first pageant Wiemold won. "1 held my breath when they were reading the names," Wiemold said. "When they said 1 had won, my mom was Since her

crying;

I

first

pageant,

was crying.

It

was a pretty amazing experience."

she attended, usually spending houi

"The worst part of leaving the rodeo arena is knowin that you're not going to see the people you've again,"

Wiemold

met eve

said.

In addition to attending rodeos, sold horses during the

Wiemold trained ani

summer. Working with horses wa

something Wiemold has loved since she was five year old. I don't know where I'd be without horses in my life, Wiemold said. "I've just always loved the cowgirl life."

"


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Sfimi bT bEIST

bUTLEI?

LEE

A

progressive condition has

caused Sammi Butler to lose central vision in both eyes.

the center,

"In

purple-blue dots that

I

I

have can't

see through," Butler said. photo by Matt Frye

A different viewpoint I

eyes

seem

ide-open, penetrating blue

to inquisitively seek inform-

ation; they

make slight,

rapid shifts across

the subject, attempting to take

it all

in

using only the outer rims of sight.

Due

to a rare condition called Starg-

ardt's disease,

Samantha Butler

lost all

1

look straight ahead there's a

purplish-blue splotch in the middle," Butler said.

"Everything else

1

school, Butler had

no previous

indication

thought

knew

1

it

was normal," Butler said.

"1

couldn't see as far as others but

at

her high school;

when

she had

trouble passing the exam, the school nurse

"1

1

first

me

told

it

would

started thinking about all the

needed to go see before time ran

out," Butler said.

Before she started to panic, doctors told

blind because the disease does not effect peripheral vision.

Though she felt a great still

experienced

"All that first year I hated

had

to

come

this for

to deal with

the

it,"

Buder said.

to the realization that rest

of

my

life,

so

1

1

have

Part of her adjustment was

coming

warned her about driving

license but

make a difference," Butler said. Her optometrist assumed Butler had

going through

to

at

night.

"A few weeks after was diagnosed was my purse and came upon my license," Butler said. "I cut my permit I

I

up because

I

I

would never drive again."

Butler decided not to obtain a day-

assessment. Butler was put through a

driving license because she was afraid of

variety of tests to determine the problem,

what might happen.

an experience that was extremely daunting for her.

"I

don't really want to drive anymore,"

Butler said.

say,

Shyly tucking blonde hair behind one Butler said the condition has slightly

affected the "1

way she

deals with pei^iple.

don't really like to look at people

because

1

have to

stare," Butler said.

had to adapt her learning Working with the Talent Dev-

Butler also style.

list

of accommodations needed to ensure success.

Because she often cannot see notes on a

notes from the professor or another student. "I still sit in class,

teacher says

1

write

and whatever the

down, but they don't

always say everything," Butler

s;iid.

In spite of the effects her condition had

Kansas City for further

in

have the freedom to

white Kiard or projector, Butler received

it."

appawal for Butler to obtain a day-driving

kept

didn't

"I just

elopment Center, Butler developed a

anger and disbelief

have

felt

'I'm leaving,'" Butler said.

ear,

be limited. Doctors hesitantly gave

Mercy Hospital

People

things

1

they

I

astigmatism, but sent her to Children's

2^2:1

than most teenagers.

"When

on putting different lenses in front of my eye and asking if it made things better, but I kept saying no because it didn't lie

friends to

surfaces before age 20.

he was getting frustrated because

went to see the optometrist, and

C(xjld tell

bad about asking

drive her, so she was closer to her family

terms with the fact that her driving would

referred her to the local eye doctor.

independence during high schcwl. She said

macular degeneration that typically

"1

Butler went through a normal school eye

liability."

lack of driving limited Butler's

she often

1

adjusted."

exam

Butler was eventually diagnosed with

sense of relief Butler

hat her vision was abnormal.

with the

The

Butler that she would never go totally

Diagnosed during her junior year of high

"1

it

Stargardt's disease, a progressive type of

can see just

fine."

I

wanted them to find out what

progress,

central vision.

"When

"1 just

was," Butler said.

"I

don't

want to have to deal

Butler said the adjustments

on her

life,

seemed

insignificant.

"I've

had

it

for so long

now

sometimes I can't even notice that It,"

I

Butler said with a slight smile.

that

have .

Few people perceived a difference in bM icy blue eyes, an accomplishment for Butler,

who

sought to keep her lack of

vision ftx)m greatly affecting her

life.


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PfliE

Iff

A

passionate aviator, James Pate's love for flight

is

inspired b/ his father

"I

look up to him," Pate

said. "I Inherited his zeal."

photo by Matt Frye

Flight reflects father I

what

I

want

My Dad's always been my hero.

to be,

He's

and I'm who he was," James Pate

said.

both looks and mannerisms, Pate was raised with his

first

when he was

flew with his father

5 years

His most treasured childhood memories involved

rising

with his father at 6 a.m. to spend the morning

in their "I

stuff

would constantly ask him questions about what was or how things were working," Pate said.

Their shared passion

being in the

for

air

created a

powerful bond between the two men.

even have

we

"There

to say anything," Pate said.

don't is

just

this understanding."

Throughout adulthood. Pate flew with

his father

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his

From the 8 p.m.

first

time alone in the plane.

was the ultimate sense of being alone in

Looking

at life

from

far

life,"

a

good

Pate said.

skill

important anymore," Pate

would allow him

his

and flight exarr

States Air Force after obtaining his license.

Though

excited about the opportunity. "1

always thought

experience and

I'd

go into the Air Force

skill for

That hasn't changed." Pate

to use

the good of the nation. said.

Excited about flying different planes and logging

said.

many

unparalleled.

it

being able to look at the sky and

know

flight hours,

Pate hoped that flying for the

United States would increase his

skill level.

was part of his career or his personal

life.

Whethei Pate

said

he would continue flying until he could not

what the tops of the clouds look like," Pate said. "It's as if you're driving on clouds." Focused on securing a future in the air, Pate

of aviation with

planned to earn his

my family,"

official pilot's license

Pate believed

he had no previous military experience. Pate was

To Pate, flying was almost a religion. He said moments in the sky alone and with his father were is

abilities.

to pass the oral

with ease. Pate looked to become a pilot in the United

my

"Suddenly, the things you think are so huge don't as

summer. Confident of his

above changed the way

Pate viewed his experiences.

"Flying

we're in the airplane together,

Ibrahimlihan,

"It

flew solo.

time to the pristine weather. Pate remembers

every detail about his

seem

Cessna 152.

"When

first

way, floating 200 feet above everyday

father's love of flight.

Pate

was not until the day before

It

21" birthday that he flight

Bearing an uncanny resemblance to his father in

old.

whenever possible.

fl\

anymore.

WM

during the

"1

want

my Dad; I want to share my love my kids and continue it throughoui

to be like

Pate said.


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Janson

Thomas became

a

member of the Governor's Youth Council "I've

the

in

gotten to meet

fall.

some

pretty influential people

in

state government,"

Thomas

said, photo by

Matt Fryc

Cabinet oi political opportunit)/ ^HH

aving a already perfected the careful annunciation and

winning smile of those used to being in the public eye, a member of the newly established Governor's Youth Council was paving the

way

"It's

prepared himself to advance as a civil servant.

my

true desire

and

interest to contribute

be a true public servant," TTiomas

my

back to

never want to be called a

said. "I

was

said. "I

thrilled to hear

I

had gotten the appointment," Thomas start making a difference at

was very excited to go in and

such a young age."

facing Missouri through his

education issues in the state legislature.

Board of Higher Education.

"We hope we can

Two youth

council delegates were

help with a candid and frank discussion about

the issues in higher education,"

The

When Thomas heard

chance to be involved

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Thomas

said.

application process for the youth council began in early

August.

People

interviewed in late September and informed of his

selection in October.

council was

assigned to work with each of the governor's cabinet members.

2^6:1

have young people had

In addition to working

worst fear."

work on the youth council. The initial made up of 45 young people, ages 17 to 22, who were appointed in November by Gov. Bob Holden. "As the inaugural group, we look upon ourselves as laying a solid foundation our successors can build upon," Thomas said. Thomas was appointed to a two-year term with the Coordinating

Kkip^rfufrm,

before, at such a high level,

the opportunity to give perceptions on issues that are emerging."

"I

society, to

Tliomas hoped to provide a youthful perspective on the problems

Klu.

new initiative that is historically ground breaking," Thomas

on the youth council, TTiomas also served Student Association of Missouri. As a delegate to the association, he worked toward raising awareness about higher

politician. That's

KiMffclrlr, Jarafc -

a

"Never

Thomas was

for a political career.

Also a member of the Student Association of Missouri, Janson

Thomas

"It's

said.

AflricillllM*

Scknce

n|. JIB - Oeopiphr

Brook*

'

ManAflrmcnt

about the council, he jumped at the

in Missouri politics.

in the

A political science major, Thomas planned to intern in Washington, D.C. during the summer, hoping to further cement his future. Meticulous in his preparation, he was currently working on finalizing the specifics of the internship, which he hoped would provide job opportunities. "I've laid

out the groundwork for a career in international relation

conflict resolution, specifically

Nations,"

Thomas

United States mission to the United

said.

After the summer,

Thomas planned

to continue

government. Through gaining experience venues,

Thomas hoped

work with the

in a variety of political

to secure a future as a public servant.


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1:2^7


CLflUDIfl

MOLinfl bT

mU OPOUAOUIIS

Claudia Molina

came to the

United States to

two

live

with

university professors.

"They've been

like a

mom

and dad for me," Molina said, photo by

Matt

Frye

Holy education leads to Northwest ne student found an education United States through divine intervention. In Honduras, Claudia Molina was raised in a

in the

American education were

slim.

By

of 1997, Molina received a letter from

restrictions, Molina's parents sent her to a private

Catholic school.

come

By the time she reached eighth grade, Molina's family could

no longer

afford to send her to private

Sister Carol that

to know the couple as Mom and Dad Falcone. "They adopted a child from Honduras, and they wanted him to learn about his culture," Molina

school. Refusing to lose Molina as a student, Sister

said.

Carol Dust of the School Sisters of Notre Dame,

Happy to comply, Molina taught catechism every Sunday and in return Sister Carol's parents paid

By 1998 Molina was living with the Falcones in MaryviUe and attending Northwest. Immediately, Molina felt welcomed in her new home. "They are very open to talk about things," Molina said. "1 feel free to give my opinions." Adjusting to American culture was easy for

for her education.

Molina but sometimes shocking.

who

continually encouraged Molina to attend the

Catholic school, promised to help her in exchange for work.

After graduating high school in 1996, Molina

"I

couldn't believe

Molina

my Dad

Falcone did the

"The men

home

asked Sister Carol to keep her ears open for a family

dishes,"

willing to support her through college in America.

(Honduras) don't do the dishes." Molina would say goodbye after graduation to

After a year of struggle, Sister Carol did not offer

"She gave

me

this face like. ..yeah right,"

Molina

at

United States, Sister Carol told Molina her chances of in the

last four

years.

love my own family," Molina said. do love these people too, cause they've been mom and dad for me."

"Obviously,

said.

Because college was expensive

said.

the family she had grown to love in the

an optimistic response.

People

November

would transform her life. Northwest professors Janice and Paul Falcone were the faces of Molina's future. Molina would

lower middle-class family. Despite tight financial

2^?:

getting an

"But

1

like a

1


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Stranger tips his hand, altering difficult life HH

tnigghng through personal and financial

txlcs. a waitress found salvation through the c-rcstty

ike

make ends meat. A regular customer of Liberty, Mo. diner, where she waitressed, took note ofher stress. When he came into an inheritaiKe, ^ regular customer wrote Shields a check for i^icd to

-

OJXO. was stRMcd about money,

ai>d

I

think maybe

he'd heaid that from the other girls," Shiekls said.

Shields «id the customer,

who visited on a weekly

bans, came into the restaurant and staned iuking her

qWMions about her

finatKes. After tabulating

tauch inone>' Shields spent

on housing and

how

tuition,

he approached her with a number. 'After he figured stuff up, he looked up and asked ;ne.

I

didn't

"I just

know what

looked at him opened-mouthed; to say."

'Would $100,000 get you by until you graduate.'"

said she immediately told

she could accept the "1

was stunned.

emotion," Shields

I

him

that she did not think

gift.

think

said. "I

While

in middle school, Shields

I

went through every

kept saying 'Thank-you'

she was rushed to the hospital to

for

High on speed, have her stomach

pumped. "1 was in jail for two weeks before going to court, it was terrifying," Shield said. "I was sentenced to five years probation, but

I

only served six months."

over aiKl over, but he said he didn't want any thanks."

Persevering through her past, Shields graduated

According to Shields, her benefactor had children

high school and transitioned into college life at Northwest. As a student-athlete. Shields had difficulty finding time to earn enough money for

who

died in a car accident. She speculated that he

viewed helping her and a few other girls at the restaurant as a way to remember his family. Shields thought the "I life,"

gift

brought things

full circle in

her

life.

believe in karma, and I've had a very difficult Shields said. "I feel

it's

God's way of giving back."

tuition.

"Life

is

much

less stressful,"

worried about money. I'm

Shields said. "I'm not

much more

comfortable."

In spite of finaiKial ease. Shields won't give

Facing financial difficulties since coming to Northwest, Shields said her persoiul struggles were

job as a waitress at her

surmounted during middle and high school.

the job to keep myself normal."

"I still

hometown

Kan

^irHnu,

.

Faatfr <t

up her

restaurant.

work on the weekends," Shields said.

SM«b.

I

was arrested

distribution of a controlled substaiKC.

Shields stniggled to respond to the gesture. She

of a virtual stranger.

most college students, Bridget Shields

'I

Shields said.

"I

need

Ciibi— ii ^tumm

Krm

Rtdi

A«r«ralHn

Shields

'.2S1


mis scmtftm bT 5EIST

LÂŁÂŁ

While balancing many different occupations,

James

Schreffler keeps his eyes

on

his first love, flying. "It's

hard

now to find

and money to

fly,"

the time Shreffler

said, photo by Matt Fiye

Goals take flight youthful preoccupation with flight captured the imagination, eventually turning into an attainable goal.

Compelled by molded his

life

dream of

his

flying,

entered the Reserve Officer's Training Corps immediately

Guard

in Denver.

A

biology major, he was responsible for advising the Battalion Commander in

all

Taking the job with the goal of becoming a

pilot,

him to flight school

few years as a chemical

In 1994 Schreffler,

officer.

moved with his family to Alabama

was excited because

wanted I

1

was

The

to be," Schreffler said. "1

where

1

had never flown before

first

time he was able to hover a

be able to do

while to get a hang of

it,"

Schreffler said. "It takes a

.said

being in the

air

was a feeling of intense

excitement.

The

hard to describe," Schreffler

"It's just

said,

shaking

a neat feeling."

training regiment consisted of long classrixim

hours iind flying sessions. Future pilots were required to pass a final flight

2S2:|

People

Whiteman Air

Force

an additional source

Public Safety.

went through law enforcement academy to

job," Schreffler said. "It flight school, there

was a

was a

lot

lot

more

get the

like college

more classroom

than

time."

volunteering to be a Dare Officer and the Maryville High

School Resource

to

Officer.

interacting with kids," Schreffler said.

show them

that police aren't the bad guys."

Working

an informal counselor

as

exam before

graduation.

"We need

for many students, made him a better

father to his three children. "I

said.

"When you're flying low and fast and getting down in it's

at

Schreffler thought the experience

it."

His love of flying increased with each day of training.

his head.

to Missouri

of income, Schreffler applied for a position with Maryville

"I like

such a feeling of accomplishment-you're wondering

the trees,

Guard

Base. Searching for a civilian job as

helicopter.

you'll ever

move

Schreffler secured the position with public safety, later

of flight school was the

Schreffler

couple eventually decided to

to the Missouri National

"I

finally getting to

According to Schreffler, the most memorable moment

if

He flew often, transporting troops across

to receive additional training.

got there."

"It's

me having to

the Midwest; occasionally he spent time away from home

to start helicopter flight school. "1

have been dealing with

because his wife was from St. Joseph. Schreffler transferred

Schreffler said the unit agreed to send

1992,

unit in Colorado.

aspects of the unit that dealt

with chemical warfare.

who married in

parts

be away." After graduating flight school, Schreffler rejoined his

assignment was as a Battalion Chemical

Officer with the Colorado National

after a

"The hardest

from college in 1991.

Schrefifler's first

was intense and frequent,

him going.

"She's very supportive and very strong," Schreffler said.

James Schreffler

around achieving his objective. Schreffler

after graduating

Schreffler said the training his wife kept

see a lot of the stuff kids are going through," Schreffler

"Hopefully that has helped

me prepare my own kids."

In addition to duties as a police officer and the Missouri

National Guard, Schreffler taught an

ROTC orientation

course at Northwest. Schreffler said the class was designed to give freshman "1

find

it

an overview of the program. enjoy now new Army officers."

really enjoyable," Schreffler said. "I

turning around and helping pnxluce


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Twins discover inner selves root the

womb

to a

room

maring has become a way o^

in Millikan Hall,

life for

two

sorority

When Julie

to atteiHJ Northwest, but Julie wavered in her decision.

^residents.

and Jtxii Victor were bom 1 minutes apan on 2, I9S2, and since that moment they have been

Julie

"I

wasn't sure, but after

come

"Glowing up we did everything together,* Jodi said. ike dragging

when

your best fhend everywhere."

the twiits were four years old their family

Wnrly doubled in me. ^

,

.

The

birth of triplets gave the

two bnxhen aitd one

don't

know what

it

woukJ be

like

iMt to have a

iig ANnity," Jodi said. "It taught us interpersonal skills.

<n get along with anybody." iirough middle schixil, Jixii ^n

nact of the same

-i^yr\ that they >

and Julie participated was not until high

activities. It

expanded

their interests.

high sdwol we sOfted branchii>g out,' Julie said.

played die ante sports until ^ry. It

was

my own thing."

I

I

knew

I'd

started running cross

I

decided to

coming

have someone."

Participation in different activities

made the sisters'

more apparent. When Jodi announced that she would be running for the presidency of her sorority, Julie decided she would

differences

and

follow her

sister's

similarities

example. Both were elected to the

office.

Leaving the comfort of their hometown,

Omaha

them devek^ as individuals. Not knowing all the same

more outspoken than me, I'm more She takes charge more," Julie said. "I wouldn't be president if we had joined the same

people was one of the biggest changes for the twins.

sorority."

Neb., the

sisters

thought the college transition helped

"For the most part

sister.

some thought

to Northwest also," Julie said. "She was

here, so

j

deciding where to attend college, Jodi and

were faced with a turning point. Jodi had chosen

friends," Jodi said. "In

'the twitw;' Jixii

and

we

we have

separate groups of

high school we were

known

as

don't have that here."

Julie

own

sororities

allowed them

became a Sigma Sigma Sigma, while Julie chose to join Phi Mu. "We did different things when we got here, and to develop their

social circles. Jodi

I

was forced to find exit what works for me instead of what works for the both of us," Jodi said.

is

a lot

The

twins will be separated for the

Jodi graduates

call

first

her

all

As time

time

when

December 2003.

going to be pretty hard," Jodi said.

"It's

K)th rushed as freshman in 2001.

Getting involved with different

"Jodi

laid back.

"I'll

probably

the time." progressed, subsequently increasing the

physical distance between the sisters, they felt their

bond would continue

to

grow and develop.

my life I've had someone to relate to, regardless of who our friends are or where we go. That's "All

not going to change," Julie

said.

AtarkaAc, NIxar BackcA>io«», AtrnMiM

Victor

I

|:2SS


CflTLfn

PUKCtltlOff bT bfTST

Lff

Caylen RueschhofTs experience at the Maryville

Treatment Center led her to a

'I

was

new major

considering changing

my

major," Rueschhoff said. "Being in

the hospital helped

decide." photo by

me

Man Ftye

Troubled minds teach new lessons egular interaction with the mentally

prompted a life-changing of the

Her work with patients and her increased

ill

interest in the complexities

their conditions, led

human mind.

"I've learned a lot

Serving as a mental health technician at the Maryville

Treatment Center

at St. Francis Hospital

changed

center July

She began working at the treatment She originally hoped to find a position in

life. 1.

the emergency room, but

opening

she heard about an

mental health ward, she eagerly applied.

in the

"I've always

when

wanted to work

in a hospital,"

Rueschhoff

influenced

With

day,

because she did not

know what

apprehension was unfounded as she

to expect. felt

Her

completely at

"My first encounter with a schizophrenic didn't scare me at all," Rueschhoff said. "I was just interested." The Maryville Treatment Center offered short-term care for individuals suffering mental

illness.

RueschhofTs

responsibilities included conversing with the patients,

encouraging interaction and assisting nurses. "I'm the eyes and the ears of the nurses," Rueschhoff

being."

People

field,

exactly what this job

1

want

has taught

monitor the patients' physical and mental well-

she hoped

to be yet,"

me that

I

love

Rueschhoff said the job changed her outlook on those

lot

from mental

illness.

of people have gone through terrible things for help,"

Rueschhoff

amazing that they are able to take that

Helping patients through

said. "It's

step."

difficult times

taught

Rueschhoff patience and compassion. "I'm a lot more tolerant of people than

ease with the patients.

said. "I

know

and they come to us

Rueschhoff said she was nervous

mental health

after graduation.

working with people."

"A

first

a degree in the

don't

"I

said. "It's

to choose psychology as a major."

Rueschhoff said. "But

workings and meet people closer to my career field would

her

me

have options

suffering

On

2S6:|

to

said. "To be in the hospital, understand the inner

be helpful regardless."

about psychology and the inner

workings of a psychiatric ward," Rueschhoff

Caylen Rueschhoff's academic path, career goals and outlook on

interest in

Rueschhoff to change her major.

I

used to be,"

can understand people better now." With new academic goals and a better comprehension

Rueschhoff said.

"1

of people's experiences, Rueschhoff said her position at

the treatment center helped direct her medical inclination toward a tangible goal. "I

want to continue working with people," Rueschhoff makes a job so worthwhile when people come

s;ÂŤd. "It

in depressed

and leave smiling. Even the negative things something positive."

are almost always followed by


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Colter, Sarah

Combs, Paul Comes, Elizabeth

Commer,

Alicia

Conyers, Morgan Cook, Jenna

Cook, Justin

Cooper, Vanae Cornett, Chase

Couts, Darrick Coverdell, Allison Cracraft, Jason

Cradic, Stuart

Cradick,

Summer

Craine, Jason

Crane, Sharon

Crawford, Cody Crawford, Keri Cronin, Colleen

Crowe, Robert Currence, Elizabeth

Curtis, Joseph

Dake, Brooke Daniels, Sariah

Davidson, Stacey Davidson, Stephanie Davis, Jennifer

Davisson, Lindsev

Dawson, Carissa Decker, Merci Dehart, Lauren

Deimeke, Nick Dencklau, Dani Denney, Meghan Dettmer, Emily

DeWeese,

Jeff

Dey, Jenna Dicke, Tarry n Dieckhoff, Kristin Digiovanni, Lisa Dill,

Michelle

Diftselhoff ,

Abby

Dodd. Daley Dombrowski, Lydia Doudna, Lisa Dovel, Megan

Dozark,

Amanda

Duffey, Keith

Duncan, Amanda

Duntap, Michael

Dunn.

Phillip

Dye. Michael Edwards, Kara Eggers, Traci J e ramie EUbcid, MichcUe

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BiB^r


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Ltt

As a jrounf boy Kan., Brian

in

Paxico.

Hm» navar

exp«ct«d to b« l«adin{ tafant through Africa.

'K found a way to do I

an/onc can,* Hetsc photo bf

Man

it.

said,

fryt

African dreams lead to jungle safaris olorful photos of the African countryside, located MMBewhere between encyclopedia cntnes on "aeronautics" aiK)

proverbially," Hesse said. "That was

~]sta^' imttgated a fasctiution with the vast country.

something powerful about knowing, without a doubt, that

\ «iMant

profcMor of political science, Brian Hesse's eiK:hantment

Africa began as a jufuor high student. According to Hesse, his

.

cipal

gave him a key to the school so he

when he

got

bond he

-rd kicking through the

cixild play basketball.

penocd the library. One day he volume of an etKyckipedia; since

often first

moment he has been hooked.

-

graduate of Kansas Slate University, Hcsae's fust experieiKe

.>

Africa was

imiversity study abroad program.

Mpded the University of Dar Es Salaam I^BRfaall for the university team. ^HIt teammates helped me with

my

in Tanzania

culture shock,"

He

and played

Hate

said.

^mi*. with the team, I got to travel arotmd the country."

He«e traveled extensively on his first mp to Africa, but one of his memorable moments was his vint to South Africa durit«g the -

democratic election. Hesse described the atmosphere of station as a 'carnival with a sniff of trepidation.' Hesse said the

Ki

would vote and hug each other

m spite of their nervousness

violence.

most irapirational event of my life," Hc«e said. Abo dunng this trip, He«e Mid he stood at the aouthem-uuM •as the

Cape of Oood Hope. was so ptofound for me to thmk that was at the I

experierkces behind me, literally

my

and

epiphany. TTiere wa^ this

was

Hesse returned to the United States resolved to make Africa.

He

finished his uiudergraduate degree in 1995

pursuing graduate study in

While

in Loixlon,

research

to ensure frequent

London

it

back to

and began

in the fall of 1996.

Hesse had the opportunity to return to Africa

trips, visits.

but

it

wasn't until 1998 that he found a

He became

a

Cowabunga Safaru. Leading groups on

panner

in a

company

varicHis safaris

way

called

thnnigh Africa

company, Hesse believed he found ideal employment.Whilc on tours, Hesse said he had airuuing interaction with wildlife. for the

"In Uganda,

I

sat

watching a 400-pound

down bambtxi

trees with

Hesse

makes

said. "It

no effort,

[I

ytxi realize that

gorilla

capable of tearing

was| )ust a few feet from him,"

humans

are so fragile."

Hesse led tours whenever he found the time in his teaching schedule. Providing his experiences in

He also hoped Hc«e, achieving

him with real-worM examples, Hesse

Afnca made him a

believed

better instructor.

to etKourage students to seek out their goals. For his adolescent goal to visit Africa re«ultc>i in the

discovery of a compelling interest. tip

e country at the 'It

many

my calling."

on several

\

throu^ a

the continent with so

very edge of

"At

first I

went interested in the anitnab and the *Jvcnture," Hesse was everything that I dkJn't realize aKiut Africa thai

said.

"But

kept

UK coming back."

it

HESSE

hzs'?


(JEPOAT KflOOS bT

flLEAl

(JPOUAOUIIS

Driven to compete collegiate football,

Scaggs became a sniper U.S. Marine Corps.

the

in

"I

was

pretty small," Scaggs said. joined the Marine

in

Geromy

"I

Corps to

get bigger." photo by Mott

frye

Compelled to achieve in athletics eased by high school classmates

who said he could not

make it as a football player, Northwest running back Geromy Scaggs persevered through military training and several

me

Refusing to into the

was pretty small.

I

Marine Gsrps," Scaggs

joined the Marine Corps to

a sniper in the military, Scaggs traveled to 25

at in

extremely

California, then

While

enlisted, Scaggs

kill

"It's like

the position

practicing for a

"1 felt

I

lucky."

game

duty. for four years

"It's like

and not

holding the carrot

At 27

way

don't like the

came

motivation, Scaggs

Yuba Community College

to

Northwest

in

in the spring of

he was not perfecting

his shooting skills,

Scaggs played on the Marine Corp rugby team to aintinue his athletic training.

He played outside center,

tryout for the University of Montana's football team,

but was shtKked

when

the head coach shot

him down.

said.

and

raising

two children: 8-week-old McKensie and 4 year-old Dylan.

While other football players shared lunch with their friends, Scaggs often had lunch with his son Dylan at the J.W. Jones Student Union. teammates and

for

life

with family

life

was not an

issue

him.

"It's

not tough; the best way

I

juggle

it is

because

school's easy," Scaggs said.

Enduring rejection and conquering the

a position comparable to a running back in fcxitball.

Following the Marine G)rps, Scaggs was anxious to

on the team," Scaggs

years old, he was newly married

Balancing school

in front of the horse."

260:

a chance to walk on,"

we

player.

was

was disappointed he never

anyone during active

getting to play," Scaggs said.

When

at

"I'm just the old guy

difficult to get to

the Marine Corps," Scaggs said.

had to

me

said

let insults injure his

walked onto the team

different countries. "It's

give

coach

2001. Scaggs was not a typical Northwest football

get bigger."

As

said. "TTie

Marines play football."

rejections.

"Football drove said. "I

"He wouldn't even Scaggs

military,

Scaggs became a stronger person. Scaggs was working

on

his final semester at

Northwest preparing to

graduate with a degree in international business.


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1:267


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LEE

Watching her mother struggle through a terminal

Melanie

illness,

Siedschlag found a greater appreciation

for the people in her

life.

"People take others for granted,

you learn not to do

that,"

Siedschlag said, photo by Matt Frye

Mother's love passed on rofoundly influenced by her mom's

life

Three weeks before her mother

and

mom

forget.

fight a losing battle with breast cancer. Siedschlag's

"He

Melanie Siedschlag dealt with watching her

mother died, Dec.

28,

2000

after fighting the disease

sick;

I

grew up around

hospital,

drove her

Siedschlag said.

According to Siedschlag, her parents did the best they could to keep her mother's condition from affecting the family. This

know "I

just

how bad

it.

She always

said,

'What

I

are

you going to do

went "It

to Texas for

was

some experimental treatment.

a final attempt," Siedschlag said.

"She said

way it was a last ditch effort." Over Thanksgiving, her mother felt strong and the family gatherings continued as planned. As winter either

"I

home

last

to

was

in the

come home,"

started freaking out."

to

Omaha, Neb.

was the longest two hours

1

realized that

deal with the death of

1

Siedschlag said.

As a method of dealing with grief, Siedschlag began speaking about her experience. She said speaking at events like

BANG,

or Being

A New

ever," Siedschlag said.

make

it.'"

Siedschlag's

mother

three weeks in the hospital surrounded

Siedschlag also relied on her family as an outlet.

"My family has gotten a lot closer," Siedschlag said. "We talk almost everyday now, something we nevei did before."

Siedschlag

still

experienced influences, even

make gestures.

degree in May, she said the fact that her mother was

"She'd wink and

a teacher helped her choose her academic path.

was precious."

When

her mother passed away, Siedschlag's

stricken family pulled together to

make

grief-

funeral

arrangements. Siedschlag said the experience

made

was

was

19,

and

I

was helping pick out

used to go and hang around in her classroom,"

me

that teaching

a casket.

scary." Siedschlag said.

Siedschlag returned to Northwest, she

It

be an influence her throughout her

"There

isn't

HanJlo*, Jacqueline Hanev, Astra Hanev, Laura Hansen. Elizabeth HanstHi, Katie Hansftn, Theresa

Harden

2621

People

III.

Leon

a lot

â&#x20AC;˘^^

tc

life.

a day that goes by that

her," Siedschlag said.

Gritton, Jessica

Handa, Sachie

is

about being a personable person." Lessons taught by her mother would continue

her grow up very quickly. "1

1

Siedschlag said. "She taught

Groves, Christie

Halsey, Stephanie

aftei

her mother's death. Graduating with a teaching

Green, Ben Grcfe, Hollv Grinchuk, Olena

Gutelius, Erica

Greek, was

therapeutic.

Greeley, Beth

Gutschenrittcr, Pete

first

needed to find myself and

my mom,"

Graves, Eddie

Hackinann, Bethany Hagan, Jeff Hagedom, Susan

At

she attempted to act as though nothing had happened,

"She kept trying to take her tube out so she could

When

progressed, however, cancer took control.

Mom

two roommates packed her things and

talk," Siedschlag said. It

A few months before she died, Siedschlag's mother

was

by family and friends.

mom wouldn't have

here?'"

said

kept thinking, 'I'm not going to

spent her

things were.

would have been home every weekend had

he

Her worries proved unfounded.

meant Siedshlag did not

known," Siedschlag said. "But my liked

"It "I

all

and that I was going to have

Siedschlag's

it,"

struggled to deal with the loss of her mother.

"Then and

called

Siedschlag said.

for 12 years.

"She was always

died, Siedschlag

received a call from her father that she would never

death, a stronger individual emerged from tragedy.

1

don't think

ol


Harr. S«rmk HarrrlMin. Andres HafTu. Kirk Harris.

Lamn

Harri».

UimImt

Harmon.

Patricia

Han. S«cvra

Haakc

April

HMth^N

Stffhanie

fwncvnMk tnca Haim. Jot

KUn-Btth

Hma.KMk

SlEDSCHLAG

:263


.

CflPOL CLflfLin bT bfTST

LEE

Carol Claflin works with autistic children using social

pets

"The children

Boomer

like

easily associate

with the pet, which

encourages interaction with the

facilitator," Claflin said.

photo bf Matt Frye

At an educational crossroads I

ith a carefully

concealed sense of urgency,

she worked to break into the quiet world

many

autistic

children live in, alone and unable to communicate.

Associate psychology professor Carol Claflin

in 1999-2000.

Sparked by an rise

Claflin returned to teaching, she

article reporting that

and by a family connection to

"Not only do you change that child's the family's

life,"

During the

life,

you change

Claflin said.

fall

of 2002, Claflin's program became

what she described as "homeless." According to Claflin,

the condition, Claflin decided to study autism

the Maryville Children's Center, which formerly

intervention methods.

housed the program, changed

"1

my

wanted to get back to

passion,

which was helping

Claflin's niece

primary interest,

my

had recently been diagnosed with

services for her. Disturbed by the lack of help, Claflin

was curious to discover

if

the parents of local autistic

children were having similar problems.

/i

"I 1

did a needs-assessment here, around Maryville,

found the same thing," Claflin

that studies

said. "TTie

and

problem

is

show these children need lots of intervention

During part of her sabbatical, Claflin moved to Mirmesota to live with her niece, Carrie. Claflin worked hours a day with Carrie, developing language and

interpersonal

expand her intervention

to Maryville; she

County "It's

wanted

efforts

when

she returned

autistic children in

Ncxdaway

The

encompass

university

was

the

left

Claflin visiting

homes of many of her former clients.

"I've driven over 7,000 miles to see children

families," Claflin said. "It's

been

like

and their

two full-time jobs."

Claflin said one of her most memorable moments was when the parent of a child she had been working with came up and thanked her.

"She

said she

never thought she'd hear her child said. "It's

say,

amazing to think that

1

helped achieve that moment." Trying to balance teaching responsibilities and work

with autistic children

left

Claflin feeling like she was at

me

it,"

to recognize that there

is

"At heart I'm an educator, and I'm trying to

determine if 1 can best serve by educating other educators

Trying to balance

it all

left

Claflin searching for

direction, trying to decipher whether she should

Claflin said.

Working with the Maryville Children's Center, Claflin set up resources for children with autism

"I'm the midst of a personal reevaluation," Claflin said.

or by working one-on-one with kids."

to benefit from extensive intervention.

very frustrating for

a need and to not meet

focus to

a crossroads.

skills.

Inspired by her work with her niece, Claflin decided to

its

services.

sponsorship of her program. This

'Mommy,'" Claflin

to progress."

six

both children and family

unable, due to financial difficulties, to begin

kids," Claflin said.

autism, and her parents were having difficulty finding

26^:

When

encouraged her students to get involved with the children at the center.

may

have found her calling while on a 15-month sabbatical autism was on the

their parents.

and

continue to serve as a professor or work in the directly helping kids like her niece.

field,


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lvr», RcfMv JackMn. Haywood

Jackion.

il'^^llJi'T

Ramrfha

jam, Ritu jann. TWrru Jmnifif». Angela Jmnmfft. Shea

jen*cn. Jmnifrr

Danid Mary JcMc. Shannon Jcppcscn. jcaatCH.

Johnson, Grace JahnMHi. Scon johoMn. Tattaonia

Joaca,

Aaron

Jonr*,

Aoumb

ione«.Caae )anrs. Diana Jones. Scr^nie

Kapoor, Ashtsh KecAiavet, Gnc*

Krtth. Zarh

Andm

Ketlrr.

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26S


266:1

People


b)

0POUAOUI5

flltAI

finD Aflll

mi

Staphan Ttiry ipÂŤnt nin*

monthi

in

Ko>ovo on

i

peacekeeping miuion cry to rebuild

'We

what we

destroyed.' Terry said,

photo by Alott Frye

Peacekeeper teaches tolerance nc up to war b>'

chni^

bravi-

Arncntan

t'lKhnnf; for peace,

si)lJicr stixxl

hoping to bring about in the Civil

m Unit of the U.S. Army. whole )ob of the civil

nifKis

aifiair

isto

win the hearts

of the people," Terry said.

Mring his freshman year at Nonhwest, he was

noned to serve 'vo.

as a peace-keeper

m

war-torn

Terry said that the Albaniaru had been

^Liu^Uenng Scrbiatu for about 30 years when the kiniKd States intervened in 1 999. For 230 days, Terry lerotkcd with a group disseminating over

Ro the I

$5 million

suffering in

can.

We got

them

that by educating the

people, they could help end the perpetual devestation in

ways he never imagined.

Kosovo. "I

think the biggest thing that remiiuied

'The adults are really quiet, they have a lot of pride and its hard to ask someone for something," Terry said. "It's hard when you don't have anything to ask

Terry said. "You don't know, walking

someone

shoot ya."

to give you something for free so that your

The peacekeepers not only sought

to help the

people financially but also emotionally. They tried to teach them to embrace and accept cultural differences.

"We wanted to instill in them an openmindedness, origin." Terry said.

there was a war was

if

someone

is

just

me

that

their resentment toward us,'

going to

down the street come up behind ytxi and

Terry braved that hostility between Serbian attd

kids can eat."

to not be closed off to

people.

*Ve obviously do whatever we

The peacekeepers hoped

healthy water, firewixxl for winter," Terry said.

Poverty lingered around the comers of the stmr-

smelling streets. Terry saw children and families

in a torcign ctHintrv-

Stephen Terry worked as a staff sergeant

.\\e

fixxd,

someone because of their ethinc

Albanian people throughout "It

makes you

and here they

feel sad

his stay in

didn't never

do anything wrong

world and they're so innocent," Terry look at

them and

happy to be

Kotovo.

because you have these kids

they're smiling

said.

in the

"But you

and they're

just

alive."

McChkklM Mcv raf% (xm

Tfrrv

:267


VICKET bflUMLI bmr

5T

An Baumli

Lff

avid learner, Vickey

is

compelled by her

interest in genealogy.

became

"It

a sicl<ness," Baumli{

said, photo by

Man

fryr

Loneliness branches into large family tree or a fiery librarian with graying hair, a consuming

discover

Hard

all

hobby

led her to

"When

you find something

digging," Baumli said. "It

she could about her family's history.

to discern by her amiable nature, Vickey

Baumli was an

like that

it

inspires

makes you wonder what

you to keep happened

else has

in your family." [

only child. Standing approximately five-feet at the library for "I'll

coat,"

Baumli's

Baumli worked

28 years and was a self-described "campus mom."

walk up to a perfect stranger and

Baumli

tall,

tell

them

to put

on

their

to her, but in spite of her constant

interaction with three sons, students and faculty, she

still felt

family,"

Baumli

said.

I

was very lonely, and

"Now I have

1

wanted a sense of

a big family."

is

a

huge genealogy

go there

site in

Independence," Baumli said

always leave with something new. You can glear

I

a lot information from just about any source."

of her favorite trips was a visit to Salt Lake City. According

to Baumli,

Mormons keep

extensive family records as part of theii

had uncovered six Revolutionary

"Salt Lake City

got records

is

no one

a

Mecca for genealogists," Baumli said. "They've

else has."

War grandfathers and traced one family line to the 1600s. The hobby soon turned into a passion, one that Baumli describes

genealogy day

as a "sickness."

was the opportunity to see places that

"It's like

a giant jigsaw puzzle. There's always another piece you

need," Baumli said.

"I just

obsess over that."

TTie search for details about family

members could take

years

and

countless hours of digging. "It

can be something you've been looking

Baumli

said.

"When

you find

it,

you look

for, for

at

it

10 to 15 years,"

20 times.

It's

an

indescribable feeling."

When

much as she could about their life stories. my family had a family tree," Baumli said. "But wanted to know how these people lived." Baumli said she found one grandmother, who after a long illness, "Both

sides of

stabbed herself to death while her husband and children in the next r<x)m.

In addition to long vacations, Baumli

I

sac

unaware

trip

made approximately

on<

per month. She said the best part about travelinf relatives

might have

lived.,

awesome to think that your grandparent could have beet walking up the same steps," Baumli said. Making use of her passion for genealogy, Baumli co-authored t book, "Abstracted Newspaper Index of Nodaway Co., 1869-1900. "It's

The

so

book, published in 1997, was a source for genealogists anC

those interested in the history of NixJaway County. "I

searching for the names of her relatives, Baumli tried to

discover as

PEOPLF

I

religion.

In 1984, a gift of old family photos sparked Baumli's search to find her ancestors. Since then, she

26?:

"When One

something was missing. "Being an only child,

more information, Baumli searched through old newspapers, censuses and county and city records. Baumli also made trips all over the country trying to discover more about her family; find out

"There

said with a bright smile.

demeanor drew people

To

all

loved working the time but

it's

on the book," Baumli

said. "I

wish

I

could do

i\

not very profitable."

For Baumli, what started out as a hobby

'

blossomed into a publishe<

work. Working on the book further infused her passion for learning Baumli's

discoveries introduced her to a family she would havr

never known.

been a voracious reader and an avid learner," Bauml "Genealogy has opened a whole new world to me."

"I've always said.


McK«.

Di>

McUif>.M<in» McL««i(hlin. R«txv<a

M(UIUn. EliuMh MtMurtiTK. Mikr

McNolW. McN<iLI

Ommt

McWiOHiiB.

Bmo

MnJ.KM>r

Mmkli. AAtn

BAUML!

iZCi'i


Meyer, Sarah Michael, Lisa

Middleton, Zachary Miller,

Adam

Miller, Brant Miller, Christine Miller.

HoUy

Miller. Katie Miller, KrY»ien

Mingft. Laura

Moncivaii, Matthew McMtre, Jacob

Moore, Megan Moors, RomUui

Mormon.

Ltndatv

Mo«cr. Marv

Muentr.

Jill

Mullenix, Abfav

MulkKk. Erin Murphy, Bethany Murphy. JeMc

270:|

People


WObbl

AlCtlflEL \-

bT

JBE

tm m

On 1 (MX njn. MKhad Hobb* can log

raatjr

ow 20 milai. 'Th«t'«

th*

ncm to

manthonmi.' Hobbs

utd.

You gotta hav* th« long phau bf Maa

run.*

fryt

Escape along the roads :i

the

muments when the only noi.se was worn running shoes slapping the one faculty member found his health,

*i)lirary

the sound

i>l

;-jv«fnenc,

his stress relief It

and

was his dad's influence that

initially got

In running, but

it

was

Hobbs began his running career while

in his early 30s.

would be a good thing for me to do,* Hobbs said. 'A way to get into shape." After a brief hiattis, he returned to the sport in *l

his

thought

it

Mk, Hobbs found

tKan stress "Since

I

that running could be tnore

relief.

staned again,

an obsession." Hobbs

it's

don't think

"Professors

hkom ptHsion for the sp«m that kept him taking to the to«d.

"She was

him with an escape from the everyday

pressures of teaching

his passion.

Michael Hobbs interested

A self-described perfectionist, Hobbs said running provides

gotten to be a bit of

said with a slight crittge of

guik.

career, is

own

According to Hobb*. challenging endurance runs and spnnt workouts forced

that's

a

and research.

dangerous," Hobbs said. "Running

my

kept

me

life

to devote time to-it's

from completely narrowing myself into the

role of professor."

While providing him with an outlet, running also helped Hobbs improve on a professional level. Hobbs, said

he was a better

impossible.

With the goal of completing a marathon,

Hobbs began

at

how

your mileage," Hobbs

said.

difficult

"When

I

it

ootcrs.

"You get completely

in touch with the physical

Hobbs said. "You turn off the analytical and get to know younelf on a primal level." self."

self

I

is

to increase

finished

my first

was so proud of myself"

just impossible to

know what

julie, that

helped him

'1

Hobbs said,

laughing. "She

marathon Hobbs was hooked. Since it his goal to do one marathon per He completed his third marathon in Kansas City,

After his

first

then Hobbs made year.

2,

"TTie

2002.

moment most vividly remember was running 1

with this small pack from mile 12 to alxxit mile 15.

We

weren't talking but

we had

said.

this interesting

"We were

Hobbs completed the marathon

all

intensely

in J hours

and 29

minutes, a personal record that qualified him for the

Hobbs said

finish.

To qualify for the Boston, Hobbs

it

I

never even imagined,"

said.

Hobbs planned to participate in the Boston Marathon April 2 1 an opportunity he says he never ,

thought possible. "It

makes

farther than

you're getting into."

Struggling through the 26-mile race,

was his wife,

said to her,

Boston Marathon the next spring.

to increase his mileage.

was surprised

I

she said, "You've got

me stop."

let

focused and enjoying the race."

Hobbs entered the Wichita Marathon in 2000. Stepping to the line, Hobbs filled with apprehension. "I was as nervous as 1 could be," Hobbs said. "It's

as well as

wouldn't

And

The confidence running instilled in Hobbs allowed him to pursue objectives he previously thought

20-mile run

compete agaiiut themselves

finish.'

connection," Hobbs

races,

to

can

teacher because running increased his self-assurance.

personality.

nmners

just

Nov.

an associate English professor

1

four miles left-don 't stop,'"

tendency to get sucked into their

another element of

"I

Runnirtg became a way to delve into his

and

have

mark and

at the 22-mile

me realize that

your body can be pushed you ever imagined," Hobbs said. "A lot

of people give up

but

I

know

I

on themselves,

haven't reached

my

physically, after 40, full

potential."

M«c|4n.J<>dM

Mvw* llWW

N«—.CWliii|*n

NkhokAabn

O'lilni.M^Hi

HOBBS

211


Odegard, Kim Olms, Kristina Olsen, Colleen

Olson, Danielle Orrell. Nicole

Orschein, Jordan Ost, Rachel

Owen, Christohper Owings, Clifford Owsley, Julie Oxford, Brieann Oxley, Stacy

Packard, Heidi

Keegan

Pahkill,

Pankau, Breni Park, Junghoon

Parman, Grant

Andrew

Parmenter,

Parmeter, Rose

Pamell, Erin Partridge,

Ronald

Peeper, Richard

Perkins, Keinon Perry,

Monica

Petersen, Brett

Peterson, Katie

Peterson, Nicholas Phares, Aaron

Phillips,

Jake

Phillips,

Tara

Piercy, Holly Pill,

E>ana

Brandy

Pitts,

John

Piatt,

Plettner, Jennifer

Pollard. Carla Policy, Emilie

Postnikoff, Janelle Potts, Kristen

Prewitt, Jacci Priest,

Amanda

Pritchard, Suzanne

Quaas, Heather

Quandt, Carrie Raffet, Sarah Ragar, Brandy Ramsey, Tim

Shannon Ransom, Lauren

Randal),

Rapp, Lauren Read, Dallas Rebori, Shannon Reiley.Jil)

Reinig, Becci

Renshaw, Kari Reschke,

Reynolds,

Amy

Tammy

Richey, Cierra

Rickcrton, Ashley Rivera, Nathan Rives. Jeff Rix. Jeff

Robcrion. James

Robcru, Erin Robinson, Alicia Roccker, Susan Rolf.

SkyUr

Ruts. Nicholas Royx****, Joshua

Rumner,

272:

Propi

f

Tricia

jigg^


tIEIDI

br

fiLfxi

H

opounouTis

Heidi Bakar looks tt â&#x20AC;˘ picture o(

hw ftmc*. whom

ihÂŤ daodad to marry iflar a courting relationship.

'So many people don't

what

k>ve

is,'

Baker

know

said.

photo bfTtnyitlMitY

Faith-based relations hile

many Northwest

in the dating scene, for

some

students tcxik

pan

a deeper fulfillment

was

Baker felt too many people hurried into relationships

and

settled for less lot

Heidi Baker dated on and off throughout middle and

"A know

high school, befbre reaching a point when she felt dating

really

know what

found with courting relationships.

was meaningless and a waste of time.

"A said.

lot

of people date for the wrong reasons," Baker

"You shouldn't lower your standards to get a

"1

herself to

E^er

searched

uncover the complexity of kjve.

had to understand the meaning of what love was

before

I

couU get

into a rebtionship with

someone else,"

Baker said

woukj ftxiB on couning. or finding a potential mamage partner rather than a dating partner.

wnxe down

a

list

of

thmgs

I

wanted

Her future hushond wouM have

to be a Christian as

well as a respectful aixi honest person. Baker also

expected him to state his intentions up front.

With high expcctatum set for herself. Baker looked to her foith for assistance.

was praying lo God,

tix),"

think

it all

really get tc

people don't

is."

for everyone.

depends on the person and the situation

Baker said. "Others feel dating

why they choose

isn't

nght

for

them,

to court."

After the dark clouds of dating parted, Baker look control of her

life

and found happiness.

Everything

fell

into place

when she met her fianc^ down the hall from

Chris Karwoski. Karwoski lived

The neat first,"

Baker

thing about Chris

is

that

we were

frieixls

said.

had a lot in common. "Well read books together, watch movies together or we'll go on walks," Baker said. realized they

Baker's religkin did not permit sexual intimacy befi?re

mamage. So, when Baker creeping

in,

"I state it 'I

don't want to date anyone

or be with anyone you have not chosen for me,'" Baker said.

love

many

After attending a mission trip together in Texas, they in a future

husband," Baker said.

"I

and don't

Baker in South Complex.

While in coUege, Baker decided her next relationship

*l

"I

that's

Taking time off from relatioiuhips,

it

the person," Baker said. "So

Baker did not think courting was

boyiineiKl or girlfhcnd."

withm

than they deserved.

of people rush into

she dealt with

up

front

felt it

the harvJ of temptation

immediately.

and clear the

air, it

helps curb

temptatKWi," Baker said.

Along with her ^ith, courting completed physically, spiritually

Baker's

life

and emotionally.

273


Scbiurrenberger, Diana Schneider, Travis Schroer, Matt

Schtickman, Suzanne Schultz, Diana Schumacher, Rachel Schwarz, Laura

SchwiÂťow, Casey

Schametta Seaman, Jen

Scott,

Sears, Catherine

Seek, Laura Seek, Millicent

Stim, Martha

Shanka, Stacev Shannahan, Scott Shearer, Lindiev

Sheek. EUzabrth Sheeicy,

Amher

Shewel). Kalee

ShkUa. Angle

Shieldt. Bridcet

Shinrman, Shannon ShifvfcrUnc,

Matthew

ShirUy,)efi

.Heidi Short, Rachel Short, Sutan

27^:1

People


m

bY basT

vwk of nil nocTM fnoRMfMM from hod to covsr

It

witn

nil

put.

I

wvtn

tomthwg.* Mon|vnid.

Momentos reflect a lifetime of memories HHecured with Scotch

tape, memorabilia of life

moraents covered the off-white walls of the Larry Monjar decorated the walls of his living a collection of items representing his past.

Photographs, certificates, quotations and other items of sentimental value gave insight into the experience of the

unassuming night custodian.

"It's just stuff I've

\(.>niar said

slightly

with a slight shrug. yellowed certificate of his honorable

above his

from

Italy,

where

was drafted

Army hung on the

cable. After returning to

his father

Kaiuas

was stationed,

Vietnam War. two to three weeks, and I got :be notice, 'UikIc Sam wants you,'" Monjar said. Instead of becoming a member of the ground ">, Monjar opted to stay in the military for one lar

for service in the

wasn't there but

â&#x20AC;˘u^iitional year

and take classes to become

helicopter mechanic.

He

he was

said

a

grateful that

he never had to take a shot at another person.

The and I

only thing

I

ever shot were paper targets

Monjar said. "A couple of times have to, but I'm happy to say it didn't

flare canisters,'

thoui^t

I'd

happen."

According to Monjar, he spent )66 days, 8 hours minutes in Vietrtam. Monjar said his most 'ening experieiKe occurred just before he was

to return to the

United

Vietcong rixket

States.

hit a five-ton truck in the

iinitiotu dumpsite. Fire id

main

from the explosions

to 40,000 galioiu of gasoline.

The

entire

pany spent 14 to 16 houn hunkering down in !:^unkefs to

avoid injury.

was quite an experierKe; I kinda thought the work! was endiitg." Monjar said. "It was just one of "It

it."

the Maryville area. During his search he met his

A

picture of the couple was pasted at eye level

on another

wall of Monjar's living room. In the

an old-fashioned photo booth, the two stood smiling happily dressed in Western garb. Monjar said he spotted his wife at an Italian restaurant on Main Street in Maryville. Monjar said he was trying to convince a friend who worked there to give

him

Monjar 'Hello'

when saw her," my manhood and said,

the counter

at

"So I gathered down."

said.

and

"I

got a

the hospital.

little

misty eyed reading

I

sat

After four months of dating, Monjar decided to pop the question. "I asked her to ntarry me and she said 'Yes.' That scared the hell out of me," Monjar said.

The couple

moved

eventually

to St. Joseph to

it

it,"

Monjar

said.

up again."

His wife's death had a tremendous impact on life. Not only had he lost his partner but

Monjar's

he also

lost financial security.

At the time of

his wife's death,

Monjar was

supplementing their household income by working a paper route. He was forced to move back to his parent's

home

in Maryville.

over one day getting applications, and the next I walked back through the town turning "1

free piiza.

was standing

"I

home from

"I'm scared to death to pick

future wife.

walked

them

in,"

all

Monjar

said.

Northwest called and offered Monjar part-time work as a custodian. Scattered throughout the other posted

mem-

on his walls, certificates commended Monjar on his work at Northwest. "I don't mind the job," Monjar said. " The people orabilia

pursue job prospects. Monjar said he sometimes

are the best part."

underestimated the impact his wife had on his

Monjar had worked as a Northwest custodian for was to work until he was able to draw $1,000 a month in Social Security and retirement funds. Monjar hoped that after he worked 10 years with the university he would be able to retire on that monthly stipend. "But we don't know what will happen in 10 years," Monjar said, shaking his head in amazement. "We

life.

After seven years of marriage, they went to a retreat

where they wTote a the

iiwl 41

.A

made

picture, taken at

picked up over the years,"

Jucnarge from the United States Âť!tll, just

they were unable to resuscitate her. Monjar thought of the letter almost immediately after he returned

butt afterwards because you

After returning home, Monjar looked for a job in

4piii intent.

room with

those things that you just bend over and kiss your

own

last

said

he scoffed

"I

letter to their spouse as

if it

were

thing they would get to say to them. Monjar

thought,

Monjar

said.

hours of

my

at the idea.

'I

don't

know what

to write to het,"

"Turned out to be the shortest two

life."

His wife wrote him a

letter that she

made him

promise not to open until her death 10 years

later.

knew she was going

to go

"It

was almost

as

if

she

before me," Monjar said.

When

he returned home one evening from

walking his dogs, Monjar found his wife suffering

from a heart attack.

He

called the paramedics, but

five years. His goal

could

all

be dead, hut that's a bit pessimistic

isn't

ur From Vietnam to his experience at Northwest, Monjar pulled meaning out of a simple collection of moments. Items posted on Monjar's walls served as a reminder that life changes course quickly and without wamittg.

MONJAR

|:27S


CflMPbELL bT bfTST LH

With a smile love of

would

is

scuba

love to

diving.

go to the

Great Barrier Reef; there mucti

her

Desiree Campbell's

life,

chosen passion "I

reflecting

wildlife there,"

is

so

Campbell

said, photo by

Man frye

Dive deep into

underwater adventure ehind an easy smile and bubbly personality

lay

an inner

After receiving her open water scuba diving certification at age

1 1

,

Desiree Campbell explored the

hidden world beneath the waves

at every opportunity.

Campbell's father sparked her interest in scuba diving. After

he was

and her mother "It totally

to

freaked

he encouraged Campbell

certified,

go on one

me out at first;

1

like,

was really nervous," 'This

is

really cool.'"

Both Campbell and her mother were so excited by their

first

experience that they immediately enrolled in

a certification class. During the class, Campbell's dives

were limited to a pool at the training

facility.

Campbell

and her mother made the five-hour drive from

hometown

of Eldon, Mo., toNorfork, Ark., to take the

certification "I

exam.

let

you do

it

until you're 12,"

Campbell said. "But

Campbell's young age concerned certification officials,

but because of her demonstrated maturity and her take a certification

determination they agreed to

let

exam. In order to

must show that they have

the basic

skills

"Here 1 am,

surrounded by adults, and I'm

terrified

that I'm not going to do something right," Campbell said. "1 can't

screw up, not only because of the

test,

but

because mistakes can result in serious health problems." Certified in

276:

Pfopi

f

December, Campbell went

t)n

her

I

Campbell said.

saw a sea

"It

was

first

like

a 60-foot dive,

turtle, spider

and

I

crab and

everywhere he took me

there was something else."

Shaking her head first

amazement, Campbell said since

in

dive her outlook on scuba diving has changed

drastically. "I started

out just thinking this would be a cool hobby;

now it's an obsession," Campbell me who am."

said. "It's really

made

I

According to Campbell, every dive alters her outlook

on

life.

"You're in a whole

new world," Campbell said. "You're

seeing things that a majority of people never get to see;

almost

spiritual."

Not only has the sport sparked changes in Campbell's perceptions on life, but it also changed her outlook on "It really

issues.

opens your

eyes,

making you more aware of

the world and more aware of the issues," Campbell said. "If people are

messing

point in going

down

it

up, then

soon there

will

be no

there."

Because of her passion

necessary to complete a lake dive. 1 1 ,

eel,"

environmental

wasn't about to wait."

pass, divers

got to see so much.

it's

almost didn't get to get certified because they usually

don't I

their

life.

went with a dive master on

"I

her

trial dive.

Campbell said. "But then 1 was

her first taste of ocean diving, an experience that would

change her

determination and passion for adventure.

for

scuba diving, Campbell

was certain she would move to Florida

after graduation.

A recreation major, her goal was to eventually become a full-time diving instructor.

"I'm definitely atmosphere;

I

whenever

scuba diving excursion in January. Traveling with her

dives

family to South Bimini in the Bahamas, Campbell had

parents said

if

moving down

there.

I

love the idea of being able to I

want

to,"

Campbell

love the

do cxean

said. "Plus,

my

I'm going, they're going to follow me."


Shull. Ptullip

Sirfmng, Krrra Siimi. Heather Sfc4m, Peter

Smith.

Con

South. )eiuiiicr •

Smith.

Krv*a>

\unAmf

Smrth. Mtru»a« Smith. SfeplkMur Snv^rr. Nlchofa*

SolcmKm. Amiwr 3^SVprt«

LMI^t

•i«nM.RarM

CAMPBEL

1:277


Stepheiuont Lindsay Steward.

DarU

Stoburg, Peggv Stone, Benjamin Stull, Lisa

Stumme, Lori Summers, Lori

Svottoda. Lesley

Swearingin, Tracy

Swedberg, Sarah

Swope, Corey Sychra, Tami Tague, Troy Talone, Nick

Tamprateep, Jenna Tapps, Tyler Terry, Stephen

Teutsch,

Amy

Tlieulen, Stacy

Thomas, Janson Thomas, Scott

Thomas, Stephanie Thompson, Jason Thomsen, Sara Tindall, Jamie

Tmker-Fortel, Lillian

Todd, Aaron

Toebben, Julie

Townley, Joanna Tripp, Kathleen

Trower, Angela Turner, Lewis

Twombly, Tiffany Umscheid, Amanda Van Buskirk, Emily

Van Dusseldorp, Katie Vance, Barbara Vandermillion, Robert

Verbeck, Mary

Vescovo, Laura

Vmci, Amber Vo^er, Heather

F VoDtmann, Brittni Vorm, Lindsey Vorthmann, Cassi Vostrez. Liz

Wagenknecht, Rainett Waldo, Nick Walker.

EmUy

i'

^

P-i//'

;

I

It

^ISBS

Walker, Jestica Wallace, Sarah WaUer. Charles Wasson, Dustin

Wataon, Nicht^as

Watu, Kylie Weaver, Lindsey

Webb, Fak>hn Wcis. Kimberiy Weis, Marcia Wcstlake, Aaron

Whiaton, Jennifer While, Kecly Wicker, Rence

Wieac.Cara WiUt, Jami Wilfred. Shalini

Wilkinson, Leslie Williams, Adina Williams,

Amber

Williams, Bctay

27g:|

PEOPLE

1


RflCtlEL

CMWfORD

iiiMlJHNMikiR

5T Dflnnr

Housed

finD

Qom

sfinciifz

her practice

room, Rachtl Crawford's

coundatt commcndaciont

coww 'I

the walls.

would have not chosen

twirling

my

if it

sister,"

weren't for

Crawford

said,

photo by Ttrryn Undtty

An age of success twirling to a close I^H

he haniwocid floor, scufiied and worn, was as much a( a testament to her success as the awards and trophies towenng above. Kachd Crawibrd's home studio told of a life of tu-trling that began when she was 2 yeats old. She attributes part i^her accompluthments to her sister Elisabeth,

who also

twiHcd.

Qtowing up with a sister who panicipated

in

the same sport did not produce rivalry for Ciawford.

"We both have our own styles," Qawfofd said, "^e leam from eadt othet'

Since 1985, Ciawfeid had competed in a week-long has placed in the top five

on an araunl bsHS and

has been one of the top petformcn in state competition.

To shaipen titness

her skilb, Crawford

program

Piiates,

bepm

ballet,

the

other cardiovascular workouts

nd weight lifting. To tram mentally, she visualized her routine*,

her

watched video* and

tried to

buiU confidence

abilities.

you're at

year."

the wutkload of a college education

her twirling career.

thought about quitting several times," Crawford

"But

I

money my

When

it

always think about the family and

I

came time

amount of time and

have devoted to

to decide

twirling."

on a college, Crawford

chose the closeness of her fomily in Maryville over institutions elsewhere.

"Going to early-morning

practice, attending

competitions and going to lessoas without

from home," Crawfbtd

While

made Crawfatd

at

my

family

said.

Northwest, Ctawfoid enjoyed performinK

at collegiate ftxxball

"Here, the crowd

and

is

baiiketball

games.

wortdetfiil," Crawfbid said.

They

are really supportive."

With only two yean of

NCAA

eligibility left,

Crawford knew her days were numbered. The beiwfits

*'0

*

of her twirling, such a* a good work ethic and physical fitness

The demand for maintaining a competitive edge and Lfuestian

when

always hard," Crawford said.

support system was a drawback to attending college away

ranonal twirling competition at h4otie Dtvne University. Site

at the stress level

Whenever she thought about giving it up, Crawford thou^t about the years of practice and the support her "I

if it

wirling leanra in Dallas, something Ciawfocd sti II does

in

by

said.

to

is

it's

"Maintaining that (position) becomes more difficult year

my sisto;' Ciawibid Mid. *Ii is much easier to excel

rqpilariy.

that

family gave her.

would twc have dwien twirling

when you have somebody to watch." Smce the agt of five, Qawfeid and her sister attended

iiT

"Anybody

the top level,

hadn't been

*l kjr

r

in

mm

woukj continue to

assist

her in the future.

When Crawford decided to leave twirling, she woukJ have a lot to show for it. Shelves of trophies and awnd* served as a reminder of a talented and MCoeMfol poK.

CRAWFORD

.11')


Willianu.

Sucy

WiImhi, Anita

WimbUh, Kathryn Winecoff, Sarah Winkler, Jennifer

Wiu,

Jill

Win, Jamie

Wolfe,

Stdb

Wnght. Rachelle York. Benjamin Younf(,

LinduY

Young, Sara

Young, Tyler Younghans, Jennifer

ZcntM-, Katie

Shannon ZimmerKhied. Erin Zicgler,

Zolnowtki,

Adam

Zuerlcin, Sarah

Zuk,

220:

Propi

f

Amy


DflHELLE

5Y MISY

BrouM mW coon to woouta

Iff

n

(lMpÂŤ3sa(Hi. 1i au|^ ID* lOfnin*; if k okM |4 noun to fic

lomcowif nfpC

liMn dw'xii^ai

n ^K*.* Braua

Last dance perfects motivation Mciplme and perfect ion Um,

instilled

reasorts to

abandon

to the sport,

DaNelle Brouse's high school graduation brought it the end of her drive to become a professional daiKer, a passion that once consumed her. Brouse began dancing at age four. By the time she was 10, she was travelling 45 minutes everyday to with

"Ever since

I

and ballet classes. was a little girl wanted I

professional dancer," Brouse said.

When focused

time for a social "1

ballet, that

she had

m

little

life.

danced every night and all weekcnd-every weekend." Brouse was attracted to ballet because she loved the control associated with the dance form. "It was the discipline," Brouse said. "Every other form b very free. With ballet you are regulated from

said. "I

something as

remained

in

New

York City. Brouse

New York for a few weeks, taking classes

Broadway DaiKe Academy. was full of itervousness and anticipation. I knew

at the "I I

couldn't hang in with the fan atu] tap classes, but

I

thout^l

'It

had a chance with ballet." Brouse said. was after the firK claw that I realized I didn't

suck."

1

of Peculiar,

a lot of

in the

it,

Mo.

confidence," Brouse said.

think

1

could have done

I

a professional."

as a career or to attend college,

degree offered more

it

it

Brouse

felt

a

stability.

and whether

for practical reasons,

was right or wrong

I

always wonder," Brouse

will

Brouse no longer dances, nor intends Her intense personality does not allow her dance as a leisure activity.

to

do

be back

at the level

I

was

"1

at,

know

I

so.

to pursue

"I'm borderline obsessive-compulsive with perfectionism," Brouse said.

my

could never

and that would he

unacceptable to me."

Though dancing was no Brouse said she was

still

longer a part of her

life,

tremendously affected by

her years as a dancer. "It

to an unparalleled

opportunity. Brouse was part of a dance troupe that at nationals in

chance

Faced with the decision to continue pursuing

dance

eyeball to fingertip."

competed

me

"Looking back on

wasn't the normal high school student," Brouse

Her diligence gave way

a

said.

she reached high school, Brouse was

on dance, primarily

hometown gave

"It

"I sacrificed

to be a

had

realization that she

professional dance world hit her after she returned

to her

a dream.

With the intention of returning

atteixl tap, jazi

The

by countless

hours of practice and repetition, eventually became

it

taught

me self-motivation.

If

you're not doing

do it," Brouse said. "I'll fight way through anything if I really want

for yourself, don't

my

something."

Not only did dance motivation,

it

also

instill in

Brouse an inner

compelled her to pursue a career

in the creative ans.

With her sight

set

on graduating with

a degree in

English and minor in writing. BriHise pursued her

academic career with the same drive she invested in her

dancing years ago.

BROUSE

2^1


bl^flDfORD

PflTE 5T

ttm

OflLlIZ

Raye Bradford dealt with her father's death while taking classes

and

living

away fronn

her family. "They evolved certain way. Living their

without

my dad

in a

lives

there, and

I

wasn't there to be part of that,"

Raye

said.

photo by Matt Frye

Grief at a distance trolling

,

emotions.

1

"When

back from supper with her boyfriend

on a seemingly mundane Thursday evening, November 2001 permanently etched into Raye Bradford's mind 1 after learning her father had passed. "I came out of my body and reacted with all of the

the

According hardest.

Science and Computing, she snuggled to adjust to her

"It's

weird;

She

felt

it's

like

1

had these other

hadn't ever met," Bradford said.

your family

is

when her mother

began dating a man two months after her father's death.

first

realizing

home was

the

religion

"1

turned around and in the back comer by the door

was

my dad

in his favorite jacket

1

couldn't

moon and practicing

you choose, then you go to a

happy place, Bradford said. "You pick your path but you have to follow your path."

dad

Finals stared Bradford in the face a little over

one

and he

is

smiling. That's a

"1

see a ghost;

good

A year had passed since Samuel's death, and due to

moments when she advice.

listened to

She reverted back

him speak words

provided concerning school.

When grades got

While the

after effects of her father's death

sometimes made daily

life

a struggle, she looked to the

future with goals she defines as "bright

"Emotions you have are emotions you have, give

her mind from his funeral.

those emotions because you miss out

Nate

Bcrwiiik, AlyRsa

Blount, Ralph Blum, Michael Bradford, Rachel Brtiiham, Tcil

BfHriwthlgU Anthony Chriatcfucn,

Loit,

CoMBfcc, Rachel Divto. Lauren Davitt Stephanie

and shiny stars"

for the future.

once

Bell,

tough,

she said she did not want to do anything.

appearance was by replaying a type of "mini-movie" in

Benedict, Joaiah

of

to the support her father

them

Beir-Hart, Brittany

it's

sign."

bad memory the only way she remembered his

a

kind of see

my

throughish," Bradford said.

year after her father's death, reminding her of the

the self-defined religion, Christian- Wiccan.

Asher, Clark

People

was

from the Academy,

by talking to the

Bahram-ahi, Emilv

2^2:1

my mom, and I miss

said. "I

Sitting outside of her house, she dealt with her father's afterlife

mutated."

her family was "transitioning," and support

faded in and out. Emotions escalated

also lost

She envisioned her father to still be sitting on

"Whatever

I

I

to Bradford, the first trip

"When 1 went home

familie's changes.

wasn't there anymore.

my dad

go in the house because Dad wasn't going to be there."

and addiction problems.

Attending the Missouri Academy of Mathematics

people there that

lost

knew, Bradford

that she was going to behave like a 19-year-old person."

Bradford's father, Samuel, died in his sleep at 47 years old after battling a medical history of kidney

"My home

1

I

the couch in his favorite hat.

wailed," Bradford said.

transplant, heart

mom

their credit," Bradford said. "Feel in a while

when you have

them every

time, but don't live

on your

life."


B^^SR

Dmms, Lann lcluM<II.S«iM

l**nwr. Dana

SM*h AtrM

GlUrtfHr. C»tlMMB.

(»lmn. Erica i»arh»tn. )ttk (iraf. Prtrr

iSS^B^B nSIT

HcTvsft, jtm

HUl.

Tmv

Hinr*. Kcndni

Hoffman. Mkhftd Hirtmrr, Brittany

Hunt, Ca»Mndra

UMI.

KatM-

Inl, B«i

UmAi

Jackaon.

)ml«rh, Jordjin, Strplufiic

SuMn

Kerr,

Kline, Daniel

Lukk. JcfUm

Lawrence, joafcus Le. TiHani Lultrdl,

Andrew

Mayet, Jedkliah Mefau. Ami

NIcMoa Nkboha

Newport. Parker, Pale,

CofT

Peeli.

PCflMde, Chriadne

PoMdhMarta

Pmedel. RickanI Reter. Allen

Rofcinnn, Ntcbolaa Roundft.

Iftaac

Rudolph. Stephen Rvcsek, William

^fll

Service. Tnivla Shaffier.

!i>>aiiai>

SireKk. Caaaandra SMffleliran. Daniel

TdlMllliachev. Vladiala«

/^.

Tranl. Michael

Tank VI-)M<Mk«ielkl

Tdlocfc.CkM<» TwHcbaa, TrtMHi

U Anna

AU

>K^-f^A Waa»r.)eMM^ Wan|> (tnvfv Well%.

TlmiM

Wlti»M<.Tad Wilhaaa,KTb '••••^

RflW^^I

Bradford |:2?3


1 1 1

8 61

3

1

Alpha Kappa Lambda

Alpha

Mu Gamma

Alpha

Psi

1

B

40

174

Omega 74 1

Alpha Sigma Alpha 140, 146

118,130, 131,137

Alsup, Richard Alvarez, Thomas

236, 237

Backenstoss.

American Association of Family and

212, 255

Consumer

Baek, 9,

Beagley, Joah

108. 193 1

Bearcat Sweethearts 21, 159

Doosan 50 255

Bearcat Voice 158

Beasley Daniel

Bagley, Lacey

191, 282

Beatty Aaron

Baier,

Bailey,

Leigh 255

Becker, Bryan

Bailey,

Mike

Beeny, Karen

124 Music 19

Amnesty International 30,31 Anand,Akshay 164, 175, 254 And They Danced Real Slow in

Bailey,

Rachel 241

2Pac 71

Jackson 2

Bain Painting, Inc. 288

Abdul, Paula 90

Anderson, Jason

Chuck 130

Abele.

Abele, Matt

137

130.

48 160,

190

Anderson,

122,

160,

112,

Jill

Trenton

48

1

162

Being a

241, 273

Beinor, Stephen

Baker, Kristin

Accounting Society

Anderson, Michael 86, 95

Baker,

Anderson, Roy 193, 223

Baker, Susan

Anderson, Steve 148

Baldon. Kathryn 255

Bell,

Anderson, Tiffany 168, 254

Baldwin. Kerry

Bell

Ackerman, Derick 168, 254 Acklin, Kinsey

ACM

254

188,

Amy 254

Andrews,

Andrews, Corey

172

2

Andrews, Katie 182, 241

Adams, Becky 149, 152 Adams, David 254

Anello, Stephanie

Adams, Jenny 176 Adams, PhyUis 241 Adams, Ades,

254

159,

Starlith

Adkins Alison

178

Adkins, Joni

Adkison,

Elisa

8

1

Advantage Week

Roone 95

Armstrong, Lance 9

Barlow. JiU

Armstrong, Ryan 148

AgClub 173 Ag Council 74 Ag Parmers Cooperative 305

Arnold, Rory

1

Albanez.Jake

Ascheman, Paul 204. 254 Ashbacher. Anna 146, 254

Bartel,

1

1

Asher, Clark

Allee.

191,

254

5

148

1

John

173,

Bauer,

Aubrey, Mark

1

59

AutryJill

58,

Auxiliary

100

75

1 1

Avula, Keerthi

Allred, Ashley

165.168. 254

158.

Almottar. Kasene 24

Alpha

Gamma Rho

Awtry, Ayala,

Jill

1

46

164,

255

169,

150

1

168

150, 170,

Azarkane. Nizar

148.

255

255

139

137,

Megan

Bertels, Kurt

Bessler.

Jenna 160. 257

176

187

Bickford. Angela

1

48

169. 241

Biere. Jennifer

Biermann, Danelle 257 Biggie, Lloyd

95

Bikoko, Chikulupati 24

Joseph

Bilka.

146

Billesbach.Tom 214, 221 160,

255

Bins. Bethany

Bisbee. Bonnie

Baumli,Vickey 268

Bishop, Barbie

Baur, Tiffany

168,

BaxleyNiki 169, 173,

Baxter,

49,

185

Bid Day 155

176

Ryan 158, 168, 255

Baxter, Evie

160

180,

1

1

Beta Beta Beta

160,

149,

152.

89

ofthe Beef 140

157,

257

Berwick. Alyssa 282

160, 255

Christopher

160,

Milton 95

Berle,

Berry, Heather

188

33 1

Berger, Sean

Bernhardt, 168.

65

95

Baumli. Lisa 188, 241

156,

Dan 144, 162,

Ayers, Daniel

255

44

Baumgartner, Sarah 146,

59

Choir 14

193,254

180,

Tim 139 Bauman, Megan 130

Aversman, Ashley 254

163,

201

78,

Baudoin, Chad 153

Students 171

1

Alhanof Black Collegians Gospel Dave

Battiato,

Battle

Bauer,

Alliance of Black Collegians

Allison.

174

1

Amanda 149

Berg, Dave

Andrew 160

Basinger, Jessica

146,

167,

146.

Asmussen, Richard 148

Association of Nontraditional

87

1

Shelby

Barton, Tiffany

ogy Professionals

4.

Andrea

37. 45,

166,

Askreen, Mary 234. 235

60

Muhammad

21.

15.

Barton, Becky

254

Berg,

Berger, Nicole

Bartholow, Malinda

150

Rachel 241

14.

Bartine, Eric

Association of Information Technol-

Allen. Candice 241 Allen.

168,241

154,

Aspegren. Rick

160

Albertson, Shane

Alden, Naulie

120,

11.

Barth,

154,

Askey. Stefani

4,

Bartels.

Ashlock, Jamie 254

182, 241 11.

76, 152,

282

Ashley Angle

160, 241

Albright, Jamie

Benton, Crystal

168

Barrett, Olivia

Ahrens, Christine

1

Benson, Jordan 257

Artman, Carrie 188

64

1

Barmann, Tiffany 188, 255

1

2

Barmann, Sarah 154, 168, 255

159,

72

Amy

Benson, Joel 207

Barnes, Taylor

84 Agronomy Club 74 Ahlin. Ashley 254

Akins. Jon

Benson,

193, 255

Barnard, Jenna

Agnew, Mike 24

10,

Bennett, Rebecca 257

165, 186

154,

Arrowhead 104, 106, 107, 109 Arthur, Lindsey 254

Aggarwal, Tarun

Akers, Kara

Bennett, Julie 257

1

Arnold, Sarah 300

1

165, 257

Bennett, John 257

161,

160

109, 115

Bennaciri, Ibtihal

159,

Agriculture Ambassadors

Rob

Beninga, Mike

169,

154, 257

Mandy 257

148, 255

154,

1

Ahlrichs.

188, 241

257

Benedict. Kenneth

159, 255

2

152, 257

60

Owen

Bengtson,

Hannah

Barlow, Jeremy

1

64

Barlow, Jeff 66, 92

Armstrong, Kelly 162

149,

Bender, Bobi

Benedict. Josiah 282

Movsar 82

Barfoot,

48

Belton, Katie

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Barbour, Jamie 255

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130,168

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Mar jean

8

1

48

1

243

Dotson, William 283

1

Mark

F

160

Dotson, Laura 283

189

16

Pagan, The

Eimer,

Deckard, Kristen

Dan 41

Ethos

Eye, Derek

Edwards, Kara 258

1

Andrea 172, 243

Estrin,

Wendy Ewing,Adam

Edwards, Carla 188

Adam

Essig, Estes,

Evans,

185, 283

Eickhoff, Ashley

192, 243

46 Annie 258 1

Evans, Janis 243

1

Ehlers,

182, 243

Amy

Evans,

80

EgLnoire, Jeramie

150

Kim

Espeer,

Edmonds, John 32, 115, 116 Edwards, Bryson 48 Edwards, Bud 12

Eggers,Traci

192

170,

150

Erman, Ozden Gokboga 148

Evans, Alicia

Edwards, Zach 112,

182,

Erickson, Grant

304

Egeland, Carla

203

190,

181

102,

Melik 148,

Ercanli,

David 172

Dodd, Regan 139

1

Epperson, Tara

Euston,

Edwards, Kristen 193

Megan 86

180,

Erbek, Ethan 6

165

1

89

1

208

Ethridge, Rusty

Dotson, Emily 240

Deao, Jamie

1

Ensminger, Staci

258

Dodd, Daley 258

Dotson,Alane 168,

Dean,Thad 176, 207, 243

84 258

Entwisde, John 95

Eboh, Kenneth 115

159,

Dothage, Jon

20

Chuck

English, Juanita

148

Eckstein, Sasha

Doolittle, Stephanie

1

155

154,

Engle, Gretchen

Dishman, Lee 147

Dawson

Day, Leah

1

Engel, Nathan

Easterla,

Donnelly, Jerry 223

258

7

Enderle,

EarthShare

Davisson, Lindsey 258 Carissa

Eminem

Duncan, Amanda 190, 258

Dinnius, Mark 283

Donalson, Danielle 160,

,

Emberton, Katie 258

60

1

Dulle, Jeremy

Dimmitt, Kimberly 151, 243

Ben 193

7

Emison, Chris 147, 258

Eagen, Jessica

Dombrowski, Lydia 159, 258

154, 238

1

Duke, Linda 214, 221

Eades, Virgil

Davis, William

Davison, Melissa

Dugan, Sean 150

E

95

Davis Stephanie 282

150

Elum, William 166

11,

Dolt,

,

EUwanger, Megan

Dye, Michael

165,

282

Davis, Lauren

Duffey Michael 243

Dugan, Brian 150

7

1

Erwin,Ashlee 161,

178,

54

1

Dockus-Ahlrichs, Katy

243

Ryan 133

Ernst,

152,

Davis, Latonya 8,

Mandy

Ellis,

66

173,

Dix, Emily

1

Ellis,

54

Duvall, David

160

Divis, Bridget

154, 258 1

174, 258

Duffey Keith 258

1

1

188, 189, 243

159,

Nancy 223 Digiovanni, Anthony 150 Digiovanni, Lisa 154,258

Ditsch,

157

Jennifer

Dust, Sister Carol 248

152,

Disselhoff,

243

Davis, Jennifer

Davis, Neal

185, 258

73

Davis, Holly

Davis,

9,

258

48

Davis, Cherokie Davis, Diane

172,

Ellis,

Dickerson, Teresa 63

Diagnan, Ryan

Dillon, Kristina

Davidson, Lisa 31, 189

Holly

Dieckhoff, Kristin 258

258

172,

Dijkstra, Edsger

1

Dave Matthews Band

1

207

Dignan, Kyle 160

Daunter, Jason 2

Davis, Brett

168,

Diggs,

4

Daugherty, Mavie

Davis, Angela

258

De Young, Ron 79

151,

146

Dauner,Jill

182,

Ellis,

Dungeons and Dragons 65 Dunlap, Michael 258 Dunn, Chris 158, 160, 243 Dunn, Phillip 258 Dunn, Rebecca 11, 160, 161 Dunn, Sally 189, 208, 209 Dunnell, Rebecca 208 Dunwoody, Amanda 49, 243 Durmus, Levent 178

Dickens, Kate

Dargin,Troy 212

1

176,

Dicke, Tarryn

165,

Lisa

169,

1

MeUssa 181

Elliott,

148

Duggan, Michael

60

1

Dey,Jenna 150,

196

Daniels, Sarah

Daudna,

146

Dewhirst, Robert

1

Datlatt,

182

176,

Deweese, Jeff 258

146,

Daniel, Karen

Ucy

140, 153

243

Duering, Brian

189

160,

Dennis, Heather

166,

154

Dark, Kara

Dennis, Emily

Amy

Duer, Kyle

Dettmer, Emily 191

98, 118,

Damrow, Barton 46 Danek, Megan 110, 120, 121 Daniel,

Dudley,

Denney, Meghan 258

Derr,

Dake, Brooke 258

Dalton.Jake

Dubolino, Tony

163, 258

Dencklau, Dani

DePriest, Jarrett

11,

Dale, Terra

178

Department of Higher Education 246 DePeralta, Ebony 1 89

Dahm,Jeff 150 Daily, Kyle

Demir, Sibel

Dempsey, Peter 283

91

1

Festival Fiala,

261

Ron 207 of Cultures 28

LaciAnn 161, 178, 189

Fichtner,

Amanda 261


67

i

Ptedlcr.

Ben 2b

Firldrr.

Fl)(g.

128

Fisher.

176

)4inn

Fisher.

178 Finch.

IIS

Plndlcy.

I

A 160

Knsirn ISO. 261

Megan

Fisher,

Richard

Fisher, Sarah

176. I8S.

S3

261

Franc

F randsen . Jetini fer

Frank.

Amy

Flinn. Casey

1

IIS

Freeman, Brock 137

Frerking.

6

1

Fontaine. Gelina

Acme

261

Fritke.

130 1

182. 22S. 261

ISI.

Foot. Jeffrey

240

Fritz.

R>rd. David

160.

Ford. Tiara

I

162

151,

152.

S9

161.

Forensics

an inirrKroon tlut i)7utcd

ito btUtffmtaaaitmtiAtiuBimao(2BOi.flmi,y,TmymLm^

178.

Ricky

29

I

2

160

IIS.

261

SO

207 185. 207

1

192 178. 243

FuUbright. Brad

243

Fuller.

149. 243

Fuller.

152

160.

159,261 170

Connie 300

FuUer. Kayla

Foxx. Charmel 243

261

1

1

Frost. Rochelle

Carrol

184.

Fuentes. Ben 26.71.

Amanda 243

146.

1

177.

163,

Frye. Matt

Chad 118. 137. 261

Foy, Nicole

174.

Fuelling. Heidi

Fox. Christopher

28.

Froment. Mary

Fry.

261

Fox, Samantha

1

Frucht. Suzanne

168

261

149.

Sharon 45

Frucht. Rick

243

46

Forsen. Michelle

Fox.

177.

178 1

Fowler.

Miu Sam.

172.

Forrester. Allison

Foss, Julie

Hiutfa

I6S.

178.192

148

Froehlich, Aaron

Fordyce. Lori

conu onto

173.

Fries-Britt

8;

152.

Fnedrich. Lacy

S

Vending 303

Focxl,

Ifigfawajr 71

Derek

Fnedench, Laura 1

261

154,

149,

Frerking. Lindsey

170,

Raymond

Kan

261

Gemayel 146 160,

170. 261

169.

Wayne 190

Frederick.

.

243

172,

Frederick. Hrin

46

Florence Alabama

243

S

I

I

Frankeii Hall Council 162

37

I

24 3

Frankrn, Alane

I2S. 127

124.

Florea.Wes 130.

Floyd.

261

29. I8S.

Gabe

192

146.

Fleischniann.Todd 243

Fonoti.

from U.S.

Cinny

Flaheny. Randi 261

Folwer, Chad,

Trafiic

i>.

Francis, Heidi

Flynn, Julie

c>jmiwuJnfc»ii»*coJq»iau»dwpdcath».Tlicio«daioMructioo began in 19S8 ind u^at mic

60

Francis, Alexa

Flag Raising 28

Flohr. Charlie

166, 261 I

261

Flemmings. Craig 243

137

Fisher,

146,

Fixter. TilTany

Fleming.

168

162.

243

148

Mail

Frailey,

Flizgerald. Jennifer

Fleming. SioH

JO,

131.

Fisher. Mitt

Ryin 261

Rndicy. Timothy 9S Flnkr.

160.

Fisher.Jill

RndlnJ^rrd IIS

261

Denys 9S

Fliher. Jesse

137.

HMih

166.

Becky 24

Fiiher. Chniiin

Fuuiici^ MAiugrnirni Auocutiun

I6S.

i8

ftsh, Brian

Third Bank 297

Fiugerald. Erica 283

243

FtKher. BriltAny

261

Fields. Tt-nriilu

Ken I8J

Fuuiey. Kendri

Brn 147

Flria>. J<mi

Fifth

Finnrgiii.

I

Ricturd 207

Field.

154.

261

Nancy 243 207

Fulton. Richard

%iA Sigma

Congratulations Seniors! We will miss you !

2*?) il


9

6

1

6 55

Griffm, Rebecca

Glab. Joe

Funston, Chanda

Glasnapp. Mehssa

Emmy

Furrow,

Glasnapp, Nick

261

G

6S

1

,

261

Gaelforce 72

Mo

Galbraith,

Gritton. Jessica

Meghan Gambhn, Chad

1

261

Gross, Pat 225

Goad. Craig 2

Groumoutis. Tina 2

Grosse, Ashley

118.

119.

Hamilton, Megan 21,

GoUady, Shedrick 159, 261

Guhani, Rudolph 89

Hamilton, Natalie 2

157

Gomel, David 146

GuUick, Marlene

179, 202

Gomez, Anthony 261

Gumm, Bobby

Gonzales. Rebecca 261

Guns, Young 71

Gonzalez. Ada Lucia 162,169,261

Gurley, Kris

193, 261

192

182,

Goldstein, Nicole

54

1

181

Goodall. Kris

Goodman, GouldEvans 288

Dana 283

Goodsell, Joel

155

154,

Goold, Michelle 122,

Garrett, Matt

159

Goos, Gerrad

160

1

Gorham.Jack 283 Gorman, Robert 243

1

49

90,

182

Gutierrez, Janeris

243

Gutschenritter, Pete

184, 262

Handlos, Jacqueline

Haberyan. Kurt 207

Haney, Astra

Gould. Brian 159

Goymerac, Mike Graber, Julie

Gerlach,Troy

133

Graduate School 236.237

1

48

152

Grame, Bess

Ground,

261

180. 190. 202

Common

Graves, Brian

1

Graves, Eddie

Gibson, Scott 261

Graves,

147 115, 243

Ryan 148

168, 262

Gray Ryan SB 148,243 Great White 86 Greely,

Gilgour, Samara

Green, Ben

8

Derek 150, 261

283

Gillespie, Sarah Gillette.

HoUi 120

155, 262

154.

Green Day

McKemy Center for Lifelong

1

Greenwheel 40 Greek Week 76 Grefe, Holly

Gilson.Alysa 283

Gregg. Tiffany 243

Cinder, Laura

1

I

84

52

Ginzburg, Alexander 95 Girdner,

JfH!

Givens, Joel Giza, Melissa

2^2:1

243 I

1

5

243

Missouri Educational

Green, Clarence 34, 54

Gilmore, Erica 226

Gilson. Melissa

Northwest

rtuuK

262

Becky 9

Green, Adolph 95

George 223

62

Sam 177

Greeley, Beth

214, 221

1

60

Gildehaus, Luke 261

Gillespie,

Flexible Learning!

70

1

Grant, Malinda

Gratopp. Apryl 2 6

149

1

262

Graf Peter 283

69

Gibson, Chris 208

Gille,

1

Graduation 79, 80

Gibb, Maurice 95

Gilbert, Steve

169,

Hanks, Rita 2

89

Grabowski. Christine

Gilbert,

Haney, Laura

166,262

Opening the Door for

1 1

65

1

120

Giddings, Seth

162

135,

159, 262

Governor's Youth Council 246

Gerlach,Terri

Gibson, Troy

Hancock. Herbie 19

Handler, Ruth 95

Goudge. Ted 203

Gibler, Kia

Hance, Ryan 172

Haberyan. April 228. 229

Undsay 152, 188, 215, 261 Geology Club 180, 202 Gerdes, Mike 50

Gibler, Erin

1

9

Handicap Accessibility 46, 49

Gehring, Angela 149, 261

Gianchino, Molly

1

Handa, Sachie 51, 160, 165, 262

Hackmann. Bethany 262

1

22 1

Hand, Michaela 174, 243

Hackler. Ashley

Giambrone, Vinny

1

1

Goudge,

Lurenda 261

Angela

Hanson, Katy

Goudge, Beth 225

59

.

154, 262

Gegen, Curtis 168, 261

1

Hammon

Gutelius. Erica

Gedwillo, Brian 261

Geier,

Hammerskin 74

Hammontree. Erica 134. 135 Hampton, Andy

50

Gottsch, Nichole

1

130

1 1

1

Gaunt, Thomas 38

1

119,

Gustafson, Jon

Gotti,John 95

Eric

5

Hamilton, Jason 220

Hammond. Nancy

Gaukel, Karis 243

152, 243

1 1

Hamilton, Barbara 2 Hamilton, Katie 21, 238

50

H

1 1

Gordon, Anne 166

Gaston, Kyle 243

Germer, Anitra

262

75.

Halverson, Jennifer 243

1

Hamilton, Mark 2

Godsey, Karina

154, 261

Gerlt,

243

Halsey. Stephanie

Guhde, Shelly 169, 243

48

1

Garrett, Julie

1

160

Guettermaim, Luke 148

Garland, Logan 261

Gerken, Carrie

137.

Goldsmith, Ciara 159, 173

Gansen, Hannah 162,

146

Brad 160

Halsey. Sarah

Guest, Kelsee

Gannon, Rich 91

Gatrel, Jeffrey

Hall.

Gokboga, Ozden 148,261

Gambhn, Chad 19

243

243

Goecker, Jordan 7 2

1

Gates, Hillary

182,

Hamblin, David

63

Gamma Chi 155, 156, Gamma Theta Upsilon

Haley Mick 9

Gross, Caroline 26,149,

Tony 115. 220 Gnefkow, Jennifer 98, 112. 122 1

Hahn. Melissa 169

Hamar. Zsolt 73

MeUssa 190, 192, 261

Garner,

Glenn, Erica 283

Gruden.John 91 Grudzinski. Mike 42. 43 Gruwell, Erin 74

160, 261

Galvin,

Hagedom. Susan 262

236 262

Groves, Christie 262

Gahndo, Jorge 93 Galitz,

Hagan.Jeff 262

Grinchuk. Olena 262 Grispino. Frank

71.

Hafemeister. Eric 243

Grinchuk. Leana 165

Glaus, Troy 90

15,

5111

Haddock. Gregory 203

165

148

Griffm. Scott

1 1

Goddard, Ryan

176, 261

ISO.

Abby 166, 261

Gale, Tiffany

48

1

Goddard, Melanie 64

213

Galate, Christy

1

Glover.

Gabidoulline, Anvar

Gaffney,

178

115,

Glover, Gloriana

Gaa, Stephanie 236

154

137,

Glasscock, Dakota

6

5

115

Funk, Christina 261

190

5

1

146,

262

Gregory. Abbot 4, 24

Gregory, Jason

1

186

Greisen. Chris

108,

184

Griffm, Dustin

800 UNIVERSITY DR - MARYVILLE PH: (660)562-1113 FAX: (660)562-1949

46

Greier. Lindsay

Grell. Clark

Learning

150

114

WORKING TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF EDUCATION THROUGH TECHNOLOGY


6

H*n«rn. Betsy 192. 262 HAasrn. Kalir

I

SO.

262

Harder.

Ambra 63

Hardinji.

176

Haiuun.Therrva 262

Hardue, James

Han/rlka. Roxannr 243

Hardy. Bart

Hardw. Jinw^ 146. 177

Hardy. Ty lor

HArdc«. Nancy

Hargrea\rs. Alan

Harder, Tt>m

2

I6S 1

Harden. Leon 262

Harness. Taylor S2.

Danny 178. 192

Harp.

Harr. Sarah

1

48

Harris.

Harris. Jertnell

1

S

I

263

Harris,

S9

26}

187.

263

ISO.

hndsay 263

Harris. Mil

137.243 ]ami 243

Harness. Ben

1

180.

Harris. Chris

Harman.Aiu) 184. 243

163

)<)«

Harris. Kirk Harris. Laura

Harnn^con. Brandi

143

Harris.

263

Harrelson. Andrea

IIS

167

166.

26. 148

Jeff

hdlc

Harrison, Jennifer

243

24

169.

3

9S

Harris, Rlthard

1S9. 169.

243

Harrison, Patricia 263 Hart. Alexis

S4

I

168

Hart. Kli/atH-ih Hart. Julia

243

Hart, Lois

168

Hart,

Ryan

1

SO

Han,Stesen ISO, 168. 263 160

Hartle, Anj^ela

Hart man Jessica

243

,

Harton. Ralph

7

1

Harvey. Beatrice Harvey. Scott

1

263

S9.

86

1

Harwood. Peggy 42 Hislag. April SO. 263 Hastings. Stephanie

1

263

163,

S9.

Hatcher, Robert 9S Hatfield.

Marcy I6S

Haiterman, Erica Havskins. Matt

Hawley. Kaiy Hayes. Joy

I

128,

169.

162.

263

180

263

146.

Haynes, Charles Haynes, Steven

129.

50

102. 2

1

263

2

Hays, Beth 263 \lAit

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three.

ffci*f

Hays. Matt

193

Hay worth. Chadd 243 Head, Amanda 263

KNWT-TV would _.^. like to

congratulate our seniors! Bobby 1

Gumm

Bill

Felps

Kimberly Ernst

Joe Cox

Your hard work will be missed both on and

Sara Magnus

AndyTownsend

off the screen.'

Matt Sanchelli

*

Justin Ross Will

Murphy

Eric

Mickelson

Roy Anderson Jessi

Jacobs

http://www.nwiiiissouri.edu/~KNWT/INDEX.HTML

2^3


Head, Marcy 263


1

HubtMfd. Dran

9.

8.

DvAnn 244

Hudson

ISO. 26S

14.

J. .

CouikU 63

Hill

Johnson,

Jackson. Byron

Jackson. Dexter 91

Huhimnn. .\nund4 190. 244 HuU. Brun 184. 244

Jackson.

Huil.Chmtiiu 26S

Jackson.

163

ISO.

Hannah

159.

Johnston. Matt

1

Jackson. Hayw(M>d

186

Jill

Jones.

166

162.

Jackson. Kristin

Hunuiu Mimhon 270

Jackson. Lacey 93. 119.

Hundir). Kithy 26

Jackson.

Hungirun Orchestra 72 Hungair. Mark 46

Jackson. Randy

Hunkrn. Undsry

146.

26S

Daw

Huncrr. B«n Hunirr.

Jackson. IVavis

S3

I

1

1

1

S

S2. 188.

1

Jacobsen. Courtney

Hurst. Suiannr

88.

1

S4

1

Jagger. Noelle

146

Husband. Rick 86. 9S

James. Ashlee

161.

Hussami. Nazira 244

James. LeBron 9

Hussein. Saddani 84. 88

James. Victor

Huston. AndrrM'

S

James.

16.17. 26S

Janes. Theresa

I

I

Hutchins. Jonathan

Hutchinson. Mikr

H\

Ww

107

Jasa.

303

Roddy

120

110. 112.

Jay,

Eddir 32. 108.

IIS

114.

Uoyd

Jelavich.

Mark 195 Mike 60

no.

22. 23,

4.

Jenkins. Tra\is

160

Jenning. Brian

185

ICY 71

Jennings, Angela

IHP Indusinal Inc 287

Jennings.

Otlmeier. Jessica

Jennings, Shea 265

S2

I

Dam. Ramon 86 incubus

ISl.

16

172.

1

64

191. 26S

blgeb. Justin

Zach 63

1

166, 245

and Intenutional Center

Interculiural

152.

Nathan 283

}I2

Mary

160.

162.

265

180. 265

Shannon 146. 174. 265

Jewell. Brian

16. 18.

106

1

SO

Don 153

KFC 303 Khanna. Dhiraj

64

1

1

64

Khanna. Gaurav 148, Kharadia, Virahhai 184. 245

173,

148

Kim, Laeyoung 29,160

Kimbrough, Kerry

192

178.

Kies, Pat

50

1

Kimbrough. Sage 212. 213

7 1

1

2

160

Kimrey. Crystal

182

Kingston. Garrett KirchhofT. Reid

Kirk.

Mike 148. 265

Kishwar. Joonas 43.214. 221

225

165,

193. 216

174.

181

Kirk. Jared

115

Kisker. Brett 1

64

161.

168, 245

165,

168.

Kite, Jake

246

148

Kiltie.

Kanger. Michaela 245

Kitzing. Julia

Kansas State University 259

Kitzing.Tim

Kappa Delta 193

Kizilarmut. John

Nu

1

82, 224

Kappa Sigma 141, 143, 149

190. 265

181.

Kile, Cassia

Kamath. Akshay 29. 164. 165

Kappa OmicTon

164

64

1

Kim, Jaehee 4

121

Student Union

154,

Ketcham. Steve

66

Kalkbrenner, Carissa

Jensen. Lori

Jesaitis.

190, 245

148, 245

1

182

Khan. Hunain

120,

Becky

245

Key.

Kaligotia, Sreenivas

48

Jeppesen. Daniel

181.

122

Dan

Emily

265

169. 160.

168,

Klamm. Malt

19

137

130.

176.

Kleeschulie. Jennifer

Kapoor, Ashish

tniemaiional Student Organization 28. I6S

Johnson. Arlisa 245

Karowski, Chris 273

Klingensmith. Cheryl 265

Karsh,Yousuf 95

Kloewer. Elizabeth 265

teterfratemity Council S9.

Wmeier. Jeuica

I

im-in.

Maegan

isbeU.

Kane 283

I

bnei. IVter l»er>on. hres.

Iwai.

1

1

1

Johnson. Bnan 245 166.

26S

Johnson. Carrie Johnson. Chase Johnson.

244

168

SO

Dwoynne

Johnson. Jack

168

120. 1

Johnson. Grace

64

Came

48

S2

S9.

bhii.Akiko 244 ishimoto. Shoko

1

Kapur,

1

59

265

1

Mayank

Karssen, Kara 13,

192.

19

Kapur, Kunal

148, 265

14,

1

80,

Kasoa. John

46 Kay.Wtndy 166. 245

Johnson. Jams 20

Keefhaver. Grace

Kecton. Renee

Ben 283

Johnson. Lezlee 38

2

168,

28. 118.

Johnson. Jim

Kegs and Eggs 3

283

Klopfenstein. Kenton

165,

Renee 26S

166.

Kling. Daniel

2,

KaufTman. Chris

159

Kline. Kevin

1

1

265

166

182

137

Kloppenburg.

Jill

133. 246

179.181. 246

154,

184.

247

21. 37.

166.

167.

Klot/. Br<x>ke

Klute. Paul

180. 246

150

Kleinlein. Josh

64 64

246

149

Duane 184. 223 John, Kerem Suer 48 Johnson. Andy SO Jewell.

137

265

95

1S3

151.

131.

166.

Susan 283

Kerr.

102.

68

1

Amy

Kerr. Jean

180,

1

130.

162.

Kerkmann. Casey 167 Kern.

161,

118.

KcrkhofT. Sara

130.131

Kaiser, Kyle

60. 245

1

Ingram. John 244

Keraus, Kyle

265

165

154,

265

146,

162

Kephart.Amy 149

20

K

Jensen. Kyle

Jesse.

1

Justice,

173. 265

Jentsch.

9S

160

Jones. Sara

Jurado,

Jenson. Jina 233

Inlow.Chru ISO. 26S

Kennish, Laura

1

Kaipust, Kylie

Ingram. Heather 228. 26S

ten. Frank

Jones. Paul 2

66

1

178, 191

Kennedy, Shawna

265

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National recognition for the Emerald Scholars Program

Good Luck Seniors! Weni Miss You!

139

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166

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172,

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252

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103

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152

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106

249

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272

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148

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154, 1

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Rhodes, Charleatha 10,128

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PoUan, Aaron

Polley,

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167

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163, 272

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249

184,

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159

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60

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249

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Thank you

Zaman.

I

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Mohammed

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164

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165

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Zaroor. Allie

Tower would

like to

thank the following people

for their

158.

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Zeeb, Laura 162

contrihutions to the production of the 2003 yearbook:

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Ann

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Studios, Scholastic Advertising, Scott

Duncan, Josh

Maria McCrary, Nancy Hall, Julie Bogart, Debbie King, Jerry Donnelly, University Conference Center, Data

Flaharty,

Zeliff.

86

280 Shannon 169. 280 Ziemer. Sarah 152. 253 Ziegler.

Zimmerman. Dani 35 Zimmerman, Sarah 152,

188, 253

176.

Zimmerschied. Erin 280 Zink.

Dean Hubbard, Darren Whitlely, Colleen Cooke, the Northwest M i s s ond tea r 1 1 a nife

166.

Affairs,

1

154

Zenor. Katie

Processing, Registrar's Office, Melissa Gilson, Alysha Keith,

Student

Nancy

Zeller.Jeff

Ryan 133

Zolnowski

.

Adam

154.

168. 253

Zuerlein. Sarah 35. 163.

280

Zuk.Amy 280 ZwTifel.Tom 174. 223 Zwiegel. Jennifer

172, 253

373


BctRyLe* :\^"

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iOO!

In the

ring,..

Edilor-in-ChM i.kji. Mdiua "the Oiiy" Galiu Futif J hv cirffec anJ the enrrp urnrmirJ by fellow fij^tcn workini; tntjcther. Proloniicd cxrKwutc to "hawrmrni life' and little sleep causes unexpected fluctuations in mood, random mumhtint; iinj v>melimc* screaming for no reason. Managing Editor a.k.a. Bet«v "Can't Buit Her" Lee This fighter Licked the ability to HOP around in the ring, bur ran circles around her challetwen. No matter the strength of the punches that were thrown below the belt, she sucked some kind irf magic luice through a plastic tube and said 'let's knixk this out' all four rounds, then she did. Matugiiig Edilar ».k^ Linduy "Confuted Character" Crump I ler persuiu changnio often you might not recogni:e her in the next match-up. A background

drama allowi

in

while

ihii fighter to portray Girl Scouts, teachers, loutnalists

m New Orleans IX;RING third deadline.

even Cfreole an/Caiun

Phocographv Director a.k^. Mall "Go <3o Scooter Trkkalcr Racer" Frye .Amanng. breathtaking, extraordinary, impressive, stunning, bewildering and stupefying w>rctacles on the Baihr>x>m Expreu. No one went to the John in such Abercrombie. GQ. prom dre** arvi bra filled with oranges style.

Drain

Director a.k^. Melik "Efe the Warrior" Ercanii Turkish lighter and his caged sidekick fuel up on mochas with tripple shots of etpresio. Four time champiotu against "deadline with dwindling sleep." The team received constant training tips via a cell phone Regulations regarding the use of the wireless phenomenon are still in debate of the Tower Y'earb<«ik Federarion. Sports Editor a.k.a. Ashlee "DouUe E" Erwin The crumpled paper .)n the wall reminds those who walk in the Tower office of what can happen to them if they take her title as Tower YearKnk Federatum Thumb Wrestling Oampion C linstmas 2002 or ipell her name incoaectly. Go Cardies! Chief Photacnplwn a-kj. Drew "the Brother" Battlooo and Mike "Dapper" Dye One plays basketball on a daily basis, has a coffee cup glued to his hand, a guitar to the other and snarls while bitting his lip. The other sporadically wears suits 'lust because.' and questions hl^ future The combinaiion Wked in one room for an entire school year produces terrifying

Thu

i

ilts.

L' IllfDSiinofi»<

rryn "Tas«r" Undacy "«' T]!" «""»»» vendetta against men and is not afraid to use JOO.OOO volts of etectriciry •j' Utr has hsdden, ever-so-sweetly, inside Wallv the Watermelon ix one at three Cxjach handbags. She may have been the best -dressed in\ srafif. but IikAs can be deceiving. PraJtlhrn AadMaal a.k,a. Sam "Sauuh" Farr I am Sam. I aai iwi the Kxigy man I have a chicken. Do not be taken away by this fighters sweet languav and made-up vocaKilary. sfie never gives up a fight even when the same opponant. 'r sp<iniani<'<usly combusting index." comes back to life five times or more. >\ Edilor-in-Chirf a.k j. Danny "the Lone Cunnun" Bums liii fighter used his networking skills to tackle the biggest opponent in Tower Yearbook hJeratHW history the On occasion, he teamed up with members from N^SYNC and two •

I

D

:

DVD

<rtfTrTmr .irmir^ rn lav

y

=^

tytit

hn

pl.in

>-if

arrack

-^5&n-

i^ s^Hk'


^;YOU It

was a year regarding you and your convictions.

Reflect

on the

positive

created your character.

and negative experiences that

While authorities apprehended

Mohammed

Sept. 11 mastermind Khalid Shaikh

Afghanistan, tensions rose regarding

and the weapons

As

UN

inspections

conflict with Iraq.

of March, nine students withdrew from the

university reporting for active duty in the Dr.

in

armed forces.

Mark Corson was

also called to active duty.

made

transition replacing

university

a

smooth

The

Corson

and Dr. Alex Ching whom Givtdien Notliliotisc stniim Iter guitar during Anuicsty Iiitcrnatioiial's 'Books not Bombs'

unexpectedly died of a

aiiti- war demonstration.

heart attack.

it's

"I think

good we're getting something

going in Maryi'ille because a worldwide movenwnt," nesty President Jed

Murr

this

You gathered on the

is

Amsaid,

Tundra

photo by Matt Frye

protest a possible

war with

Iraq.

peacefully

to

You debated the

fate

During a February War Forum students spUt into small groups to discuss their concerns

and

about the upcoming possibility

war with

of

was nice to hear more than one angle on the whole Iraq. "It

Jen Seaman by Niki Carder

situation," student said, nliolo

of our country in a war forum sponsored by Student

I'ieirs

Senate.

You celebrated as local bar owners broke a gentleman's agreement that banned all-you-can-drink University President

specials.

At

Dean Hubbard's recommendation,

Northwest alumn, raps

an

LeRon

Ford,

original piece during

an

Alliance of Black Collegians

Open Mic Night. The oi\ianized nights gaw students the cltance to

experience different cultural norms, such as poetry and dance, photo bv Michael Dye


? jTHI '^/y^

r r y.


"

"

the Bc^ard of Regents sent a proposal to the City Council requesting a

ban on 'free'

alcohol.

Under the

influence

of alcohol, Nathaniel Oster drove into Phillips Hall in

January causing an estimated $15,000 in damages. Social

life

developed a new outlet as Phi Delta Theta

established a

new

fraternity

on campus. Bearcat

basketball took an unexpected turn as the basketball

the

first

team won an

women's

MIAA Tournament game for

time since 1990 and recorded

its first

winning

record since the 1997-98 season.

The men's team

Chad McaDaiiicI mid Sean Berger cheer for the men's basketball team at the end of the first

halfofFeb.

26 contest

â&#x20AC;˘|

quarterfinals

to

against

Missouri Western and did

The The Hornet's 92-82. photo by Matt Frye

Emporia State

the

lost in

University.

Bearcat's defeated

Molly's Tiffany Lawson mixes a W^tite Russian for Luke Bryson

not play in the

championship game

for the first

time in

MIAA

six years.

during a Friday night special. "The

make it easier to keep minors from drinking because

specials

they're not drinking out

owner Mike Hoskey

ofpitchers,

said.

The

events you encountered and the people you

interacted with affected your views of the world.

reacted to the randomness of daily

life

You

and formulated

your future.

T A

hypnotized Daley Dodd is frightened by a belt that she perceives as a snake. "Hypnosis feels like a dream, " Dodd said. 'Afterwards, when people would ted me what happened I would then remember, just like how you would remember your dreams. photo by Michael Dye

Closing


\

\

*

\^

Students filter in and out of the ].W. JoTU?s StudcHL Union in November. Regarding you, the year's events affected your character and built the

foundation of your (nofessiorud future, phouj by Matt Fryc

/


n

w


4^;YOU

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Tower 2003  

Northwest Missouri State University Tower Yearbook

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