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^ONTENTS Opening 2 Student Life 6

Entertainment 58

Academics 114 Sports 166

Croups 210 People 266 Closing 334

4^

Copyright 1994 Tower Yearbook Northwest Missouri State Universit>'


Something Else Altogether 1

994 Tower

Volume 73 Northwest Missouri State University Maryville,

MO 64468

(816) 562-1212 Enrollment:

jj

'.^'J}^

5,814

Taking advantage of the Maryville Aquatic Center Jean Ann Jenkins relaxes with her children. Jenkins enjoyed visiting Maryville 's biggest attraction frequently during the summer months. Photo by Tony Miceli.

Construction crews work on the $6 million Lamkin renovation. Despite the rain and strikes the gym was to be completed in time for the basketball season in the new Bearcat Arena. Photo byRuss Weydert. festivities end, Alpha Kappa Lambda dismantle their house decoration. Even with the physical evidence gone, the threat of a copyright lawsuit made it a day to remember. Photo by Puss

As Homecoming

Weydert.


weeks

After

we hoped

of flood devastation

to ease into the usual school

routine, but the year

was

BRINGING "I

enjoyed Family Day be-

something else altogether. cause

Arriving

in

town was hectic when

Interstate

29

through the

'Ville

tion

was as

to

it

gave

me a chance

meet some kids

that

was rerouted

normally woold not have

and by-pass construc-

gotten the chance to meet

traffic

during the games.

It

was

active as ever. always a challenge for

A

I

recycling

program greeted us

and IT seemed everyone was environmentally aware as

we separated

paper,

to

meet

many

families

and remember them throughout the year. In fact,

aluminum cans and trash.

as

me

some of my most

memorable experiences

Northwest faced changes as Lamkin

Gym and Roberta tinued while

Hall construction con-

we found on-campus

improvements with remodeling Grill

Works, World

of Cuisine

dining of the

and the

addition of Dunkin' Donuts.

Despite

were

still

all

of the

changes there

traditions like Family Day, but

even Homecoming had a twist that

ALTOGETHER different.

4^ 2 Opening

was

happened on Family Day/'

Bobby Bearcat said.


Students select meals in the Grill Works. Dining were remodeled over the summer. Photo by Tony

facilities

Miceli.

Cars line up on Highway 7 1 Floods and by-pass construction caused heavy traffic in the Ville. Photo by Laura Riedel. .

Construction

workers Chuck Bibb and Joe

McCarthy install

bleach-

Lamkin Gym. Renovations were postponed several times due to rain. Photo by Chris ers

in

Tucker.

Opening 3


Taco Johns opened at its new location on June 14. The new restaurant expanded facilities allowing more room for diners and kitchen space for cooks. Photo by Russ Weydert.

Dave Morton, Brian Watts and the Northwest Marching Band provide halftime entertainment at Arrowhead Stadium. Band members got to attend one of the many sold-out games during the season. Photo by Laura Riedel.


Homecoming got off to a controversial

START when Disney requested our

theme be changed to avoid a "We

start

house dec

planning the

weeks

in ad-

The Delta

Chi's

six

breach

of copyright contract.

We finally

with

beautiful

kicked vance.

were known for going out for Homecoming.

focused tion

year.

on

all it

all

We

of our atten-

lawsuit and

weather

off in

festivities

late October.

Despite controversy, the Ville

was

expanding with new owners and busi-

for the whole

No matter what

nesses developing throughout town.

Al-

other Greeks were going

though we fought rumors

to participate Delta Chi's

Taco Johns gave us a change for the

would always participate in all three divisions be-

better with a

Taco

Bell,

new restaurant on South

Main Street. A comic store gave us

cause of our tradition/'

Greg Glesinger

said.

SOMETHING

different to look at

and

another grocery store came to town.

With BIC changes happening at Northwest, we

all

chipped

in

and made

the year

SOMETHING ELSE 4 "^W

ALTOGETHER 4* Opening 5


6 Student Life Division


As most students

summer

break,

the

'Ville

for

some stayed around

for

left

ANOTHERsemester,

cooling off their

days at the Maryviile Aquatic Center.

The bar scene

finally

seemed com-

when The Pub reopened

plete

YEAR

on Aug. 26. Another

its

doors

college

in

would not have been complete without facing controversial issues such as ho-

mosexuality on campus.

The Residential faced controversy

Hall

Association

when "dorm

cut the word "dorm"

police"

ALTOGETHER

and requested that students use the

term "residence

hall."

We welcomed friends and relatives for Family

Day and found that students

were catching on to the country scene while joining the Chiefs mania.

It

seemed

everyone had their own role IN

ENTUFE 4* years of service The Pub closed April 30. 1993, leaving students witti one less bar to chioose from. The Pub reopened after remodeling by the new owner Jerry Sturm. Photo by Jon Britton.

After

50

Student Life 7


TheMaryville Aquatic Center offers new job opporliiiiilics ^~ for students like Garry Harper. Photo by Tony Miceli. Lifeguard Brad Bruner helps a young

of the two shdes added

to the

new

swimmer down one

pool.

Photo by Ton\

Miceli.

The Maryville Aquatic Center broke every attendance record since Britten.

1958 with 45.750 people. Photo by Jon


P

1^ J^B

t)t

even the Great Flood ot 93 could dampen

spirits as the

new Maryville Aquatic Center opened. "Building the Aquatic Center added pride to our

commu-

RodAuxier, of Maryville Harks and Recreation Departfacihtv like ment said. "No otherr community around here had a facility what \\'e had here." nity,"

According

to

Auxier, the condition of the old pool

did not meet health

.

y

EVERYONE

and safety standards.

"We felt a new

pool was needed and thought about refurbish-

ing the old pool." Auxier said. "But

we decided

a

new Aquatic

Center would be better."

INTHE

The building of the Aquatic Center also brought 32 new job swimming Twenty life guards,

opportunities to Maryville. instructors

1

1

and a manager were hired.

For students, the Aquatic Center was a new place

and catch some for those "I

went

who

hang out

POOL

liked to lay out.

five or six times,"

pool because

to

rays. The shallow edges of the pool were perfect

I

Amy

Slater said. "I liked the

new

AQUATIC CENTER ADDS

could layout and not get hot."

The $1.6 million complex offered a new way for students to cool off during the summer. "The new pool was a lot bigger and it was really not that expensive for the type of center that

it

was,"

PRIDE TO

COMMUNITY

Amanda Endicott

said.

The

big slides, cool water and a place to lay out were popular

enough crowds

that that

even Mother Nature could not drive away exceeded 45,750 as the new center proved

great success.

to

the

be a

BY RUBY DITTMER

I


W^'

^

aryville

was going through

college students and the

a transitional phase, giving

community

a change. Everyone

was

excited at the prospects of flourishing businesses in town.

Students gave a high rating for the Maryviile Aquatic Center, which opened on Memorial Day.

"The idea was

to bring in a large

crowd and add something

new for Maryviile." Shawn Powell, assistant manager, said. The $1 .6 million project attracted 1,500 swimmers on their best day. The remodeled pool included diving boards, four therapeutic jets and lanes were increased from six lanes to eight.

"The

A

slides

were

surprised they did

dreamed anything

it

terrific,"

that

Sue Steins

was

said. "1

way. This was Maryviile.

really

had never

1

like that."

Dunkin" Donuts also received an overwhelming response when business began in August. With ARA being the second on-site production facility in the country, Jerry Throener,

director of food services,

REFORM

was optimistic and expanded

selling

hours to include Saturday and Sunday mornings.

A new Taco Johns, located between South Main and South Avenue, opened for business on June 4. According to manager 1

Dave Williams,

the old

Taco Johns was too small

to

accommo-

date the expanding business.

IN

"New items such as deli-club burritos and Mexican pizzas, which we were introducing, required more kitchen space," Williams said. The Comic Asylum was

a

newcomer

to

North Side Mall.

After opening

BUSINESS

in July, busi-

ness was good and manager

Randall Bacon planned

more shelves and

to

add

a bigger se-

lection.

A new liquor store located next to the post office was Cork "n Keg. Despite competition with other stores, business was expected to prosper.

RECENT ADDITIONS

"We had to keep the prices down

in line

with everyone else."

owner Darren White said. "We offered more in ways of service,

BECOME AN INNOVATIVE REALITY

not just the product."

Northwest would even add something for fitness-conscious students.

The $6 million Lamkin

completed

in

Gym

renovations would be

June 1994. Additions included basketball, tennis,

volleyball and racquetball courts, suspended walking and jog-

ging tracks, lights and motorized bleachers, athletic training

room, classrooms and a physiology

lab.

"This renovation was necessary because the old gymnasium

was over 30 years old and had limited

facilities."

Bob Lade,

coordinator of renovation, said.

BYSUEMOHAMED

Mozingo Lake, a $5 million project that began in the mid-60s. was coming true for citizens of Maryviile. Construction began in 1990 and the lake was to be completed in 1994. Mozingo offered a recreational facility with camping, beaches, fishing, boating, golfing and hiking.

would give students and community a choice of a different I had to go down to St. Joseph for activities and entertainment," Carol Davis said. "I was looking forward to the "It

place to go.

Mozingo project so that it would keep us in town." With new businesses in operation, Maryviile was to a new lease of life and a place to call "home" students.

10 New To The

'Ville

turning for

in

many


ARA worker Kill

lis

RliisiK-sliclps.icuvliimcrplckouiiliniyhmiis. Diiiikm' Doiuils

cmploNccs wore required

to ulleiui a

fise-week training course

in HiÂť.Iom. Plioio h\

Jaek Vaught.

Randall liacon. manager of the Coniie As)iuiii. sorls ihrough a seel ion

The comic kind

Allison

Todd

in

store

opened

Marw ille.

stocks cereal

at

Ph<ilo

ol eoinies.

June allhc North Side Mall and was ihcoiil\ one of it's

bv Chris Tucker.

Maryvillc's newest grocery store. Value Fair. The store added

more competition, with bulk items Codi Holhrook and Aiigie

in

at

.Aley enjoy

discount prices. Photo by Chris Tucker.

some

relocation and expansion of the restaurant,

new items that Taco Johns offers. With the Taco Johns also increased their menu. Photo by

ot the

Chris Tucker.

Student Life 11


7

FLOOD LECACY AMES, IOWA:

The flooding

from the Skunk River and Squaw Creek swept through Iowa State University pouring 16 feet of water into

Hihon Coliseum.

DESMOINESJOWA: waters

damaged

Flood

main water

the

plant leaving 250,000 residents

without safe drinking water for

1

days.

HANNIBAL, MO.: A

new

downtown,

flood wall protected

but a levee broke one mile up-

stream which caused 9,000 acres

of farmland to flood.

JEFFERSON CITY, MO.: The main link to Columbia, U.S. Highway 63, was closed. Most of

K

several hundred residents of north

Jefferson City were evacuated.

KANSAS

f

CITY, MO.:

Kemper Arena and American Royal buildings feet of

filled

with three

water and went without

electricity for 18 hours.

PARKVILLE, MO.: After ap proximately five feet of water flooded the downtown area, three fourths of the businesses were

covered

in

mud. The

city hall

post office also had to be

and

moved

temporarily.

ST.

JOSEPH, MO.:

The water

system that serviced 85.000 dents

was knocked out

for a

resi-

week.

at Iowa Sate University Ames, Iowa, were heavily damaged,

Buildings

in in-

cluding Hilton Coliseum, where 14 feet of water stood on the main level. School officials believed

water would not touch

the complex, therefore

it

was never

in-

sured against flood damage. Photo by Jon Britton.


what some analysts called the greatest natural disaster of the century, the Great Flood of 93 devasn

Midwest with 51 deaths; 65,000 people evacuated from their homes; 34 million acres of land flooded; 50,000 people left unemployed; 517 countated the

ties

declared federal disaster areas; 57,000 destroyed

homes and $5

Many

billion to

$10

billion in

damages.

areas were hit as rainfall started in June

let up for weeks. Des Moines, Iowa, went power and water for weeks. Parkville, Rivwithout erside and St. Joseph, Mo., were flooded and St

and did not

Joseph also

lost its

water

supply for one week.

Northwest was affected by the flood, even

»

if

minuscule

in

propor-

tion to other areas. "It

looked like

said.

we were down

"We

in

part-time stu-

called freshmen over the

mer and there were some

who

Mansum-

the Financial Assistance Office

to say that the flood affected them.

ilitKlf'f'fl

OF

93

said they weren't

coming because of the flood." Walsh said others stated financial reasons were the cause for non-enrollment. Walsh said about 30 to 50 people contacted

OREAT

FLOOD

dents," Michael Walsh, director of Enrollment

agement,

THE

—continued

BY DON MUN5CH


FLOOD OF "We had areas,"

Walsh

hard to

tell."

93

25 percent of our zip code areas declared disaster said. "So. I'm sure if affected students, but it was

Like Walsh, Dr. Denise Ottinger, dean of students, did not believe the flood's effects

thought

"I

would be seen

we were more

until later.

fortunate than our sister institu-

tions," Ottinger said. "I thought

our impact from

this

had been

minimal."

A new students

was

installment

initiated

by Northwest

who were affected by the flood. Fewer than

1

to help

students

used the plan, according to Treasurer Jeannette Whited. Terri Weichinger, assistant director of financial aid, said

many for

flood victims

them

in

came in

to find out

what would be available

terms of relief packages.

"Some had come

in

to process for loans

where they

"We

previously did not apply," Weichinger said.

looked

at

cases on a case-by-case basis. There had to be a determination of loss of their home, farm or some other property."

She said some assistance funds, such and work study, were increased and have lost property to be affected.

as the Perkins

that not

Loan

everyone had

to

"Some of them were hurt indirectly - they were laid off from ajob, for instance," Weichinger said. "That hurts just as much.

We

treated

them

just as

we would anyone

else in our

professional judgment."

Some

students were not directly affected by the flood, but

witnessed the flood

at its

worst.

"My home wasn't affected," Tony Wood, from Hannibal, Mo., said. "My neighborhood was up on a hill, but some of the lower-lying areas of tow n were completely under water."

However. Emilie Allen, from Glasgow, Mo., said her waters that consumed the basement and part of the second floor of her home. Renovations were made to redo what the flood destroyed, though the water did not

home was ravaged by

damage

the entire premises.

"We

didn't have a chance," Allen said.

broke, there was a roar and the water just

"When

came

the levee

A

through.

of folks nearby couldn't go back because their

lot

homes were

destroyed."

Allen said her family was severely hurt financially because

was dependent on crops, which w ere destroyed. was Jeff Roe, who worked during the summerfor the National Guard in Northwest Missouri at Amazonia and Craig. Roe's job entailed 12-hour their livelihood

One

student, not directly affected,

included evacuating and security clearances. He said towns were accessible by boats only.

shifts that

the

"It

was

tragic to see

never actually saw

what the flood did," Roe

how bad

it

was

until

said.

"You

you were involved."

Tracy Maisel, Hannibal, Mo., said her father lost his cabinet-making business, due to the flood, which was located in the Bearcreek flood plain and had no insurance. "It was really sad to see people who lost everything." Maisel said. "There were some things you just could not replace

like pictures, antiques, etc."

Maisel said the heroes of the relief effort were the ones

who

made a difference; the people who donated time and money. Though the flood menaced the Midwest the way Hurricane Andrew mauled Miami, people learned that Mother Nature should never be taken for granted.

14 Flood


The

lack of prolecliun lor

around Bear Creek

in

homes in Ihc residential area Hannibal. Mo., stirred coniroversy

because several families thought the city had neglected protect them. tected

The

to

Historic Business District

from the Mississippi Ri\orb\

a

was pronoodwall Photoby

Sle\en Wooltolk.

A

grain bin located in Glasgow. Mo.,

Hooded by waters from

verely

Ri\cr. .Almost one fourth of Saline

Mo., grain crops were

SI4 million .Sheila

ol potential

damage. Photo by

Yoder.

aids the people of

who was

Nick Lowery,

graphs. Although Parkville est hit

County

within an estimated

Parkville. Mo., with the help of hiel.

se-

lost

The American Red Cross

(

is

the Missouri

by the Hooding,

many

was

Kansas City

signing autonot the hard-

ot the

downtown

businesses were destroyed. Photo by Jon

Bntton.

Police officers help direct unusually heavy traffic on

Highway

71.

Because of high Hood waters

in St.

Joseph.

Mo.. Interstate 29 was rerouted through Maryville. Photo bv Jack Vaught.

Student Life 15


A

s

and

fraternities

throughout Greek

sororities proudly displayed their letters

Week

they unified and competed in philan-

With the sidewalks decorated

thropies, fun and games.

in

colored chalk and banners draped out of Roberta Hall windows, the

theme "Life's Short, Be Greek," kicked off

Games began

the week.

ceremony and Greek Sing, which seemed to be the highlight of the week. The Most Spirited Greek Song was awarded to the Phi Mus and Delta Chis. Phi

Mu

after the ribbon cutting

won

also

award for Most Creative Greek

the

Song.

MORE THAN

Greek Week was not just fun and games, Greek system.

for

some

it

signified

unity in the "I

enjoyed the Greek Sing the best because

all

the

Greeks

were there and everyone participated," Shon Mosser of Sigma Phi Epsilon said.

The Greeks sponsored to benefit

a car

Camp Quality,

wash

in the

an organization

Hy-Vee parking

to

lot

help children with

cancer. Fraternities and sororities also held a Rocking Chair-a-

thon where Greeks

sat in a giant

Nodaway County Courthouse

rocking chair in front of the

donations for

to collect

Camp

Quality. "I

jU$T

thought

nity, for

it

(Greek Week) strengthened us with the

once, they could see

actually did,"

Mosser

school were blind to

all

the

good

that the

commu-

Greek system

"Some of the community and the came out of the system. For money for Camp Quality."

said. all

instance, seeing us raise

that

Other beneficial events

LETTERS what they collected goods were given

clothing drive. Another

new

event added was the canned

food sculpting. Organizations held a food drive and used

to build artistic

to

in-

cluded tree planting and a

arrangements and then the

needy families.

During the week there were also competitive and non-

CREEKS

competitive games that produced challenges and laughter for

HAVE FUN WHILE HELPIN6

spectators as well as the participants.

barrow races and the chariot "I liked

Zeta said.

CHARITIES

BY SARA MEYERS

Some

of these events

included games such as the tug-of- war competition, the wheel-

all

races.

watching the chariot races," Heidi Brenner of Delta

Heidi Melnders and

was made out of

Heidi Paden of

"It

was funny seeing

the chariot that

kinds of things being pulled by three guys."

Alpha Sigma Alphia

Mary Peterson, an instructor from Iowa State University in Ames, attended Greek Week on Monday to give a lecture as a keynote speaker in Mary Linn Performing Arts Center. Peterson spoke about why students chose to become a part of the Greek system and helped members to understand that all of really

mascot. Raggedy

Anne, during the annual Greek Sing kickoff.

the organizations experienced similar problems.

"She was

display the sorority

good because she understood college stuwas very inspirational and support-

performed their

dents," Brenner said. "She ive,

she

made

the

problems we had seem petty and somewhat

unimportant. She helped the only

me

to realize that

my

sorority

was

not

one with problems."

Thursday night concluded Greek

Week

with the awards

ceremony held in the Conference Center. Sigma Sigma Sigma and Sigma Phi Epsilon were named Outstanding Greek Organization. The award for Most Pariticipation went to Alpha Sigma Alpha and Tau Kappa Epsilon.

16 Greek Week

The Alpha's

rendition of

Nirvana's "Smells

Like Teen Spirit"

and went on receive the

Most

award

to

for

Participation.

Photo by

Tony

Miceli.


Student Life 17


^W weat was rolling down their foreheads, their arms and legs ached from cHmbing the

time while their

stairs for the fortieth

possessions were scattered around the room. This was a scenario ail too common for students

moving in for the school year. Twin sisters Jacqueline and Jennifer Thornton had the pleasure of moving in twice after they learned they had moved into the wrong room in Hudson Hall. "We just thought there was one 211," Jacqueline said. "We didn't think there was more than one." The door was unlocked so they thought they had the correct room, but moving into their first room was not as easy as they

STUDENTS

had hoped. a 102 degrees,

"It felt like

Jennifer said.

when someone came in and asked we knew something was up."

to see

our keys. That's when

So they loaded everything up and headed to the correct room. Moving in was a stressful time. However, for most upperclassmen getting settled "I

knew how wanted

were

THE

and

bullets

"We didn't have a fan at that time, we had almost

everything put away

MAKE

we were sweating

lugging everything and getting everything in our drawers,"

I

through

was

residence halls was easier.

nice helping

room

together," Michelle Leeper

them because

had already been

I

-^

it."

weeks of school were not complete without

MOVE These

to the

my room and the freshmen

to arrange

trying to put their

still

said. "It

in the

first

visits

grocery store and Wal-Mart. "I

went three or four times

week to Wal-Mart," Whitney Roach said. "We that

bought

dumb

did not think

things that

we needed,

we like

tape and silverware."

After bags were unpacked and trips to Wal-Mart and Food-

4-Less were made students were ready for the year to begin.

ORIENTATION

weeks of Northwest's orientation program. Advantage "93, of-

Freshmen had a college.

AND UNPACKIN6 WHILE ENDURING

THE HEAT

of support during the

first

fered different activities during the week.

"The really

first

feeling that

going to

like it,"

I

got from Northwest was that

Katy Jackson

people here were really cool. The

said. "I

I

was

thought most of the

RAs made

the

first

week go

a lot easier."

Among students

BY AMANDA MCMANICAL

lot

all

the activities, the highlight of the

seemed

to

week

for

most

be hypnotist Jim Wand.

Amanda Brown enjoyed the show and was flabbergasted by w hat happened on stage. "I was surprised by the things he got people to do," Brown said. "I doubt they would have done those things if they new the\ were in front of a large audience. The part I liked the best was when the guy was pretending he was Michael Jackson." Another activity which received a good turn out and high marks was comedian David Naster. "Naster was really funny," Neil Neumeyer said. "The girls around

me were

surprised by what he

was saying, but he was

good and very funny." Theevents that students participated in during their first week gave them a feel for Northw est. with first impressions affecting really

what they thought about college

18 Moving

In

life.

/'

^


L'

ndi.Th\|iiU)sis.Aiiloiii(il. in ckiLC

appcariiiKx-

ill

docs his best

Norlhucsi. hspiiolisi

Jini

Wimd

Micli;iL-l

ÂŤlis

siill

.Lickson ;i

iiiiil;ilKin.

livciuiKi-i his 12lh

biy siicx'Css, Pholii by Toil) Micch.

IrVMir Lccpcr helps KclK Johiislon nunc part of her loll inlo Hudson Hall. Suidcnts had endure ihe nun ing experience durinj; the Auyusi heal. Photo b) Laura Ricdel.

lo

Jennifer Engelke picks up her freshman seminar adsisemcnl inlormalion from Tricia Tinsley. During Advantage '93 freshmen were assigned advisers to help

them prepare

for their first

academic year

in college.

Photo by Tony Miccli.

Student Life 19


o

n an average weekend, Saturday mornings were spent

sleeping

in,

doing laundry and recovering frorn the night

However, on Family Day residence halls were buzzing with activity and signs were hung outside the halls welcoming

before.

parents to the annual festivities.

Students were shutting alarms off before 7 a.m., rising with intentions of cleaning up and straightening the their parents arrived.

home was Kristin

room before

Sometimes, sending over-night guests

a part of preparing for the family visit.

Deady managed

to

send her boyfriend back to Blue

ill

Springs, Mo., before her parents arrived.

A

"I

had

to

send

like

him."

After dirty clothes were shoved into the closet and dishes

were rinsed off the

VISIT

my boyfriend home early," Deady said. "We my parents still did not

had been together for nine months and

in the

room was done

bathroom

just before

sink, a

mom

quick straightening of

and dad knocked on the

door.

Once

parents arrived, the University had several activities

planned for families

Because of

to partake in.

chilly

weather conditions, a picnic that was

scheduled to be held on the Bell Tower patio was

TO THE

the

J.

W. Jones

into

Families also enjoyed a carnival held beside Colden Pond.

The

carnival

was a new addition

event was not a large one,

to the

among

agenda. Although the

was the clown Bumbles who made artistic

VI LLE FAMILIES

mo\ed

Student Union.

the activities

hats out of balloons, goldfish

racing, sponsored by Student

Senate and the Residential Hall Association held a ring

Another booth set up by Alpha Sigma Alpha provided participants a chance to throw pies at sorority members. Even with all the different booths, the carnival did not receive toss.

high marks by everyone.

SPEND

QUALITY TIME

"To be honest," Steve Liningar said. were geared toward

thought

it

was cheap.

little

kids, they

needed more for older

people."

Some

students went without parents on Family

Day because

they did not think there

was anything

interesting to do.

my

parents about

it,"

"I didn't

even

tell

Jason Cisper said.

"I

campus everyday. Why should my parents come and do that with me?" The annual football game against Washburn turned out to be the highlight of the day. The Bearcats took the Icabods with a walked around

BY SARA MEYERS

"I

We expected more from a carnival. Most of the games they had

this

"It

was wonderful

was

the football

a great day to

team won," Jennifer Beekman

meet

my

thought the parents had fun seeing

friend's parents.

how we

I

really

lived our lives for a

day."

home and

a time to be with people

during the

game

against Washburn.

paid off as the 'Cats

this

returned to their rooms and began the normal

20 Family Day

motivates the crowd

who made one feel

was done by a visit with friends already at Northwest or relatives from home. After parents began the drive home and signs were ripped from the walls, students student.

Bobby

Bobby's enthusiasm

Family Day was at

supports

Bearcat as he

score of 61-36.

said. "It

The Bearcat cheerleading squad

life

of a college

ended the game 6136 over the Icabods. Photo by Jon Britton.


il^'-f

n

*

Alison Burt receives a balloon from Bumbles the clown during Family Day. Bumbles was one of the many attractions during the Family Day carnival. Photo

by Jon Britlon.

lodd Jacobs and carnival had

his

many

son Dallon lake a break Irom Family Day activities. The

different booths targeting

chance to participate

in

the day. Photo by

younger children

Russ Weydcrt.

thai

gave them

a


Beth Bailen smokes a cigarette

in

on second floor Millikan. which

her residence hall is

room

designated for smok-

As part of the miage change, three out of the six floors became designated smoking floors. Photo by Tony Miceli. ing.

for residents in Millikan

Wayne

Viner. hall director, and Jeff

newly renovated room

in

Phillips

ceiling fans and other modifications hall director

Moser

Hall.

relax in a

New

were made

carpet, to

Joseph Koeberl prepares a piece of pie for use

microwave changes

some

apartments. Photo by Chris Tucker.

at

in the

Phillips Hall.

One of

in

his

the bigger policy

residence halls was allowing residents to

use microwaves

in

their

own rooms. Photo by

Tucker.

22 Residence Hall Changes

Chris


l^tl

w ho chose

the increased niimher of snidenls

ith

to li\e

campus. Northwest began wondering hov\ they were going

oil

on-canipus housing. Changes

to increase

ha\e

nia\

in the

residence halls

been the answer.

just

The biggest change

that

took place

residence halls was

in the

smoking and non-smoking floors. Karl Hertz, an resident assistant on a smoking

the designated

Phillips Hall, said onl\ a couple of residents V'lncr anticipated

due

more non-smokmg Hoors

.Another change

have

to

was

the microvsaves that residents

in their

"We checked

mum

the following year

smokers.

to less student

allowed

tloor in

snmkcd. Wayne

were

rooms, which were once banned.

with other uni\ersities and found that a maxi-

700 watts was safe with

llni\ersit_\ policies."

Viner

said.

RESIDENCE

Students responded w ah positive attitudes to changes. ""I

"It

losed ha\ ing a n)icrowa\c

in

otirroom.""Renee Hahn said.

was more con\enient than running down

the hall to the

lounge."

According

to Viner. residential life coordinator, the

was on a three-\ear handicap facility would become handicap accessible. H\en with

the

changes made

plan,

where

to residence halls

demand

campus all

halls

and the

rooms on campus was expected. Instead, the south fourth tltmr w ing of Hudson Hall and fourth floor of Tow er w ere closed. The rooms, reno\ations of Roberta Hall, a greater

according

to Viner.

was upsetting

"It

many students hall

CHANCES

the

to

help restore Roberta,"

"Re\enue was lost from the students choosing to campus and mo\e back in next fall." Also, some of the hall director's apartments were renovated to gi\ e them a more home-like appearance. New carpet w as laid dow n, ceiling fans were added and several other changes were Viner

FACE

to see so

living in that

from campus housing was used

for

housed approximately 48 students.

nunc off campus, money received

to

when

HALLS

said.

live off

made.

Wilh

all

the

improvements being made,

the

of residence halls and dormitories. According to Curtis

RHA

president, an educational

STUDENTS

Residence Hall

Association wanted to distinguish between the characteristics

Heldstab,

HELPIN6

program called

FEEL

AT HOME

"dorm police" was started by the RHA executive board. This was to increase the awareness of the differences between past dormitories and present residence halls.

The dorm of

RHA,

police,

which consisted of the executive members

instead of "residence hall."

The

word choice along with

their

"The

who had

sent letters to people

.SO

cents

was an

a

letter

50 cent

used the word "dorm"

asked them to change fine.

attention getter," Heldstab said. "Pay-

ment was never expected and

the

program was meant

in

fun."

BYSHERRI

MCCORKINDALE AND

AMANDA MCMANICAL

Heldstab thought the program was blown out of proportion. "Students had a misconception of people running around with a pencil and paper in hand and writing eveyone's

dow n

that said

name

"dorm,'" Heldstab said. "Even with the negative

we had increased awareness and that was our goal." From handicap accessible rooms and microwave ovens to an

feedback,

increased awareness of the term "residence hall." the image of the halls

made

a

change for the

better.

Student Life 23


he Wonderful World of Northwest" brought Disney charac-

crowds and controversy to campus for the annual Homecoming weekend. However, this was not the original theme that was decided upon. The Walt Disney Corp. was concerned w ith the original Northwest theme, "The Wonderful World of Disney, "claiming it was a breach of copyright laws. A Federal Express letter was ters,

sent by

Disney

for the

theme

officials to the University administrators asking

to

be reconsidered. The request

made by Disney

only affected the promotions that Northwest was using for the event.

Northwest immediately took control of the situation by altering the

theme

to

meet the requests made by Disney

a possible confrontatit)n

According tion, the

Dave

to

v.

ith

avoid

to

attorneys.

News and

Gie.seke, director of

Informa-

problem was solved by changing the theme

to

"The

Wonderful World of Northwest."

SOMETHINCi

After the

initial

problem was repaired, the tensions of prepar-

ing skits for the Variety

Show,

the floats

and jalopies for the

parade were taken under consideration. Because of the conflict with Disney, the original names of the characters had to be

omitted from any performance or parade entry.

TO

"The Wonderful World of Pinocchio" had "The Wonderful World of Woody."

to be switched to

of

The annual Variety Show, held Wednesday through Friday Homecoming week in the Mary Linn Performing Arts

REMEMBER and

was

it

Center, contained various

Greek and independent organizations

who were

perform-

The

ing skits and olio acts.

Variety seven

Show contained seven olio acts

skits,

Show was not held through

the first time the Variety

Saturday of

DISNEY THEME

Some skits such

as

Homecoming week.

Students that performed

in the

annual Variety

Show

skits

spent an abundance of time practicing and preparing for their

CREATES

CONTROVERSY

debut.

Kelly Burger of Alpha

"We

put in about 25 hours a week," Burger said. "It (the

award) was given out of people there.

BY SARA MEYERS

Sigma Alpha won Best Actress for her

performance as "Woody."

a great honor.

theater type production before so

On Wednesday

game and

at the football

was

It

it

I

was a

night of the Variety

there

was

had never been lot

Show

any

of fun."

the

King and Queen were presented and crowned

a lot

in

The Bearcat Tales portrayed by Alpha

Homecoming

in front

of a

Sigma Alpha full

house. Byron Willis sponsored by Delta Zeta and Leslie Hagan

members, Becky

sponsored by Sigma Sigma Sigma were elected by the student

Hassig and

body

as

King and Queen.

Lo\ell,

Another highlight of the Homecoming

festivities

annual parade held on Saturday morning. For the several years the weather held

and blue skies for the days

first

was

the

time

in

warmer temperatures, sunshine

march down

College Avenue front of the

House. Because of the conflict in

floats to

in tToat preparation.

be draped

Wet weather caused many

in plastic to protect the

24 Ho.MECOMING

theme the

spirits as rain

pomp

decorations

title

of the clowns had

to

be changed from

Ducktales to Bearcat

from becoming ruined. Finally,

in

Alumni

activ ities.

During the week however, weather dampened caused a delay

Am\

Northwest students, alumni, family and friends lined

Tales. Photo by Russ

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;continued

Weydert.

i


Jiin Slill

ihcir

of Phi Sigma Kappa puis

Homecoming lloat.

the Phi Sigs

ihi;

finishing

loucheson

Two

nights before

were working

to pertect their

Aladdin Homecoming

tliial.

Photo by Russ Weydert.

Homecoming King and Queen, Byron Willis and Leslie Hagan take the traditional ride down College A\enue during the parade. There were approximately 100 entries in the

parade. Photo by

Tonv

Miceli.

Student Life 25


REMEMBER from the Fine Arts Building to the downtown area to floats and listen to the various marching bands. However, the parade was shorter than past years. "We were very happy with the number of entries, but we would have liked more." Kristin Thompson, graduate assistant the streets

watch the

in

charge of Homecoming,

said.

Along with floats, clowns and jalopies in the parade, there were high school marching hands from across the region that traveled to Northwest to join in the celebration.

were not as many high school bands entered

However, there

in the

parade as

in

years past.

"The parade was a

Thompson said. Homecoming the same day as ours

shorter this year."

bit

"Missouri Western had their

and some bands went

there, because it was closer." The community of Mary ville also helped out with the Homecoming parade. Several businesses and individuals, including Chip Strong and Joe Zahnd, donated money to a parade fund which was established to help cover the high costs organiza-

when producing

tions encountered

tag for the cost of producing a float

a float. The average price was approximately $3,000

for each organization.

"We

established a fund this year, called the

Parade Fund."

Thompson

Community

"Everyone who entered a float in the parade got an equal amount to give more of an incentive. It wasn't much but we wanted to help them out."

The residence

said.

halls also joined in the

Homecoming

spirit

by

decorating in accordance to the theme. Franken Hall had the characters in Disney's "Jungle Book" on display in front of the

Hudson Hall held a contest for best floor decoration was judged by the custodians and several hall directors. hall.

that

Center Second Hudson entered the contest with their rendition of the Cinderella fairy tale.

The floor decorated the hall by hanging blue curtains made with toilet paper for the entrance, hand sketched paper on the walls and a talking goose at the entryway. Three hostesses lead people down the hall narrating the Walt Disney version of the story and at the end guests were served lemonade in the part of the hallway that was called the palace.

"We said.

spent a

"The

lot

first

of time putting

part of the hall

it

all

was

up." Jennifer lined with

Beekman

hand-drawn

illustrations of the story and the second half was the palace. We covered the water fountain with a blue aluminum foil type paper and put a glass slipper on top of it."

The

won

tloor

the contest with this

tion portraying the

famous

tale

performance and decora-

of Cinderella and her wicked

step sisters.

After the parade on Saturday morning, the afternoon held the

annual

Homecoming

football

game

in a

packed Rickenbrode

Stadium.

Northwest's starting quarterback Lawrence Luster was suspended from the Homecoming game due to a violation of team policy after being arrested for suspicion of shoplifting.

According to the police report. Luster was arrested "for larceny following an incident at a local business, in which a bottle of gin

was taken without being paid

started in his

Jones returns as a guest

for."

game suspension and quarterback first collegiate game against South-

Luster's arrest led to a one

Greg Teale

Dressed as a groundskeeper. Jean

west Baptist University.

emcee

in a

cameo appearance in

the Variety

Show Photo by .

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;continued 26 Homecoming

Jon Britton.


As

"The Little Mermaid." Graham Sisco Gays And Lesbians Together At Northwest. GALTAN

Ursula, from Disney's

represents

placed

first in

ihejalopy division ot'the parade. Photo by Fay DahU|iiist.

Brad Stephens as Bobby Bearcat and Brian Bclloffas Linda Girard give their rendition of "Bobby Does Opera." Phi Mii .Alpha Sinfonia returned flair alter a year of absence and went

on

to

win

1st

place

in the

independent

skit competition.

Photo by Russ Weydert.

Student Life 27


REMEMBER was fun having it was in a bad

"It

though

my

The game concluded

in

on Homecoming Day with

made

the

first start

Northwest's sixth consecutive loss a score of 21-17.

winning touchdown

causing a great

let

on Homecoming, even

situation," Teale said.

down

for

in the final

Southwest Baptist

minute of the game

Northwest fans.

Despite minor setbacks that arose in planning, the

coming

Home-

were executed without problems on Satur-

festivities

day.

"Everything went very smooth," Leilani Greenfield,

coming

co-chair, said. "I'd say the biggest

Home-

problem was

that

representatives didn't take the information back to their orga-

was

nizations, but that

easily remedied."

Northwest sponsored joyed by students

at

activities

were not the only ones en-

Homecoming. The bar scene was another

popular outing that received overwhelming crowds over the

weekend. Lie

Awake, an alternative music group, made a return appear-

ance to The World Famous Outback on Friday and Saturday

The band brought in a packed house on both nights with songs such as "Tainted Love" by the Cure and "Hey Jealousy" by The Gin Blossoms. "They were awesome," Lucretia Winemiller said. "They played new music that was on the cutting edge." Even with the problems that arose during the week, it was a time that would instill memories in all who participated in "The Wonderful World of Northwest." nights.

their renditions of

The Phi Sigma Kappii float makes its way down College Avenue during

Homecoming

parade. The Phi work paid off when they received first place in the tloat comthe

Sig's hard

petition.

Photo by Jon Britton.

HOMECOMING AWARDS BEST OVERALL HOUSE DECORATION

BEST FLOAT Phi

Sigma Kappa

Alpha Sigma Alpha/Alpha Kappa Lambda,

"Aladdin"

VARIETY SHOW SKITS I

"Aladdin"

NDE PEN DENT- Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia, "Bobby

Does Opera"

-

SORORITY

-

Delta Zeta,

"Who Framed Bobby

FRATERNITY

-

Sigma

Epsilon, "Bobby

Phi

Bearcat Meets the Weird World

of

AWARD FOR

BEST

ACT Phi

Mu

Alpha Sintonia, "Bobby Does Opera"

OLIO ACTS Three Men and a Melody in

Phi

Mu Alpha

Sinfonia's,

"Bobby

Does Opera" Kelly Burger

World

of

in

Alpha Sigma Alpha's, "The Won-

Woody"

BEST FLOAT Phi

JALOPIES GALTAN, Little Mermaids Ursula SMS-AHEA, Costume "101 Dalmations"

CLOWNS Phi

Sigma Kappa

Phi

Mu

Alpha, "Herbie the Love Bug"

Sigma Kappa, "Fantasia" "Snow White" Sigma Sigma Sigma, "Poohs Corner" Phi

Sigma Kappa, Sigma Kappa,

COSTUME Phi

Sigma Kappa, "Mighty Ducks" Pan and Friends"

Delta Zeta, "Peter "Aladdin"

HICHLY COMPETITIVE Phi

^^

Mu

Delta Zeta,

BEST ACTRESS derful

Society, "Ifs a Small

PAPER MACHE

BEST ACTOR Brian Bellof

Sigma

Support Services, Phi Sigma Kappa, Phi

Alpha Sintonia. "Bobby Does Opera"

PEOPLES CHOICE

-

World"

PARADE SUPREMACY

Waif

BEST OVERALL SKIT Mu

Lamda, "Aladdin"

INDEPENDENT

Bearcat"

Phi

BEST HOUSE DECORATIONS CREEK Alpha Sigma Alpha/Alpha Kappa

"Aladdin"

COMPETITIVE Support Staff Council, "Beauty and the Beast"

POMP Tau

Phi Epsilon, "Alice

Phi

Sigma Kappa, "Cool Runnings Jamaican

in

Wonderland"

Bobsled" Phi

Mu

Alpha Sinfonia, "Herbie the Love Bug"

J

28 Homecoming I.

i^

(


k

Peering

parade.

is in

ihe

plaee.

Steve Simon helps out

on

v\

ith

their "I'nder the Sea."

the Delta

Chi house decoration. The Phi Mu's w orked w

theme uhich won second

place. Photo b\

I.

^^-

\i'

\^,, ftj^i^yKr-

*?'*,

,<y

^4k

^ ^

m

Wt-^

ith

aura Ricdcl.

i

^^

^

Sigma Sigma Sigma tloal. l.amkin Center. Lissa Hernandez makes sure The tlnat w as made nt' solely recyeabic materials, a first lor the Homecoming Photo by Mike ReilT. ol

oiii

e\ er\ thing

.*.,.:«'v^x'. (•.r.^*'

the Iraternity


Julie Mattisen teaches

Hudson

many

residents

how

Linda Turner and other to

third floor

Boot Scoot. This was just one of

floor activities planned for the semester. Photo by

Laura Riedel.

Matt Janssen and Caryn Burgess Two Step at The World Famous Outback on Country Night. Every Thursday night

seemed

to follow a

to dance.

western theme as many students came Photo by Laura Riedel.

30 Country


I he music of the campus,

tow n or a big

toiral

could be heard throughout the

steel guitar

did not matter v\hether students were trom a small

it

country scene was heating up. The

city, the

traditional

cow hoy was taking a turn from

to an\()ne

who

"I

the a\ erage farm

"Then my more was thought Garth Brooks had the

used to hate country tnusic." Melissa Burri

stepdad started listening to

around

the better

it

got.

it

all

it I

my

biggest itnpact on changing

said.

the titne and the

I

views."

Although the influence was not the same for everyone seemed

Students were even given the

sudden change

the

known. However, music "I

headlinetj the annual

in attitude

who had alwass

for those

fall

concert.

came about may never be

LINE

loved country

brought about hope.

it

thought

because

it

was jusia

theattenlion

all

Keith Rash said.

last,"

people,

all

more upbeat country music. chance to see a country star on

to etijoy the

campus when Su/y Bogguss

How

boy

liked the countr\ beat.

lad. but

hoped

I

it

would

had been good tor country tnusic

"It

had tnore of a pop beat.

It

was

like a

mixture of old

and new." For some the attraction was not just

were

entire country look they

cowboy

wait to get into

attire,

after.

which

the music,

in

Some

was

it

the

students could not

most included boots.

for

Wranglers, a hat and a western-style button

down

shirt.

"My boyfriend bought tne a pairof boots so that would have I

something

to

wear to

all

of the country concerts that

said. "I also

myself

all

bought

kinds of clothes

with boots, hats or anything

cowboy

Once

related

on

it."

students were

all

dressed up some headed to concerts, but for others

Country Night

at

The World Famous Outback. Thursday night as they

a different look every

AND

we went to

COWBOY

over the sutnmer," Danielle

Caruso

DANCING

wearing their favorite boots and Stetson

filed in the

hats. Students

found domg traditional country dances, such

it

was

Pet)ple took

as the

on

door

could be

Barn Dance.

HATS

Swinging and the Texas Two Step while others attempted to ride the electric bull. With customers, in cowboy hats and spurs on

jukebox

their boots, putting quarters in the

some

favorite country tunes,

to play the

bars in Maryville, like the Sports

ROPIN'

Page, took on the old-west atmosphere every night.

While

were usually packed,

the bars

own

Hall planned their

line

the ladies of

dances to get

in the

Hudson

countrv

spirit.

Practicing the most popular country dances before venturing to Chris Stu\;i practices "roping

participated

rodeo practice

ut

the

in the

"We

one of many

Wooden

to the

more

INTO STYLE

traditional

were

replicas of steers

residence halls which were used to practice roping.

practiced

the grass outside of our

in

Chris Stuva said. "At

first

people looked

at

dorm sometimes." us funny but then

BY SHELLEY STANCLE

I

liked

guess they to practice

floor activities that residents

WAY

in.

aspects of being a cowboy.

found

was

members who

many

the

ot

There were also students who turned

ihc bail" before

arena. Stuva

was one

the bar

THEIR

roping

in

Whether

just got

was

it

used

to

seeing us."

the traditional or the urban

cowboy,

it

was

their residence halls

obvious throughout campus the popularitv country had taken.

as well as at the

Even

arena. Photo b)

in the attitude

Laura Riedel.

country

if

they did not go

way

all

out, there

was a noticeable difference

people were taking tow ard country music and the of

life.

Student Life 31


Jennifer

Van Cooten shows

her enthusiasm

at

the

Chiefs and Bengals game. After their half-time performance many band members dressed up in their Chiefs gear to cheer on the team. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Cheryl Stalone and Karen Hawkins cheer on the Chiefs gathin their first Monday Night Football game. Many ered at The World Famous Outback to join in on the Chiefs mania. Photo by Russ Weydert.

32 Chiefs Mania


T

he Kansas City Chiefs staHed off the

a sense of predestination, as fans ing

at

I

W3 NFL season w ith

Northwest were proclaim-

them Super Bowl champions.

During the

year of Carl IVterson\. Chiefs general

fifth

manager/president, five-year championship plan, talk had started

around Kansas City and surrounding areas

Chiefs were one step away from winning

To

it

take the Chiefs to the next step. Peterson

bold moves signing two

With

NFL

.Allen,

it

made

several

legends.

the acquisition of quarterback Joe

back Marcus

that the

all.

was hoped

the

Montana and running

newly re\amped Chiefs

STUDENTS

offense could propel them into play-off contention.

"HNcryone was going cra/y because the Chiefs had Joe Montana,

who was

signeil

one of the greatest quarterbacks of

all

time," Seann 0"Rile\ said.

Many Northwest

fans thought the Chiefs were near champi-

onship material, but were

missing one or tvso key pieces.

just

Montana and

I

quired two legends

oi the football

To

were the

man\. the offense featuring needed pieces. "Well. thought most of the uproar was because they .Allen

ac-

realm, those being Joe

Montana and Marcus Allen." Luther .Solomon said. "People to go all the way because those two

thought they were going

players were what the team needed to complete itself."

Many in the

ward

to

Montana the

students considered

NFL

and looked

CHIEFS

greatest quarterback

MANIA

for-

watching him out on

the football field again, after his

JOIN IN

two year absence.

The Northwest Bearcat Marching Band, directed by

John Lnt/i. became a part of the excitement by play ing during the half-time entertainment of the Chiefs

game

against the

NFL LE6ENPS

Cincinnatti Bengals. "it

was a great

afternt)on for everyone." Hnt/i said, "it

just a great time.

We

alumni, like Len

Dawson and

right

was

played about four songs for the Chiefs Jan Stcnerud.

We

behind the Bengals bench."

The Marching Band were not

the only ones

KEEP FANS

got to stand

who went a

little

crazy over the Chiefs. Other students planted themselves

in

home or at the bar for Monday Night Football with the Chiefs. Some bars in Maryville, like The Palms, held weekly specials such as quarter draws for Monday

front of tele\ ision sets at

RALLYING

AROUND

KANSAS CITY FOOTBALL

Night Football. Despite the overall enthusiasm, there were

about Montana circulating

among

still

many doubts

fans.

"Sure, he was one of football's greatest quarterbacks of

all

time and he had been to the Super Bowl three times, but

The Famous

'aln>ns iif ^

orld

)Lilhack s;

watch the

screen televi-

idii

lay.

as the Chiefs

Students nut

BY SCOTT PUMMELL

I

thought he more or less outlived his reign of power." Solomon said.

Allen also upped the expectations for Chiefs fans, as he represented the shift of focus

rushing to speed and agility

in their

run offense from

power

.

"He was one of the greatest running backs and would say it was good that we picked him up," Solomon said. The addition of football legends not only restructured game 1

inly

enjoyed drink

that but also Ipecials ee pi77a. Photo hy

on Britton.

plans but created Chiefs mania for Northwest fans.

Student Life 33


34 Overcoming Death


Real World Issues

/ft'/

real ijooii

talk

about

was

it,"

Stirling said. "I

used

to

Overcoming Death

made mt

"Somethinc) that

The

to just

loss of

Jennifer

a loved one

always

seem to end up Ncrcoming the

makinc] myself lauijh lahen

Alter a

W2.

1

At the time. Stirling was grie\

ini;

the loss

had the responsibility

ol a

felt

my

job

the people

I

come

lell that

come back." Stirling said, "i was

back. Classes had Just started and

was m\

it

on m\ lloor and for

The death

I

Resident Assistant as well.

really pressured to

not really ready to

with

At first

could yo through.

keep up with her school work and she

loould Ik rememberim] the

things.

beint:

ot her father, trsinj; to

"1

good

human

a

l()->ear battle uith cancer, Jenniter Siirlmg's

lather died in

talked to somebody, because

J

a close relali\e or Iriond could be the

do;illi ol

most traumatic situation

I

someone

ol

responsibility lo be there lor

my team members."

close could send an indi\iilual into

\arious emotions, such as anger, sadness and disbelief.

"After

would focus on how bad

it

when that he

was gone, hut

I

was not

Wyman

/

it

missed him so bad.

1...

was

where

to the point

there

I

got through that anger stage, then

was sad having him gone." Stirling said. always wanted

I

and

I

would

to

be there lor

my

"I

was realK upset

was so scared

dad... I

I

kind

that he

of

was

that he

went giine.

would be gone

not be there to say goodbye."

when

Borts lost a close friend

summer. Howe's death sent Borts "At first, was in disbelief," Borts

Kelly

Howe,

a

1902 graduate, died

sudileiily

during the

into a state of shock.

I

would be remembering

have her

to

for a friend for the rest

said, "...why did

of

my

Most often, overcoming a death could thini]s that

would make me

it

have

to

happen

to her.'

I

lost the o|iportiinity

life."

not be handled by the indiv idual alone.

Many

students looked

to the counselling center to help with the emotional trauma death caused. "For the most part, what we did was just basicallv supportive therapy, reassurance that

feelings that

they were experiencing were normal and talked about things,

grief process," Liz

laugh, such as things that

While

Wood,

was

a person

the crazy

all

to anticipate in

terms of the

interim president of the counseling center, said.

grieving the death of a family

member or

friend,

it

was important

to

have the

support of friends. Stirling said that her friends worried about her

"Especially

at first." Stirling said.

okay or seeing It

would say

to

me."

that

was

at

if

I

and supported

"There was somebody

in

her.

my room constantly, making

sure

I

was

needed anything."

when someone was alone the fact that a loved one was gone really hit. It was up to remember the good times they had with the person w ho had passed away to put a smile

times

person to

back on their face. "I

like

wrote a few poems and looked through old photos a through

that stage

between

when my dad and

I

traumatic experience.

Many

stu-

used to write things dents faced emotional stress dealing

w ith

when

the loss of a loved one

or friend. Photo illustration by

Tony

to

would dress

things in

one or a friend could be a very

1

1

?>

lot." Stirling said. "1

when was really awkward I

looking.

I

would find funny things, would also find pictures

would find stuff like that and catch myself laughing." up. about a loved one or friend, the telephone calls, gifts one missed It was the little objects that they left behind that would help remember the material was the it notes. But. little oreven without him knowing. notebook, Borts' jokes in to write Howe used person. I used them, like books," Borts said. "She everyday, ..and gave me. lot of things, she whole "I had a

of

Coping with the death of a loved

1

in a

I

life that

notebook of mine she wrote jokes

Death, of a loved one. was not an easy aspect feelings to

in life to

in there.

I

was finding things that she wrote,"

ov ercome. whether they did

it

by writing their

down on paper, talking to friends or looking through old photos, it was a traumatic experience

overcome.

Miceli.

By Fay Dahlquist Real World Issues 35


36

Disabilities


Real World Issues

"OuÂŁ

ibiil

bihi lo btUH' a lot

I

more patioKe tban

before,"

I

used

i)et

ÂŤ/)

lo

be

ibiil

I

Taking

all

it

did

Tim Houhud

"/(

Disabilities

was

big dijjeraice

said.

in stride

could

iind do something

students walked to and from class

Average

However, such was not faced a day

in.

w

second

ithout a

thoujiht.

the case tor all students. Disabled students

day out struggle of going

to class

and dealing with

problems that went along with being "physically challenged."

whenever

I

jell like H.

But

Tim

"Probably the biggest problem was getting around easily."

Howard

up and down some

said. "Getting

of the hills

was

pretty

tough."

H0u\

I

bad

to

jnid

Howard, who

commuted

v^

to get

up

"1

lor

it."

not walk and do

all

A car accident as taxing for accessibility

and where

Todd Herron

any tht)ught before

did

who

was kind of confining I

tried to lake

it

to

that,

it

w as

pretty easy

sutfered from muscular

be

w heclchair

in a

I

could

all in stride."

disabled and in a wheelchair. However, adjusting to college was not

him since he had attended Northwest before

his accident

.

1

Icrron said he

iie\

er ga\ e building

his accident.

that

adjustments were not hard

man\ adjustments

did not ha\e that 1

"It

his

his condition.

aroiuid," .leff Potter,

to get

the things that other people did. but

left

Howard agreed with Herron "I really

was accepting

had limited use of my arms, but other than

me

dystrophy, said.

and do

Another disabled student said

to class in a wheelchair.

biggest challenge

a uhiy

as injured in an automobile accident three years ago.

to

lo iiuike.

make." Howard

had to watch what

said. "1 just

I

did

it."

Students with disabilities faced some ignorance.

One

student. Tina Hktermanis. said she

was

treated

differently by students because she was visually impaired. "Mt)st of the time was treated fairly." Hktermanis said. "But w as different. sometimes thought that people did not understand that was a person, too." Potter, as well as Herron and Howard, said he had not faced any prejudice. "People did not treat me any differently from anyone else." Potter said. "E\eryone was real friendly I

1

I

I

Normal stuff." campus was the Access and Accommodations Committee. Headed by Lois Heldenbrand. the organization sought to make disabled students" life on campus as hassle-free as possible and gave them the same opportunities and resources as other students. The committee advised and surveyed the campus to ensure every building was accessible, made recommendations, upilaied the

and

nice.

They

said 'hi" in the halls.

Assisting disabled students on

handbook and coordinated awareness training with faculty. "This year, the committee was following through on what they started last year, Heldenbrand said. "The committee approved a guide to access on campus. When someone came to campus, they got a map faculty

"

to see

Buying lunch

is

an

activity

most

people take for granted, but for Jeff Potter

ÂŤho must

Annelle to

deal with muscu-

lar dystrophy, this task requires a

make

American

Disability Act coordinator tor .Northwest. .She said her task

ith state

freshmen and they were

to contact

me

they had concerns with accessibility.""

if

said.

adjusted to the "I

changing times for those

who were

was seeing more disabled students coming

that.'"

was

and federal standards for the disabled.

Despite problems, there existed hope for anyone with a disability.

of for disabled students.

accessible."'

the

sure Northv\est complied w

Weymuth

doors, which were added to the

campus

Weymuth was

"i sent a letter to

companion. Northwest had several modifications, such as automatic

what buildings were

How,ard

Howard thought employers had

disabled.

to college

and

I

believed the job market was retlective

said.

With Howard's optimistic approach, things

certainly looked belter, not bleaker, for disabled students.

Photo bv Chris Tucker.

By Don Munsch Real World Issues 37


38 Interracial Dating


"Blacks and lohiks had

Real World Issues Interracial Dating

it

harder," Bill Alexander

HI

Breaking racial

"Mexicans could

said.

any

and

whites

Any

accepted.

loas

il

BARRIERS

oriental

he couple, like everyone else, was taking advantage of the outdoors.

many

could

lohites

and

il

walked

I'hey

in the

park and talked about marriage and someday,

children. In their eyes,

some onlookers,

was no problem.

Maybe

in

ing the looks they received, the

surroundings.

hand

United States

ibc

it

could not be more grand, but

lite

went

in

the eyes of

was not accepted. Not understandcouple walked on ()bli\ious to their

their being together

What was wrong with this couple holding hands? One and the other was white.

v\as black

After being exposed to Maryvjlle"s society, students were taught the

conservative lifestyle that was offered. Those

who went

against the

norm ofone-race dating found no mallcrthcirrace.thes became \iclims

back

to

slavery times.

of discrimination. Bill

Alexander, campus safety officer, met his gnlfiicnd

Through It

should not have

from the Brown Alexander said

vs.

it was still an ever-present factor in their social life. saw more open-minded people and that v\ as why he had no

Board of Educatit)n decision,

after being at Northwest, he

objections to doing what was taboo 10 years prior. He. a black man. exclusively dated a v\hite

been an issue."

1970.

in

dating, they learned racial tension, although slowly subsiding

"The campus pretty much accepted was just a lot of stares." Both families accepted

it."

Alexander said. "But

their dating for the

Alexander's girlfriend. His father was born

in

most

part, but

in the

town, there was not a

Alexander's father refused to

girl.

There

k)t said.

Debbie.

talk to

1917 and through his experiences with oppression, became

prejudiced against white people.

Alexanderwasoneoffewwhowentagainst what society had deemed as "normal. "But after sc\lmi\ ears of dating, the pressures escalated and their relationship ended. "I really

loved her." Alexander said. "The pressure was just too much."

Students were facing the same pressures that Alexander faced 20 years ago. Brent Bruhn dated a black

woman

for over

two

Bruhn believed he experienced discrimination because of

years.

hometown shunned him. "My hometown forgot about me." Bruhn and "my It

friend" to leave.

was none of Bruhn said

It

What was on

"I

Mohamed and

Tom

her boyfriend.

Prather, enjoy a quiet dinner

at Pizza Hut.

Mohamed. who was

from Singapore said that native country, to date

it

in

her

was not unusual

people of other races. Photo

want

to a job service business

People

and the lady

we were together whether they

liked

in his

told it

me

or not.

their business."

the inside

was

Another student invoked

Sue

went

his girlfriend got upset, but then she just tried to

dated a white man. Sue in

"We

I

a very strong person," Bruhn said.

"She was

being

said.

used to bother me. just thought

this.

all that

in

"We

took

it

prose them wrong.

one step

at a

time.

Everyone was

different.

mattered.""

an interracial relationship had not experienced any pressures because she

Mohamed.

a native of Singapttre. dated

Tom

Prather for a year.

Mohamed

said

Maryville did not present a problem to her.

came from to get

where everyone mixed." Mohamed

a country

involved with an American, but

Tom

was so much

said. like

"When came I

to

America

I

did not

me. Our ideas and ways of thinking

blended together so well." ith Mohamed to Singapore once their education was completed. town might ha\e made some people uneasy about being invohed in an Those that had dated other races realized there was no difference. Although

Prather planned on returning w

Being

in

a conser\ati\e

interracial relationship.

Alexander did not marry

his girlfriend, he lived

"People are people." Alexander

said.

by one statement.

"You marry someone you

love."

by Laura Riedel.

By Kathy Higdon-Bolar Real World Issues 39


Real World Issues "/

did not expect everyone to

accept the fact that

Patrick

Mahoney

a

and

I

was gay,'

said.

why

not understand

ii'i(/i

I

Homosexuality

did

"J

havinc] sex

woman was

not

Liberation

discrimination

exciting

did not expect men

most students, was considered one

for

College,

to

liberating limes, introducing

most

ot the

new experiences and

different

relationships like homosexuality.

why

un derstand

With Student Senate recognition of the organization Lesbians Together At Northwest, homosexuals became more visual on campus and in the public eye. GALTAN made the statement to the public that homosexuals were on campus, which shocked many people in the town of

having sex

GALTAN, Gays And

with other men was exciting.

I

Maryville.

Mahoney. who had been "out of the closet" for over a homosexual was often misinterpreted by heteroThe most common misunderstanding for homosexuals

Patrick

anyone

did not expect

to

year, said being

sexuals.

understand

was the sexual aspects of their relationships. "Most people thought being gay was just one thing, the way you had sex. and it was not." Mahoney said. "There were different w ays everybody had sex. Sex was such a small part of a gay person's life."

because they

it,

Graham Evetybody had

were not gay.

have

the right to

their

believed

it

Sisco.

who had been

went further than

"out of the closet" for over twenty years, agreed with

"Most people thought homosexuality was through deviation," Sisco said. "People believed was no love in our relationships and it was purely sexual. Yes, there was sexual attraction, but was also love."

own

There had been much controversy

Mahoney opinions and

express their

to

was gay. "When came 'out of the

I

just did not it

view me on one

to

there there

years about from where homosexuality stemmed.

all his life,

though

was not

it

he came to the

until recently

in the

closet,'

I

tried to trace

back of my head

back to w hen

that there

knew ," Mahoney

said. "There was was something different. But, did not know what I

I

was."

However, commg out for Mahoney meant a change in his friends. "My whole group of friends drastically changed," Mahoney said. "When

want people

but

realization he

always something opinions.

in past

believed he had been homosexual

I

own

Mahoney

just the sex.

the bat

assumed

that

people were not going to accept me.

When came

It

was kind of

I

met people.

like ha\ ing a

seemed 1 got closer to those people and " not out to, started to put distance between them and me. For Sisco. being gay meant he developed stronger friendships. shoulder.

I

out to people,

it

I

right off

my who was

chip on

the people

I

I

aspect oj

my

Uje,

which

"There was some shunning down

ality. In fact,

"My In a small town such as Maryville.

being open about homosexuality

ferred to as

showed

The

difFicult.

necklace, re-

Freedom Rings, was proud

to

he finally decided to

had were very

his

homosexu-

them, they claimed they already knew.

was not

different

from anyone else's son except for the

I

run-ins with gay bashing, for the most part the students accepted

heard

just like

it

all

the time

everybody

else'

them

just like

everyone

else.

differently about being gay.

on the news,

I

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they were

even heard not,"

it

from gay people themselves, 'Gay people were said. "If we were just like everyone else, we

Mahoney

would not be say."

By Angela Tackett 40 Ho.MOSEXUALITY

I

was gay," Mahoney said. Also, Mahoney's younger sister, who was heterosexual, joined GALTAN to support him. Being gay on campus did not pose many problems for Mahoney and Sisco. Though, they had a few

"I

Miceli.

tell

parents had just finally seen their son

fact that

be

homosexual. Photo illustration by

Tonv

when

Howe\er, Mahoney thought a person

Sisco said. "But, the friendships

strong because they were more open and truthful. There was no lying and falsity." Even though Mahoney had a drastic change in friends, Muhoney's family accepted

was being gay."

can be

in the public eye,"


Real World Issues 41


'When

I

came

tons oj virgins

end oj

here I

knew

and by

my freshman

most oj them had

Real World Issues Sexual Relationships

the

More than just

year

lost their

a one-night stand

virginity with the exception

oj one or two," Kiki Kitnkel

AS

children were sent to college, parents hoped their

money would

be spent wdrthwhile; their kids would transform into mature,

young adults and receive a higher education. But that journey toward adulthood seemed anything but easy, as students faced

'Tliey

said.

slept

with every-

many

social issues including sexual relationships.

There were many stereotypes

who were only

body and

the ijuys did not

after

naive enough to give

more than just cjot to the

it

to

rampant

men who were

at college;

girls

them. But several students said

a stereotype,

different socializing

Some girls

care.

that ran

one thing and young freshmen

was

some people just

in college.

it

was

did not realize

far

how

Many problems seemed

to

center around naive young girls and the guys that took advantage

of them.

"Younger

what they just wanted

point

to

quicker, that said.

made

it

a lot easier to

"Guys could just

tell,

tell

girls fell in love, they

thought they

them what guys wanted and they believed

it."

fell in

love, a lot

Reggie Rodman

younger girls were not the same maturity, they got upset a

lot easier.

They

believed anything and they thought the guys were in love with them." lose

and

it

then after that as

Although many students had moral views and opinions about

"girls

who

slept around." a

bad

was not the only concern involved in sexual relationships. Getting hurt emotionally or physically could happen to anyone. Kiki Kunkel was engaged when her two-year relationship came reputation

the

saying goes once you

(o

an end. After the break-up, she found herself involved

in

other sexual relationships and ended up

pregnant.

"Before, start,

you can not

stop.

I

happen, but

never thought that getting pregnant could happen to me," Kunkel said. it

was not something

I

"I

knew

it

could

took into consideration."

Some monogamous relationship and others thought it was a matter left for after marriage. Counselor Ron Webster, said many of these values came from home and students struggled with their own views and independence. "We did have people, men and women, that had traditional ideals of how things should be, then they came to college where things were more open minded and they were experimenting and trying new things," Webster said. "People we saw were trying to balance that out." While the stereotype of young, naive girls continued, Webster said for men and women, it was not

No

matter the age or situation, everyone had individual opinions about sexual relationships.

people believed

in a

only a matter of age, but also personality. "It depended on both the individual and age," he said. "They had difficulty as they got older and that was not what they wanted, they wondered 'How do get back on track." Overcoming mistakes from the past was sometimes difficult for students. However, Kunkel had learned from her own experiences and made a change in her lifestyle, she hoped others would do the I

same.

had been through, before I went out and had sex with another person, I would think twice," Kunkel said. "This had not been a negative experience but it was not something I would "After every thing that

Many students got involved in relationsliips

They

upon entering

college.

also faced the decision

wish upon anyone." Despite bad reputations and the threat of pregnancy, sexual relationships were a reality issue. Whether it was a serious commitment or a orie-night stand, everyone had to deal with whether or not they

whether

Photo

to

become sexually

illustration

active.

I

would be involved with someone

sexually.

The

situation

was different

the consequences.

bv Jon Britton.

By Karissa Boney

42 Sexual Relationships

for

everyone and so were


Real World Issues 43


44 Change

In Friends


Real World Issues "All of

my friends

school kneip everybody

and how we

Misty

()rew

hard not

In

toi]elher

to like

not

Friends are

It

"We

always forever

was

someone

may come and

Friends

friends

may

u

go. but one ihnig

change. The friends thai were made

in

ill

elementary school

he tor eeriani; the\

may often stay

ihrouuh high school, but college was ihe taclor that took the

you grew up with and

my

here

\^ ill

same

on those

The transition that took place between high school and college sometimes

"All of

friends

w

ithont the

mv

common ground that made them

friends had

gone

in different directions

friends in the

and

I

first

left

place.

did not get to see

all

when went home." Misty Jeffery said. "'We did not ha\e anything in common anymore because we were living in difterent areas and did not ha\e the of them

same

reminded me of people

1

interests

anymore."

Jeffery found one of the major differences between her

Maryville was people there had more of I hackc nome^

real toll

the

relationships.

old Iriends

most of

Friends

all were,"

Jeffery said

up

Change

in hicjh

the latest gossip.

One

of the qualities she preferred in her Mary

a

tendency

\ ille

Iricnds

to

hometown and

only be concerned about

was they respected her

right

to privacy.

"There it

it

v\as

the gossip about

all

who was

was what classes did you have and

exclusive group of people

Often people would

found

that qualities he

all

start

the time.

My

listen to

my

looked for

problems, a

However, finding a United States often like his friends in

Greece

at

behind whose back." Jeffery

much

said.

"Here

gossip unless you were with the same

friends here respected others' privacy more." in their

in friends in the Llnited .States

companions. Kostas Kapetis

were similar

to

had one back home, someone

said. "I

what he had

who

could

in his

listen to

real friend."

true friend often

moved

as

looking for different characteristics

hometown, Thessaloniki, Greece. "1 was looking for a good friend." Kapetis

me and

who and

seeing

was not

there

changed with

different cultures. Kapetis found that people in the

a faster pace and did not take the time that

was needed

to get to

know people

did.

was harder to make good friends here in the states because people were more materialistic, Kapetis said. "There was not all of them were, hut a lot of them just wanted to use you and your stuff." did not care, because a big ditference, we went out more there and had more time to talk. Here people just "I

thought

it

how fast the American society was." behavior. Kapetis also found the difference between the si/e of the cities had an impact on peoples" here. friendlier He found it was easier to make new friends because people were

of

lead to the a close friend could either strengthen the relationship or. sometimes, it would be a bad idea. sometimes could end of the friendship. Jessica Prather learned that living with a friend together living after hi)mctown. but Prathcr decided to room with a friend she had worked with in her

Living

for

one semester the two ended up going

"It if

Misty Jeffery shares pictures and

memories with Kristin Deady and Heidi Lutrick. College years let stu-

dents develop new friendships

away from home. Photo by l.aura

w ith

the

was not

really that

their separate

ways.

we got in a fight, it was just the little things." Prathersaid. "She used to get irritated

bottom drawer was open."

fact that once you started Prather attributed the fact that they were no longer roommates to the simple quirks. notice their little li\ ing with a person you were more apt to

"When you

started living with a friend, or

anybody

really,

you find things

that they

do

that get

on your

nerves," Prather said.

Friendships were an important factor

discovered what

in

everyone's

life

and during the college years was when most

the important characteristics in a friend really were.

Riedel.

By Sara Meyers Real World Issues 45


"We had

that

we would

We

a while.

trust

Real World Issues Long-Distance Relationships

understanding

the

he apart for

were ahle

So

CLOSE, YET

to

SO FAR AWAY

each other that we

would not do something

that

would

The

our

ajject

old adage saying "absence

Many

makes

grow fonder" stood

the heart

most cases of long-distance relationships.

steadfastly in

some

students and even

professors, continued long-distance

relationships despite having to be apart from their loved ones, for

relationship,"

Melody

days, life

Ludwig

said.

"We

weeks and even months. They found time

Ladonna Geddes. speech

Dr.

under-

husband since 1983. She

professor, lived apart from her

visited her husband,

Accountant for the

certified Public

state

three weeks. Since she did not teach in the

stood that

ij

each oj us

to juggle their love

with studies and visitation.

who worked

as a

of Kentucky, about every

summer, she spent

it

with

her husband.

"We saw each other more because we were making a concentrated effort to be together."

cared about each other

as mine, so

When

I

"In

my

some ways

it

made

independent

built an

the relationship better because

husband without interference from others." Geddes

not always there to share

should have occurred.

said.

"His schedule was not as flexible

she was not with her husband, she passed time by taking courses. According to Geddes, one

advantage of the relationship was she

enough, no problems

Geddes

did most of the traveling."

my good

I

life.

could focus on concrete quality time with

said.

"The bad side was

that

my husband was

and bad news."

Several students maintained long-distance relationships despite not being able to be with their loved ones. Partners found

ways of keeping

communication and quality time during Sarah Yarkasky kept her relationship

the relationship together and remaining close through

visits.

in tact

by talking on the phone, writing

boyfriend every other weekend. Trust was a factor

in

letters

and

visiting her

every relationship that had to survive the

test

of time and distance, however these relationships also had their disadvantages.

Yarkasky and her boyfriend, who lived "Education was important said. in

to

me and

I

in

Independence, Mo., had been apart for three months.

figured

if

he was really serious, he would wait," Yarkasky

"The disadvantage of long-distance relationships was

made the time we Matthew Behounek had touch

spent together

more

that

my phone

bills

went

up.

But keeping

special."

a girlfriend in Milo. Iowa, and they took turns visiting each other every

weekend. Understanding each other's schedule helped school but would be joining Northwest

their relationship.

He

said she

was

still in

high

ne.\t year.

Behounek sometimes found it a chore traveling, but "it was all in the name of love." Behounek said. Mek)dy Ludwig who dated Mick McGlaughlin, from Humboldt. Neb., found herself in a longdistance relationship, They worked it out so they saw each other almost everyday. "I would go home, or he would come down here to see me," Ludwig said. "So did not consider I

Sarah Yarkasky writes a her boyfriend

letter to

who lives in Indepen-

dence, Mo., while relaxing

room. Writing

an

effective

us in a long-distance relationship."

letters

way

in

proved

her

to

be

for couples in-

Ludwig went home to.

to see her

boyfriend after school because she wanted to and not because she had

She believed they could be separated for long periods of time but she would rather

"We

we had

not.

Ludwig said. However, since Ludwig saw her boyfriend almost everday. her studies still came first. "If I went home during the week, still put my homework and studies first," Ludwig said. "Going home to see my boyfriend was just like 1 was commuting." could go without seeing each other for two to three weeks

if

to,"

I

volved in long-distance relationships to catch

up on how things

Love,

trust

and understanding were key factors for an effective long-distance relationship.

were going. Photo by Chris Tucker.

By Sue 46 LONG-DlSTANCE RELATIONSHIPS

Mohamed and

Angela Tackett


Real World Isues 47


^^ ying

down

nap

for a

Roberta Hall. Deena Edwards

in

until someone walked in the was a roommate, Edwards was not surprised when she heard someone moving around. Then someone climbed into bed with her and she felt pressure on her chest.

expected to sleep for a few hours, door. Figuring

"I

it

my

pulled the covers over

head and

the pressure

felt

Edwards said. "Then heard someone laugh. felt like someone was right in my face." The Roberta ghost had been a legend for over 40 years.

again,"

I

I

Roberta Hall, once known as Residence Hall, was explosion on April 29, 1951,

12:10 a.m.,

at

when

by an

hit

a St. Joseph

Power and Light gas tank exploded.

6 HOST

women were

After the explosion, 21

treated for injuries,

including Roberta Steel. After returning to Northwest in the

fall

of 952, Steel officially withdrew from the University on Nov. 1

19,

and returned home where she died. Roberta Hall was not

LECEND5

some

1

Epsi-

member.

some fraternity

964. Jackson and

river after

had rained.

it

No

one checked

had shifted and Jackson was the dive, Jackson's

first to

head was caught

a broken neck and

was taken

to the

102 River.

to see if the riverbed

dive

in the

at the

brothers went to the

After this fateful

in.

mud. He suffered from

TKE house

and died

later

that evening.

There were times when members would be downstairs and hear a stereo, that no one had turned on, playing

room on

HOUSES HOLD

also

The Tau Kappa

Before Jackson died, members would meet In April

Northwest,

to

fraternities

claimed legends.

TKE

believed to be Slade Jackson, a

ON

known

had been haunted for almost 30 years by a ghost they

lon house

LIVE

the only "haunted" house

in

Jackson's old

the third floor.

An upper

torso of a

man. who appeared

to be laughing, was would turn on and off. was sometimes off when

spotted in front of the fireplace and lights

EERIE TALES

OF THE VILLE

"There was a lamp

my roommates and

We

weird.

our room that

left

burned the lamp."

Man Prather, or OMP as the Sigma Tau Gammas called

Old

BY KATHY HICDON-BOLAR

in

for the bars and sometimes it would be on when we would get home," James Sloan said. "It was really I

him, haunted the Tau house o\ er 00 years after his death. After 1

building the house,

OMP. was

a third floor bedroom, later

said to have

known

smells were noticed for no apparent reason

Some

fraternities" ghosts

hanged himself

as Suicide

in

Comer. Strange

in this

room.

were not members of their organi-

For example, the Delta Chi's ghost lived

in the

house

moved in. Townsend was a young girl at the time of her Townsend died, her parents wanted the funeral

death.

zation.

house held eerie

before the fraternity Lilian

After

house and she was buried

in the

in the

basement.

At the Delta Chi house the power would be shut off and the lights

would still be on. The men Townsend.

The Delta Chi tales

with the legend of Lilian

Ghost

Townsend.

stories

were

popular for scaring

attributed strange occurrences students

who were

like this to

Although students were scared when they heard about

who encountered these ghosts agreed they were Some stories had eerie twists, whereas others seemed

ghosts, most friendly. to just

48 Ghost Legends

be sightings, but regardless the legends continued.

not familiar with the

infamous

tales.

illustration

Photo

by Russ

Weydert.


Student Life 49


Garbage is sorted

into

masses before being placed on the conveyor belt and aluminum. Recycling began to be

to be separated into glass, tin

taken seriously

when an official program was enacted by Tony Miceli.

the city in

July of 1993. Photo by

Art Hanson and Duane Rohlnien not only had to pick up garbage on

campus grounds

but then had to sort trash from recycable materials.

Environmental Services had

when

recycling began

50 Recycling

at

their

work load increased

Northwest. Photo by

Tony

significantly

Miceli.


A plan

desire for a cleaner en\ ironmeni spurred a

m

.Mary

and glass "I

said.

to

new recycling

Residents began sorting paper, cans, plastics

\ ille.

conserve on resources and cut back on pollution.

thought recycling was a very good idea." Heidi Lutrick

"Everybody needed

meat

to

do

their part in sa\ ing the en\ iron-

tor our future generations."

Residence and academic halls placed cardboard recycling bins in the hallvvays in addition to the traditional trash cans.

"The ad\ antages of the recycling bins were to get people used to the idea

of recycling." Jessica Prather said,

"it

made people

think twice before throwing things away."

Although the recycling bins were available, there were some people w ho trash.

still

did not take the time to sort before tossing their

This was particularly a problem

if

sorting recycables

was

THE END

an inconvenience. "It

was hard

to get

everyone

in the trash

Michelle Gibbs,

to recycle."

"We weren't allowed to has e paper bins

resident assistant, said.

rooms or by was a it

the elevators with the other recycling

bins, because

hazard.

fire

kind of defeated the

It

purpose."

Another setback with the recycling program was

overtime to sort through what people were throwing away.

"We

Envi-

WASTE

was havemployees

rontnental Services

ing to pay their

that

OFTHE

were spending too

much time having to sort what people were recycling," Gene

Spear, director of Environmental Services, said. "Because

people weren't putting

it

in the right bins."

Because the budget would not allow for extra employees

to

be hired, the custodians were having to spend more time on

CYCLE

recycling and less time on their other tasks.

Although recycling was becoming inore of a hindrance than

was

a help, the University

still

putting forth the effort to

MARYVILLE

conserve the environment.

Northwest was not only using recycling resources, they also burned

the energy needs. This left

burning tor of

l.anny Lei van

fossil fuels, oil

Ircim the ci>n\eyor hell

;it

the M.ir\\illc

40 percent

be compensated by

to

and gas. according

to

Associate Direc-

Environmental Services Richard Auffert.

The recycling program, according Galletly. included more than recycling tin. glass, plastic

separates recycables

and conserve

to try

wood chips to prov ide 60 percent of

"Our goal was

Manager

paper.

also included

It

Bill

to

have 40 percent of the

"We

were going

for Maryville's residents

city's to

exceed

was

that."

that trash pick-

up days were not drastically affected. Customers who were

All recycable

used to having their trash picked up twice a week, had nonrecycable materials picked up the

Norths est and

and recycables on the

Maryville residents

ENVIRONMENTAL

waste stream

Recycling Center.

materiaN trom

FACINC

CONCERNS

and aluminum.

diverted." Galletly said.

An advantage

to City

RESIDENTS ARE

first

three days of the

BY SARA MEYERS AND MIKEREIFF

week

last three.

"There were no changes

in

our pick-up schedule for our

Emery said. "The least you could (change) the more it would work."

customers," Alice went through the

your schedule, time-consuming system

at

the center.

With residents and on-campus students sorting

their trash

and the University using waste paper instead of other

Photo by Tony

Northwest Missouri was doing

Miccli.

ment.

its

pail to

fuels,

conserve the environ-

Student Life 51


SOMETHING

ELSE

TO -^

MSowraV f\/(5

Alcohol-

fie izBSWenci

What

How

the hell

long

Where

is

is

is

a

spoofhound?

^

the road construction really going to last?

Mike

Why

is

Why

are there

Why

are so

the

Dog

really buried?

Northside Mall called a mall?

more

many

What do Campus

squirrels

fire

on campus than people? set off in the residence halls at 2

alarms

Safety sirens sound like?

Why

does Maryville have five grocery

Why

are there

Why

is

going to the bars the only thing to do

Why

is

the fear of being hit

Why

are their pointless sidewalks

Why

do

Why

do you have

Why

is

the

more recycle bins than

stores, three of

to

which are open 24 hours?

trash cans? in

Maryville?

by a bicycle bigger than the fear of being

go up a ramp

hit

to

mow

go downstairs

in

the grass at 6 a.m.?

Colden Hall?

there a big 187 in white brick on the side of the president's house is

by a car?

where nobody walks and no sidewalks where people walk the most?

Northwest environmental service men

his listed address

Why

a.m.?

when

703?

does the Bell Tower play Christmas music

in the

summer time?

During the Homecoming parade, why are there more marching bands than If

it

is

a dry

campus, why are

What happens

the day

you

all

is

there no door on the

Why

is

the Itza Pizza

Why

is it

phone

makes you mature enough

women's restroom line

at the theater in

always busy?

so hard to look up microfilm in the library?

What work do Greeks do on Greek work weekend?

How What

can anything exactly

is

live in

Colden Pond?

a Bearcat?

52 Something to Question

Macy's parade?

the recycle bins filled with beer cans?

turn 21 that

Why

in the

to

handle alcohol?

Maryville?

/^>rf!!7l>-

/\J/â&#x20AC;&#x17E;cÂŤf\


QUESTION? Student Life 53


.-J

.

,

.

•^v

'• .

K'

..

..

.*

,.•

. *

.*

.

w


t^*;?:*'

---^r

hile

some people read tarol cards, others many found their future in

turned to psychics and

TV

horoscopes.

Guide. Glamour, The Kansas Cily

Star and Cosmopoliian were just a few of the places

and find how the day, week, month or year

to look

would

turn out.

Jennifer Dickson longed to read her horoscope

from her hometown newspaper, the Chkaiio

Tri-

bune. Dickson learned to read by reading her mother's horoscope each morning.

"My mom had me read her horoscope to her while me to school," Dickson said. "I read

she was taking

saw it, but used to read it all the time was back home." "Sometimes when read them, they came true in some way," Dickson said. "I preferred reading them it

whenever

when

I

I

I

I

at it

night so

I

could think back on the day to see

if

what

said would happen actually happened." However, there were students who believed

horoscopes were completely "I didn't

false.

believe in them," Travis Gotsch said.

^^^ ^^H ^M ^^^ ^|m ^| ^^^ ^^^ H ^^^_ ^*

"Nothing true ever came of them,

and believe them

that

was

^^^^

^*

Iheirbusiness, not mine." Dr. Jim Smelt/.er,

OR

FICTION

other

people wanted to read

stars

that

FACT

astronomy professor, claimed

had no influence over him, but he thought there

was no problem with students believing or having .stars

LOOKINC

rule their day.

"if you had a strong belief, then in

.someone's day to day

case,

I

did not hold

life,"

much

it

could be relevant

Smeltzer said, "in

my

with the stars as having

them control my days." Smeltzer even read his horoscope on occasion. "I

had read

my

horoscope from time to time

newspaper," Smeltzer

said.

"Usually though,

TO THE STARS FOR THE

FUTURE

in the 1

pre-

ferred to read the sports page."

Smeltzer also spoke of mythical sides to the

stars.

"The mythology associated with stars and star groupings was rich in the way we studied the stars," Smeltzer said. "The names of some of the bright stars and groupings had origins

in the

BY TAMI DODSON AND SARA MEYERS

mythological foun-

some of it was Greek, some was Roman. A lot of the names were Arabic, because that was where the knowledge of the world was maintained."

dations,

Astrology had been a part of history for centuries

and with people still believing held, they

would be around

in the

powers that they

for centuries to

come.

Student Life 55


1^^ 1 I,

I

I

r

,ÂŤ

/ V ,

lier paycheck from Student Service worker Maria Alsup. After working at Franken Hall front desk Snuggs looked forward to the monthly student payday, usually the last week of the

Christy Siiuggs picks up

month. Photo by Chris Tucker.

56 Student Payday

If


u I

JaviiiL; a job uas olien a

siiesstiil

time tor studenis and

it

was. sometimes, even harder when their job was on campus.

between work and

Dealini; with time manaiiement

w

sltidies left

Sometimes the onl\ thing that kept them going was the last week ot the month: pa\da>. At Northwest, the pa\ roll ss stem w as set up so that employstudents

look forv\ ard

ith htlle to

to.

ees were paid a month behind what the\ worked. For the time

k

that siudenis put in

October. the\ were not paid

end of

until the

November. only got paid once a month."

"I

Kmi

worked

I'iattsaid. "I

w hole month and then did not get paid

the

for

end of

for n until the

the next rtionth."

With

of receiving a paschcck. students

the excitement

rushed to the bank or Administration Building to cash their

i

on

and groceries and possibly had enough

bills

some fun. alw ays had money

over to

left

splurge on "I

went for

my

when

a shock

left

over after paid the

bills,

I

necessities." .Shana Williams said, "it

thought

I

was going

I

to get

WAITING

money

checks. Then, they were off to spend their hard-earned

but the rest

was

really

more monev than

I

FORTHE

actually did."

Students

pay off just a

for sc\ cral reasons, l-or

worked mainly

"I

I

made and used

to eat out."

did not look as

if

it

the

end of

month students were

stretching their dollars as far as they

would go. With

tuition, rent

my money

"All of

it

it

was

McNece

bu\ clothes

to

and pow er bills

were times when there was nothing

Meyer

to help

PAYOFF

were quite

enough and by

the next

w as

it

for others

spending money." Shirley

for

keptoverhalf of what

Yet, sometimes paychecks

big

some,

and living expenses and

extra cash in the pocket.

little

said. "I

and

w orked

their tuition

went back

left

to pay. there

for entertainment.

Rosemary

to the school."

enough check to spend it on was what college was all about."

MAKINC

IT

said. "I did not get a big

anything else.

I

guess that

While some students were able to spend their money tight away, there were others who had to send their paycheck off to parents to be deposited at the bank back home. Sometimes, students hoped their checks

made

home

it

in

Depending on

their

CALLS FOR

time to cover

STRETCH INC THE

checks they had already written.

money management

pay period, students would w atch

THROUGH THE MONTH

their

from pay period to

checks closely

to

make

DOLLAR

certain they were getting what they deserved.

"When

I

first

got

my job they

$700," Stephanie Derby Zach Oriclc his

i-ashes

paycheck

to

pay

off his University bills.

Students often

found they turned over their money as

soon as they made it.

Photo by Ross

Bremner.

only be ,S400.

My mom

said.

said

I

would make

"Then

talked to

a

little

later they said

it

over

would

them about it. but I did not money went straight to pay

know what happened because my mv hills." No matter w here their money ended

BY SHELLEY STANCLE

up. students spent their

making them cover as many bills as possible. They worked hard for their money and were able to call it their own. Responsibilities that went along with college dollars conservatively,

and earning a living were not always a student's favorite part of life, but they were proud at the end of the month when

college their

work paid

off.

Student Life 57


Kicking off another entertaining year,

Campus

Activity

Programmers brought

big-name acts to Northwest.

Suzy Bogguss gave a down-home per-

formance to a sold-out crowd

in

one

of

the fastest selling concerts ever, while

Les Brown and brought their

Marvin Hamlisch

SOMETHING different

own music

with

style.

Well-known comics DeGeneres took the stage

like

Ellen

TO start off

the year and Howie Mandel sold out

in

two weeks. There was more reason to

APPLAUD

when

a second

show was

added pushing ticket sales to 1,600. Theater students proved their talent

IN

productions such as "The Bat" and

"Starkweather." It

seemed there was always something

else to give us

ENTERT 4* "Where's the mall'^" Ellen DeGeneres wonders as she mocks Che North Side Mall. DeGeneres joked about everything from Maryville to mud baths. Photo by Jon Britton.

58 Entertainmet Division


Entertainment 59


60 SUZY BOGGUSS


Y

S U Z

Northwest fans get a taste of

BOGGUSS down-home country music With

a voice that

shook the

rafters

of

Mary Linn Performing

Arts Center, coiintr\-iiHisic

sensation Su/y Bogguss enlertained the audience with songs from her past four aibinns. She sang, danced, played the guitar and even yodeled for the sold-out crowd.

The country music group Southern Wind warmed up 'Mendin' Fences." After other songs from rousing rendition of her single,

their

the

crowd with

their top five hit

albums, Bogguss took the stage with a

"Somewhere Between."

album "Somewhere Between" won her the Academy of Country Music's Best New Country Female Vocalist award in 1988. She followed with a top five hit and a Grammy nominated duet with Lee Greenwood entitled "Hopelessly Yours." With the release of her third album "Aces," Bogguss became well-known and three top Bogguss"

five hits

first

capped her win of the Ct)unlry Music Association Hori/on Award.

Nearly 800 tickets were sold the at

first

Northwest. Bogguss was pleased as

was excited

season. She

to

day, making

it

it

one of the

fastest .selling concerts

provided a postive sign for the

rest

ever

of her headlining

be performing for the Northwest crowd after finishing a lour with

Dwight Yokum the night before. "The tour was great." Bogguss

said. "We finished the tour with Yokum and so this was show where we weren't limited to a certain set. We got to expand and do different things, so was excited. We tried out new material." The new material included the song "Cinderella." which took a cynical approach to the fairy tale. Two highlights of the show were "Joe's Cafe," when she tied on an apron and

the

first

I

played the part of a waitress looking for love and "Voices

in the

Wind," which provided an

unique upbeat tempo with Bogguss shaking maracas and the band clanging cans.

was nice to finally see her in person because had been a big fan of her' s for a long time," Mann said. "She put on a really terrific show. It was great." Although Garth Brooks. Billy Ray Cyrus and Alan Jackson dominated the charts, Bogguss

"It

I

Jackie

believed that Singinj; with heart "I

and

soul,

Bogguss

entertains a sold-

out crowd.

Boyguss sang

many

ballads

throughout the concert including

her top five

thought

opened up getting a

women were getting women were starting

the charts,

more unique

stronger in the music scene. to carve their

own

niche,"

Bogguss

you would see more men's names but style.

I

said. "I

thought that

mean

if

you

women were

There were fewer of us out there and the production values were

giving us a different sound whereas

men

weren't as concerned with creating a sountl than

having one." After Bogguss entertained the crowd with a grand finale of "Outbound Plane." she received a standing ovation. Then she asked to her

mom.

B.J..

who was sitting

in the

if

her fans would help sing

audience.

As an encore, she sang

"Happy Birthday

"

a stirring rendition

of "Aces" which had the crowd up again. hit

style left the

audience enlerlaineil and enthralled as she proved she was

music sensation.

_ __â&#x20AC;&#x17E; By Mike Johnson

Bogguss' country "Aces." Photo by

Jon Britton.

truly a country

Entertainment 61


ow n make-believe music. DeGeneres used dry humor b> depicting comedy bits from everyday life. Photo by Russ Weydert. Ellen DeGeneres grooves to her

62 Ellen DeGeneres


ELLEN With a dry sense of

humor she

takes the

DEGENERES stage accomplishing her comedic goal When

Hllen DeGeneres toDk the stage on Sept.

1

I

.

u

iih

her

iinii.|iie si(ir\

-telhn;: style, the

audienee shook with laughter. "I

mv

could not helieve

'Why

agent.

it

can"t

took

me this long to get to Mar\ \ ille." Dedeneres said

DeGeneres entertained crowds

all

Newhart. George Carlin and Jerry Besides entertaining audiences

such specials as

"1

kept telling

you get me Maryville?"'"

"Women

over America with

a hunioi that critics

compared

to

Bob

.Seinfeld. in

comedy

humor on HBO in Young Comedian's

clubs, she brt)adcasted her

of the Night."" ""One Night Stand" and "The

Reunion.'"

She starred

FOX

in

television's

"Open House." which she described

as a

good Icarnuig

experience. "It showed me how tele\ ision worked." DeGeneres said. "The producers wanted one thing. The network wanted something else. just sat back and watched." DeGeneres applied this learning to her new series. "These Friends ot Mine."" on ABC. "It was about me and some friends doing what everyone did on a daily basis." DeGeneres said. "It was hopefully something everybody could identify with." DeGeneres wrote her signature stand-up comedy bit. "Phone call to God." in 98 after a tragic experience made her look at life differently. One of her friends was killed by a drunk driver and she was so mad she decided to write a letter to God. "I sat down and didn't stop writing.'" DeGeneres said. "I wrote about how long it would take God to answer my call because he was so busy and hov\ he'd mispronounce my name, the heavenly muzac... knew this was what l"d do on Carson. My first Carson was in "86. After was the first female comedian who was asked to sit on the I was done, he called me over. I

1

1

I

I

Carson couch.'"

She showed

v\ it

that

made her a

regular on late night talk

show s w ith

a bit about the thrills

of fishing. Ellen De(;eneres

"Fishermen liked

was shudders

at the

small pnrtidn

s'l/.e

of airline t'ood.

She mocked airlines as a big

part of her act.

along with

mud

massages and

memories of her

that?

wanted

was

It

to see if

to catch fish

and throw them back." DeGeneres

like dri\ ing along, hitting a pedestrian I

could

said.

thought the show was great."" Leslie Meier said.

She looked

at

it

She used her "Wasn't

it

the

way nobody

face,

1

just

hit you."""

Audiences appreciated her irreverence and unique perspecti\e on "I

"What kind of sport

and then saying. "Go ahead.

in

way

she looked

at life.

else had."

body and voice

strange that

life.

"I liked the bi/arre

to tell the joys of tlying.

growing up and mud baths.

order to relieve stress, one had to be naked?"" DeGeneres said.

"Your body was on display for a bunch of strangers and this was supposed to relie\ e stress?"" DeGeneres relie\ed the stress of class work and e\eryda\ life of the audience as she kept them laughing. Her goal as a comedienne was simple: "make people laugh."" By audience response, she accomplished her goal and showed she was the queen of hilarity.

childhood. Photo

by Jon Britton.

By Mike Johnson

Entertainment 63


THEATER Students make their main-stage debut

SHOWCASE annual Freshman-Transfer Showcase

in

New talent, three

monologues and a glimpse ofsix Showcase." Students teased

the audience with

"A Midsummer

such classics as William Shakespeare's

were Just

classic plays

the "Freshman-Transfer

Night's

1

a

few benefits of

2-minute clips from

Dream" and Tennessee

Williams' "Glass Menagerie."

Every in a

fall,

transfer students

debut performance

at

and freshmen were given the opportunity

Northwest. Thirty-five students participated

every aspect including, acting, costume,

makeup and

production from

scenic/lighting.

Director Dr. Thophil Ross said the unique thing about this production

major was guaranteed a

to display their talent

in the

was that every theater

role in the production.

"This was one of the strongest features of our program," Ross said. "This

let

them see how

did things, what a real University audition was like." Ross said there were two main purposes to putting on the annual production. "To present a main-stage series of plays for the audience perspective and for the student's

we

perspective, a recruiting or training device with the guarantee that

all

theater majors

would be

a legitimate, full-fledged part of the

involved," Ross said. "After the

first

month they were

department and could hold their

own

with the upperclassmen."

Scenes for the performance were chosen from the department's 4-play reading 1

list

that all

theater majors were required to read before graduation. The selections displayed a variety of

drama and comedy with "She Stoops

to

Conquer" and "A Midsummer Night's Dream" from

the 16th century.

The audience was also given a glimpse of life in the '.^Os with a scene from "Death of Salesman" and puppy love in the '50s came to form in "Our Town."

a

Colleen Covington who portrayed Meg in a scenario from "Crimes of the Heart" said the "Freshman-Transfer Showcase" helped her prepare for future productions. "This was not like a regular college show," Covington said. "We had a different treatment.

They were showing us how

things were

done

here.

Without

it

we would have been more

intimidated for regular auditions."

Students brought

in selections

they had

Daniel Breeze

portrays an

worked on over the summer for the audition process

and three of these one-minute monologues were chosen for the production, offering a different

anxiety-stricken

character in

twist to the show.

P.D. Fisk. portrayed by Michael Masters, gave a speech from the

Humane Society about the

"Laugliing Wild."

Tuna." Daniel Breeze gave the audience quite a scare w ith his anxiety attack about asking a woman to move aside so that he could reach the tuna can in the

The Freshman-

grocery store aisle in "Laughing Wild." Brandi Krimmel played a jealous wife yelling at a mannequin in her bed, the result of a trick played by her husband, in "Love Is a Time of Day."

case offered a

cruelties to fish in "Greater

more serious clip included Anne LeBeaume dancing to the voice of Paul Coate in "The Music and the Mirror" from "A Chorus Line." With their Northwest theater debut behind them, freshmen and transfer students were ready

A

to

move

into another spotlight in another production.

64 Freshman-Transfer Showcase

.

Rnnou

Transfer Show»*«»

variety of genres

including

drama

and comedy. Photo by Jack Vaught.


Miss Hardcastle, portrayed b> Desa KIdridge, gives her father, portrayed b> Patrick Johnson, a kiss of gratitude.

The scene taken from "She Stoops To Conquer" depicted marriage arrangements Jack Vaught.

in the 16th

â&#x20AC;˘ "^^ioBi

Century

.

Photo by


MIDWEST A true story comes

to

life,

MURDERS bringing entertainment and iiistory A shot rang out, startling the audience. They were sitting on the stage and every movement the actors

made seemed

realistic.

The audience kept a close eye on

the actors as they

watched

They were

back and forth between Charlie Starkweather and Caril Ann on the run for killing the Fugate family and eventually, many others. People all around the area feared for their lives because no one really knew where they were going to show up next. Fugate, his girlfriend.

"Starkweather," a play by

Doug Harr based on

actual events that took place in Lincoln,

Neb., in 1958, possessed a sense of closeness, particularly to those from the area. "I thought I could relate to the play a little easier," Lea Ann Vetter said. "I had not heard

was glad I went." Early in the year, NBC aired a movie called "Murder in the Heartland," a depiction of the Starkweather murders. The show was criticized for its graphic depiction of violence about the mass murders and was a major focus of Senate hearing against violence on television.

much about

it

before

I

saw

the play, but

Although not as violent as the movie, the stage production

still

struck a nerve in the

audience.

"The overall production was excellent and informative," Jim Ulvestad said. "I was not familiar with the plot beforehand but never felt lost. It should have been a three-day production because there were so

The audience was

moved on

many people who wanted

were required to see the production for a class, in

to attend."

stage allowing seating for only 70 people. For students

advance or arrive an extra hour

it

was imperative they

who

either reserve tickets

early.

With limited space, students who were able to see the play watched the cast intently. As the audience watched, the cast and crew were wrapped up in their own emotion. After spending hours at practices, they were excited to finally get a chance to perform. The intense emotion posed a challenge to the actors

in the student

production.

and exhausting performance," Carol Patton said. "My character, Caril Ann Fugate, was complex. It was difficult for me to determine whether or not she was guilty. The intense emotion was draining." The play ended with the court trial of Starkweather and Fugate. Starkweather testified "It

was a very

stressful

against Fugate, saying she helped with the killings.

One

student said the scene in the courtroom

was

particulariy powerful.

courtroom during Charlie" s trial," Christine Tedrow said. "I felt they really knew their part and the way the reporters interacted was smooth." In the end. Starkweather was sentenced to death and Fugate was found innocent. The play "I

enjoyed the scenes

in the

the ghost of Starkweather firing a shot into the crowd. After the production on Friday, Harr and the students involved in the play held a post-show discussion to help the audience better understand the performance.

ended with

audience or pert'orming on stage. Starkweather was an experience for everyone. Students were given the chance to learn a little bit of history through

Whether they were

sitting in the

the dramatic production.

66 Starkweather

^^

^^^^1,^^

5^^^,^


A reporter, Chris McDonald, interviews Sheriff Deputy Romer. Shawn Krider, for information about SlarkMcathiT. Startcwcather's murder spree struck fear in many Inhabitants of Nebraska. Photo by Chris Tucker. Sheriff Deputy

Romer and

c()n\erse about

a reporter, Shawn Wake, various aspects of Charlie

Starkweather's actions. SlarkHeather killed a total of 13 people in the Midwest area. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Charlie Starkweather, played by Shad Ramsey, tries to '

persuade Caril

Ann

Fugatc, played by Carol Patton, to

return with him to Nebraska. The play was a true story

about their run from the law. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Shawn Wake and Erika Corrado

react to the latest

in the news ofThe play showed how news media played a role in

update regarding Charlie Starkweather fice.

court cases. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Entertainment 67


L E S

Band sound entertains

Big

BROWN audiences both young and old

Bright lights gleamed from the stage as music from the Big

Band era rang out of the brass bells

and instruments that belonged to Les Brown and the Band of Renown. The notes that poured forth were

tilled

with a sound that brought back memories of the

40s

for

some members of

community and brought smiles to the younger faces in the audience. Brown opened the show with the lead player of each section playing a short

solo.

the

Each of the

solo performances received an overwhelming round of applause and cheers of excitement

from

the audience. entire Band of Renown, forgot the name moment. Stumpy Brown, bass trombone player, band received from Northwest to remind them where they were at.

However, during Brown's introduction, he and the of the school. After talking in circles for a

produced the check After a

blame on

moment

that the

of embarrassment.

Brown

tried to

excuse his

memory

lapse by putting the

his age.

"When you

get to be

my

age,"

Brown

said.

"That's not

all

you

forget."

Although the name of the University was forgotten, the music was

not.

The Big Band

pertormance the musicians produced received a standing ovation.

Brown and his band were a part of generations

who did

the efforts to

not experience the music

keep the Big Band sound around for younger

when

"Les Brown was the only band from the old days

it

that

was popular. was still around," Henry 'Butch' Stone,

was a wonderful audience, we wished we could have stayed here and done more We would have really been hot then, tonight we were just warm." Even though the audience consisted mainly of Mary ville residents, there was a fair number of

vocals, said. "It

than just one night.

students that attended the concert.

"The thing about this was that if young people heard it, if they gave themselves a chance to hear it,

they usually would dig

for

no other reason

different. So,

never heard

it

it,"

was

Darrel Gardner, lead trumpet, said. "I

different

mean

they really liked

it.

If

from what they had been hearing and they liked anything

even though this had been around forever, it was different to them because they had

it."

The selections that were performed included hits from the '40s to the present, they even played a few pieces from their latest album. Their performance included "Sentimental Journey," "Route 66," "In the the

Mood,"

"I've

Got

My Love to Keep Me Warm" and "Tie a Yellow Ribbon Around The Band of

Old Oak Tree."

Bohm Townsend was presented a plaque for his area promotions of Mike Johnson, operations manager from KXCV, conducted the short ceremony by

During the intermission Big Bands.

having several friends of Townsend's on stage to say a few words about the promotions

Townsend had made throughout the years. ^ Through efforts of those like Brown and Townsend Big Band had continued in its popularity with each new generation. With new people discovering the jazzy brass sounds that Brown and his band performed it seemed Big Band would never see its extinction.

Renown

features

the saxophone section.

The

group's successful career spanned

over 40 years.

Photo by Jon

By Sara Meyers

68 Les Brown

Britton.


stumpy Brown puts his all into a tronibonu solo. Stumpy and Les Brown and the Band of Renown performed for their llth time in Maryville. Photo by Jon Britton.

Entertainment 69


DON REESE

Comedian proves that

be Judged

can't With

his self-deprecating sense of

book

a

cover

by its

humor, black

shirt,

PjviVK

and chain-

pants, trenchcoat

decorated hiker boots, comedian Don Reese entertained Northwest. Reese, who was 6'4" and bald with a moustache, centered most of his routine on his appearance, which he said intimidated people.

"People made fun of

my

looks, but

I" II tell

you what,

it

Frequently throughout the evening, Reese growled and

got

me

out of jury duty," he said.

made facial gestures to promote his

self-imposed identity as a pirate.

"People asked could

I

do?

It

me why I was a comedian," Reese said.

was

either this or

"Well, look

at

me. What the

hell else

what?" -rk^l^.

number of topics, including marriage, music, sex, drinking, the Amish and traveling around the country. He enjoyed New York because, "no one stared at me there." On the other hand, when he was in Arkansas, he "couldn't leave his room during the day." Reese complained about plane travel and having to stay in a different hotel room every place he performed. One hotel room he stayed in had wet towels, but the wet towels did not seem Reese discussed

to

make him "I

as

a

unhappy

as

one area of the airport

hated those metal detectors," he said.

During his travels

"We

to the South,

"I

that

he could not avoid.

got a plate in

my

head.

did not have roaches in the Midwest," he said. "In Alabama,

that a roach or a

I

put

it

in

myself."

he found the roaches were huge. it

was 'Hey, look, was

Chevy?'"

Another time, Reese had the misfortune of listening

to a

country music station one night

driving in his car.

"Those were

real adrenaline

pumpers, weren't they?" Reese

said.

"After four hours of that,

m

â&#x20AC;˘i'i^

The cop asked what happened. I said, 'Randy Travis.'" The audience was given Long John Silver's hats before his performance started and many in the audience donned them. Audience members were instructed to wear them before Reese I

ended up

walked out on

stage.

Reese liked going

manager

in

changed

I

it,

into

Long John

Silver's

and

telling the staff

he was the new

Reese growls and district

makes

facial

order to get free food.

Reese did not

"When

':s>

in a ditch.

gestures to

like to exercise.

"Then they was kid, when I wanted to lose weight, I went out to run," Reese I what did do? Walk. so didn't have to run, I could jog. Now, you didn't even jog, said.

I

was waiting for the stand around and scratch your ass thing." Those attending the show were enthusiastic about Reese's performance. had seen in person. It was "I loved it," Doug Wilson said. "That was the first comedian and that was the main thing his looks humor did not fit better in person than it was on TV. His

I

promote

his self-

imposed

identity

as a pirate.

The

audience

I

I

participated in

Reese's skit by

liked."

After the concert, Reese drank a pop and talked with a group of students back stage about

donning Long

John

the trials and tribulations of being a comedian.

hats.

By Don Munsch

70 Entertainment

Silver's

Photo by

Russ Weydert.


Don Reese 71


72 Howie Mandel


HOWIE MANDEL Music and comic performance

entertain

crowd

sell-out

Music and laughterfilled Northwest as students and residents were entertained by singer and songwriter Jenny

O

Because over 500

and comic Howie Mandel.

were sold vn the first day of sales and the show sold out within two weeks, a second performance was added to the October 17, Encore performance, which was sponsored by Campus Activity Programmers and the Norrhwesi Missourian. tici<ets

The opening act, Jenny O, got the audience clapping as she performed folk and rock tunes from her first album "Here and Now." She performed many .songs including. "Boxcar Blues," "Stars So Bright" and "Sounds of the Train." "I really liked her,"

Jen Black said.

"I

did not pay too

much

attention to the lyrics, but

I

liked

her style and voice."

Jenny 0"s powerful voice and guitar rang throughout Mary Linn Pertorming Arts Center as w uzzy bug Hying inside of me," from the song, "Got

she sang such lyrics as, "...there's a fuzzy a

Bug

in

"What

My it

was," Jenny not I

tell

Brain." a song she described as an atypical love song.

was about, was

O said.

me and

"So

I

I

felt

went

something going wrong with me. but to the

doctor and he could not

I saw my friend, the fortune teller where saw was it. So it was the love bug."

then

realized, ah that

tell

I

I

did not

know what

it

me. the psychiatrist could a inan in a crystal ball

and

Throughout her performance in the first show, Jenny O plugged her t1rst full-length album. which had not been released. Jenny O wrote all of the songs on her album, with the help of her fiance on four of them.

Along with songs of her own, Jenny

O included Van Morrison's "Brown-Eyed Girl," to get

the audience involved.

This Toronto. Canada, native,

who had

only been performing for two years, got the

when she was asked to tour with Mandel. "It was great," Jenny O said. "Everybody was really nice, they treated me well and it was fun. This was the biggest break that had ever had. The exposure was really wondertul." After Jenny O retreated and the lights dimmed many shouts of "Howie" came from the audience. After a brief intermission, Mandel appeared on the stage and the audience opportunity of a lifetime

Howie Mandel discusses "Free

Willy" with the

I

responded with a standing ovation. aid of a toy

dolphin.

A

second

performance was

added

show tickets

on the

500

were sold

first

sales.

to the

after

day of

Photo by

Jon Britton.

From a doctor on the critically acclaimed television show, St. Elsewhere, to the voice of Bobby on the cartoon "Bobby's World," Mandel explored many venues during his career. St. Elsewhere brought Mandel to stardom after years of w orking on the comedy circuit. The controversial drama lasted seven seasons on NBC and made the comic a star. Mandel began his performance by giving the audience some background information on himself, such as;

becoming

a father

and a homeowner.

Mandel' s personal information took the audience into the next joke about his pet fish, which he claimed had recently died from a bladder infection. His wife wanted a horse, but he could not imagine himself with a horse.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;continued Entertainment 73


Howie Mandel jokes about "dorm

police" and tlie 50 cent fine for saying "dorm." In addition to current events on campus, Mandel talked about his family and fans. Photo by Jon Britton.

O performs songs from her album "Here and Now." As the opening act Howie Mandel, Jenny O warmed up the crowd by singing "Brown-Eyed Girl." Photo by Jon Britton.

Jenny for

Howie Mandel demonstrates how he develops put a twist on infection.

real-life experiences,

Photo by Jon Britton.

74 Howie Mandel

his material at

home. Mandel

such as his goldfish dying of a bladder


iiiy.^:y;-^t^'^

HOWIE MANDEL "I

was not

afraid of having a horse,

il

would

just

be a bileh to flush dow n the

toilet,"

Mandel

said.

Becca Lindenbusch attended though she found some of

the

performance even

"I liked his

show because she had seen him before and liked him, even from his HBO performance.

his material repeated if

some of

his stuff

was repeated because

I

had seen him

before," Lindenbusch said.

Mandel spent most of his performance interacting with the audience on such subjects as San Diego and Dallas. Some thought a few of the members were rude with their sarcastic remarks and inappropriate comments. "I

did not like the people that were obnoxious

agree with being obnoxious and rude

Rebecca Pendleton

in the

audience," Lindenbusch said. "

I

did not

any audience."

in

liked his interaction with the audience because

it

got everyone into the

act.

made you

"It

Mandel

feel

more

a part of the show," Pendleton said. "It

on rathercrude comic material

relied

to

was more personalized."

garner laughs. The material included graphic

descriptions of a colon check and sex with his pregnant wife. Students did not

"Every once it

in a

while, he

would

slip,"

Pendleton said.

"I

could

tell

seem

to mind.

he was trying to keep

somewhat clean." The appearance of the Powdertoast Man brought in some good clean humor. Pendleton, who

went

to the

"It

was

floor.

man

skit

recognized

who

"We

it

was because he

lived

on our

hall director."

Even though Mandel's

When

because her and her friends

within the costume.

pretty funny," Pendleton said.

He was our

campus.

Man

second show, liked the Powdertoast

recognized the

stay in Maryville

an audience

was

brief,

he was up-to-date with current events on

member mentioned the word "house," Mandel

took the opportu-

new "dorm police." To complete the joke, Mandel lead the audience in a chant of the word "dorm." Just when the audience thought Mandel's routine was over, he came back on stage and brought his Bobby voice with him. "Bobby's World" was his brain child based on thecharacterof ayoung boy with a skewed look of the world. Mandel created and performed Bobby in his early comic routines. The cartoon won a Daytime Emmy for Best Animated Series for dealing with such topics as child nity to joke about the

abuse and death.

"My name is Bobby," Mandel said. "And I am going to tell you a story about when my mom put

me

As

to bed."

the curtains closed

in appreciation

and he bowed

to the audience,

he was greeted with a standing ovation

of an entertaining performance.

By Fay Dahlquist

Entertainment 75


MARVIN A multi-award winner impresses

witli

HAMLISCH improvisation and music

his With

his

performed

easygoing sense of humor, composer and musician Marvin Hamlisch told jokes and his critically

Opening

acclaimed music.

for Hamlisch, the

the concert.

Northwest Jazz Ensemble performed several selections before

Although the group had performed many times,

this

was

the first time they

had

opened for such a big name. Hamlisch incorporated humor

into his musical

show, joking about the location of North-

west.

"We just checked

room here in Maryville after a five-hour drive," Hamlisch "And I have to tell you, 1 had never seen so many cows before in my life. It seemed as if Bovine 101 was big here." Hamlisch, who had won a Pulitzer Prize, a Tony Award, four Grammys and two Golden Globes, had written 30 motion picture scores, including "The Sting" and "The Way We Were." He composed the music for "A Chorus Line" and "They're Playing Our Song." He played these songs, as well as a melody called "Going to Peculiar." Hamlisch also performed for the London symphony and played at New York Philharmonic, said,

moments

into our hotel

after taking the stage.

Los Angeles Philharmonic and Casesar's Palace in Las Vegas. He got his start in music by performing for his synagogue when he was ill and unable to perform, and Hamlisch was asked to play.

As a way of demonstrating solicited

the technique of writing

song ideas from the audience

in a

19.

The cantor was

and performing songs, Hamlisch

technique called "Rent-a-Composer." Hamlisch

town called Peculiar he saw on the trip to Maryville and a man from the audience compose an impromptu rendition. Hamli.sch came up with "Going To Peculiar" from scratch. The song described the humorous experience of going through this small town. Hamlisch"s big break came when movie producer Sam Spiegel asked him to compose the music for "The Swimmer," starring Burt Lancaster. Hamlisch performed an unnamed selection from that movie for the audience. In addition to playing music scores, Hamlisch played "Happy Birthday" to the distinct styles

talked about a

asked him

to

of Bach, Mozart and Beethoven.

He

then discussed

how

composers by reading reviews from original newspaper

trivial criticism

Beethoven, Tchaikovsky and Gershwin. Hamlisch said that negative press never bothered him.

Hamlisch did not rank places he had performed at but said col lege campuses were his favorite places. This "It

showed through

his

was good," Dawn Hascall

those songs. But

I

"When I went

to the concert,

I

had no idea he wrote

all

wished he had done more of those where people threw out ideas from the

audience." Still

wanting more, the audience

visits

Northwest

for the First time.

Hamlisch had written 30 motion

performance and students were impressed.

said.

Marvin Hamlisch

could be for

concerning the work of

articles

Composer and songwriter

picture scores

including

"The

Sting" and "The left

entertained, proving that

Hamlisch

truly

deserved his

Way We

Were."

reputation as a master musician.

Photo courtesy

By Don Munsch

76 Marvin Hamlisch

Marvin Hamlisch.


Entertainment 77


CARROT He kept the audience laughing with

his

TOP off-the-wall props and inventions A loud pop startled the audience to signal the arrival of the irreverent red-haired comedian as Carrot

Top

ran

down

the aisle, throwing out T-shirts.

The comedian entertained

the

audience with inventions from his six full-size trunks. Carrot Top had appeared on shows like "Star Search," "Comic Strip Live," "America's Funniest People" and the "Arsenio Hall Show."

He was named Comedian of the Year and Campus Activities. He also had a

Entertainer of the Year by the National Association of

sitcom "It

hoped

in the

was it

works.

still

went

in the

planning stages," Carrot

really well.

It

was

for

NBC and

Top

"We

said.

was ready

were developing the idea and

for mid-season."

bits he did for the audience was on trick-or-treating in Iowa. "Iowa was just there you know," Carrot Top said. "If a kid went trick-or-treating there, he told his mom and dad, "Bye. See you in two weeks.' They would be walking along the road and a car would pass and they would yell, 'Trick-or-treat!'" Along with the laughter, he was greeted with the heckles of several rude audience members. He called them the "sniper section" because they sat in the balcony. Although they

One of the

started out loud, they

remained hushed during most of the performance, but a 17-year-old

refused to be quiet and irritated the audience and the comedian. "It was great for the first five minutes but then there was no point to it," Carrot Top said. "People never wanted that. The audience paid eight bucks to hear him yell. It would have been different if he was actually saying something but I could not understand him. Some comics

liked to banter back and forth.

I

I

liked to put

on a show.

I

was mad."

seemed to enjoy his jokes and props. "I thought the heckler was a jerk," Lisa Crouse said. "We did not pay to come listen to him. still thought Carrot Top was great. I felt sorry for him because I could tell it bothered him

Even with

but he

was

the heckler, the audience

great."

This was the second time the comedian had performed at Northwest. His last performance was sold out. One member was so impressed with that performance, she invited her mom and

dad

to this one.

"He was always cool and really funny," Bobbi Woodward said. "He was great. I liked him enough to have my parents come and see him. They were impressed." Carrot Top had high hopes for the next time he came to the Northwest stage. "I wanted to come back next year so I could do a better show," Carrot Top said. "This was not a very good show and I wanted to end up on a high note rather than one like this." He ended with a recording of cuts from popular songs, doing imitations of singers like Madonna and Mick Jagger. The musical interiude lasted five minutes and ended the show with a bang.

demonstrates

resemblance to

Wendy. His included

act

many

props and inventions that

who seemed

his

own

to appreciate his

performance. Carrot Top did not disappoint his

uncanny observations of everyday

life

and wacky

rolling in the aisles.

Photo by

inventions.

By Mike Johnson

78 Carrot Top

his

had the audience

Although disappointed with audience,

Carrot Top

Laura Riedel.


Carrot Top basks

in the

applause of the audience. This

was the comedian's second appearance

in

Marwille and

he entertained a near-sell out crowd. I'hoto h> Laura Riedel.

Carrot Top addresses an annoying heckler in the audience during his show. The heckler disrupted the comedian's act several times. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Entertainment 79


GHOST Stephen King's

tales cause

chilling

STORIES bump

things to go

the night

in

on and off. An old rickety stone went down as the audience was taken to a place where ghosts existed, a place where the scariest of stories were told. Stephen King's macabre magic was brought to Northwest when the production of "Ghost Stories," a group of five one-act plays based on King's stories, came to town. Adapted by

Thunder crackled over

the speakers as the lights flashed

house stood ominous and alone. The

lights

Robert Pridham, the stories touched on the fears of the child

in

everyone.

During the prologue. The Man, played by David Simmons, came out and a monologue of things that went bump in the night like the boogeyman in

set the

mood with

the closet

and the

unknown

thing under the covers. "There was a lump on your bed," The Man said. "I wanted you to put a hand on wanted you to put your hand under the sheet to see what lay underneath."

I

that shape.

unfolded as the audience was told what lay under that sheet. "The Boogeyman," "Strawberry Spring" and "Gray Matter" were from King's Night Shift Collection. "The Story of Timmy Baterman" was included in Pet Cemetary while "Uncle Otto's Truck" was in the

The

stories

Skeleton

Crew

Collection.

"The Boogeyman" blended that

had

the sane

taken his three children

and the insane as a man told of the monster in the closet

away

to a

bodyless voice. The

man

finally

succumbed

to

insanity as the voice became the voice of the monster in the closet. told of a young man who came back from the dead after His father's acceptance of his son without mental capacities back

"The Story of Timmy Baterman" being wounded

in the war.

the dead touched the heart and chilled the spine. "Strawberry Spring" was a blend of comedy and horror as a

from

should have about a

serial killer

murdering young

girls at

man

revealed more than he

a campus.

"Gray Matter" brought two townspeople face to face with a blob-like creature when the men it a beer and in "Uncle Otto's Truck," a man was convinced the truck, which killed

bought

was moving across

his business partner,

the yard to

kill

him.

The troupe of five

All five tales were brought to the stage with the added effects of electronic drones, shifting colored light

slits

of

and mechanically generated fog.

The audience, many of whom had read

the stories the play

the

was based on, enjoyed

the

had read

all

the

good job recreating slower pace.

I

books they were based on," Richard Trulson it

for the stage.

Some

scenes.

it

thought they did a

lost the scarier qualities

and

it

went

at a

a lot," John

Wagner said.

"I

one member chuckling, not shivering. had read all of the stories that were played. At times,

left

was more comic than Stephen King stories. It seemed more funny than scary." As the lights came on and audience members prepared to go home, some took one last look back at the stage with the haunted house and quickened their pace to head towards their secure

I

thought

from

Adapted

stories

Stephen King,

it

was a

series of

skits that

By Mike Johnson

mixed

horror with

humor. Photo courtesy "Ghost

homes.

80 Ghost Stories

by

"Ghost Stories"

thought they did a great job though."

The blending of comedy with horror "I liked

of them

said. "I

macabre

show

overall. "I

actors play out

Stories."


;'

't:~'>'i''fi--^'li''''f ?

Entertainment 81


THE BAT

Murder and intrigue surround

mansion on

a

dark and stormy night

a

Fascinating the audience with thunder, lightning and other sound effects was "The Bat." The 1920 comical mystery took place in an old mansion and involved murders, stolen money

and the mysterious person, productions

at

the Bat. This

was one of

the first highly technical student

Northwest.

James Rush played Detective Anderson, who in the last minute of the play was revealed as the Bat that everyone had searched to find. Rush enjoyed working on "The Bat" because of the technicality of the show.

most advanced show I had ever worked on," Rush said. "It went surprisingly smooth due to the technical staff. 1 had nothing to do with it except stand underneath the lights "It

and

was

the

act."

said the midnight

Rush

considered as a possibility

"The it

showing of "The Bat" was successful and should have been

when producing

audience response at the midnight

other plays.

showing was excellent," Rush

to the faculty as an idea for other plays that

would be appropriate

said. "I

mentioned

for midnight perfor-

mances."

The cast put in about five weeks of practice, six days a week and Rush said all the practice was worth it. "It was always worth it," Rush said. "As far as I was concerned, it was part of my training as an actor."

Although rumors had circulated that cancelling the Thursday showing was because of technical problems.

working

literally

entirely agree.

show was overwhelming," Rush said. "The staff was set. That was not an exaggeration. It wasn't the fault set was not done. Cancelling the first show was a good idea on their behalf.

24 hours a day on the

of the staff that the It

Rush did not

difficulty of the

"The technical

enabled them to do the job better than they could have." Shelly Branstetter attended "The Bat" and "loved

Dale Ogden,

it."

played by Carol

"The production was very good," Branstetter said. "They had a good

set,

sound effects and

acting."

Branstetter said the character of Lizzie played by Cara Gitto

was her

favorite

and she said

Detective

Anderson, played

Gitto's character added to the play's humor.

"Lizzie was comical," Branstetter said. "Her mannerisms were great. She

made

the

whole

by James Rush, that she

play."

Branstetter also said the .set added to the play. A window was on the set crew had made and Branstetter was impressed by the reality of it. "The way the glass looked was great and the effort they put into it made

that the production

a real scene which

Patton, informs

was

was not

involved in the

murders. it

come

across as

really incredible," Bransetter said.

Mary Roberts-Rinehart and Harvey Hopewood was a model for Agatha Christie when writing her plays and had been used by many as a background This three-act play corroborated by

Detective

Anderson was the Bat in disguise.

Photo by

for mystery.

By Kathy Higdon-Bolar

82 The Bat

Jon Britton.


Entertainment 83


Members of the Hubbard Street Dance Company couple off for lifts. "The Golden Section" was choreographed by Twyla Sharp and contained an upbeat tempo. Photo courtesy Hubbard Street Dance Company. Frank Chaves and Daniela Panessa hide their faces while leaping in "SUPER Is Coming Down." The number required many mechanical, calculated movements by the dancers. Photo courtesy Hubbard Street Dance Company.

STRAIGHT

84 Hubbard Street


HUBBARD Dance company entertains

STREET A

footwork

fancy

with

sounded as the audience hushed.

hcilkuv whistle

It

re\ealing bright gold streamers in the back ot the stage. .stage in

stage

got louder as the curtain went up.

A

male dancer bounded across the

gold shorts, doing a mid-stage twirl before disappearing on the other side. Soon the

was tilled w

ith

dancers

in

golden costumes pert'orming with athletic prowess and smooth

fluidity.

The Hubbard

Street

from the romantic

With 20

Dance Company of Chicago performed

to the

space age, blending old and

culturally di\erse dancers, the 1

F-"estival

at

1

pastel

world-uide

was called "The Ciolden Twyla Tharp Dance I'oundation on

they pertbrmed for the Northwest audience

Broadway in 98 The second number was "Baker's Dozen," which brought 1

men, dressed

si,x

for a

such celebrated dance venues as the Holland

Section," originally produced and performed by the

stage as

dance numbers, varying

and The Kennedy Center.

number

first

five

styles.

company performed each year

audience of over 50, (KM) people and appeared

Dance The

new

in white, danced with seven

dresses. With an odd woman

out, triangles

the illusionof

women

aspringday tothe

dressed in white leotards

developed creating a

light

v\

ith

undercinrent of

tension.

"SUPER STRAIGHT Is Coming Down" was the third number. With a space age beat in the women and three men engaged in a power struggle. E\ery movement \\ as

background, two

pronounced and defined with loved

"I

my

intensity

"SUPER STRAIGHT

imagination.

It

also

Is

by the dancers.

Coming Dow n"," Courtney Cerbin

"Georgia" was next and while Willie Nelson's version of "Georgia

man and woman danced in the spotlight. "The 40s" was the final number and the company came out in black

in the

said. "It

made me

use

seemed very symbolic."

On My Mind"

played

background, a

lop hats and canes doing

various dances of the era.

Robert Bohlken, professor of speech, enjoyed the number.

had more unison, showy costumes and

"It

The company shimmers during

"The (Jolden Section."

The

dance number began the show

and introduced the

company.

Hubbard

could relate to the creativity," Bohlken said.

"I

loved

40s,' the

it,"

Cerbin

said.

"They used so much

creativity in

dancing for \5 years and had never seen anything

making up

their all

and

it

the audience

the dances.

I

had been

like it."

Older audience members also enjoyed the performance. "I thought it was interesting, dynamic and energetic," Bohlken

As Photo courtesy

I

theme was more clearly defined as well." Students enjoyed the show. Even some of the more experienced members of were impressed. Cerbin had danced since she was 10.

"With 'The

said.

"Ihe dancers gave

it

showed."

the audience roared

perspiration on their

its

thunderous approval

brow and smiles on

in a

standing ovation, the dancers bowed,

their faces of a

show executed with

skill.

Street

Dance Company.

By Mike Johnson

Entertainment 85


WINGFIELD Gospel, Jazz and blues provide

AND DAVIS and

inspiration

spirits

lifts

Toes were tapping, fingers were snapping and hands were clapping as singers Katherine Davis and Sidney Wingfield deiigiited the audience. The duo sang numerous songs with styles ranging from classic and Chicago blues to rhythm and blues, gospel and jazz. Wingfield took the stage

"Don't be afraid

to

first

dance

and gave the audience explicit instructions

in the aisles,"

Students took this statement

literally as

Wingfield they

to

be themselves.

said.

jumped up and danced

to their favorite jazz

Arms were up in the air and hips were shaking from side to side. Some of the more popular songs that were sung included "Georgia On My Mind" and "Let the Good Times Roll." Wingfield surprised the audience by singing the themes from three songs.

popular television sitcoms, the "Jeffersons." "Cheers" and "All

in the

Family." Davis sang

members of the From Heaven."

gospel songs with the help of Wingfield's piano playing. Davis inspired some

audience to sing with her, as she sang such gospel favorites as "Pennies

Another aspect the audience enjoyed was when Davis divided the crowd and started the singing while the men sang a different verse. She finished by blending the two

women

together.

Martha Moss, assistant professor of computer science and information systems, enjoyed the participation of the audience and energy displayed by the crowd. "I liked the

so

enthusiasm of the audience and the singers," Moss

many people

get into

Davis would not

let

said. "I

see

it."

Wingfield outdo her, as she too decided to arouse the audience. She

requested that everyone be happy and give each other hugs and kisses.

male student jumped

was surprised to

out of the audience, ran

up on stage and gave her

To a

Davis' surprise a

huge hug and

kiss.

The crowd roared with laughter. Not only were students encouraged

to

dance

in the aisles, but they

stage. Students jumped onstage to join the duo in song and dance.

Wingfield

at

the piano, while

men

took turns dancing with Davis.

were asked

Women

One

to

dance on

tlirted

around

student enjoyed the

experience of dancing with the singer. to dance with somebody' ," Thom Hiatt said. "I was the went up and danced with her. She was very romantic." Wingfield had played more than 25 years as a major keyboard artist and vocalist. Some of his credits included keyboard recording sessions with Mick Jagger. Son Seals and Luther

"She

said,

"You know,

I

really

type of person that would do

it.

want

so

I

Allison. Davis took her talent to theaters across the country, as she received

smging

in various musicals.

wide acclaim

Davis and Wingfield were nominated many times

in the

for

Katherine Davis a

hug during her performance.

"The show was a huge success with crowd participation." Heidi Gehrman. president ot Campus Activity Programmers, said. "We met them at a convention in Omaha last year and

During the show

members

of the

audience were

decided

the music scene

had changed, the classics

still

had

asked on stage to dance. Photo by

their fans.

By

86 Wingfield and Davis

gives

ja//

music category of the Campus Entertainment Awards, given annually by college students.

we had to bring them here." The singing duo proved that although

Aaron Hufty

Sherri McCorkindale

Laura

Riedel.


Sidtif)

Wingfield and Katherine

Davis sing a version of "Babv

Do

\(tu

Want Mu

To Do."

I'niouram'd tni'inlKTs of I'ncT to partii'ipati' bv

dancing

in llif aisles.

What

Thi'

lhi>

duo

aiidi-

sinjiinj;

and

Photo b\ Laura

Riedel.

Katherine Davis sings the bhies with help from

members

of the audience.

Davis and her partner Sidney Wingfield, provided an evening of gospel music mixed with the blues.

Photo bv Laura Riedel.

Entertainment 87


CHRISTMAS Charles Dickens' classic tale of one man's

CAROL campus

rediscovery of youth comes to As

the live orchestra played the

opening chords of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen," the

curtain opened on a stage bustling with people opening their shops

London. As they worked and greeted other people on the

in

sang while snow

fell

on the

set.

As

on Christmas Eve morning

street, the

townsmen and women

the Christmas season started, so

began "A Christmas

Carol," the 1975 adaptation of the classic Charles Dickens' tale of a man's rediscovery of youth.

"A Christmas Carol" was a mainstay of the Christmas season from movie versions starring everyone from Oscar winner George C. Scott and the Muppets to television sitcoms and

dramas which put

their

own

twist

on the

tale.

Charles Jones' adaptation remained faithful to

Dickens' original version.

The first performance of "A Christmas Carol" was on the mainstage of the Omaha Community Playhouse in 1975. Since then, Jones' adaptation grew into four national tours that crossed the

United States and Canada and was seen by overaquarterof a million people

every year.

"A Christmas Carol" featured a lavish set with an authentic looking toy store with a glass window and the counting shop where Ebenezer Scrooge toiled his hours. Along the streets, townspeople were dressed vegetables and

in period

costumes with

their carts, selling such things as scarfs,

ale.

r

The show included special effects such as falling snow, a glowing sign, a revolving bed and smoke billowing from the fireplace in which Jacob Marley's ghost emerged from, weighted

down

with chains. Sounds like chains rattling and wind blowing added to the effect.

Because the production was brought

campus

theatrical presentations.

in

from outside Northwest, admission was higher than

But members of the audience appreciated the more lavish

production.

"The effects were by

itself. It

great," Michelle Higgins said. "I could not figure out

Christmas carols such as

numbers by

how

the

bed turned

looked heavy."

Peter Cratchit

"Away

the cast of 20. Tiny

in a

Manger" and "Greensleeves" were sung

in

musical

Other Night," which was repeated with an echo effect when Scrooge saw the future with his

past, the present

and how

brought about changes

the story of an unlovable old

man who was

visited by three

night. The ghosts showed him scenes from Christmases in the would be in the future if he did not mend his ways. The insight

Eve

apparitions one Christmas

it

in

Scrooge

that affected relationships with the townspeople, his

employees and nephew. in

father's emer-

gence from the

family suffering from his death.

"A Christmas Carol" was

anticipates his

Tim, played by Stacy Volz, sang an acopella version of "The

counting house.

The

cast included

many

children

who sang and danced through-

Tony Medlin was the man behind Scrooge, hailing from Troy, N.C. He played the character various productions of "A Christmas Carol," including a one-man production entitled

out the show.

Photo by Jack continued

88 Christmas Carol

Vaught.

!


Entertainment 89


The

streets of

London

fill

with song

and merry making on the famous night that changed the life of Ebeneezer Scrooge. The play was highly attended and enjoyed by students and faculty of Northwest. Photo by Jack Vaught.

Bob Cratchit, played by Karl Kippola, says hello to the toy store keeper, played by Barry Lambert, on a narrow street. The Nebraska Theatre Caravan's performance took place at Christmas. Photo by Jack Vaught.

90 Christmas Carol


CHRISTMAS

CAROL "Scrooge." His Northwest pertormaiice stirred up both good and bad iiiemories. "I first

played Scrooge ten years and forty pounds ago," Mediin said.

tonight because on the night of my

moon

eclipse ot the

first

"It

was ueird coming

performance of "A Christmas Carol." there w as a

so the atmosphere was very similar to that night ten years ago.

I

total

was also

not feeling too hot on that night either."

The

role of

Scrooge required a great deal of physical

into the air

from excitement and

fear.

During one dance number,

acti\ity.

he had to dodge the other dancers because he was invisible and

at \

arious times, he had to leap

This was hard because the night he peiformed

in

Maryville he was sick.

"We did a Mediin

lot

said. "It

of shows and there was a great strain on my voice along with the physical," was hard to recover from being on a bus. There was no chance to recover from

We had a sick bed in the back of the bus. which 1 had been occupying for a while." Although Mediin directed a variety of plays for different companies and pla\ ed characters

the flu.

ranging from King Lear to Willie Loman. he considered Scrooge the most complex and difficult to play.

"Scrooge w as one of the most desperate characters

in literature,"

desperate characters, there had to be a basically good center. I

did not get tired of

On

it.

Mediin

was hard

It

to

said. "Even with work up to it, but

became absolutely real. Scrooge felt guilty and It carried me away with its power." 42 years old. couki see a time when he could not do it

stage, the role

needed forgiveness. He needed redemption.

Mediin loved the character with the intensity "It

Dickens'

do

"A

began

tu unfold

on

but, at

required.

was such a demanding role," Mediin said. "As long as could do the role justice. was 42 and was already feeling the age restraints of doing this old man." I

that

Linn

one place. He worked

of the fellow .\rts

Center uith the song "God Rest

Ye Merry Gentlemen." The

company took

Jack Vaught.

"The ideas were

there but Dickens put

them

all

the ravages that fate could dole out. 'A Christmas Carol' brought these

When

I

pertbrmed.

I

tried to get children to read the

Mediin and company

left

a favorable impression on the audience, filled uith children,

students and older people.

"The props and the kids.

"It

United States and

said.

sweat houses before gaining fame as a writer so he was aware

novella because no production could replace Dicken's eloquent prose."

1

.Another

Canada. Photo by

man and

in the

ideas into a single inspirational tale.

their rendition

throughout the

ould

Charles Dickens did something that no other person had done before

"Dickens created Christmas." Mediin in

Performing

v\

and encouraged the reading of the novella.

the stage of the .\Iar\

1

I

Mediin believed

Christmas Carol"

t

it.

it

said. "The actors were incredible, even them as actors when they were performing."

were just grand." Natalie Banks

member of the audience

did not expect the \astness of the production.

was bigger and more involved," Higgins

imagine

As

set

really did not think of

it

to

said. "I

thought

it

would be good but

I

did not

be this big."

the cast

bowed

to

Tim echoed through the "God Bless Us Everyone."

thunderous applause, the words of Tiny

theater, leaving a smile on even the most unmovable Scrooge.

By Mike Johnson

Entertainment 91


CHRISTMAS PLAY the Red-Horned Rainmoose"

"Randy,

brings a children's fantasy to stage Everyone had heard of Dasher, Dancer. Prancer. Vixen, Comet, Cupid, Donner, Blitzen and the red nosed Rudolph, but few i<new Randy. In "Randy, the Red-Homed Rainmoose," the story of this forgotten rainmoose was told to a group of young and young at heart.

The

children's Christmas play

requested

at

gave students a chance critics.

became

a tradition 17 years ago.

A

$1 donation

was

the door to support Maryvilie Food Pantry in lew of admission. The production

and perform for a group

to direct

that

could sometimes be the toughest

In order to keep the children's attention, "Randy, the

Red-Homed Rainmoose" was

a mixture of participation and fantasy. Although there was a storyline, there was not a

strict

fourth wall and the actors were able to interact with children.

The audience was seated on

the floor, giving

it

a

more informal atmosphere. Actors,

dressed as elves, entertained the kids before the show. They visited, did magic tricks and even

down Christmas lists. come get you a reindeer if you want one," Scott Hite said to one

took

"I will

you

lots

boy.

"We will bring

of cool games too."

The elves then

led the audience in a

what

their

The messy

story of

Randy, the under-appreciated rainmoose whose job was to clean up after the When Rudolph got sick, Santa Claus and the elves were afraid

elves, then began.

the discovery that

to

guide the sleigh.

When they

Randy's homs glowed, the rainmoose saved Christmas. During the

show, several children yelled out comments to the it

to sing

tme love brought them.

Christmas would be ruined because of the thick fog and no one

made

>u^

group of Christmas carols. "The Twelve Days of

Christmas" was done with actions as the audience was divided into smaller groups

was planned that way. "The kids reacted the way

wanted them

I

to,"

actors.

Wake

According

to director

said. "I tried to

wam

Shawn Wake,

After being told that Santa's sleigh needs to

be waxed. Rick

Mathieu the actors

tries to

what

remember

would happen. Kids yelled out stuff at any time so they had to be on their toes." Paige Vandenburg, who played an elf named Fred, enjoyed the interaction with the kids. "We got to play with the kids," Vandenburg said. "We did not have to stick to a strict script so we could change lines if we wanted to which gave us more freedom to work with." Although Vandenberg had been in other productions, she said this was the most

several enthusi-

challenging.

astic

"I

a bit.

had

to

be faster on

They could see

my

feet,"

Vandenburg

right through us so

said. "I

we had

to

had

to react to the kids

and ad

lib

ÂĽ%

quite

be careful. Children's theater was the

where the

wax

is

With

sleigh

located.

the help of

young

audience

members,

toughest type of theater to do."

One "I

not

Mathieu's student enjoyed the change of format.

loved

it," Jill

Wood said.

"It

was

different

from other productions

in that the kids

were

They were very much The tale of "Randy, the Red-Horned Rainmoose" had even the the toughest critics glowing part of the play."

left out.

as the actors took their

bows.

Randy, was able to find

it.

by Chris

By Mike Johnson

92 Christmas Play

character.

Tucker.

Photo

.4


Klf Ericka

Corrado and Rainnioose Rick Mathieu

ebrate alter rinding nut Raiidy the Rainnioose

cel-

will lead

sanla's sleigh. Ihc children's Christmas play had been a tradition over the past 17 years. Photo by Chris

'

Tucker

An elf, played by Paige Vandenburg, gets help from audience members on how to care for a sick rainmoose. Interaction between actors and children was a major part of the play. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Entertainment 93


KANSAS CITY Orchestra brings the experience

SYMPHONY of live

classical

music

With horns blowing, violins strumming and cymbals banging, the Kansas City Symphony brought a mixture of classical music along with new instrumental music to campus. The Kansas City Symphony, directed by William McGlaughlin. had performed at Northwest seven previous times. The symphony gained national recognition with a 1988 Public Broadcasting System television special. "The King's Singers Holiday special with the Kansas City Symphony.

made two recordings and was broadcast on

also

It

Morning's" Easter program It

was one of only

"Saint Paul Sunday

1988 and 1989.

three nationally recognized Missouri symphonies, in the

Louis Symphony and radio station, this

in

St.

made

Joseph Symphony. According the

symphony

to

company of St.

Sharon Bonnett, of

KXCV public

special.

"We liked to showcase some of our talent," Bonnett said. "The Mid America Arts Alliance offered funding for non-profit groups to bring such programs to the area. Kansas City

Symphony represented some of the best talent Missouri had to offer." The symphony played Johannes Brahms" "Tragic Overture" and "Symphony No. 4 minor." Both began softly, but ended

in a loud finale of

in

E

sound with the orchestra feverishly

ri

playing a variety of instruments from the violin to the tuba.

McGlaughlin also chose a selection from Kay Gardner called "Rainforest," which evoked the sounds of the tropics.

"Kay Gardner wrote this in 978 while she was living in San Francisco," McGlaughlin said. "There was a sense of quiet and calm. It was written before the political uproar over rainforests and long before Madonna or the Grateful Dead even heard of them." The other new piece the symphony played was "Summerset" by Cary John Franklin. "It was written about childhood memories," McGlaughlin said. "Franklin told a story about growing up in the music. There was the element of the little boy listening to a train and then little murmunngs and then a big disturbance. To this day, he was afraid of tornadoes." According to Bonnett, bringing entertainment like this to campus was important. 1

who

"People

lived 100 miles

away from

the live performing

group had an easier access,"

Bonnett said. "There was another dmiension. While the radio station offered

mances, there was the dynamic of the experience.

It

live perfor-

Conductor William

McGlaughlin, right,

is

bid

farewell after

gave members of the community as well finishing

as the students a chance to experience

Jennifer Stort also believed hearing "It

was

better live," Stort said. "It

it it

was

in

person was better than hearing

great actually being there.

I

liked

it

on the

it

because

radio. it

was

"Symphony No. 4 in

E minor. Op.

98."

The Kansas

According

City

Symphony

"It

was a consortuni

something

different,

something everyone did not enjoy."

to Channing Homer. Spanish professor, students found themselves surprised. was extremely good for the students to have it at a low price," Homer said. "Some of them were required to go and were pleasantly surprised." Blending the old styles with the new, the Kansas City Symphony gave Northwest students

of musicians with national recogni-

the opportunity to have a live musical experience. tion.

By Mike Johnson

94 Symphony

Brahms'

live."

Photo by

Chris Tucker.


Sharon Bonnett, station manager of KXCN/KRNW introduces the Kansas City

Symphony.

in association

KXCV7KRNW

with Northwest Kn-

corc Performances sponsored the symphony's visit. Photo hy Chris

Tucker.

Entertainment 95


JIM Hypnotist mesmerizes

w

t

i

ii

WAND

mind

matter

over

Returning to Northwest for two more sold out performances, hypnotist Dr. Jim Wand once again astounded the audience. Wand had performed on campus and had become somewhat of a legend as well as a favorite

among many

hypnosis had provided students and

students. Watching people do things under community members entertainment and laughter for 1

performances during the past seven years.

Wand

stressed that a person

would never do anything he or she would not do in real life. Still, students did do a variety of things under hypnosis

Hypnosis did not take morals away. like

simulated strip acts and pretending to be singers like Garth Brooks.

Because of the demand $4

to see

people doing the unbelievable on stage.

Programmers added a 9 p.m. performance along with

Activity

a piece for his return

engagement.

Stacey Han.sen enjoyed watching people

proved

this

by having students act out

their trances, students

Wand showed

this

Wand and Campus

show. Students paid

his 7 p.m.

were asked

to

come

at the

off the stage and

be

still

in a trance.

\

Wand

mention of a special word. After coming out of

go back

to their seats

while

under Wand's

still

spell.

by having them smell one another or jump up and yell "kiss me,

Fm

vaccinated."

"When the girl

smelled the guy next to him because Jim

Wand cued her was good," Hansen

Dating Game."

said. "I also really liked the

The Dating Game consisted of three men who were bachelorettes and one man who was bachelor. After playing the game, the bachelor chose a bachelorette and they

Acapulco

won

a

a trip to

for their date.

Although Dorothy Corless wanted

to

be hypnotized she decided to watch the show.

when he had people sing and act crazy," Corless said. "When the people were dancing around, that was my favorite." Doug Swink also chose to watch the show this time instead of going under. was on stage. did not get to watch "It was more fun watching it," Swink said. "When "I liked

it

myself.

was better watching my friends." Bowman was not an amateur when came to attending Wand's performances as this

much

"Since said. "It

state.

Dr. Jim

it

was her fourth performance. Because of

To

in a self-

induced hypnotic

It

Angel not too

While

I

I

I

many

times she had seen

she said there was

it,

still

it

before, a lot of

it

was

the same, but

some of it was

different,"

Bowman

to

experience hypnosis

in a

smaller setting.

Wand

provided a mini-

Audience members were invited to attend and learn more about ending addicting habits or different motivation skills. The workshop provided people with a hypnosis session on Jan. 2

25-page handout on

rigid

how

1

the entire weight

of an adult male.

hilarious."

allow students

Wand's

body supports

variety.

had seen

was

the

.

Wand

believed

that everyone

could benefit

to regularly hypnotize themselves.

Hypnotizing sold-out crowds.

Wand showed

the

power of

the mind.

from

self-

hypnosis. Photo

By Kathy Higdon-Bolar

96

Jim

Wand

by Tony Miceli.


During Ihc Dr. Jim Wand show, students slumped out of chairs ÂŤ hllc utidiT hypnosis. This was Wand's 15th appearance at Northwest. I'hoto h> Laura Riedel. llit'ir

A hypnotized C'ara (iitto tries unsuccesstully to rememher her name during Dr. .lim Wand's 9 p.m. performance. V\ and's mesmerizing display packed the Mary I. inn

Performing Arts Center for two shows. Photo by

Chris Tucker.

00^

Entertainment 97


98 The Real

Live

Brady Bunch


THE REAL LIVE BRADY BUNCH A

9 7

1

continues

sitcom

s

'

entertain audiences of memorable episodes of the

live

"This was different than any kind of theater it

was

"Car Wash" and "Hey,

I

took the stage for "The

show brought

it

to a

had done." Tosney

I

and we used the actual

live

When the spectators arrived at Mary the

all

sitcom that performed the most

'70s.

Jim Tosney. who played Greg Brady, said the vaudeville. Since

ol ihc

1990s

tlie

Mike, Carol. Greg, Marcia, Peter. Jan. Bobby, ("indy and Alice Real Live Brady Bunch." The shou was a reenactnicni

to

script,

it

new

level.

said. "It

was

like

heightened the show."

Linn Performing Arts Center popular disco music

like

was decorated

like

Will Survive" greeted them. The orchestra

pit

room with flower print, yellow and orange couches and huge throw pillow s. The room was to make the audience feel like they were actually watching television. Along

a "70s living living

with the living room, there were applause signs that

To energi/e

the crowd, cast

members threw

lit

up

to

encourage the audience

to clap.

out two big beach balls for the crowd to

back and forth while they performed a dance to

"YMCA." The beach balls brought

bump

laughter

to the audience and set the madcap mood of fun for the rest of the night. "The audiences were exactly what we wanted from an audience." Tosney said. "They came saying 'Hey. I paid the money and I was expecting a good time and I was going to come in

and smiles

with a good attitude that

The

actors also held a

competing for various

I

wanted

be entertained.""

Show."" four audience

members were chosen

which the contestants were competing approval. After each round, a contestant would leave and the one that was

The game had

the contestants

and

prizes.

Game

For "The Real Live

to

game show where members of the audience were

three rounds in

to

be contestants.

for the audience"s left

on stage would

win the game.

Each contestant was awarded The Bradys have a family talk to

encourage

the

.Fan to

cheerleader.

The

"Real Live Brady

Bunch" performed "Her

Shadow,"

an episode from the original

Photo by Jon Britton.

dinner

for their participation in the at

Towerview

game show.

Prizes ranged from

Yoohoo, a chocolate drink. after each round there would be a series of commercials. to

commercials centered around Northwest" s eating establishments. in a purple and white lycra suit stating the importance of

One commercial was Batman Dunkin" Dounuts

to fight off the forces

Cotter, talking about "I like

my men

Towerview and

like

my

of evil. Another was Liza Minneli. played by Patricia

the similarities of steak and

men.

steak: well done,"' Cotter said.

Following a brief intermission, the episode of "The Real Live Brady Bunch"" started. The episode the cast performed was "Her Sister"s Shadow" about middle child Jan"sjealousy of older child Marcia.

One

aspect of the show that audiences found funny

was having

adults playing kids. This

also presented a challenge for the actors. "I

television show.

to a free steak

Since the night was real television,

Most of

become a

Sister's

condoms

was a challenge for me because was 29 and was playing a 6-year-old,"" "Another challenge, was not like Greg Brady and the whole joke of the show

thought that

Tosney

said.

it

I

I

1

I

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;continued Entertainment 99


THE REAL LIVE BRADY BUNCH was

that

we had

adults playing kids."

Another challenge for the actors was getting everything perfected, since most of the audience members were Brady fans. According to Carrie Aizley. who played Jan Brady, the

watched Brady episodes to get the show in perfect form. "It was very specific work, we had to get things down pat," Aizley

cast

said.

"People

in the

audience were die hard fans and they knew when we goofed, they knew when it was not on over and over target. We sat and watched the episode that we were doing and watched them

**

on video and studied each individual."

Audience members thought that the cast was terrific and very precise. she acted "It was hilarious," Jennifer Knight said. "Jan was my favorite character because show." Another highlight of the show were the clothes of the "70s on parade. Tosney did not

just like the Jan in the (television)

comfortable

in his clothes, but

"The clothing

that

I

wore was

it

a

feel

helped him build his character.

pox on humanity," Tosney

forced to wear corduroy or polyester, but

it

helped

me

said.

"Nobody should have been was so hippy he was

play a Greg that

It helped you get in the mood, but it was awful." Following the show, the cast sang different songs such as "Keep on Movin" and "Sunshine Day." During that time the cast played on how the actors of the television show liked each

lame.

other off the show.

During one of the songs, Greg was dancing suggestively with Marcia then Carol cut in and started dancing with Greg in the same manner. According to Tosney the cast took their ideas from Barry Williams book "Growing Up Brady" in which the actor wrote about his life as a child star on the set of a hit television series.

Florence Henderson (the Brady

"We

took a

mom)

He discussed such

things as his relationships with

and Robert Reed's (the Brady dad) alcoholism.

of ideas from Williams book," Tosney said.

lot

"We

played out those ideas

throughout the show."

Members loved

it."

Daniel Breeze said.

Cotter, and

Marcia Brady, played by

talk about

Jan

in

"It

the final scene of

"The Real Live Brady Bunch."

The show was an off-Broadway production on a

party."

After the final curtain

of a lovely lady,

played by Patricia

Antoinette Spolar,

of the audience were impressed by every aspect of the show.

was explosive, it was wonderful, it was great." Tosney thought that doing the show live was what made it such a huge success. "The show became almost twisted and strange," Tosney said. "We were actually doing the lines of the show and actually doing the episode as it was written because it was live and everybody knew the characters there was some sort of transformation that took place. The whole atmosphere from the beginning of the show when it opened to the end was like a Jjuge "I

Cindy Brady,

call, the

who was

audience members

left the theater

bringing up three very lovely girls

singing "Here

is

the story,

.

.

By Amanda McManigal

100 The Real

Live

Brady Bunch

nation-wide tour.

." .

Photo by Jon Britton.


\Iariiu Brad>. pla>t'd In Antoinette Spolar, speaks to Alice about

w hether or not

to f;ive pointers to

pla>ed b\ Carrie B. Ai/le>. about

Man>

of the

members

pre\iousl\

Broadway shows. Photo bv Russ

Dr. Roger Corley spank my fanny"

Jan Bradv,

pom pom played

in

tryouts.

several

V\ evdert.

"Quick Chris, come hither and "The Real Live Game Show." Four

recites in

members of the audience were picked to participate in the game show and win prizes. Photo by Jon Britton.

Entertainment 101


CITY OF Murder and mayhem rages

in

lavish

ANGELS musical set Taking the audience on a sounds of the

and

late

trip

down memory

Angeles

Los

in

lane to black and white

movies and

40s. the musical "City of Angels," depicted sex and love

in

the jazzy

both the movies

real life.

The plot of "City of Angels" was split into two different casts, the movie cast, whose set and clothing was all in black and white and the Hollywood cast, whose .set was color. Stine, the main character of the Hollywood cast, was attempting to turn one of his books into a screenplay. Much to Stine's dismay, the director. Buddy Fidler, did not like any of his scenes and he ended up rewriting them.

The screenplay

Stine

was writing involved a detective named Stone, who accepted

the job

of finding the young and beautiful Mallory Kingsley for her equally beautiful step-mother,

Alaura Kingsley. What Stone did not know was that Mallory was not missing but Alaura had contrived a plan to

kill

her husband Luther to inherit his money.

Stone's search was cut short

him. Right in

when Stone

fell

when Mallory showed up at his apartment attempting to seduce man burst into the room and took a picture of them

into her trap, a

bed together, which ended up just being part of a plan

woman

Both Stine and Stone were having pursue her writing interests

was caught up in his pictures was killed.

To

in

past love,

New

Stone arrested.

to get

troubles. Stine loved his wife,

who

left

him

to

York, but also liked having a mistress on the side. Stone

Bobby, who

left

Stone after the one

man that could get

her into

women

and employment problems. Stone was angry

principles as a writer so that Fidler

would

that Stine

was giving up

his

get his way.

Stone was Susan Ebke's favorite character because he was a typical '40s man. "Stone, he was hilarious, he was your typical

To go along with

"4()s

character,"

Ebke

"City of Angels"

said.

paced two-part plot, the music kept the plot rolling. Songs such as "Double Talk." "The Tennis Song" and "Everybody Gotta Be Somewhere" kept the tempo

"My

favorite part of the play

together,

a

Tony award-

made everything

CD," Jeffery

winning musical directed by Joe

story.

was

the singing,"

Ebke

said.

"Because

it

really brought the

Leonardo. The musical was

fit."

Another tradition of the '40s in "City of Angels" was a four piece singing group, called Angel City 4 which cleared up some of the confusing portions of the plot. "I had never heard or seen the show before, but after just seeing the first half I'm gonna go out and get the

is

the fast

going as well as told part of the

show

I

further complicate the plot, Stine and Stone attempted to help each other out with their

various

Stringer said. "I loved the music.

It

was

really stylish.

It

sponsored by

Northwest

Encore Perfor-

was just mances and the

an incredible sound."

The Tony award-winning musical went on

the road

on Nov.

I

and had a two week

stint in

Kansas City, Mo., and one-nighters on college campuses throughout the country.

Maryville Free Press.

Photo

courtesy "City of

By Fay Dahlquist

102 City of Angels

Angels."

'I


Entertainment 103


The leader of Woody Herman's Young Thundering Herd, Frank Tiberi, plays an introductory number to the audience. Tibieri's work kept the Big Band sound of Woody Herman, alive.

the original

band

leader,

Photo by Chris Tucker.

Tim DeBoom and Tony Wood

play

saxophones during the Northwest Jazz Festival concert. Performance of "Mexicali Nose" and "Mean

their

to

Me" won the band a standing ova-

tion.

Photo by Chris Tucker.

Northwest Jazz Band members perform during the Jazz Festival. The

band opened for Woody Herman and the Thundering Herd. Photo by

Jimmy Myers.

104 Jazz Festival


JAZZ

Brass sound of professional

FESTIVAL band impresses students A festival of big band ja/z sound with iriimpcts blaring and drumbeats pounding came to Mary Linn Performing Arts Cenler w hen the Northwest Ja// Band and Woody Herman ami the Young Thundering Herd tooi\ the stage on Saturday. Feb. The Northwest Jazz Band opened for the Woody Herman Band with songs lii<e "My Romance" and "Greasy .Sack Blues." Encore performances such as Woody Herman and the Young Thundering Herd provided .'i.

students the chance for a culttual advancement.

"Encore performances were

John Ent/i. director of the Northwest Jazz Band. because

Woody Herman made

and benefitted many students culturally."

a great opportunity

a large

said. "I

impact on a

Entzi prepared his ja/z band for the

lot

w ished of

Woody Herman

my

there

were more

thai attended,

students."

and the Young Thundering Herd

performance by ha\ ing his students listen to a \ariety of Herman's musical pieces. "During the fall semester, 1 played Woody Herman pieces to my Jazz Ensemble class, so they would appreciate him more in person." Entzi said.

Members of the audience enjoyed the opportunity to listen to the Northwest Jazz Band along with Woody Herman and the Young Thundering Herd. Carol Cronin seldom had the chance to hear a

performance from the Northwest Jazz Band because she was a graduate assistant and

spent the majority of her time preparing and teaching classes. "It

was

the best

much because

1

had ever heard from them." Cronin

said. "1 did not get to hear

them very

was always teaching." Sheena Grenier, a music education major, enjoyed the jazz musical festival because she could relate to the emotions the bands were trying to produce. "It was great." Grenier said. "My favorite part was when Darcie Ashley performed "My Romance.'

It

I

just kind of put

you

in the

mood.

Although hearing members of a jazz band from Northwest had its plusses. Woody Herman and the Young Thundering Herd produced a performance the audience was pleased with.

However, a pert ormance of jazz bands w as not all

the Jazz Festiv al

w as about. Nineteen high

Four of the 19 bands went home with 1st place wins: school bands competed Melcher-Dallas High School. Maryville Jazz II. Paseo Academy and Shawnee Mission East. Woody Herman and the Thundermg Herd helped out the high school bands with clinics and at the festival.

the concert as an

example of how a professional jazz band sounds.

Brian Watts, bass guitarist of the Northwest Jazz Band, enjoyed the pert'ormance of the professional jazz band, but believed there should be nK)re opportunities to listen to jazz

musicians "It

was

at

Northwest.

great."

Watts

said.

"We

needed

to bring

more jazz

Brassy sounds and blues ended the evening with applause as

Thundering Herd took

their

bows and

left

stuff to

Northwest."

Woody Herman and the Young

the stage.

By Sara Meyers

Entertainment 105


106 Michael Medved


MICHAEL Film

expounds

critic

on

MEDVED lack

Famous author and vvitii

his

morals

of

message on

Medved based

cinema

in

Medsed

Public Broadcasting System film critic Michael

HoliywDod played in people's lives. upon the book '"Hollywood vs. America"

took the stage

the etlects

his lecture

that

caused an uproar

in the film industry. "1

belie\ed that a great

many Americans were

Hollywood was doing," Medved

Medved

not pleased uiih the type ol vM)rk that

said.

also said that the biggest issue with the

mo\ies was caused by popular culture

in

people's lives. "1

had come

violence and

it

u ilh mm ies and lele\ ision was not too much was not too much toul language and was not biggest problem was simply too much popular culture in our lives

to beliexc that the biggest issue

was not too much

much neohlism. 'Ihe altogether," Medved said. Med\ed spoke of three basic too

did

ni)i

mtluence

its

to

be

known

points

it

it

Hollywood promoted. The

to be

know n

for the negative aspects of

for the positi\e aspects."

Medved also spoke ofthe

idea of people in

Medved

Kilni critic

und

iiuthor Michael

Hollywood interprets

America's in the

reality

movies.

Med\ed"s lecture

was part of the

hat ihey did. they only

Medved

disagreed with. ised

\

iolence and

il

his lecture by

television and there

how

w

more hostile aggressi\e altitudes and behaviors m real life. " Med\ed said. The final aspect Medved spokeof was the idea that if one did not like the message they saw on the tele\ ision then simply turn it off. He did not believe in the Hollywood philosophy. "In this culture you could run but you could not hide and it was very easy to say. okay," " Med\ed said. "If you did not like it. turn it off but was not easy to do that,

discuss

Ihc issues of

Hollywood

said.

showed a direct correlation betw een prolonged exposure to telev

Med\ed ended

Medvcd

point being

Hollywood thinking they did not shape .America;

they just reflected the actions of Americans, which ".Surveys

first

audiences, they just entertained them.

"Hollywood did not want wanted

sexuality,

warning

that

.Americans spent too

were more important aspects

much time watching

in life.

Some "I

students agreed with Medved's message while others did not share his views. thought he was very interesting, " Susan Snyder said. "Even though he was broad on his

speaking approach, his viewpoints were

still

interesting.

I

also agreed with the points that he

made." Dr. Richard Frucht thought

Medved

presented a lecture that

"Michael Medved presented an interesting lecture because relationship between the

Frucht said.

media and violence or other

"What he presented were

it

made

students think.

addressed a timely issue ofthe

attitudes in

Ameincan society today,"

ideas and opinions that the audience could discuss and

Culture of consider." Quality Program.

Photo by Jack Vaught.

A

famous movie

critic

with a controversial message,

on how Hollywood affected

Medved

took the stage with a lecture

lives.

By Ruby Oittmer

Entertainment 107


Cast

member Kurt Dossche, from Belgium, helps himself Larry and Joan Apple, a host family for Up

to lasagna.

With People, invited

1 1

members for a home-cooked meal Tony Miceli.

the night before the performance. Photo by

The cast of Up With People consists of 1 10 members from 22 countries. J. Blankton Belk, who started Up With People

in 1965,

positive images.

wanted young people to use music with Photo by Jack Vaughl.

108 Up With People


UP WITH

Musical extravaganza

EOPLE

P

from other countries

cultures With a

brings

burst

iif

energy the cast of

peil'ormance of "World

in

Up With

F'eople

exploded diHd the stage u

ilh their

debut

Motion."

The cast originated from 22 different countries and were approximately 00 persons strong. They were betw een the ages of 7 and 26 and had applied after they attended a previous show. Applications were available after the performance at Northwest as well. The performance was presented as a live satellite broadcast w ith the \iev\ ers playing the side 1

1

of a

li\

e studio audience.

Members had only

five

weeks to prepare themselves for every aspect of their year-long

"We all changed roles, so we had to learn all to the

music and dance routines." Marianna Landros

long hours often from six

in the

morning

'til

tour.

aspects of the tour from the selling of souvenirs, said. "It

was very

difficult,

we worked

nine at night."

Cast members also had luggage requirements.

a

"We could take only one bag with us during the tour." Landros said. "It could weigh up to maximum of 40 pounds." Up With People presented educational messages through song and dance. Themes such as

staying in school and the foundation of the family were presented. Protecting the earth, helping the refugees in the Balkan States, helping the homeless and

AIDs were themes also introduced into the performance. The audience got into the act when cast members brt)ught some of the crowd on stage to learn a dance routine. One audience member who appeared on stage was Kristin Schmaljohn. "The show was incredible, it was really good." Schmaljohn said. "I just liked seeing the

V

different outfits (from other countries)

Without host families.

Up With

and what they wore."

People would not have been possible.

Mark and (ieneral goals of

Up With

People

are to promote cultural aware-

ness

and

three cast ""It

really

Pat Kinman, Northwest alumni and members.

spark

community action. Their

performance

at

Northwest began the one-year

"World Motion"

in

tour.

what we had here." and the United "It

Vaught.

learned about

ditf ereiit

cultures by traveling through Europe

States.

was wonderful,

the kids liked

watching the people they knew up there." Pat

During one number, the performers went into the audience and brought

said.

their host families'

children up on stage.

"The highlight of the show was when the cast brought the kids from Maryville up on the whole theme about the keepers of the universe and protecting the earth," Angela Moss said. stage and did the

With

a burst of energy that lasted throughout the

brought culture and

Photo by Jack

and Caitlin. hosted

was wondertul to have been a host fanuly." Pat said. "The kids learned a lot. we had a good time. They shared w ith us what they knew and their experiences and learned about

Members of Up With People to

their children, Christopher

"World

In

made

show, the cast members of

a lasting impression upon the audience of

all

Up With People

ages w

ith their

tour

Motion."

By Ruby Dittmer

Entertainment 109


Brian Noonan performs a skit on the high cost of souvenirs. This was the 10th year "Forbidden Broadway" had been entertaining crowds. Photo by Jack Vaught. is better, the movie or the musical production of "West Side Story." "Forbidden Broadway" performed for a sell-out crowd. Photo by Jack Vaught.

Chita and Rita argue which


\

.-'

5

'I

FORBIDDEN comic

Providing

production

relief,

BROADWAY musicals

satirize

The cliche "practice makes perfect" fit u ell 11"

of

fur

"The Best

(if

Fcirhicklen Rroadv> a\

:

Vcilunie

when it appeared at Northwest. procure a humorous viewpoint of all \ iable aspects

lUth year of ()l'f-Bri)ad\va\ production

Its

111

"Forbidden Broadway" found a \\ a\ to Broadway production from the actor himself

a

to the decisions

of the songwriter.

more contemporary plays like members of "Forbidden Broadway" borrowed the tunes from famous

The cast poked fun

"Annie." The cast

at the classics

from "Cameloi"

to the

musicals and mockeil the characters and reproductions of the performances.

member

Cast

Noonan had played Gus and Cirowltiger m the Broadway priiduction anti was the youngest artist ever to create the

Brian

"Cats" before joinins: "Forbidden Broadway" role in the "Cats" production. In

the intoxicated actor playing

problem and how "1

wonder w hat

"Forbidden Broadway," he acted out his impersonation of

King Arthur

m "Camelot" with a song about the actor's drinking

affected performances.

it

the king

drinking tonight."

is

Noonan

sang.

"Oh wonder how I

the king

is

doing tonight."

"Forbidden Broadway" also took the opportunity to play off the humor of the Broadway in the irony the actors were animals instead of humans.

show "Cats"

Because several of the parodies made during the production of "Forbidden Broadway" having a knowledge of the history of

dealt with the finer details of theater performances,

Broadwas musicals helped audience members understand the "1 thought it was very funny, even though had not seen all 1

get a

lot

Amy

out of

it."

Ann Shea

(iuenthner believed

I

Cast

Shana Mahoney and Jof

I*ai)arella

explain the theme of "Forbidden

Broadway." The performance took popular Broad-

way musicals and added comedy

and

satire to

them. Photo by

Jack Vaught.

could relate

lo

the ones they did

and did not

said. it

was

easier to find the performance

knew about the majority of the musicals "It was really funny." Guenthner said. songs

satires.

the actors "I

knew

humourous because she

were mocking.

a lot

of the musicals and

when

they did the

them."

member .Shana Mahoney, who had previous roles in "Camelot" and in "The Phantom came out onto the stage dressed as "Evita" singing a tune about Barbara

of the Opera."

.Streisand being picked for the television reproduction of the a

remake of

the tune "Don't

Cry

for

me

Broadway show. She performed

Argentina." showing her disdain for the casting

decision.

"Don't cry for

me

Barbara Streisand." Mahoney sang. "The truth

is

1

Mike Howland found this to be his favorite pail of the show. "1 loved Broadway musicals, the parodies were perfect." Howland Streisand bit was hilarious." The

ne\er liked you."

said.

"The Barbara

cost of souvenirs did not escape the wrath of laughter the cast caused.

$60 to come see the show," Joe Paperella sang. "It cost 60 more to leave." "Forbidden Broadway" mocked the great white way of theater districts and made a

"Although

it

cost

production the audience loved.

By Sara Meyers

Entertainment 111


Michelle Neuerburg and Kip Mathews, members of Northwest Celebration, perform for guests at the annual Yultide Feaste. The Feaste had been a holiday production of Celebration for 20 years. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Northwest Celebration members contribute to the production of "West Side Story," with 25 to 50 percent of the

group participating tion.

in the play.

Along with the produc-

Celebration held a tour and their annual Yuletide

Feaste.

Photo by Jack Vaught.

Members

of Northwest Celebration sing "Go Now My Love" during the tradional Yuletide Feaste. The dinner and entertainment were made possible by the First

efforts of several

groups on campus. Photo bv Laura

Riedel.

112 Northwest Celebration


NORTHWEST Celebrating with

/

>

and

love story

a

CELEBRATION Christmas merriment Norlhwest Celebration, a group of singers with a classy

style, entertained its

way

through a successful year.

With

the

sound of trumpets and

Yuietide 1-easte

\\

as

a toast w'nh Wassail, a hot apple-cider, the 2()th annual

underw ay. The Feaste was a holiday event sponsored by Celebration,

a choir in which students auditioned to be a part of. ""It was a big honor to be chosen out of 100 \o 200 people who auditioned, that made up a group of 26." Kip Mathew said. ""It was a big honor, it opened up a lot of doors tor

me."

Members performed two

concerts and went on a nationwide lour and

.lanuary they

in

Mo. Members ol Celebration ""West Side Story." was a musical love story of also participated in "'West Side Story Tony and Maria and the moralistic tale of rival gangs whodisco\ ered fighting w as wrong. performed

at

the

Music Educators con\ention

in

Tantara,

.'"

^J

â&#x20AC;˘ill

""Se\eral

Mathew Story'

members of Celebration participated in the production of "West Side Story"," and Mark Petit had lead roles in the musical. 'West Side

said. ""Francie Miller

was

the first true University performance, in the sense that

areas of Norlhw est.

and

it

The

theater department and music department

it

combined

w orked on

it

different

together

also included the public relations department for publicity."

However,

their biggest event

was

the Feaste.

"Normally we practiced three hours a week." Mathew said. ""During preparations for the Feaste we put anywhere from two to three nights a week, spending several hours at a time."

Guests were led into the J.W. Jones Student Llnion Ball the Renaissance Era and gathered around a table, with a

walked

in

and began

to sing. Later, dinner

Room

by Lords and Ladies of

bowl of Wassail as the Madraliers

was served and guests were entertained by

several small groups singing Christmas carols. After dinner, the

Wench, played by Carol "You've Lost that

Patton. and the Hag, played by Jennifer Brandt, spontaneously sang

Loving Feeling"

them

in the

to

an unsuspecting male

in the

audience.

The

rest

of the audience joined

serenade.

Dr. Richard

Weymuth. choirmaster of the Feaste, said teamwork was the key to putting

together such an event. a pleasure to

work

team work," Weymuth

said.

"It

was

Some members Mannasmith was

for a University, things like this could not ""It

was

a total University production

happen without

working together."

of the audience were overwhelmed by the Feaste. Vanessa

in tears after the

performance.

was beautiful," Mannasmith said. "The music had not It was really wonderful. was great. It reminded me a lot how missed it." realized much had been to the Feaste for a couple of years and "I really

enjoyed the Yuietide Feaste,

it

of past Christmases. I

I

I

Productions like ""West Side Story" and the "Yuietide Feaste" were just a few of the

^

many performances

Celebration broueht to the campus.

_ _ _. By Ruby Dittmer .

Entertainment 113


114 Academics Division


As the year began, Academics seemed anything but routine

when

Dr. Robert

Culbertson, vice president of Academic Affairs resigned

from

office

VanDyke took over as There was about as

still

we

and Dr. Patt

interim.

SOMETHING

waited for the

to talk

final

news

about whether or not President Dean

Hubbard would move to Arizona and start

somewhere ELSE

.

Students worried about paying for school were happy with adjustments

made new

TO

the financial aid

installment plan

as a

was implemented.

Random students were

LEARN

office,

selected to

through a new freshman

pilot

program that clustered classes IN general

education requirements proving

there were always

new

ideas through

ADEMICS 4* John Bankson works on a graphics project in the new Garrett Strong chemistry lab. The lab, which opened in the fall, gave students access to updated personal computing resources. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Academics 115


ADVISERS

PI A

IMPORTANT

ROLES By Tami Dodson Whether around

it

was choosing

tallying or setting a

a class, sitting

time to get together

for sporting activities after classes, students

other than in class to talk or we met to play soccer or racquetball."

Some advisers treated their advisees as equals,

and

as well as students.

advisers played important roles throughout col-

Oludaja thought

lege years.

Advisers were there for students

if

assistance

was needed. They helped decide what classes should be taken when and sometimes which professors to take. Some students went to see their advisers at least

saw them when

it

once a week, others only

was time

to register for the

know

Dana Auriemma thought she and her adviser. Dr. Chris Schneider, had a good relationship. When it was time for registering for classes or if Auriemma had a problem, she knew Schneider would be there for her. "I did not go to see her very often." Auriemma said. "But when we saw each other we got along Having more than one ad-

some of

viser tacts

mid-semester was also to switch ad-

adviser

was

to

adviser."

to

be the link between students and

"While the students were

in

school they could

meet these requirements and not have to go to the administration

was more

and complain about not

graduating because the

than putting a

re-

Oludaja spoke of his

their advisers

Both saw

signature on a

"It

piece of paper,

was also

know

it

getting tiH

stu-

people

as well," Bayo

a

week

116 Students and Advisers

I

was

helpful for both he

that

we were

so close,"

Oludaja said.

Stephenson receives advice

Oludaja said. "The adviser role

about classes

was more than

from

ture

putting a signa-

on a piece of paper,

know

it

was

the stu-

dents as people as well."

role the adviser played direct affect

on the

their advisees.

his adviser,

Bayo Oludaja. Stephenson and

Oludaja also

Whether students and their advisers saw each other on a daily or a semester basis, the

had Bayo Oludaja as both

him about once

and

also getting to

dents

Mike

well.

their ad-

an adviser and teacher," Stephenson said. "Plus. I went

rela-

tionship with Stephenson as

to

visers about every other day.

to .see

their advisee's."

semester and year to year," Oludaja said.

Michael Stephenson and

'I

"These con-

"An adviser needed to make sure the student knew what was required of them from semester

I

for teachers.

in

the ad-

the administration.

I

was in." Jennifer Mott said. "I was being bounced between two advisers and went to see someone who was not my main adviser whenever had to see

Auriemma had

said.

if

quirements were not met."

visers a lot in the department

my

problems

Oludaja thought one of the main duties of an

hard for students.

"They seemed

life's

was needed," Oludaja

"The adviser role

academic

life.

helped to promote good relationships be-

or having to switch advis-

ers in

for a student to

"Advisers should be there to help students dealing with

pretty good."

vi.ser

was good

and other aspects of a student's

tween advisers and

next semester.

it

their adviser cared about both

had a

lives of

spent time together outside the classroom.

Photo by Chris Tucker.


Corben Baik-r converses with

his adviser,

attending the

W in^ru'ld and Davis concert.

man seminar

class to

liis

home

Fred I.amer, before

I.amer in>ited his fresh-

for horsd'oeuvre before

tlie

perfor-

mance. Photo bv Tonv Miceli.

Fred Lanier's freshman seminar class socialize at his home. Getting know students outside the classroom was important to many advisers. Photo by Tony Miceli. to

Academics 117


Former Vice President of Academic

Affairs, Dr.

Robert Culbertson, gives his last goodbyes to Katheryn Murphy after his resignation in June. Culbertson took the position of chancellor at the University of Wisconsin-Platteville. Photo by

Tony

Miceli.

118 Culbertson

& VanDyke


TO VICE PRESIDENT

CHANGES By Karissa Boney As students bcsjan the year, it seemed like the same old routine, but aeadeniies had taken on another outlook with personnel ehanges

come

Platte\

ille.

at

Academic

1

9').'^

Allairs to be-

the LIni\ ersity of Wisconsin-

He was proud

have been a part of

to

the growth Northwest had faced. "The faculty felt ownership in this University

more now

than

institution,"

any lime

at

in the

history of the

"1

thought stu-

Culbertson said.

dents felt more ownership in Northw est than at any time in its history. The faculty and students brought this about and w as proud to ha\ e been I

that held the

the doorkeeper

door open for

problems. to take ideas

to

examine

and impro\emein. a strong

specting the student as a cus-

tomer and the notion of under-

Atlairs.

graduate research.

to treating

and

While Culbertson gave wells. Dr. Patt

filing

preparing for a

and improNe data flow Photo by

for

I.aura Riedel.

.

making

their

month

"We were

own

that she

Academic

staff

were

changing some things, we were keeping and trying to

file

improve data How... and imiMinmg flow of work

VanDyke was in

IM')4

ownership

also busy preparing for a re-

from the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Hducation ami working on the

"The faculty

new

freshman general education

in

pilot

program.

VanDyke

re-

ceived satisfaction from seeing

more now than at any in

the

program underway.

see faculty

institution,

Dr. Robert

Culbertson said

come

to-

gether and be so excited, that top experience,

had been

a

nothing

the last eight or 10

in

years had compared to working with that pilot."

fare-

Affairs.

was assured and

adjusimenis.

trying to upgrade

history oi

fice as interim vice president

faced challenges. .She

employee. VanDyke and her new

re-

VanDyke was move into of-

and

faced a brand new oftice with only one veteran

"To

Acaemic

tiles

the original one

the pilot

president of

Rom

VanDyke still

Uni\ersity of Wisconsin.

notion of continuance of qual-

one who

as only gi\'en a two-day orientation instead ot

we)uld specifically take the

ity

CI)

w

He

commitment

system to cut down paper

procedures.

the

interim \ice

anDyke

to

the

this interim position I

at

duties as

implemented a

it

was maybe

1

manage things well since knew the work that was going on here," VanDyke said. Although she was familiar with some office

were challenges

from Northwest

\

felt that

view

Culbertson hoped

an Dyke takes ON IT academic

was just

for approval." she said.

mini strati ve

\

"It

Aschancelior.Culbertson's duties were similar to those of the president at Northwest. He

ahead, including existing ad-

I'att

elopment Center had also acted

happen."

realized there

Dr.

)e\

could step forward mio

Dr. Robeil ("ulbertson resigned in June

chancellor

1

as assistant vice president ot .Academic .Atlairs.

in the

Administration Building.

as vice president for

ol the ralenl

VanDyke

said.

While VanDyke served as committee was looking for a permanent interim, a search

replacement by April

VanDyke was

1994.

considering ap-

a

plying for the position but was

professor of English and more

not sure what the future held

recently founder and director

for her..

VanDyke who had been

Academics 119


120 Installment


NEW

T

Installment

IMPLEMENTED By Tami Dodson Northwest changed installment plans From three

payments

allow students to pay their

to

tuition in smaller,

more convenient increments.

Jeanette Whited, treasurer, explained

why

they implemented the revised installment plan.

"We

^:'^^

thought having four installments would with family budgeting." Whited said.

extra time to pay. or they thought there were

who signed up for the was automatically put into the plan. The only exceptions were students who had made special arrangements and needed As

in

years past, anyone

installment plan

charges of two-thirds percent interest per month

more time to pay their bills. Whited was excited about how much easier this plan was for students and their families to pay their tuition bills on time and was happy the

were charged for not paying the balance

plan would be the one used from

fit

in better

The

nevK plan

tuition

allowed forstudents

pay their

to

fourths instead of thirds. Finance

in

Students were always encouraged

Any

to

in full.

pay off

who

their bills as

soon as possible.

paid in

did not have the finance charge

full

attached to their

bill.

student

Jane Smith of the cashiering department to

Whited

said.

"Unless there was a need to change,

we planned to continue to use it for the students." Even though James Aldrich had problems sity

should continue to use

supposed

to

made

"This plan

it

budget their money and helped

who

got paid monthly to

'It

same

was

process

before

said. "Financial aid

applied to the students" out to the

with the remaining bal-

paid the

OfTice for his

l.'Sth

of each month."

Students seemed to respond

new

fourth install-

favorably to the

ment. The new

cording to Whited.

installment plan

made

easier

Whited

%|^^

pay their I'niversity

was

same process as before and there was more work for us, but the advantages

hill.

Photo hy Laura Riedel.

more work

was

outweighed the

efforts put into the

for us,

ther said

it

was

great to

have

make plan.

the plan

allowed for more

it

to collect

money

to

pay

how

it

paying

my

to

be

made when

bill."

caused more paperwork lor the

advantages

administration. Smith said the

new

plan

was more convenient

to students

"If

into

efforts

also allowed for smaller

Although the new plan

but the

it

and

their families.

was mt)re convenient

for students

and

their families,

then they should use

work

it."

Smith

said.

Jeanette

Whited

work done."

Smith said nn)st students ei-

time

payments

ouiwcignicu the

the for students to

ind there

plan ac-

said. "It

new

the bill," Aldrich said. "I liked

"There had been no complaints,"

it

bill

ance divided into fourths to be

Cashiering

i^._

was

the

"They should keep because

i'-

be able to pay their bills,"

first,

Aldrich was not

payments using

easier for

students and their families to

makes a check

it.

be on the plan, but problems with

applying for financial aid forced him to

use.

Smith

on.

with the installment plan, he thought the Univer-

to pay.

spoke of how the plan was easier for students

those

now

"Definitely the plan would be used next year,"

The only differences were

having one more installment

James Aldrich

still

three installments.

The

extra chance given to

students to pay their tuition

said.

made the new installment plan work for everyone.

Academics 121


GAINING

HANDS-ON

EXPERIENCE By Sherri McCorkindale Their palms became sweaty, butterflies danced in their stomachs and thoughts of screaming kids

minds. What was this was student teaching.

filled their

nervous condition?

It

For many education majors the idea of student teaching was frightening. What if they could not solve every problem'.' What if they did something

wrong and

parents'?

the kid threatened to

Thoughts

students about to

like these

were

tell

"One of the major differences was the teachers

to

"If

own

tary

needed some science supplies for my would check them out at I

when

I was through," Pryor said. While Horace Mann students had more privileges than regular schools, Pryor found the chil-

student teaching to be helpful,

class.

Kim Janky completed

St.

Joseph

at

dren to be well-disciplined.

her

"There were no major problems with dfsci-

Skaith Elemen-

School and found experiences

Brown

in

pline at

Brown

the elementary school located in

"Teaching

me

at

Brown

"Teaching at

made me feel room," Janky

helpcu

me

pre-

like a real teacher

my own

control of

class-

interaction with kids during her

student teaching in

pare for student

St.

teaching, but

teaching

in St.

concentrate on the quality of

Joe

made me

feel

evaluated on set dates.

was more nervous Brown Hall, because my structors could

check on

Although

like

real

teacher in control of

my own

class-

it

room,"

Kim

helps students at

Skaith in-

me

Hall to other schools.

122 Student Teaching

Janky said.

Elementry School. Janky

was something

said that

times, student teach-

student teaching

ing was an experience that no

in public schools

at

education major would forget.

outside

Despite the differences from teaching in Horace

Mann and

dent teachers

still

gained the

knowledge necessary

teaching from

Kim Janky

in

teaching in other schools, stu-

Kristin Pryor discovered dif-

Brown

practicum, while student teachers in other schools were

feared

teaching."

in

anytime during their

anytime," Janky said.

Joseph.

"There was more busy work and demands to follow during my practicum at Brown," Janky said. "At the St. Joe school, there was more time to

ferences

Horace Mann, students were evaluated by their instructors

"1

said.

Janky found she had more

my

Hall

prepare for student

teaching, but teaching in St. Joe

in

Brown

Hall

be

Another difference was the evaluation by teachers in their schools. At

ing.

helped

to

ner-city," Pryor said.

Hall, provided students the opportunity to teach

classes before student teach-

Horace Mann, but I suspected there

discipline problems in larger schools in the in-

Hall enhanced her teaching abilities. Horace

Mann,

*

Northwest" s science department and return them

embark on their first adventure

student teaching in

I

to materials

practicum,

for

despite the fears they experienced before taking

over their

Horace Mann kids got

go on."

Horace Mann also had access from different departments.

in student teaching.

Many found

the field trips that the

all

their

common

Ui

had a larger budget to work with," Pryor said. "Most schools never had enough money to go on

real world.

for the

Hall feel

Brown

made her more

like a

real teacher.

Photo by Tony Miceli.

â&#x20AC;˘


Gower High School improve their budniinton skills. Student teaching was one of the final requirements for education majors. Photo by Tony Miceli.

Scott Kerns shows students at

how

to

^â&#x20AC;˘^ ^

Academics 123


124 Free Services


Money

DUWJM

,v By Kim Todd

Man_\ people assuMied college was simply a place to study and pany w

classmates.

was more than

ever. Northwest tures

itli

B.D.

How-

of 1992,

and exams.

library,

services the University

amount of free

quickly became utilized.

approximately 166 students applied for

made

"Students have really responded to

One such service, w hich was designed to help

"In fact, anyone

The

lopic.

conference

time to talk

had one student say "You saved my academic career" with the term paper research ser-

The pressures of campus

life

they turned to the services of-

"It

"I

vice,""

was

know

Timko

nice to

that the

so

many

ter.

"Trying

to

maintain good

life,

was

often

more demand-

down

job," Jim Nelson said.

Career Day was

many know,

students

it

that if the

great, they too ^ students as a free /^ f

someone

ment Services

"

one who

"For

was good to stress became

would have

to talk to

and some-

could advise them."

Owens Paper other free

Sara Uphoff said

a 9 to 5

Career Day.

Career Place-

services free

grades, while juggling a social

representative at ing than holding

The program

Photo by Sheila

offered students.

Yoder.

was provided by the

staff at

it

was

labor intensive, but the payback was worth it." Sara Uphoff believed the

made available to students made life easier in a place that was a home away from home. "It

you know

was nice to know,

University services let

"It let

free.'"

Uphoff

you know they

many

said. "It

really cared

It

made it a much more

friendly place to be."

about the students and their welfare

that the

provided so

about the students and their welfare.

they really

Plus was an-

service Northwest

said. ""For the librarians,

free services the University

University

fered by the Counseling Cen-

from

up a

set

over the subject. Stu-

time.

said. "In addition,

often surprised students and

service

and student then

librarian

ment."

.

this free service."

we helped skills. Plus, we

Gaa

might offer future employ-

to all

said.

above class

dents found this service saved them valuable

tried to introduce the students to businesses that

.

level or

application then a librarian researched then-

at the center.

with resume's and interviewing

open

type of

"At Career Services, we provided a variety of information on graduate programs throughout the country,"

company

this

Timko

Timko said the process to gain assistance with research was simple. A student filled out an

Jeannine Gaa, director of Career Services, believed students could not help but be impressed by both the literature and guidance they

Phyllis Scott, a

200

taking a

could take advantage of

was Career Place-

ment Services.

consults with

of I99.V

service that the library provided,"

.students locate future jobs,

Be\erly Stoll

Georgene Tiniko, director of the

to

this service in the fall

a\ ailable to them.

could find

it

According

a place of lec-

Students were often surprised and pleased by the

Owens Library and beginning in the spring

"

The University was primarily a

place of higher learning,

and with the numerous free services offered, dealing with stress

and term papers became

easier for those

vantage of the

who

took ad-

.services.

Academics 125


126 Alumni Professors


WELCOME

BACK

ALUMNI By Shelley Stangle At

tirst

glance, the raniiliarcaiiipus looked the

since the> went to school at Northwest.

same, the only difference was ihey were not

They had

"The students were more consersative than

teaching in the same institution where they had studied.

and the faculty focused on teaching."

graduated, received teaching degrees and. for

some,

Dr.

They found themsehes

doctorate.

a

they were '"There

Ed Farquhar. professor of chemistry and

was

There were

everyone

"I

recalled the procrastination,"

Coming back to his alma mater was a decision he made because of the area. '"I came back largely because 1 had had so many good experi"It

stood the extracurricular activities students had

this part

of the country

Having attended for

Northwest

alumni news

work.

Northwest,

Photo hv Russ

Wevdert.

.

professors found

easier to

"It

was

effort into their

14 years after

graduated that

I

f^van said.

I

Richard Flanagan said. ""I put more into my teaching and worked harder because it was my alma a

still

"They were

Some professors noticed that student activities had changed

advan-

when

it

it.

to

understand

the student. They were

still

the

same kind of people and came Ryan areas. how school knew the said. "I and groups worked and underfrom the same

when

""

students wrote

about such things. However,

wondered if sometimes would have benefitted from having taught at another I

school."

the

kind of people

Although the first few years were sometimes unusual for the professors,

lot."

mater."

its

I

started teach-

ing here and things had

changed

"

had

because they under-

was easier

stood

it

easier to display pride and

more

to teach

""It

student,

Having once attended

them

the University

access to and had to deal with

understand the

said.

put forth

1986 from

the last

at

was lime

through an

master's in

done

tried to get stuff

minnte."

college."

was

1984 and her

said.

tages and disadvantages for professors

glances

bachelor's in

Ryan

"Especially around the end of the semester,

Then I went to grad school and the closer came to my Ph.D the more thought about teaching in

was home to me." Farquhar

received her

professors were

from Northwest," Farquhar said. ""Initially, I was going to teach mathematics in high schtxil.

because

Ryan

when

something they had also done.

ences as an undergraduate and

letter.

times

coming back to teach was the farthest thing from his mind until he attended graduate school. ""1 graduated had a variety of plans when

1

Brenda Ryan

many

reminded of their college days when students did

I

Knglish teacher

I

also

physics, graduated from Northwest in 1958 and

1

V =3

when

attended." Brenda Ryan said. more emphasis on job preparation. There was more focus on the indi\idual. The school w as still as friendly, student-oriented

students anymore, but professors.

and came from the

same

areas."

to

it

was

also nice

be familiar with the campus

and

their surroundings. They

were able

to relate easier with

their students

and were more

dedicated than they might have

been otherwise.

Academics 127


PRODUCING A

NEW IMAGE By Cody Walker we

Northwest stepped into the bright hghts and part of

new image campaign

its

to recruit stu-

The radio was

dents.

Dave Gieseke, tion, said.

director of

news and informa-

had done for years.

and Jefferson City, Mo. "The radio spots were basically on a lot of rock and young country stations, in which the age group of listeners were between 14-years-old

coln, Neb.,

We tried to develop an image

for Northwest." final years

of high school, the mailbox was bombarded with

many

as

2U0 mailings from various

and 20-years-old,'" Gieseke Advertisements

universi-

"We wanted

Northwest

to be a

name

that

was

to the recruitment of students

recognized." Michael Walsh, director of enroll-

ment management,

said.

"We

wanted people

"We

to

tried to

tive

high school

1

993, began airing in

"Wc wanted

Gieseke

in the ad,""

said. "It hit

e

tivities

component

first

in-

about

in three

ma-

jor recruiting areas; St. Joseph,

Mo.. Kansas City. Mo., and

Omaha, Neb.

.

-

us, that

,

wc

located

in the state

and

wc

treated

only seniors also juniors,

in

included not

high .school, but

sophomores and

freshmen. The second market

was directed toward friends, relatives nity people.

We

parents,

people personally

and not as numbers,"

wanted

to fo-

128 Image Campaign

fact that

our

Michael Walsh

Videos focused on the elec-

campus and various

tivities the

ac-

University offered.

aspects were covered during the

image campaign.

for

the Northwest advertising project tape an

interview in

"We raised interest in Northwest and gave a personal

Walsh

said.

wanted the students

to

portant thing; honest.""

J.W. Jones Student Union.

The campaign included television

and

radio spots, ads

"We

show up

and get enrolled. The most im-

said.

The crew

tants.""

touch,""

and commu-

cus mainly on the students and

and the

Walsh believed important

"There were two markets

first

re-

featured the

classes were taught by regular

tronic

that

which we targeted," Gieseke

we

faculty and not graduate assis-

volved the usage of television

commercials aired

the ads

electronic campus, student ac-

to k

components.

"The

high school students could late. In

994 and focused on four basic

The

who

the prospec-

a specific audience, and the

The campaign, which was in

inter-

have a Northwest student

was a freshman or sophomore from

numbers."

formed

and raising

est.

know about us, that we were located in state and that we treated people personally and not as

said.

said.

high school newspapers

in

and some junior colleges also proved beneficial

ties.

1

same areas as in Des

Moines, Iowa, and future plans included Lin-

We did what businesses

Often when a student reached the

component, as the

in the

were also aired

the commercials, but

"Many were doing a lot of activities to

get students interested.

the second

advertisements were aired

"Universities fought harder for students,"

as

placed the commercials next to mainly teen-

age television programs such as 'Martin" and 'Beverly Hills 90210"."

action of prime time television during 1993 as

we remained

in

high school

newspapers and informative videos.

Photo

by Jack Vaught.


The canipuign Jones Studenl

iri'ÂŤ tapes a I

nion.

1

commercial

in the .].\\.

he creÂŤ also lllnied at the

Administration Building. I'hoto h> .lack \ aught.

Mark cial

Person interviews Leslie Hagan. The commerin the fall. Photo by Jack Vaught.

was filmed

Academics 129


130 Procrastination


JUST

A

By Laura Riedel Every student had experienced voices that never tjLiit, less activity

ha\e written

nagging

it:

These were not symptoms throughout the semester.

It

many

was

but

it

usually did

classes, supported

their grades.

did not have time to do

case." Litte said.

by

the project correctly. tried to

example

was

them

Two

"We

all

both did because there were too

just easier to

room and

sit in

my

Meyer

talk."

in

different than

it

was

high school. Meyer said

Rosemary

MeytT puts studying

<i

off

little

that a test

was

coming up like they did in high school, which made it easier to These three had different

on the phone.

ways of procrastinating. Meyer admitted to talking on the

said the

residence halls

provided

many

phone when she should have been studying while her roommate, Taggart tended to paint

distractions

which made procrastination easy.

Photo by

Laura

Riedel.

as not

always the

on

"Sometimes an ungraded batch of papers lingered on your mind and caused you to wake-up unduly in the rather morning and grade them,"

the kitchen

Litte said.

Litte admitted that

floor than grade

those papers and usually ended up

last

the

thing he wanted to even

think about.

"Sometimes,

got sick of

I

grading papers," Litte said.

would

wandering

some-

was

times, grading papers

rather

wash

"I

the kitchen

floor than grade those papers

through the

house

and usually ended up wandering through the house looking

for

something to

for something to distract me."

Students had a

lot to learn in

how

her fingernails. Finnegan said she did a variety of things to

with procrastination

distract me," Dr.

of the

avoid studying. She cleaned people she would normally not

do

to

were also prone to this affliction. sometimes put off grading papers but he

college. Learning

her room, wrote letters to

their pa-

them

step-by-step process.

put things off.

longer and talks

Meyer

wash

in a

in

college the instructors did not

remind them

would

"i

v\

never forgot about them.

was

friends'

All three said the atmosphere

was much

many

said. "It

off. but that

Instructors Litte

the time.

things to do in the dorms,"

it

Procrastination did not only strike students.

of her

friends, Jane Taggart and Rosemary Meyer, said

they procrastinated

upper level English

Meyer's claim.

pers through stages which forced

a prime

of a procrastinator.

Finegan was not alone, however.

taught English composias

Litte said he started his students

avoid studying

visiting her friends, said she

because she

tell

"Sometimes students worked well underpressure and pulled

who

who

Dr. Bruce Litte,

Sometimes, a student would put off a project for so long that when they finally .started on it, they Celest Finegan,

to being a procrastinator. but

tion classes as well

This disease did not affect students physically,

isited friends.

wiirked better under stress.

students

procrastination.

affect

\

said her instructors could not

of a mental disorder

but something that struck

and

Meyer admitted

to quiet worry.

and insomnia due

to

Procrasination affected students differently.

preoccupation with mind-

Litte said.

many

to

cope

was one

important les.sons

they tackled, but found waiting easier in the long run.

Academics 131


Jim Sharp, groundsman, is greeted in the morning by a long trail of toilet paper. Grounds workers were up cleaning at 7 a.m. while many students were still sleeping. Photo by Chris Tucker.

A Kawasaki Mule is used to haul around plastic, aluminum cans and bottles that are picked up in the morning. Since Northwest's recycling

program took

effect,

grounds workers used these hicles to haul als.

ve-

reusable materi-

Photo by Chris Tucker.

At Phillips Hall, Rocky Kowitz and Jim Sharp collect assorted trash. According

to

improvements made to Phillips, the hall was known as the messiest of the high rises, an honor now held by Dieterich Hall. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Kow

it/,

and Sharp, prior

to

132 Money Spent on Grounds


PLANNED

ENHANCES

GROUNDS By Tami Dodson Purchasing t'lo\<.ers, mi)\A,ini: the lawns. upkeeping machinery and doling out salaries for the

F-ji\

ironniental Ser\ ice

men

all

came

\

ia

Hubbard, the Board of Regents and myself

the

b\ the

wasdecidedthrough months of planning, paper-

budget. The budget was decided

work and figures. Warren Gose. \ice president

because the\ had to have

ser\ ices

The money listed

for

grounds

in the

tally

m

the

budget was

under the heading Operation and Mainte-

nance of Plant.

It

was then broken down

into

categories: general physical and fuel and ties.

$

1

whereas

fuel

and

utilities

The total amount budget was $3,820,046. The

contained

They had one tors

spent

employees was figured into the Operation and

money

in its

About cent came from the state.

the In the

Mary

Linn parkin}> lot.

Jim Sharp

70 per-

the state

believed

it

was

The money came from federal

student fees.

grants.

rest

People also donated

money way the campus looked and

job of ktepin;;

wanted

the grounds in

rounds through

knew i'ood to

to iTinkc

good

comply with

the wishes of the

several areas of

•^•^

visitors, nui

"A budgeting

process was

morning. Photo gone through with people makb> Chris ing their wants and wishes Tucker.

know n," Gose

said. "President

way

the flowers

hated to see so much money used on flowers that

"But

1

could have gone towards acafor pur-

chase of new materials."

on I

uici

to be so

elaborate," Kristin Hill said.

thought the grounds

Hill

looked good, but they were also a bit overdone. "1

not think they

University.

campus each

wisely. Kristin Hill

demic departments

to help out.

would go meant developing a budgeting process that would

money

unecessary.

because they liked the

Deciding where money

use.

Building looked." Hill said.

grounds needed

of the

continui's his

order. Sharp

i

good

in fiont of the Administration

with

remaining coming from

and

make sure the

put to

"1 liked the

budget from 6.S to

isely

signed to help spend

Maintenance of Plant budget. the

v\

to

Even though the budgeting process was de-

cost of repair-

Northwest received a bulk of

their best.

director and three associate direc-

working together with Gose

money was

charge of

in

were looking

the groimds

making sure

utili-

ing and purchasing machinery and salaries for

V'

u.se.

Environmental Services was

for this section of

,4.^4,().'S6.

the

be allotted for

two

General physical was comprised of

$2..'^8.'i.990.

in late .kuie,

a final or close to final

of students w ho would be attending during upcoming school year. When the amount of students attending was determined, the Board of Regents could decide how much money was to

finance.

tor

setting the budget used to maintain grounds.

o

Board of Regents."

Three percent was trimmed from the 1993

budget North\\esl used torgrounds. This budget

worked closely with en\ ironmenlal

dis-

cussed the budget. All finali/ations were done

knew the grounds needed good to make good

to look

impressions on visitors, but

I

did not think they had to be so elaborate," Hill said.

Despite differences of opinions in spent,

how

all

the

money was

students were able to

enjoy the scenery provided by

Environmental Services.

Academics 133


^

PILOTING m-

HEAD A.

START By Michelle Ferguson A

tour-semester program was being tested to

help incoming freshmen.

The

helped freshmen get a head

start

Pilot

Program

on their college

education by relating classes. "'It

connected some of my classes together like

speech and composition." Cindy Mueller "It

helped out a

The

Pilot

Program randomly fall

enrollment

were asked and encouraged to

.selected

to

a voluntary basis, but

list.

120

Students

stay

in

the

had the option

have good

The Pilot Program coordinating committee was planning a similar program for fall 1994. Instructors liked the program because they could

know

from one another and because they got to faculty members in departments other

than their own.

was a lot of fun to visit with other faculty members from other departments," Pat Lucido, "It

chemistry instructor, said.

drop the program.

One

to

classmen," Mueller said.

learn

lot."

freshmen from the

program on

said.

"The program gave me a chance

teachers which were usually taken by the upper-

of the goals for the program was to

The

idea for the program

was

for students to

research the student's background to determine

stick together so they might be able to learn

was a factor in the success of the student. Dr. VanDyke, interim vice president of Academic Affairs, found early in the semester that

from

if it

Patt

many

students had already obtained college

from high school. The program was designed

credits

to

help students take classes

relating to one another. Incor-

porating classes such as position

1

1

1

Com-

and speech was a

key point to the proposed success of the Pilot Program. This

was done so

the instructors of

each course could focus on lated subjects to

re-

their education at

grammers thought it was a good idea, if students were in the same class they could learn more from one another. "It was a lot easier to meet people because they were in the same class,"

"The program gave me a good chance to have i>ood teachers

which were

enhance the

student's learning process.

usually taken

"The program was a good idea," Chris

Mackey

said. "I

planned to continue with the

program."

Some

students

who

partici-

pated in the program benefitted

from the program by improv-

more

Northwest. The pro-

the upper-

classmen/' Cindy Mueller said

Mackey said. The success

of the program

could not be determined after only two semesters

in practice

because the benefits were far reaching. "It

was too

program did

gram did

early to

the

not hurt anyone,"

VanDyke said. VanDyke believed gram did two a small

tell if

well, but the pro-

things.

Trevor Pyle's Pilot

group talk the pro-

about factors

created

that led to the

It

group of 120 students

Civil

know one another

Pilot

that got to

and students learned to express themselves

VanDyke

Program

discussion

better.

believed the pro-

War. The Program

originally

consisted of 120

freshmen who participated on

gram achieved a better integration between participants and

a volunteer

events and also by improving their study habits.

was an educational

Chris Tucker.

ing their knowledge of current

134 Pilot Program

benefit.

basis.

Photo b\

Âťr"


.Ii-nnifer Fitch leads a I'ildt

Pronrani discussion group

in

Coldcn

Hall.

One advantage

students evperieneed ÂŤas the eorrelation oldillerent classes. I'hoto h> Chris I'ucker. Dr. \

irgil

and Anna Noihstine. Students in the Pilot them to become more familiar with each

Alhertini advises Joseph Koeberl

i'rograni took classes together, allow ing

other. Photo b\ Chris I'ucker.


THE

COi^-T^INUING

CHALLENGE By Scott Pummell Challenge and a strong sense of focus were the

term, the enrollment reached 2,000. "I didn't

necessary elements a person must find in themselves to reach the highest levels of excellence,

know

that

Korea was any more

at-

tractive than any othercountry but I thought that ,

innovator in the field of quality, an educator in a

was one of the values of learning a foreign language," Hubbard said. "When you learned somebody else's language, you developed a special interest in them that never went away.

foreign land and as president of Northwest.

Having learned

their

ing their culture,

you just had a special

University President

Dean Hubbard

said.

Challenge had always been a driving factor

Hubbard's

life,

in

including his experiences as an

After earning his bachelor's and master's degrees from Stanford University in California,

Hubbard decided

to

challenge himself by

After five years in Korea and the growing

success of the language schools, Hubbard de-

His studies centered around the Korean lan-

"I

interest in

that part of the world."

at-

tending Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea.

guage and

language and understand-

cided to return to pursue a doctorate. "1 will

culture.

was more interested in learning the lanI was in getting a degree and 1 took

when

I left Korea and the lanwas starting to get bored," "That was the reason that left. I

admit,

guage school,

I

After graduating from

Hubbard said. remember sitting in my office and saying that the place was working, the students were coming and going, the faculty was teaching, things were

Yonsei, Hubbard again de-

going smooth but the challenge

guage than

the entire program, everything they offered,"

Hubbard

said.

cided to challenge himself by

"When you

starting an English language

school from scratch. .

The

institute

used American

college students as teachers

and was similar

wasn't connected with

the Peace Corps, but the pro-

gram was similar in that U.S. students would take a year out of their education to teach."

Hubbard said. The school taught Koreans including military and government officials, students and university professors.

When organized,

the it

800 students;

school

was

included nearly in

the

jrncd some-

body ?-

lan-

'

second

136 Dean Hubbbard

was gone.

It

was time

to

move

on." It

was

same aspect of

the

challenge that contributed to

Hubbard's longevity as

presi-

dent of Northwest.

Peace

to the

Corps, according to Hubbard. "It

I

guage, you devel-

oped a special

from

to uni-

the short terms

of presidents stems from con-

Hubbard said. president was only in

straints in time,

interest in

that never

Hubbard

The damage caused versities

When

went

:l\\'n\',"

President

Dean

Hubbard

said.

a

President

illustrates a

handmade piece of Eastern

European

The

office for a short time, they

crystal.

barely had the opportunity to

Hubbard's

and were never

"hit a stride

really settled in."

"I'd rather be in one school that really

home was

of oversea

stands out, that artifacts.

survived with significance, that

becomes

full

of his collection

a leader in the

-continued

by Russ

Weydert.

Photo

<1


Academics 137


while working in Seoul, Korea plays the trumpet with Bruce Johnston, one of Hubbard's former professors. Hubbard was in Korea during the late '60s and studied a program centered around Korean language and culture. Photo courtesy of

Young Dean Hubbard,

Dean Hubbard.

Hubbard speaks at the Quality Conference. The conference featured guest lecturer Monica Manning speaking on leadership skills. Photo by Jack Vaught. President Dean

138 Dean Hubbard


CHALLENGE and

naliiHi

iiualc

dift'erencc

a

education rather than

v\as intrigued.

university's performance, then

learn

it

could explain

much of Northwest's improvements over

I

lubbard had

completed

just

at

his

position

"I I

solely

it.

it

and

I

to

10 percent of the time

percent of the time

"He same

me one

time

said 85 percent of the time

I

I

detest

tolerate it,"

was about the job. Would do it

it

I

Since Hubbard took over as

Dean

Northwest's ninth president,

I'ri'sidi'iit

Hubbard

I

version of the

a

board

one time It

of

his residential oirice his

during

spare time.

tinuous improvement through

were the central principles

use of the space

evolved into the theories of

his

garage by

Total Quality

it

into his

personal office.

Photo by Russ

Weydert.

I

said

85 percent of the time

that

it.

I

10

Management

first

the Culture of Quality, he

advanced

time

I

tolerate

College in Lincoln, Neb.

kind

that

leading the nation

in

particular dimension,"

that

Hubbard said. Hubbard said the programs implemented along these lines had greatly improved Northwest, but the University should strive

for

improve-

horizon," Hubbard said.

never arrived.

detest

A

It's

"You

always

drawing on." dedication to constant

improvement helped provide

to practices of quality in

management by his wife when he was the president of Union

time

its

the system.

"Quality was a receding it

5 percent of ^:.^

was the most

"There was no question

we were

there,

intro-

it

institution of

ment.

Award.

Hubbard was duced

TQM,

always

percent of the

and the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality

renovating

and

lied

Hubbard made

above

me how I

constant self-evaluation.

The philosophies he had reupon and helped develop

came

was what we should

in relation to

he dedicated himself and the

I

Since Hubbard had implemented Northwest's

.5

said.

had

focused

brought experience and

be doing," Hubbard said.

University to a system of con-

makes use

1

a strong conviction that this

mcMTibcr

hesitation."

1984,

love

again? Absolutely and with no

University

in

believed

I

that

had remarkable success, so when

Northwest

said that as his

TQM by going

Colorado

in

how

and

Hubbard

Union

at

on the principle.

"We

said.

had a board member ask

liked

his interest in

through an institute

was not always an enjoyable

Hubbard

this in education."

do a workshop on quality

Hubbard continue

Oth year as

experience and this could explain part of the turnover,

"I

ue could

thought to myself that

further explored the matter by invit-

ing Tories to

Northwest's president.

The

at

talk to

College. Tories afterward suggested that

each school, 1

I

something from

Hubbard

tlie

average, most university presi-

dents lasted only about five years but

come

about how to manage quality," Hubbard said.

head

the

at

administrator's position was a key to a

On

quality

ol to

her administrative people about quality and

consistency and qualits

past decade.

directoi

the

Honeywell Corp., Jose Tories,

around," Hubbard said. It"

invited

".She

hitihcr

in

churn and turn

just

it

Hubbard said

him with

the necessary focus to

accomplish goals and provide organization.

Academics 139


YEAR

t

r

REFLECTION By Tower

Staff

Cabinet members faced issues ranging from

because the students paid for

construction.

its

consensual dating policy, while trying to im-

"Everyone should pay to use the facility," Veatch said. "1 would feel very uncomfortable

prove with key indicators from the Malcolm

using the facility right

disputes over faculty fees to a proposal for a

Dean of Students

Baldrige National Quality Award.

While most universities saw enrollment drop drastically, loss.

Northwest suffered only a

Annelle Weymuth. executive assistant to

was a promising

the president, said this

noted that Northwest saw only a

1

sign.

She

percent de-

crease while other universities saw enrollment

parking

lots

"We

such as elevators.

and handicap accessibility a posi-

tive aspect of

Weymuth

was impressed with some of was simply an exciting place to

said. "I It

(

was

all

fee.

for

less that

we were going

to get

"It

it

with

looked hope-

any funding, as a

were paid for by student

money." issue the University had to

face in Ottinger's opinion

was

incident that occurred at

A

scuffle

the racially related

The World Famous

between an African-Ameri-

can customer and a Caucasian bartender resulted in a protest.

"There was a

Although the proposal was

Chuck Veatch.

direc-

lot

more we needed

to

do about

Ottinger said.

"Everyone should

vised for discretion concerning

pay

to use

consensual dating between

facility,"

faculty and students.

"Discretion should be used

any relationship," Veatch

said. "Certainly there to

probably

Chuck Veatch said. "I would

be a higher level of

discretion relative to a

member

member of the

as

opposed

to a

faculty dating a

student."

Along with Weymuth.

feel

very

uncomfortable using the facility rieht

with-

Veatch also viewed the Student Recreation Center as a plus to the University.

Veatch said the

faculty should pay for use of the Student Recreation Center

140 Cabinet

tive thinking,"

out paying

"

VanDyke

If

I

some topic would ring. Time was

got interested

.Annelle

Weymuth addresses

said.

"My schedule wasjust horrific. the bell

of faculty dating someone of

community

VanDyke. interim Academic Affairs, found not basing enough time a problem. "Absence of time for reflecDr. Patt

vice president for

tor of development/alumni, ad-

the

having worked through

dealing with differences,"

not final.

needed

it,

result those renovations

work."

in

without paying."

Student Senate)," Ottinger said.

Outback.

Northwest.

had such pockets of excellence,"

the great ideas.

"1

The most impoilant

drop as much as 6 percent.

Weymuth saw changes

supported the

slight

now

Dr. Deni.se Ottinger. also

sexual harass-

ment between

in

faculty

and

just something one had to deal

students.

with in a job like this."

executive

VanDyke had a good feeling

As

tht

assistant to the

about the year.

president,

some sense of accomplishment," VanDyke said. "I was also helped by a marvelous office staff that knew what was going on. Ev-

Weymuth was

"I did feel

erybody wanted

to succeed."

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;continued

also the

Equal

Employment Omcer. Photo by Jack

Vaught.


As Public Relations

Officer, one of

Bob Henry's main

responsibilities

is

a liaison

between the athletic depardmnlarHJIlie president. Henn dealt "ithchalleiiKinf; issues throuyhout the >ear, including the dismissal of Mead Football Coach Harold "Bud" Klliotl. I'hoto

by Tcmy Miceli.

Board of Regents: Susan Mattson, secretary; Jane Brown; James Gibson; Dean Hubbard: Robert Stanton: Audra Kincheloe; Jeanette VVhited, treasurer; Frank Strong: I)ann> Marsh.

i

Warren Gose,

vice president of Finance, explains

the economic problems Northwest faced with lloodins over the summer. Gose said despite the hassles the floods caused, the llniversity pulled together as a team. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Academics 141


As Director of Development/Alumni. Chuck Veatch's main duty is to oversee fund-raising. Veatcli believed everyone should pay to use the

Student Recreation Center. Photo by Tony Miceli. Dr. Denise Ottinger talks about the hassles

some

off-campus students face when dealing with landlords. Ottinger's duties as dean of students required her to be involved with issues on campus as well as off

Working

campus. Photo by Chris Tucker.

to

improve Northwest, Vice President/

Director of Applied Research Dr. Robert Bush,

reviews papers dealing with improving the Culture of Quality. Bush said this was the key to

Northwest's future. Photo by Chris Tucker.

142 Cabinet


REFLECTION Dr. Robert Bush, vice president/direclor of

managercaught the

difficulties

were

Bush was

really opportuni-

new Student

nel changes as rapidly as possible, so that kind of change would not slow the cooperative pro-

said.

Wey muth and Veatch. The

it.

He

paid close attention to the financial side of

government issues such gation bond.

"Should any or

Academic

changes were

a significant part

"Our major function

change,"

of Henry's year.

Henry and other cabinet members

also faced the chal-

lenge of implementing styles included in criteria of the

her position as

Malcolm Baldrige National

vice president

Quality Award.

"Because

it

was a

Dr. Robert said.

"Trouble

and

difficulties

sophisti-

cated system and a complex

sought. Photo

by Chris

Tucker.

implementing

it,"

it

and

Henry

campus

not had in a long

time from state funds." Gose said.

Renovations

Gym

to

Lamkin

and Roberta Hall con-

sumed

Gose was

time.

also

challenged with understanding

were really

"Work on continuance improvement of University (was a challenge) to as

all

Gose

my

area as well

facets of University," said.

Despite a

critical

beginning

with flood problems, Gose did

opportunities."

fully

not see any majorcontroversial problems or issues. Overall he,

said.

along with other cabinet

of us were having problems fully understanding

we had

the Culture of Quality.

Bush

system of management some Robert

I

missal of Harold "Bud"

rector. These personnel

Culbertson was

come to pass we would have some

part of that

thought

that

President for

for

and the general obli-

construction on the

resignation of the athletic di-

for Dr.

recommendations

as

lottery, the riverboat issue

Elliott,

head football coach, and the

replacement

cess."

rectly affected with the dis-

Interim Vice

while a

I

"The variety of activities and the whole atmowas wonderful," Bush said. "They tried

make it comfortable for everyone who used The whole thing was overwhelming." As a liaison between the president and department of athletics Bob Henry. public relations officer, was di-

held

to

Vice President of Finance, Warren Gose was

to

VanDyke

needed

tively with the city,"

also concerned with issues affecting Northwest.

was viewed

.sphere

a to-workcr.

with community issues.

"We

as a plus to the University.

facility

to

recycling program, meant slaying in close con-

work closely and cooperaHenry said. ".So hoped they would be able to work through their person-

as excited about the

Recreation Center as

Working

attention of Henry.

with the city on several issues including the

tact

determine our market niche."

ties."

thank you

The

would be the future of Northwest. "We saw our whole Culture of Quality as a very dynamic idea," Bush said. "That was going

"Trouble and

a

Marysillc.

in

Applied Research, said the Culture of Quality

Bush saw the challenges as positive. "Our major function was change," Bush

VanDyke sends

personnel changes

dismissal of the city finance director and city

to

Affairs Dr. Patt

sity v\'ith

Challenges affecting North-

west went beyond the Univer-

bers, believed

it

was

a

memgood

year.

Academics 143


Danny Veerkamp studies in his room at the University of Ostrava. The exchange students studied overseas from August to December, Photo by Andrea Berthelsen.

Robert Schneider, Eva Schneider, Danny Veerkamp and Zach Meyers sit in front of their temporary home owned by the University of Ostrava. The students were part of the pilot program sponsored by Northwest and Ostrava in the Czech Republic. Photo by Andrea Berthelsen.

144 CZECHOSLOVAKIAN EXCHANGE


EDUCATION

LEADS US TO

WORLDS OTHER i By Cody Walker

^ ^

Through ti\'es at

sities.

went

ihc

cumbined work

iini\ er-

engaged

an exehange program was organized and uito eftect during the tail

of ()stra\a

in

As

seven weeks of their stay,

When

gan regular semester classes

treme differences

people and were

alcohol."

many

community of

cov-

The adventure was an educational and

cul-

in the

for

Eva Madlova and Dita

Spunanoa spend an afternoon looking over their

home-

work. Madlova

and Spunarova

came

to the

over there for that length of time was a

lot better

nity than only a

opportu-

week

"Learning

how

to

in

the midst of

Robert Schneider said. "And the fact that the for the spring lic

Robert Schneider

Czech Repub-

said. "But

it

gave

in

the Universities

at

differed from Northwest.

was

had two sections, one

lecture

and the other was

tutorial," Pavel

"We saw

Kovar

said.

overheads and pic-

and

tures in our lectures

in

our

we used what we

on the It depended some were just lecture and some were only tutorials." learned.

classes,

abihty to

adapt to later

on

Experiencing another culI

ture

in life

and gave me

was something which was

an invaluable experience.

"Learning

the

how

things was

to deal with

very hard,"

Schneider said. "But it gave me

was an ex-Soviet block and

needed."

semester. Photo

being able to witness the

by Laura

building was an interesting

later

Riedel.

perspective to a historian."

the skills

re-

our

third lived girls.

tutorials

me

"The opportunity itself was honestly not something one could actually turn down,"

United States

was very hard,"

change

during past years.

in

one house

boys and

In the first tloor lived

"We

things

or so."

The Czech Republic had been

had a bar

a small college,

Classes

great," said.

was

here."

seeing a different culture was

Andrea Berthelsen "And being able to stay

It

second and

"Just the thought of travel-

and

the ex-

lite.

"We

Stiskal said.

600 people.

experience for students.

ling abroad, experiencing

dormitt)ry

Boys and girls only lived together in some rooms. It was not a problem. Our rooms were very similar to dorms the

ered their stay."

tural

Jiri

Student Hall.

somew hat like celebrities as the .'^.'SO.OOn

newspapers

in

"At our school we did not have trouble with

"The students never had the language before," "They did great and

Dr. Richard Frucht said.

to

Czech Republic

in the

The Czech students commented on

University.

were very impressive. They talked

from the Technical University of

arrived at Northwest.

finished, they beat the

beside

the 1994 spring semester began, five stu-

Mining and Metallurgy

students endured intensive language study for

se\en hours each day.

me

tt>

dents from the University of Ostrava along with

the

five students

first

students

activity

Europe.

in

ends," Schneider said.

Czech Republic. During the

while

studying was traveling to Europe on the week-

program which consisted of studying and

residing at the University

in

"The most memorable thing

1993 semester.

Five Northwest students s'olimteered for the pilot

Studying was not the only

ot rL-prescnlu-

Northwest and Eastern F.iiropean

skills

1

the ability to adapt to things

on

in life I

and

it

gave

me

needed."

Academics 145


Angelia Knight, of the CounseUng Center, orders a video that confronts sexual exploitation in the media. One area Knight worked in was helping adult survivors of sexual abuse. Photo by

Tony

Miceli.

Angelia Knight and Anthony Rodgers complete their office

work

environment

in the

in the

Counseling Center. The

Counseling Center was de-

signed to be a comfortable atmosphere for students. Photo by

Tony

Miceli.

146 Counseling Center


RESOURCES

ft-

^

W'

By

Hartman and Sara Meyers

Julie

FullappiimiMK'iu liooksand lack ot a

kept the Counseling Center busy during the

tall

How e\er, the staff relaxed afteranew

semester.

counselor joined the

However busy

lull stall

whether he or she should have been referred

staff.

Ron Webster began employment did

my

at the Center

'')?<

enjoyed working with the people which

1

was

really important

Webster

said. "I

when looking

for a job."

enjoyed working with the

stu-

dents and issues they had."

Webster was previously employed Tulsa Boys

Home

at

the

in Tulsa, Okla., but found the

work at Northwest more enjoyable. "It was nice working with college students going through changes," Webster said.

The Center's purpose was to ser\ e the student body by helping them adjust to college life. Jan Cosgrove, counselor, found this to be a

depended

WOod,

interim director

problem

of the Counst'linj;

enjoyable."

was fun to watch people grow and feel life

changes

and also personal growth in advises students order to become independent on matters adults kept the Center busy. ranniny from

academic

stress

"The

students vMth

to personal

problems.

"Usually

Durint; the

fall

semester the

or

in

400

saw 20

to

22

week." Liz Wood said.

clients a

we

saw. indi\ idually

groups, approximately

available

"With a

lot

ot

all

problem ÂŤith over-scheduling.

Photo by

Tonv

Miceli.

referring students to other

They worked with Talent Development Cen-

resources. the ter

and social workers.

could not he

we had we could

deal with

long term issues like personality

Wood

disorders."

facilities

were

we were only open

nine

said.

not capable because

"But our

a year."

Counselors donated extra time to support those in need of

professional stafl individuully

20

to

advice.

The Center saw groups

said.

difficulties

22 clients a

week," Liz

Wood

or

'>''.

to

help combat

heavy scheduling.

"They were therapy groups opposed

to support

groups and

usually had six to eight stu-

"

we

saw, individually groups, ap-

deiiis

111

them."

Wood

said.

"Usually there had been some type of family abuse that the students could specify to be in the group."

proximately 400

The Counseling Center helped students

cut dov\n on over-scheduling

was

facilities

year long.

the training

to .'iOO students per year."

.Another tactic used to help

Center had a

more serious problems elsewhere

simply because the

"The

full-time professional

staff individually

on w hat the particular

after hours for family related

themseKes."

Dealing with

(entiT,

lot

said. "If

that

said. "It

better about

whole

months

"My work was Li/

a

Wood

it was a simple direct someone else could handle we would send them there or if it was a complex problem we would refer them to someone who was available 12 months a year." The counselors at the Center would often refer

issue was,"

rewarding aspect.

Cosgrove

to

another resource for help. "It

internship here in the spring of

and

and the student would decide

the case they

to alleviate the accessibility .struggle. "I

the Center might iia\c been,

they did not turn anyone away. L^epemlmg upon

to

500 students

in college to

deal with problems that arose

during the years before gradu-

year."

ation and

was viewed as a valu-

able resource.

Academics 147


Mike Swarthout works on Swarthout wanted to

his pickle

to teach physical

ball

skills.

education classes

elementary children. Photo by Tony Miceli.

Scott Jenson practices a skill test during his racquet

and individual sport

class.

Through

activities to teaching.

a small discussion

how to apply these Photo by Tony Miceli.

following class, students reviewed

148 Physical Education


TRAINING By Stacy Clevcrlcy The

awaited

iotig

and the sweat

tioti

\

ictory. the risins: anlicipa-

that sat uptin the

were the characteristics e\ ery tune they

w mild

in

reasons a student chose a career

hrow, those

may have stemmed from

the iiiind of coaches

North-

Storm

was physical education. The what did it take to become a coach? Most people looked at coaching as sotnething

ihein about sports."

had

said.

in

question was:

to

many

the eyes of Jim Johnson,

physiology of exercise, anatomy courses and kinesiology classes. There were also

things a coach had to be

in

everyday practice most people

as a

but

it

was their problem.

learned that

I

w hen

I

coach as well, you had the

point across

whether they were checks her

or F students.

on

timing students

drill.

Physical

My

to

A

job

was a

itnportant

in

students

when

physical

tional skills.

"A

how

coach was only as good

the players he had," Tappmeyer said. "When I saw a team come from borderline bad to pretty good, it was a as

to

apply

skill

drills in their

teaching positions.

Photo

by Tony Miceli.

pretty

good

feeling."

There were many different

that

or baseball teams required a

"When

saw a

1

sense ofcontrol over emotions. "I

team of kids from

,

whether

they were

to

had

to be patient

said. "I

goals

had

had

to be tough,

set

realistic

goals.

Goals

played an important role and

were needed

to get

through the

saw a team of kids something from me, I

my

learn

com-

whether they were successful or not, a part of my goals were completed," Storm said.

pleted,

Storm

I

The last part of coaching was to

"When

part of

and

be a good communicator,"

coaching profession.

successful

education was to de\ elop good

majors would

any job

in

dealt with people. Coaching football, basketball

but fair."

education

later

Patience was also important

Storm

comtnunication and motiva-

decide

took a dedicated person to do the Job,"

thetn

depended

factor

planning a career

many ideas

as a coach.

to get

it."

An

mind

Nikki Turner said.

ot.

were F students in class, teacher it may have been

thought

each individuals "It

"I had to be a good communicator," Head Basketball Coach Steve Tappmeyer said. "If

there

Sotne of these

included: the education core, athletic training,

There were many

were not aware

different classes and studies to complete

their physical education major.

be tlexible and patient." Johnson

in his

to teach

Students on the Northwest campus found

"Everyday something new happened."

aware of

skill

something

back to the youngergeneration. wanted

|

during a

said. "I really

sports." Brian

in

to give I

head baseball coach.

stopwatch while

wanted

west, but one few people took time to explore

very simple, but not

Nikki Turner

was always involved

"I

real

It

influence others.

field or the track. at

coaching.

bly a favorite coach or a person that helped to

step foot on the court, the

There were many majors available

in

a favorite sport, possi-

The advice

said.

coaches

at

that

Northwest

head left

for

those interested in becoming

coaches was experience and connections.

Academics 149


While intern-

ing

at

Mar

) >

the i

1

1

e

High School David Benson

computes

grades. Benson also explained to students what college life was like. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Sandra Marr's duties as an intern at the Maryville probation and parole ot'tlce include working with officers, talking w ith clients and filling out reports. After completing her internship. Marr hoped to continue working at the office. Photo by Chris Tucker. Jennifer Karg's internship at the local St. Francis Behavioral Medical

Center gives her the opportunity to deal with paranoid Karg wanted to get her master's degree

schizophrenics. Eventually, in social

work. Photo by Chris Tucker.

150 Pshychology/Sociology Interns


AN

WAY OF

LEARNING By Mike Johnson Signnind

humans

l-rcLid suid

started learning

then afterwards,

ale lunch

read patient's

files

before birth. Karl Jung argued people learned

with them.

did one-on-one interviews and

from the environment. Many sociology and psy-

obser\ ed the techniques of the

chology students found experience while com-

to

filled out applications in the sociol-

ogy and psychology department cepted, chose where they wanted provided

list.

then, to

if

1

usually got

I

do anything they were doing."

hours of classes, Karg enjoyed the experience.

ac-

go from

com-

was a

"It I

Karg

a wiinderful experience,"

lot different

from what was

in the

said.

book.

had learned what a paranoid schizophrenic was

but

20 hours of service.

Marr worked

was

"It

a

After interviews with the supervi-

sor of their chosen facility, the student pleted

staff.

1

Although she worked full-time and took 19

pleting internships.

Students

I

was

it

working with one.

different actually

woke me up

really

to

what

it

was

It

like."

the probation and

One

parole office, working with officers, conducting

intern

student who did not benefit from the program was Dave Benson. Benson

wanted

to intern for Public Safety or the sheriff

.Sandra

client interviews

was very

"It

at

and even doing home

interesting,"

Marr

visits.

said. "I did a

of different things. Everything the officer did

lot

had

to

be recorded so

Dean

I

department. Because of scheduling, he took a

job

Pierson, Marr's supervisor,

was im-

high school.

Benson's duties were figuring up

stu-

dent grades and ranks.

pres.sed with her performance. "It

at the

Among

did that as well."

"It

was nothing

was great having her

I

would have done

have

Benson

to,"

if

I

did not

was

said. "It

around," Pierson said. "She

a different area than the one

was always on time and she wanted to work. appreciated interns who wanted to work."

was going

I

Jennifer Karg interned in the St.

Francis Behavioral Medical

Center. Like Marr, the internship gave her experience in the field she "1

in

social

to get

my

wonderful " experience Jennifer Karg

1

said. "It

was

would have

work with women who

esteem and were overly

lot dif'"

"

in

her

internship.

went

to

the department

twice a week," Karg said.

"1

'

from what

was

in the

dependent on another person."

Karg had many duties

i

according to

Wayne

a success.

"Some

of the students ended

up with a job," Vanzomeran "Others made contacts

that led tojobs.

Some found the was

not the area they wanted to it opened potential

pursue. For others,

their eyes

to

possibilities they ized.

books."

the

program, the internships were

area they had focused on

said.

had been battered, who had low

"I

Still,

Vanzomeran, adviser of

said.

master's

work," Karg

"Eventually,

self

a

was studying.

wanted

liked to

"It WLis

I

into."

What

depended

had not

real-

they got out of

a lot

it

on the student."

Throwing out the books, students found the answers through experience.

Academics 151


TRAINING

PHASES

OUT

By Lance Dorrel and Sara Meyers The Reserve OtTieer Training Corps program had been a part of Northwest since the

late

1970s, but on Wednesday, Jan. 19, the Board of

Western State College

in St.

Joseph, Mo., and

Northwest would reimburse the student for travel expenses.

ROTC

"No one was really offended with the program

program. The program would officially become

being closed." Bankson said. "Everyone was

Regents finalized plans

to

phase out the

1995 spring semester. The

extinct after the

primary reason was lack of student

"The decline

number of students served was no longer meeting our

ROTC

students"

interests

and needs," Interim Vice

Academic Affairs

President for

Dr.

1

15 students involved in

accommodated

students would be

ROTC the

in

University's plan.

make (the program) an extension with Mo. West being the "The University had John Bankson,

member,

said.

the option to

"It

was a shame:

was

'There would

best to close

it."

The required courses would continue to be offered to those students but

new

students

would not be

to join

program since

in

the

Army

I

the

Bankson

felt

a shame: the

I

came to school," Tim Westfall said. "I was really looking forward If

to it."

a course was unavailable,

students

would be allowed

to

take the course at Missouri

152

at

.\urin\vcj>t

had

ROTC

no

real pressure

with

was just a

from the proextinct be-

cause he was a junior when the

always supplied the U.S.

Army

with

quality officers,"

Spcary said.

was

"It

just a sliani

such a good pro-

the

of the

ROTC

classwork

to be

thrown by the wayside."

to

program, he double up on

to

complete

his

degree.

"The program would not be completely gone until May of 1995," Bankson said. "I would be completed with the program by

Northwest"s decision to ROTC program

not only affected the remaining 5 students in the

IVlatt

Hansen

watches as

John Bankson does push ups

during

Army

ROTC's

fltness

training class.

Students took

then.""

phase out the

1 1

gram had

younger members

some of

would not have

had

before

Army

decision was made. Unlike

I.e.

was going

been

ROTC program at North-

Northwest had had the opportunity.""

ROTC program

ROTC pro-

gram. "1

the

gram becoming "It \vas

programs

a

who needed them,

allowed tojoin the

ROTC

program ex-

the

good program had to be thrown by the wayside. Anybody who wanted to be an active duty officer who had graduated from

shame such

it

We really had no say in

down.

in

quality officers,"" J.C. Speary said. "It

ROTC

instructors here then, but they it

ROTC

cancellation.

have just been fewer felt

in the

west had always supplied the U.S.

courses during the spring semester. These

base,'"

so there were no hard feel-

pressed their disbelief

Patt

said.

There were

for,

Students involved

in the

indicated

VanDyke

compensated ings."

interest.

program but

the class to get into better

shape and

improve

to

their

also any prospective students

who wanted tojoin Northwest by means of the ROTC program through school.

their high

leadership experience.

Photo by Chris Tucker.


The

ROK

\rni> training class tAiriists at

Ihi'

Stiidtnt RiTrtalion Cinlir.

KOTC

students took this course at 6 a.m. to improM' their physical condition. I'hoto h> Chris

Tucker.

Kosctta Harris, Shannon kcane

nd

I.

aura Sampscl of

ROTC,

present (he colors for the National

hall .Slate.

the

Anlheni hefore a haskel-

name

Pillshurj"

auainsi

ROTC

also

marched

MomeconiinK and

I'atrick's l)a> parades.

in

St.

Photo hv

fhris Tucker.

I f"

/

1 d^^f

Academics 153


AN

TECHNOLOGY By Sara Meyers Gaining hands-on experience was one of the

key aspects of a college education. This could

This technology

much more

was provided in various academic depart-

rience

the field of

geography

Angela Boudreau became interested

have been achieved through internships, but also another way to prosper with hands-on expe-

made

than just map-making.

GIS

after a

in the

demonstration that Steve Fox, assis-

tant director of

Geo-Technical services, gave

in

her cartography class.

ments.

One department

that

"1

helped students gain the

had cartography and Steve showed us a

important experience was the geography/geol-

demonstration," Bourdreau said. "He got

ogy department. A sub-division of this department was the Geo-Technical Services which ran

interested in the

GIS with

all

it

me

could do."

a mapping service for Northwest allowing stu-

Macintosh computers and new software programs had replaced the old pen and paper the

dents to access

cartography classes used only 10 years ago.

utilities.

Geo-Technical Services was an extension of the

geography undergraduate program estab-

lished in

1985.

It

was developed

provide

to

students with computer cartography and

Geo-

Boudreau explained how

the GIS was hooked campus buildings. All one had to do was to click on the name of a building on campus and the computer would

up

to a database of all the

graphical Information Systems, GIS, knowl-

come up w'nh

edge and experience.

structure.

The GIS

The Geo-Technical Services equipment and materials

needed

to

campus. Environmental Ser-

was a vehicle which provided

"It

update the depart-

ment. "It

enabled the University to

student

purchase mstructional equip-

ment

in the

technical geogra-

phy, said.

"It

real

or!d experience

phy classes," Dr. Don Hagan, professor of geology/geogra-

which gave them

was a vehicle

which provided students

real

a competitive

in the

career marketplace."

New technology sity

the Univer-

had incorporated into

this

edge

in the ca-

reer marketphice." Dr.

program included the GIS. The

GIS was a complex system of maps and databases, which

vice

employees used

the pro-

gram

to keep records on grounds work they had done. Employees that took care of

and

the tlower beds lized the

trees uti-

system frequently.

"The grounds men worked with the system a lot," Boudreau said. "They could tell how much fertilizer was used and where."

world experience which gave

them a competive edge

on

also helped other departments

also helped Northwest to pay for

a digitalized tloor plan of that

Don

Technological advancement

allowed Northwest 2 in the top 20

to

rank No.

most effective

geography programs

in

the

United States.

Hagan

Working with

the

new

nology helped students

tech-

to gain

mostly consisted of the build-

the hands-on experience of a

ings on campus.

college education.

154 Geo-Technical Services

<4


Angela Boiidreau works on the (Jco- l\'chnicnl System at (iarri'tl Stronj;. (iedjiraphical Inlbrniation Systems was a complex mappiii}; proj-ram which aided Northwest in several areas including in\ent<)r\ and recruitment. I'hoto by Laura Riedel.

Dave Pavlich works

intently at the

computer.

technology allowed Northwest to rank No. 2

New

in the

top 20 geography programs in the nation. Photo by

Laura

Kiedel.

Melody

.laco

and Laurie Babe work

in the

puter lab at Garrett Strong. Northwest's

advancements the

I

in

com-

many

computer technologies helped

ni\ersity to ha\e one of the top geology pro-

grams

in the

country. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Academics 155


AND

PRACTICE

MOTIVATION LEAD TO

SUCCESS

By Stacy Cleverley Mum

was

definitely not the

word

in

the

""I

owe

a lot to

all

of

my teammates and

coaches

The

attitude

Speech Department. The forensics team, headed

for the support they gave to me.

by Dr. John Rude, Jeff Pryzbylo and Nathan

totally turned

Pruett off.

showed hard work and

With

practice did pay

the theater experience of

Rude and

around from

Mary Moore thought

the

last

year."

team had improved.

""We had a really good team," Moore said.

over 10 years of experience Pryzbylo had, the

""We acted like a team with support and encour-

team had a strong base

agement."

for learning.

"There were only two upperclassmen, therefore the

team

felt

would have room to

come," Rude

knowing they improvement in the years

confident

for

in

and Kansas State were just a few of the schools a

left

mark

on.

""When they went up against these top schools

would take

was and just what Rude said.

to get there,"

He believ ed the team hadjust enough successes to have a of being close to the top."

""taste

He was

also assured they

what they had

Many

to

do

knew

had been looking

Atkins said.

we needed

for.

there before," Al ""It

Ulvestad took

home a

the individual

in

""It

won

"'Our team

Rude

place in

the

at

Invitational

the first time

I

had

place," Ulvestad said.

156 Forensics

came

in foren-

over into

to carry

was just

said. ""Without

like any, it

a

it

took practice,"

band could not play

all

learning."

"itic youthful

that left a

lasting impression

was

the

Mid-American Forensic Leagues

in

Northern Iowa.

Northwest walked away with

a positive en-

ergy and moti-

vation that was

not

a

song and a drama team could not do a play. They

':heriw

before," Al

first

time

Mary Moore and Al Atkins portray a

four years. ""This

had been the best

husband and first

wife in

"War of

had ever had," Atkins said. "I hoped to go to finals in five events. It would

the Roses."

be the

the forensics

semester

first

I

time

in the last six

The

incarnation of

team had a students"

continued to

a

team."

in

The

was something

we

3rd place win for the

a

years."

Atkins

Nebraska.

was

1st

st

program

interpretation

Weslyn Weasel

I

had

attitude

The competition

was something

The positive attitude reached

Tour

to

as a team."

out to Jim Ulvestad as well.

in

needed

team had

team had a positive energy and motivation

was not

that grades

work effort be improved as well."

said. ""But the

The winning

were

to win.

""The youthful

oral

sics

were constantly aware

Rude

students on the team

could sense the change they

that

first,"

studies.

they saw what true excellence it

strengths than weaknesses this time.

"We

said.

Rude also thought the team was willing to work and they wanted to win. Bradley, Hastings Northwest

Every group involved as a team had strengths and weaknesses. The forensics team saw more

anticipation

rise as they pre-

positive

attitude which

pared for finals and nationals.

As for Atkins, Ulvestad, Moore and the rest of the team,

matched the team's

they hoped Northwest would

performance.

accomplish their goal of a na-

Photo by Chris

tional

championship.

Tuclter.


I'lTforniing a section of the pla>

"The

Fain." Incrid. plaM-d b\

Tapia.

I'lslui

ad>ii-e (in learning: to Iom' IutscII h>

phiMd

b\

ShaHM

nianie at the

I

\ alcntine is

yiven

Ru{l\ard.

lUihtol. Diirinj; lluir perfor-

niMTsit> of Northern Iowa, they

placed 2nd. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Myth Speech." a The many students be-

Al Atkins delivers "The I'rban

comedy oration

that he authored himself.

speech dealt ÂŤilh stories that lieved true, but

myth

that the

ÂŤere actually

roommate

false,

such as the

of a suicide victim vtould

recieve a 4.0 (iPA. Photo by Chris Tucker.

Academics 157


Nick, played by

who attempts

Shad Ramsey, ignores Jackie, played by Anne Einig, Students that produced the play

to resolve a conflict.

for the lab series gained experience but

Tony

no credit hours. Photo by

Miceli.

Anne Einig, gets into bed with Nick, played by Shad cheer him up. Lab series productions allowed the actors, directors and stage crew to acquire valuable hands-on experience.

Jackie, played by

Ramsey,

to

Photo by Tony Miceli.

158 Lab Series


TESTING ^ ^ Ground For

PERFO IViVlli^lVCf By Mike Johnson when he

cian and sound engineer."

was 28-years-old and Kenneth Branagh acted and directed "Henry V" when he was 28-years-

the parts accoaluig to her

Steven Spielberg directed

old. In the lab series

â&#x20AC;˘"Jaws'"

sponsored by the theater

department, two senior theater majors younger than these directing

J

men when Michelle Ough

got a chance to prove their mettle directed "Post-

poning the Heal Death of the Universe" and Connie Juranek directed "If It Don't Hurt, It

"It

and

props and staff

for

were paid and royalties and

programs were paid for by the department. Allison Mizerski found acting under a peer an enjoyable experience. Terrie, played h> Chet

"1 really liked

Michelle," Mizerski said.

visits

had a good time and she was a really good director. She was

Cathy, played

professional, but she

knew

by Lisa

how to work and have

l.ant^. a

same time."

Hardin,

fun at the

One audience member enjoyed the play, finding humor

cancer patient, in lier

in the

serious situations.

hospital

was very funny,"

""It

room. I,ah

Kathleen Byre said.

series

part where they were lying in

both postponing en-

productions

bed,

such as "If

tropy."

It

Don't Hurt.

It

Ain't Love"

Juranek learned a

lot

from

her experience as director. "It

were founded

"I liked the

was

very interesting."

by University

was a chalJuranek was a whole colenge. There

Players.

operation of people

Photo by

work with including the set

Tonv

designer, the master electri-

said. "It

Miceli.

I

had

to

"We

trying to get the actors to relay the

wanted." Juranek

said. "It

We

could ha\ e

experimented

to

one

that worked."'

interesting. "I

knew Connie

for four years so

it

was

really

weird." Hardin said. ""We would talk on one level sometimes. It made for a certain positive energy because when peers directed me. they

were not as sure of

their art."

Following the productions, refreshments were serv ed and a discussion of the performance

was

held.

Audience members were encouraged to talk about what they liked

a

It

challenge,

Connie Juranek said There a whole cooperation oi people 1 to

do

ision.

Chet Hardin, who was in Juranek's play, found the experience of working under a friend

ii

had

v

tried several different possibilities before

coming

the University

The University Players paid

1

difficult to gel the actors to

it

gone many different ways.

Players as an outlet for any students who wanted to direct. The student had to get approval from the department.

was hard

message

Ain't Love."'

The plays were produced by

uranek found

work

with."

and disliked about the production

from the

the lighting.

set to the actors to

One subject of dis-

cussion was the placement ot the audience in chairs

on stage

rather than off. Set designer

Jeff Johnston thought

it

added

to the intimacy.

"By stage,

putting the audience on it

made

the

show more

intimate," Johnston said. "It

broke

down some

of the barri-

ers so the audience could identify

with the characters more."

Showcasing a actors and

cast of ready

two able

directors,

the lab series proved to be a crucial testing

ground for

make "Great White Way." dents hoping to

it

stu-

to the

Academics 159


160 Computer Science


VISION I

I

Wi

COMPUTER GRAPHICS

By Amanda McManigal a large part of students" lives

Since some of the concepts ol ihe program

Northwest. The use of computers were often

created a problem for Ektermanis she worked

Computers were at

taken for granted by students because of the

computers

every residence hall room and

in

numerous computer

Even with dent found

this

labs across

computer

to

fit

her needs. Tina Ektermanis, a blind student.

the computer. After

computer graphics learned how computers produced graphic images and the different algorithms or calculations that were

rected they

in

"I

a

I

thought to myself "Oh

my

was a lot better than thought it was going to be, mainly be-

God!" Actually the class I

cause

we were

dealing with

al-

gorithms.'"

Since Ektermanis was blind, she relied on her

mind

to help

with the help of

her create

her reader Phil

Ektermanis could get a concept

pictures.

the

of what an object looked like

in

she was blind.

her head by feeling

Ektermanis

her to visualize the object three

dimensionally was "I

it,

but for

difficult.

could imagine what to pro-

to

duce on the screen and the picvisualize the ture,""

graphics. Photo

work

program normally did not run success-

it

was

Ektermanis

visualize the

by Russ

3-D then

Wevdert.

challenge."

to

said.

"But to

whole picture

make

it

2-D was

after the

once and

it

usually

would not

Ektermanis

real

said.

to tell her

program had been

There never were any

what he

ran.

complications be-

tween the two.

"It

was no

real

problem work-

was no

"It

problem

real

wiirking with Tina,"" Stiens said.

"She had

a really

good

concept of what the picture

ing with Tina," Phil Stiens

"She a really good concept of

said.

what ture

would look

would

look like in hci

like in

Ektermanis had done extremely well

in the

computer

science program despite her

handicap.

"Tina was one of the top dents

the

in

been a

lot

stu-

department,"'

said.

"It

also had

of fun working with

her."'

Even though Ektermanis blind, she had found a way

was

to successfully

head."

her head.""

McDonald thought

McDonald

pic-

in

a

it

right the first time."

Ektermanis relied on Stiens

saw

knew that had to take this class since

Kktermanis

mind

successfully

in class.

Tina

on her

was very

had been cor-

the errors

the program. Ektermanis

fully the first time.

requirement," Ektermanis

said. "I

relied

said the

all

would run

"We would run

how

she would be able to perform

Because

to create.

puter graphics class.

nervous and was not sure on

Stiens.

knew

what computer graphics Ektermanis was trying Ektermanis would write most of the program

Prior to taking the class Ektermanis

assignment

to help with the class.

then Stiens would help her finish the program on

used to produce these images.

graphics

someone

few challenges while taking her required comStudents

works on her

for

Stiens had previously taken the class and

chose computer science as her major and faced a

computer

Ektermanis had asked her instructor. Dr. Gaiy

McDonald

campus.

access to computers, one stu-

difficult to locate a

it

with her reader Phil Stiens.

complete the

required computer graphics course for her major.

Academics 161


'mSTE

OF THE

REAL WORLD By Ruby Dittmer Dealing with business

in

Northwest students advised

tine

real

world,

local, small busi-

ness owners.

sign advertisements for the residence halls

"This class was not like your typical class-

room

situation

and took

tests,"

where you did the assignments John Baker, associate professor "This was risk taking be-

of accounting, said.

worked with real small businesses, they developed a plan for them and then executed it. this was the real world."

cause students

in this class

During the Organizational Policy and Decision

Making

class in the fall semester, students

were assigned a business

to advise.

The business

me deHomecoming to hang in

viewpoint on advertising. They helped

who

Students

into six groups, each

group was then assigned a

of the students

who

advised Blair, enjoyed the

class.

"By

taking this class,

I

was good

practice for me,

had

after graduation,

not been for this class."

it

who

Time

might have had.

working on as business

we

to

how

advised,"

often we met with Dena Mathias said.

Melody would not have

I

gotten the opportunity to advise a business until

lems

depended on what problems we were

got into real world

applications," Mathias said. "Advising

responsible for details on

that the business

Suresh Kumar,

to its

new

was moving Stitches in two miles east of

also advised Blair,

location

Maryville on First Street.

the

"I

had

make

the

to find the

most economical way

move," Kumar

said.

about what progress had been

class

was

made.

good

not

first

relationships between North-

west and the Maryville community.

"By helping

out the small

I

able because I had learned what

most would learn during also built

to

"The experience

received from this was valu-

Students then wrote reports

The program

i

business to advise for the semester. Mathias, one

owner and students met often to discuss financial concerns advertising dilemmas and other prob"It just

u

on campus."

took the course were divided

your typical classroom

their

job."

Both Blair and the students involved agreed that the most significant aspect of the pro-

Suresh

Kumar

and Dena Mathias advise

gram was the hands-on training Stitches in

businesses. Northwest gave

back something nity,"

Baker

to the

commu-

program. Melody Blair, owner, liked having students

was so glad

input, especially

the

assignments and took

tests... this

was the

help her. to

real

were college students," Blair said.

"They were

because they had

162 Business

a big help a college

"This was a great

way

stu-

dents practiced what they had

been taught," Blair

Taking

Baker

said.

owner Melody

The

Blair.

clients.

risks,

students dis-

covered was a part of the

class different

ness classes.

group met occasionally

throughout the

said.

real

business world. That

world,"

Time

students received while

was what made the Organizational Policy and Decision Making

have their

because they

that

they advised their perspective

you

said.

Stitches in Time was one of two businesses who used this

"1

where

situation

from other busi-

semester to look over books and

make

sure

things ran well.

Photo by Laura Riedel.


Mi'lod> Rlair hi'lps Brian XMi'di-rholt uilh his kiny lostiinu' al Stitilu-s in Time. Blair ÂŤas (inc of two local hiisini'ssoHntrs

\\

ho sought assistanit' Ironi the Organizational Folio and Decision Making class.

Photo h\ Laura Kledel. Assistants look on as Mclod\ Blair helps Brian

W iderholt select a costume.

.Students not onl> advised

business ouners on finaiHial matters but also obser\ed business activities. I'holo bv

I.

aura Riedel.

Academics 163


SHORT

GOODBYE By Mike Johnson Gym

Lamkin

was standing room only

friends and family

crammed

ter graduate.

as

ates receive hard-earned diplomas.

On

They just wanted

to see their child

and get out of there."

inside to see gradu-

Mattson was actually applying her education

the faces

of some candidates was a look of rehef and hope

at

for the future.

for her

The ceremony lasted just over an hour and went smoothly, a contrast to years past. Execu-

typing an article for the St. Joseph News Press on

Anncile Weymuth,

tive Assistant

the graduation coinmiltee. believed

was due

"We

some very

did

too long.

The

we began

definite

said. "Before, the

"I

planning,"

planning

in

In previous years,

"If people could see that

so

said. "Our objective was to keep things short." The graduates were seated

who were still I

didn't

demic

left after

made

years past. The invocaand benediction were

omitted because of a "92 ruling

affairs,

made

the practices op-

tional. Also, the

limited to talk

how

"I

was more

assured than

and graduates seemed

"I

thought

it

Teresa Mattson

was

those

I

was

in

my

field

and

I

was

self

presented candidates with their

commencement

address

table

Americans who shared

their

view for the future of the

college graduate.

want

to

be,"

Danner quoted

Reno. "You must be account-

sitting

among,"

Your family

own

will

actions.

be important

while trying to accomplish

Teresa Mattson

that

you

set

all

said. "I didn't

Lamkin, unlike past graduates, they weren't greeted

S![

there

and

feel scared."

w ith

Pamela Dunlap adjusts her hat and makes last minute preparations before entering

out to do."

As the candidates fi led out of

Lamkin (ivm. In an effort to

shorten the rain,

high heat or humidity .The can-

ceremony, students were

didates were greeted by a

sealed prior to

bright and comfortable sun-

graduation.

and family members were

light: a great

there to see their son or dauah-

future as college graduates.

164 Graduation

in

there and feel scared."

able for your

better,"

said. "Parents

job

U.S. Attorney General Janet

to

appreciate the changes.

like a

"You can be anything you

mail" of

speakers were

long they could

wasn't

was given by United States Congresswoman Pat Danner of Missouri's 6th District. Danner quoted some no-

by the Missouri Supreme Court that

sit

diplomas. The special

ceremony, a con-

trast to

it

waiting tables after gradu-

was working

I

assured.

it

Weymuth

intern so

Dr. Robert Culbertson, vice president for aca-

graduates

would be a short ceremony and that things were running smoothly, they would stay."

tion

people

problem.

to alleviate the

was just an

ation.

January."

many

they received their diplomas so plans were

prior to the

it,

waiting

sat

be called, her hands were busy

was more assured than many of those I was sitting among. I knew many

ceremonies were

president wanted to shorten

to

the bag," Mattson said. "I

to

careful preparation.

Weymuth

name

her lap-top computer.

who headed it

As she

the graduation ceremony.

way

to start their

Photo by Britton.

.Ion


United States t'oncressMoniaii

I'at

Danner

jjivcs

theeommeneenieiit address. Danner discussed the liope the graduates should ha>e had for their future.

Phuto hy Jon Brilton.

After working toward her diploma, Kristi Markt retei\es eongratiilations Ironi

lluhbard. Ihe class of ate in

I

.anikin

(

,\

l'>'>3

I'residitit

"as the

last to

Dean gradu-

m before its reno\ ation. i'hoto In

Jon Britton.

Academics 165


We

began the season with

cally

correct terms as

cially

became the Bearcats.

all

politi-

athletes

offi-

The women's tennis team placed 1 St in

MIAA Regional Conference for

the

the second consecutive year.

Lamkin volleyball

Gym renovations forced the

team

to face

SOMETHING

home games were sched-

new when

all

uled

Joseph, Mo., with hope that

in St.

Lamkin wasTO be completed the

home

first

in

time for

basketball game.

Football fans had a lot to

CHEER

for as the 'Cats fought to hold onto 4th

place

in

their conference.

Some

ABOUT

students had a

lot

as athletes excelled

to talk in

more

than one sport.

Fans witnessed anything but a cal

typi-

season IN

SPORTS 4* Sandi Ickes fights for the ball against Missouri Baptist players. The Bearcats went on to beat the Spartans 64-49. Photo by Jon Britton.

166 Sports Division


Sports 167


Waiting for the right pitch, Mel Creglow concentrates on the ball. Creglow finished the season with a .236 batting

average. Photo by Scott Jenson.

Shortstop Natalie Lesko attempts to throw out a runner.

many indoor practices the Bearcats came close to a winning season with a 14-16 overall record. Photo by Scott

Despite

Jenson.

/A\\ke

in

and

face

skill, Rhonda and

Rheba Eustice

proved twins

Rhonda Eustice

could

be a winning

mb

CO

I

n a-

Both

tlon.

en|oyed

a

great seas

on

n

Northwest's

Softball team,

Rheba Eustice ting

with

Rhonda

.418 and Rheba

bat-

fielding

.951.

While Rhonda was catcher

Rheba played 2nd base during the four years they played on

the

team.

played there

Although they

different

was

still

"We were family,"

positions,

competition. a

Rhonda

competitive said. "Even

if

we were ]ust playing cards, there was still a little competition. It was good competition though, because we both played different positions and

had gotten to play as much as the other."

Although they competed against each field,

off

other on the

the

mained good

field,

they re-

friends.

Off the

Natalie Lesko patiently waits for the perfect pitch as she readies herself at the plate. Lesko went on to

claim a .260 overall batting average and batted in nine runs throughout the season. Photo by Scott

Jenson.

Field

Pitching for a strike, Lori Campbell fires the ball home. Campbell ended the season with an 2.18.

168 Softball

Photo by Scott Jenson.

ERA of


DEFEATING OBSTACLES Johnson

Mike

B As a

result of

months of

team was unable

softhall

many games were

and snow, the Bearcai

rain

on the

to practice

field

and

Talent

outweighs

cancelled or postponed.

Despite the lack of practice, the season got off to a great start as the 'Cats

ÂŤ^

in

won six of their first eight games

I'lorida.

During the tournament. Rhonda Eustice school single-game record offour

w on the

first

went on

hits.

inexperience

West

the Spring Fling Classic at the University of

tied the

on the field

The "Cats easily

tournament game with a score of 10-4 and

to beat five other teams.

With

the best start

since 1976, the team ended the season with a 14-16 record.

The 'Cats did

not fare so well in the

MIAA

North

Round Robin Tournament. The second game of the tournament was close, but the "Cats lost 3-2 to Emporia State. Eustice had an RBI single Division Softball

and Natalie Lesko had a

game

triple for

in the third inning,

breaking

it

State

wound up

with a single run.

MIAA North Di\'ision,

The next tournament was the

w here the

an RBI, tieing up the

Emporia

"Cats struggled against odds to end play with

a 2-8 record.

Everything came

down

end when they played four games

in

to the last

week-

one day.

was very pleased with our performance, considerwe were up against," Coach Gay la Eckhoff said. "The players were asked to do the impossible thing of playing so many games and having the whole season come down to that one weekend." A highlight of the season was when the "Cats tri"I

ing the disadvantages

umphed over Benedictine College 5-0. During the game AmberCremeens stole three bases, a single game Shannon Armstrong had four

record, while single

game,

a feat she also

Accomplishing first

this feat

accomplished

twice

hits in a

"91.

in

made Armstrong

the

"Cat to have done so twice in a career.

As

a

young team,

talent

outweighed inexperience

many of the new players filled

"We were

a

little

in

team and the younger

getting the job done,"" Molly

as

gaps the team needed.

Mercer

girls

were

said.

Despite rain and inexperience, the "Cats went on to

have a good season, coming close

to a .500 average.

Sports 169


1/1/ h

I

e

I

Coach Jim

Johnson

Dim Dohveck

dives back tu first base

after a big lead-off.

Dohveck finished

the season three for three in stolen

bases.

Photo bx Scott Jenson.

spent the year on sabb a

t

c a

I

Tom

Huff'mgton reaches for a catch for

an out

in the

game

,

State. Hiiffington

on

working

doctor-

his

Steve Chor

ate

e X

,

against Pittsburg

I

of

tile

season

had

the

will} 146.

most pntoiits

Photo by Jon

Brillon.

-

Bearcat Steve Chor acted as interim

head coach

for the

'Cats.

This

was Chop's first time as

a head coach and he led the

team

to a 9-1

8

overall

record

and 3-8 MIAA record. "I

enjoyed the experience,"

Chor

said.

what

to do

learned a

"I

lot of

and what not

to

do."

After transferring to North-

west from North Arkansas

Community

College,

Chor was

a starting outfielder for the

'Cats during the '88 and '89

seasons. first

season,

he batted .277, had

26 RBIs

During Chor's

and 19 stolen bases. During the '91 and '92 sea-

Chor acted as the

sons,

graduate assistant for the team. During the time he was an assistant, he studied for his

master's

physical

wanted

in

health

education.

and

Chor

to use his master's to

teach at the University

level

and coach baseball. During a home game. Blake Watson slides safely

Off the Field

fullv stole three

Watson

siiccess-

by Jon Britton.

Larry Walls

hits

a grounder as the crowd looks on. Walls had a batting average in ten runs in S2 times at the plate. Photo by Jon

of .293 for the season and hatted Bniton.

170 Baseball

into third base.

bases out of the four he attempted througliout the season. Photo


INDIVIDUAL HIGHLIGHTS Johnson Players set

Andrea

By

Rain kept the baseball diamoiRJ niiidiK and the inside with only tour outside practiees.

The

field practice contributed to the Bearcat's

leaiii

lack of on-

low scoring

personal

season. "It was a year of bad luck."" Interim Coach Steve Chor said. "We probably would have been a better team if we would have practiced more outside." Chor said the lack of outside practice time doomed the team defensively and that proved to be the "Cat's

downfall

goals and

meet

season.

all

The baseball team had a 3-8 MIAA record and 91th in the conference oserall record. They ranked 1

1

in

accomplish-

overall fielding statistics and posted a .916 fielding

percentage committing 86 errors. The players were

aware of the

statistics

and were quick

to put the

season

ments

behind them. not to think about the season much,""

"I tried

Huffington said.

"We

had more

Tom

talent than the record

to come together as a Some days we had good hitting and others we had

showed, but we were not able team.

the defense and no hitting."

Despite a losing record, the season highlights were indi\idual accomplishments. Outfielder Blake

earned a spot on All-Conference Second

Watson

Team

along

with All-North Division honors. Watson led the "Cats in batting

averages with a

.41.3

average.

"He had a great year and he deserved it,"" Brian Davis said. "It was probably one of the only high points of our season."'

when week for throwing a four-hitter during a lO-inning game against Central Missouri State. Graham's pitching helped the "Cats secure a 2- win. After losing to the Mules 13-12 and 26-5 earlier in the season, the win was a welcome Pitcher Darren

he

was named

Graham

MIAA

also brought in hi)nors

player of the

1

comeback.

Graham

finished the season with a 7.88 average

strikeouts per nine-inning

MIAA

Conference

Although

rain

game and ranked

6th in the

in strikeouts.

and bad luck contributed

to the

team's

poor performance, individual accomplishments were a ray of light.

Sports 171


their

share

of yell-

matches,

and

court.

Julie

the

finished

season with

22 wins and one loss and Lucy finished

20

with

wins

and three losses. Being MIAA

and

singles

doubles capped the year.

There was competition on the court because Julie

was

one year older than Lucy.

"We were competitive because we were so close in age," Julie said. "We were always striving to be the best.

The sisters found the

playing on

same team had

advan-

its

tages.

"We knew each well," Julie said.

"I

her body motions

was wrong and

other so

could if

tell

by

something

could be there

for support."

Being sisters and tennis

was

a

playing

good match

for

the Caputos.

Off the

Court Ste\e Ptasnik puts his all into afore-

hand during a singles match. Ptasnik had a winning season with a I-O record. Photo by Jon Britton.

172 Tennis

I

singles position

and the

Julie Caputo concentrates on a return during the match

on the tennis

only

Portillo serves to his

had

best matches

in

Eduardo

No. 2 doubles. Photo by Scott Jenson.

Lucy Caputo

champions

hall,

sisters

found their

Lucy Caputo

on the

most

Julie

Caputo

his eye

opponent. Portillo played the No.

ing

Julie

Keeping

f\ Ithough

against

SIU Edwardsville. Caputo ended the season

22-1 record. Photo by Jon Britton.

with a


EXPECTATIOIMS Bearcats

By Mike Johnson and Mike

Reiff

Bearcats

The women's tennis team hud a successful season by

a backhand lo her opponent. The

Regional Conference. Photo by Jon Britton.

overall record.

the regular season but faulted during conference, end-

place in the

Coach Mark Rosewell to competition

Regional Conference

said.

"We played against excel-

competition and performed well."

Wet weather the facilities at

Gym

and didn't lose very many of our matches." 1

player, Julie Callahan, broke the

team win record with her 73rd singles w record of 72 wins made in '92.

in,

breaking a

With four players winning 20 of the 2S matches, was present throughout the team. "Singles and doubles were both very good,"

talent

defeated e\'ery team except Southwest Baptist

Unisersity during the regular season, but had tough

matches

in

every

flight ot the

tournament,"

Indi\ idual standouts included

Eduardo

Mark Ardizzone. who played No.

helped out.

"We were fortunate to have the two courts at Lamkin Gym," Rosewell said. "We were able to play indoors The team's No.

ing the year with a 12-9 shov^ing.

Bill

Bobo

said.

presented a problem tor the "Cats, but

Lamkin

Rosewell

"We

really together as far as supporting

each other," Rosewell lent

attributed ihe team's success

and togetherness.

"The team was

determination

hits

successful season by placing Isl in the

said. "I felt we had a pretty good structured program and everything just seemed to work well." Losing only one game, the men's tennis team aced

1st

1

with

MIAA

had a

for the second consecutive year. The Bearcats placed 19th in the nation and finished the season with a 7-4

winning

stand out

MIAA

Andrea Schneider

1

Poitillo

Ardi//one also receised the Sportsman Award

MIAA

and

and No. 2 singles. at

the

Conference Tournament.

Another standout was Bobo's efforts singles spot.

in

Bobo went undefeated during

ence with his only loss

in the

the No. 6 the confer-

match against Southwest

Baptist.

"We had high expectations for our team," Rosewell "We were nationally ranked three out of the past

said.

five years

and

it

was hard

to live

up

to that pressure."

Sports 173


CLAIMI

G

VICTORY /he

men's

track

team

had a cult

one

player celled

ex-

Mark Roberts

the rest.

fin-

with

1st place at the

in

MIAA Outdoor Championships

challenges

competition above

in

ished

take on

season,

but

Mark Roberts

diffi-

Bearcats

1,500 meter

the

in

teamwork

with a time of 3:57.44.

was only a sophomore, he was already making a name for Although Roberts

himself.

Roberts was the only Northwest

Crossroads

and

Kim

The men's

steeplechase

in

Roberts

was on

it

the

said.

there.

I

to

nationals,"

the enthusiasm for the first confer-

With

season be-

hind him,

Roberts had the

goal firmly

in

his grasp.

do with personnel.

fall,

we had

a great

we

Track

in

3:57.44. Mitch Dosland

and the high jump with 6-4

The

3/4.

'Cats finished 3rd out of 12

Northwest Invitational.

the

Sleath clocked 48.6 in the 400

meter for a

1st

solid placing

place finish. This

was

a highlight in a

season of solid teamwork.

The women's track team boasted dominated by one key member as

door and outdoor

had been

Two

titles."

team members qualified

NCAA

Division

II

Track

The

team rather than being in

'Cats

tational

it

years past.

competed

meets and the

teamwork. worked hard in practice and stuck together," Renee Stains said. "We were all really to their ability in

"We

really

close and

Terri Gillispie,

friends.

I

Nancy Huppert,

Wood

Melissa Smith and

all

re-

Academics.

"We were ranked high said. "It

in

became good

thought the togetherness showed."

ceived awards for All-Conference

cited about challenging for the in-

nine invi-

NCAA Divi-

work of

a

young team and

in all the

showed

meets." Smith

the talent

the team.

and hard

Everyone gave

their all."

and Field Tournament. Justin

sion

Sleath's 400-meter time of 47.65

outdoor season with several 'Cats

events, the team strove to have a

was

placing well in their events.

season of high points.

Meaghan Wilson captured

went

to

said.

"We

a

the fastest time in that event

Northwest athlete since

the

800 meters

by

"83. Chris in

II

Championships during

their

the

heptathalon with a final total of

4,440 points. Carrie

in 1:51.67.

Wood finished

The team finished 4th at the MIAA Outdoor Championships

5th in the heptathlon with 3,386

Mark Roberts providing

400-meter hurdles with a time of

with

Northwest's only individual cham-

pionship, covering the

174 Track

meters

placed 3rd in the long jump with 23

a strong

Blondin provisionally qualified

Off the

Photo by Jon Britton.

had," Alsup said. "They were ex-

for the

a great

to

feeling about the personnel

had to work

harder."

1:56.32.

feet

800 meter

in the

Perkins finished the season with a personal best time for the season

relay.

in

"During the

"The potential

just

MIAA

Coach Richard Alsup believed

the goals he set.

for

at the

fell

ship.

ence meet had

"My goal had been

team claimed

During the meet against Midland College, Ron Perkins runs

Outdoor Conference Champion-

9:45.2.

Roberts had great hope for

qualify

track

Todd

victory in the indoor season, but

behind placing 4th Invitational, win-

3,000 meter

the

ning

By Elizabeth Brown

st place finisher

1

Missouri Southern

at the

and talent

1.500

points.

Anne Northup was 4th in the

1:06.33.

The 'Cats attributed their success

With such high rankings

Some

in

credit

Coach Charlene Cline. "She made us work hard," Stains had the potential and she

worked to make

us get the most out

of the talent that was there."

Showing

spirit as a

ent for the game, the

team and

tal-

women's track

team enjoyed a victorious season.


more ineliesjrom his leap The men 's track team finished 1st in the \ortliÂťest Invitational. Photo hy Jon liritlon.

Jaysin Horn diiriiif;

strives to f;aiii a Jew

the long jump.

.*.^^

Clearing the bar at 4-9. Brian Mclirayer competes in the Herschel Sell Heptathlon. McHrayer, who placed 7th, was the only Bearcat to compete in the decathalon. Photo hy Scott Jenson.

Chamas takes the lead hy a stride during the 5,000 meter competition. The women 's track team competed in nine in vitational meets and the NCAA Division throughout Neffie

the season. Photo hy

Jon

Britton.

Sports 175


Softball

MIAA 2-10*

Overall

Record 14-16

â&#x20AC;˘

Record includes tournament

plav

MO-Western Emporia

Washburn

CMSU Emporia

Washburn Mo-Southern

CMSU Emporia Northeast Northeast

MO-Western

0-5

Mel Creglow; Rheba Eustice; Erin Shannahan; Amber Crenieens and Back row: Karen Oftert; Melinda Madison; Molly Mercer; Renee Hahn; Natalie Lesko; Kristi Sweeney; Lori Campbell; Kelly Matthews and Shannon Armstrong. Front row:

Rhonda

Baseball

MIAA 3-8

Emporia Emporia

CMSU CMSU CMSU Northeast Northeast Northeast

MO-Western MO-Western MO-Western

Men's Track Pittsburg

Jill

Patterson; Theresa Quijuno;

Eustice.

Overall

Record 9-18


SPRING X

During the eight-game Spring Fling Classic, third baseman Melinda Madison batted .333 with 8-16. Center fielder

Jill

Patterson batted .250

\\

ith five

The "Cats ended the series with a 62 record, which was the best start to a for 20.

season they had had since 1976.

X

During pitcher Darren Graham's

lO-inning performance he gave up only four hits and suiTcndercd one earned run

during the

game

State University.

against Central Missouri

Graham

and struck out

batter

10. a

also

walked one

career high and

because of his performance was named

MIAA

The

pitcher of the week.

CMSU

feated

'Cats de-

2-1.

During the game against Emporia

State,

Dave Benson was 5-5 with five runs scored and three RBIs including a solo home run.

center tlelder

The "Cats

finished the

MIAA

North Divi-

sion Conference with a record of 3-8.

The

'Cats also finished second in hitting with a batting average of .270.

the Doane College Relays, Wardlow clocked 5.42 seconds dur-

BSI' During Brian

1

ing the

1

10 meter hurdles, a personal best

for the season. Bill Hallock

won

mer throw competition with

a toss of

7.

Chris Blondin took

1:54.1 in the

1st

ham-

the

1

1

7-

place running

800 meter, which was

a per-

sonal seasonal best. Brian Wanlldw completes his

last

hurdle at the North-

west linitatioiuil. Wardlow scored a seasonal best time

of 15.42

in the 1 1

-meter hurdles. Photo by Jon Britton.

WRAP UP


SPRING WRAP UP

Lucv Ciipuli) stretches for the Photo hv Jon Britton.

hull during a singles match. Ciipiilo recieved 1st place in the

â&#x20AC;˘SiF- At the Cavalier Cup, Tanya Drake won

1st

MIAA

place in the

100-meter hurdles with a time of 15.6 seconds. During the meet.

Conference Championships with a record of 20 wins and three losses

time that the "Cats had been ranked, the other times occurring

in

"88 and '89.

the Bearcats placed 3rd with 65 total points.

The women's

Meaghan Wilson placed

1st at

MIAA,

capturing the decathlon

with a final total of 4,400 points.

O

In the

tennis

team picked up

theirfirst

win of the season

duringtheirfirst dual meetagainstDruryCollege9-0withall six singles seeds.

match against Mankato

State, Julie

Callahan

Gump was chosen MIAA as player of the week. Gump was 4- at the No. 5

(Q) Duringthe week of April l2,Jeremy

set a

Northwest record for most career wins with her 73rd victory as the

by the

No.

singles position and 3-2 at the No. 3 doubles position with Bill

1

singles player.

1

Bobo. Julie

Caputo picked up her

1

1

th victory

of the season

singles as the "Cats beat Benedictine College 9-0.

Caputo as the

first

No. 2

MIAA selected

MIAA player of the week for "93. The selection

was based on matches

in the first

The Northwest women's

NCAA Division II

178 Spring Wrap Up

at the

weeks of

the season.

was ranked 20th in the pre-tournament rankings. This marked the 3rd tennis team

The men's 1

record

team finished the MIAA in 2nd place and a 5tournament. Mark Ardizzone placed 4th in his last

tennis

at the

season of play.

Todd Shane placed 2nd and

1

1

losses.

in the

MIAA

tournament with 12 wins


Women's Track Pittsburg


Kerri Doetker's track

her as she

ties

and

her shoe.

It

volleyball

equipment surrounds

took a lot of determination

and

dedication to be involved in two sports. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Linebacker David Roper runs

to assist in the tackle

the game against East Texas State. Besides being a

during

member

of the football team, Roper was also on the baseball team. Photo by Jon Britton.

Jaysen Horn pumps iron in the Industrial Arts weight room during the off-season. Horn and other athletes involved with year.

more than one sport had Photo b\ Laura Riedel.

180 Athletes

In

to stay in

shape the entire

More Than One Sport


*

ATHLETICALLY IIMCLIIMED Don

B When Bo

M

n s c h

u

Jackson announced he v\as going

both baseball and football, he said football would be his

"hobby." For two-sport athletes

more than one

at

Northwest, playing

to

be students

first

created a challenge, because

"ordinary" student,"

and

I

used

David Roper,

I

by

to the pressure.

a football

liked facing

up

But

I

competing

in

could not be an

and base-

"There was so much on the

ball player, said.

to get

skill

and they had

to take their sports, as well as their studies, seriously.

had

show

sport could not be construed as a

"hobby." Athletes had

"It

Students

to play

line,

so

I

more than

liked challenges

them."

to

Roper's biggest goal was not excelling on the

field,

one sport

but getting his degree in pre-med. Attending school and

playing sports never created a dilemma for him. "I had been balancing different things all my life," Roper said. "I always had something to do. The main thing was spending my time wisely."

Another football player balancing two sports and was Jaysen Horn. He spent approximately 20 to

studies

25 hours practicing football a week,

games and

three-hour

sometimes

Practices

good

ing a

had

"I

would not

left

attitude kept

to

Horn unmotivated, but bas-

him on an even

push myself," Horn

stay

in addition to

his time with the track team.

said.

keel.

"Otherwise

For Kerry Doetker, volleyball playerund track ber, playing "It

".So

on

it

I

1

mem-

do well. in high school," Doetker said. it.

to

But there was more riding

college."

Doetker, took

two sports meant pressure

was hard, but 1 did it was kind of used to in

I

around here long."

who

spent 20 hours a

6 hours of classes

in the fall

week

practicing and

term, said her parents

were the stabilizing force behind her success.

"They valued success and getting things done," said. "I worked hard for myself and for them knew they would be very hard on me if because Doetker

I

I

failed a class or something.

ive of

Butthey were very support-

me."

Roper, Horn and Doetker said coaches were

all

supportive of their careers as athletes and students and

encouraged them

to

meet demands of the classroom by

giving them extra time to study

when needed. Each had

time for pursuing non-sport, non-school activities, but unlike Bo, none had gotten a Nike contract yet.

Sports 181


CHALLEIMGES Bearcats

K

B y

home

tage, but

to be unbeatable at the begin-

ning of the volleyball season, but despite

assists in

the Bearcats

a single game.

Photo by Jon Britton. school record of 1,169

in a career.

eight-game losing streak when they played Missouri

Southern University. The game against Missouri

proved a challenge.

The

"Cats

to a close.

won

their first

game of the season with

a

3-0 victory over Benedictine College. They started an

Western University gave them two wins. They ended

row and a 2-24 1

record.

Although Yurka played on a different court than she had during her three years with the team, she

Although they did not have the best season, Coach

managed

Sarah Pelster thought the potential was there.

with 1,027 digs.

"We

had a

lot

of talent and depth on the team,"

Pelster said.

At the

MIAA conference in Bolivar, Mo., where the

to place third

Although the team lost long-time players, was plea.sed by the new talent. "Jennifer Pittrich led the team in assists with

1

.

Pelster said. "Additionally, she set records for assists in a

MIAA conference action in Warrensburg, Mo., against

by a freshman.""

which

left

her 40

away from breaking

Terri Palmer"s

list

Pelster

"Cats went up against Southwest Baptist University,

had Becky Brown leading the team with eight digs,

still

on the "Cats all-time dig

Heidi Yurka led the "Cats with nine kills and 18 digs.

nationally-ranked Central Missouri State University,

182 Volleyball

and 59

with 1,126 total assists

to block, setter

ball. Pittrich led

The "Cats could not even boast home court advantage. Because of Lamkin Gym renovations, the 'Cats had to play their home games at Missouri Western in St Joseph, Mo. The lack of familiarity with the court

came

the season with five losses in a

set records

some dy-

namic pertbrmances. the team's hopes were dashed as the season

court advan-

As the Missouri Western players attempt Jennifer Pittrich saves the

The Bearcats looked

lose

Todd

m

1

26,"

most

game, most assists in a season and most digs

Pelster believed that despite the loss of talented players, the volleyball

team would have a competitive,

rewarding and successful future.


Outside

liilttr

Kerry Duetker jumps for the spike. The

Bearcats finished 5-/.?

Jon

/;/

MIAA

the

conference. Photo hy

Hritlon.

During the liame ai-ainsl St. Mary CiiUe^e, outside hitter Heeky Hniwn \pike\ the hall lirown finished her volley.

ball career holdiiii; the record for the

and Has the first Sorthwest

to

history.

achieve over

Photo hy Jon

most

dif;s

1,0(1(1 kills

with 1.22-1

and

difis in

liritton.

/\ Ithough the women's volleyball team had a season

and

highs

of

senior

lows,

Becky Brown proved

victori-

Becky Brown

ous.

Brown had the most service attempts and

tempts

kills,

at-

kill

any player on the

of

team. She had a school record

most

for the

digs

game,

a

in

37 against Missouri

with

Western.

"â&#x20AC;˘r"^'^T|a?^^

Brown's love for the game r^'t*.'

^iz

F

contributed to her solid standing.

W:--^ 1^^ 9''^

"I

ttrasJ

the competition, the

liked

teammates and the team fort," Brown said.

She was proud

ef-

her

of

achievements. "It

was

me

gave

nice a

plishment,"

was always

and

sense

it

sort of

of

accom-

Brown nice to

said.

"It

know was I

looked up to."

Strenuous play

did

put a

on Brown. She sprained

strain

her ankle and pulled muscles.

With a career

of

records

and achievements, Brown had a career to look back on with pride.

Off the

Court Outside hitter Angle Crouch misjudges

her dive lost to

to

save the

hall.

The Bearcats

the University of Missouri-Sl.

Louis in three games. Photo by Jon Britton.

Sports 183


S E ASO OF CHANGE High spirits

By Mike Johnson and Shelley Stangle Breaking from a huddle, the Bearcat football team

dominate

stepped up to the scrimmage

were on the edge of

low scores

line.

They had spent hours

practicing the plays and were ready for action. Fans their seats as they waited for the

team's next move. The score was 7-0 and Northwest

was

in control

of their fourth

game of the

season.

The game against Emporia State University brought their first win and moved the "Cats to l-4overalland 12 in

MIAA.

Lawrence Luster passed for 3 yards and Jason Melnick had six receptions, which was the most by a 1

receiver in a

game

1

The

since 1988.

"Cats staged an

eight-play drive and got the score on Luster's one-yard

run with 2:52 remaining in the half.

The "Cats

games of the season Mankato State.

lost the first three

including their season opener against

55-28. Although first

Mankato had

a 21-0 lead within the

eight minutes of the game, by the second quarter

the 'Cats only trailed by seven points, 28-2

1

,

thanks in

touchdowns by Jesse Haynes, Luster and Melnick. Mankato regained control of the game and it was over for the 'Cats. A highlight of the game was part to

Luster scoring a career-high of

However

1

69 yards

game of

the fifth

Washburn, was considered

to

in

one game.

the season against

be their greatest feat as

home their second win. "The team's best game was against Washburn,"

the 'Cats brought

Jason Krone said.

"We

played both good offense and

defense.""

The

"Cats trampled

Washburn 61-36. Krone made

four touchdowns which were his

was

first

of the season.

It

the third largest single-game point total in the

team's history. Defensive back

Cody Buhrmeister tied

the school's single-game record with three interceptions.

Other honors came when Krone and Donnell Griffin

were recognized by the

MIAA

for their accomplish-

ments not only on the field but in the classroom as well. Krone had a 3.46 grade point average and Griffin a 3.23.

Both were selected for the

MIAA All- Academic

State player and scrambles for

more yardage. The Bearcats had a disappointing season with

only three wins

and

Football Team.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;continued 184 Football

Greg Teak fights off an East Texas

eight losses.

Photo by Laura Riedel.


II

fi

Sports 185


ml rustratlon

#

abounded the

in

athletic

department

the

as

Bearcats' poor perfor-

mance

Harold "Bud

the

Elliott

dismissal

versial

controof

Coach Harold "Bud"

led to

Head

Elliott.

The administration was concerned with the disappointing

seasons the 'Cats had had recent years, Bob Henry, rector of Public said,

in

Di-

Relations,

which hampered student

and athlete recruitment. Elliott

was sis

believed the University

putting too

much empha-

on win/loss records and

not taking into account the

accomplishments the 'Cats had made.

make sense that all of the sudden we talked "It

just did not

about the things that the University stood for

and what we

had done here and then suddenly they

measured

every-

thing on a win/loss record," Elliott said.

The University planned find a

replacement for

to

Elliott

by the end of the year, Henry said.

Off the Field Northwest

tries to

block a field goal

attempt by Noriheast Missouri State.

The Bearcats lost to the Bulldogs 38Photo by Eric Burtis.

16.

186 Football

Strong safety Antonio Sparrow up ends Northeast Missouri State receiver as he catches a pass. This was the ninth straight loss of the Hickory Stick, a symbol of rivalry

between Northwest and Northeast. Photo by Jon Britton.

^ ^ ,

**'^


The "Cats acquired their final uin of the season the week following the Washburn game, when they beat Missouri-Rolla 27-20.

"The

best part of the season

was

the middle because

we were winning." Luster said. "Another highlight for me was the Missouri-Rolla game. had 168 yards I

The Bearcats swarm around Art Austin, Northeast Missouri Stale University tailback, as he breaks through

North west 's tine. The 'Cats ended the season 3-6 in conference and 3-8 overall. Photo by Jon Britton.

slump losing the remaining games of the season. The season ended with a .3-6 record overall and 3-6

rushing with one touchdown and threw two touch-

for the

downs

Elliott,

in the final

which resulted

MI AA

in

two and ahalf minutes of the game a 27-20 victory. I was also voted

Player of the

Week

after that

game."

all

was not gold

for the player.

Luster was arrested for shoplifting three days before the

Homecoming game against Southwest Baptist UniGreg Teale started in his first game of the

versity so sea.son.

According

to the rule

books, Luster had to

sit

out one game.

Despite the temporary loss of the quarterback, the "Cats headed into the

hopes but like

lost

was going

Homecoming game

with high

21-17. Chris Brooks scored what looked to

be the winning point of the

only 1:53 remaining, however,

them a winning four-point

lead.

SBU

game with

scored, giving

The "Cats went

was terminated. Although

Luster also passed more yards than any other quarterback since 1986, but

MI AA Conference. Head Coach Harold "Bud" who had coached the 'Cats for seven seasons,

into a

success,

Elliott was blamed for the team's lack of some members of the team were shocked and

were other factors

said there

that contributed to the

losing season.

"We

had a

lot of young players and a pretty tough Ben Hansen said. "Yet everyone seemed anxious to get a new coach. They did not see the stuff the team was up against. Things started to get old and the team was fed up with the whole situation." The "Cats completed the season with individual

schedule,"

achievements and records

set.

losing season, they learned

how

managed

to

keep

Although they had a to

work together and

their spirits high,

accomplishing

individual goals in the process.

Sports 187


Âť

^ A<

^

i

is

^^'.

DITIO Bearcats

Todd

m

K

B

The Bearcat women's cross country team gave an

strive with

impressive display of speed gional, but despite hard

youth and

their

1993 season

in Joplin,

Mo.,

in the

MIAA

a

1

st

place finish

5K.

Conference, Stains led the team,

finishing 20th overall in the 129- women field with a

1

split

in the

three-mile

with 18:14.8.

According

to Stains,

Wheeler fin44 runners who completed

Mark Roberts placed

3rd

in the

4.4 mile run

at

"At mid-season we ran very well." Alsup

we won two meets

(who had been

in a

said. "In

row. However, our best

splints,

while Chris Blondin

a 10th place finisher) received a knee

injury and that had negatively affected our perfor-

breaking the record was one of

the highlights of the season.

good knowing that I had accomplished something from all the hard work in practice," Stains said. "I felt

1

Simpson Invitationals with 22: 14. Head Coach Richard Alsup said injuries were the main reason for not making the top ten at regionals.

freshman had bad shin

set in 1984, In addi-

1984

who

the

previous school record of 18:54 set in

Eustice,

a time of 33:29.

ished 59 overall out of the the race.

Rheba

men's competition was

in the

fact,

broke the record

led by

1th place.

time of 18:53.5 in the 5K. Stains' time broke the

tion, she

188 Cross Country

women's team was

finished in

Leading the 'Cats

the

1

At the

During the Central Missouri State University meet, the

Shannon Wheeler with

1

at

Johnson County Cavalier Cup with

by Renee Stains

Mike Reiff

LeRoy Simpson Renata Eustice placing 2nd in the 5K 1st

with a time of 9.48. The team scored a 2nd place finish at

College. Photo by

points.

The 'Cats placed

experience

line into top ten territory.

finishing 13 out of 19 with 31

Inviiationals with

Great Lakes Re-

work and determination, they

were unable to cross the finish

The "Cats ended

at the

Trying to nil seconds off his time, Jason August works on breaking the tie with Park College. In the Bearcat Distance Classic held at Nodaway Lake, the 'Cats tied with Park

mance

at the

Great Lakes Regional."

Although, the cross country teams did not advance

NCAA

Division

II

Championships, the "Cats had

solid core of returners.

to

a


l/l/,

a

h

t

I

record that

would make \ndy Wuebker finishes the uphill climb, bringing in a 27th pUue finish at the Hearcat Distance Classic at Siidaway

senior

a

MIAA champion-

proud, fresh-

ships in Warrensbiirg, Mo., with a total of 1 49 points. I'hoto

man Jack Hams ran to

Uike. The 'Cats raced to finish 7th atthe

by Mike Reiff

Teammates Tracy Robotham and Jennifer Sodes pace each other during the

5k

Bearcat Cross Country Distance

Classic meet at i\'odaway iMke.

of jack Harris and showed what it

line

Robotham and Nodes

finished with times of 22: 14 and 21:45. respectively. Photo

by Chris Tucker.

head

the the

took to be one of the men's

cross country team's most valuable players.

Consistently out performing

the

more experienced

on the team,

team

Hams

players led the

to a 1st place finish at

LeRoy Simpson

2nd place

with a

Invitational finish in

the

8K run. He placed 20th atthe MIAA Championships, ahead of his teammates Jack Hams was modest about

was no

"It

said. It

his high standing.

"I

big deal,"

did not get

Hams

cocky about

or anything. The other guys

did not treat

me any differently

other than the fact that

I

was

a freshman."

Extensive training

open to

injuries

left

late

Harris in

the

season. "I

ran 70-90 miles a week

during the said.

"I

season,"

Hams

had a stress fracture."

His determination and

skill

on the track proved Harris

was

a player to watch.

Off the Path Runners take off to a 3rd place finish at the Bearcat Distance Classic. After

a rebuilding season, the team finished 5th at the

MIAA

Championships.

Thoto by Mike Reiff

Sports 189


Football

MIAA 3-6

MO-West

14-21

Northeast Emporia

16-38 21-15 61-36 27-20 17-21 12-38 10-41 33-49

Washburn UM-Rolla

Southwest Pittsburg

CMSU

MO

Southern

Overall

Record 3-8 '////

M^r

.^

Front row; Becker;

Row

2;

Dimond;

iM.

r

'4

Oliver; Quinn; Ruse, Elliult, coach; Cade; Guslatson; Schat'fner; Johnson and Bergan.

Brooks; Philhps; Bowers; Miner; Blakey; Kimhrough; Diven; Knust; Fulls and Melnick,

Row

3:

Roper;

Zom; Blum; Krone; Spence; Forney and Moore. Row 4: Grooms; Shores; Rinehart; Adwell; Richmond; Buhrmeister; Van Fosson; Vial and Harris. Row 5: Combs; Hazen; McCartney; Horn; Ford;

Teale; Green; Haynes;

Alsup;

Danielson; Willits; Sleinkuehler; Wheeler and Griffm. Moser;Stollc; Mortis and Thurman.

Row

7:

Row

6:

Glas; Dorrell; Larson; Maras; Miller; Fogel; Krener;

Sparrow; Massey; Dorris; Perkins; Laffey; Luster; Starkebaum; Hansen

and Scheib. Back row: Lanning; Williams, Renfro; Fuller; Uhde; Druse; Bilslend; Harper; White and Wilson.

Women's Cross Country Simpson

Inv.

William Jewell Inv. Midwest College

3rd 3rd 17th

Cup

2nd

LeRoy Simpson Inv. Northwest Classic MIAA Championship

1st 3rd 5th 13th

Cavalier

NCAA-II Regionals

Front row: Rochell Hill; Neffie Chamas; Renee Stains and Renata Eustice. Back row; Seller;

Tracy Rohothani; Rheba Eustice; Jennifer Nodes; Mary

McCoy and

Ron DeShon, coach;

Jennifer

Richard Alsup. coach.

Men's Cross Countr Simpson

Inv.

William Jewell Inv. Midwest College Cavalier Cup

LeRoy Simpson Inv. Northwest Classic MIAA Championship NCAA-II Regionals

From row: Jason August; Chris Blondin; Shannon Wheeler; John Holcomb; Andy Wuebker and Eric Devolt. Back row; Ron DeShon, coach; Ron Perkins; Mark Roberts; Jack Harris; Jim Ulvestad: Kevin Cook; Clint Johnson and Richard Alsup, coach.

190 Fall Wrap up


FALL

WRAP UP ^^

After the Washburn game, quarterback Lawrence Luster ranked 2nd in the

MIAA

Conference

and 4th

in

passing 123.5 yards

in

offense. Chris Brooks

total

ranked 3rd with 8.3

yard.s per punt return.

The women's cross country team

^j^

finished 2nd out of

Cup. Three

1

at the

women made

.ICCC Cavalier

their

way on

the

Northwest Cross Country 5-K All-Time

Top 1

Rheba Eustice turned in a time of 9:3^ lor .Slh. Renee Stains a time of 19:42 10.

placing 7th and Renata Eustice finished

with 19:48

I^F

at 9th.

The men's cross country team

Park College for

1st

place

at the

tied

Bearcat

Distance Classic. The top finisher was Jack Harris in 6th place in the 8-K course.

QMJennifer

Pittrich set a Bearcat volley-

most assists by a freshman. Becky Brown was presented with a plaque

ball record for

for appearing in 100 consecutive matches.

Angle Crouch and had

led the

team twice

a career high

in kills

28 digs against

Washburn. As Heather Potts humps the hall. Lisa Sherman and Angle Crouch wail for the assist. Northwest lost against Peru Slate 0-3. Photo by Russ Weydert.

Volleyball Emporia

MIAA 3-7

Overall

1

2-24

WW


Forward John Golden blocks a shot by a Mid-America Nazarene player. The

game against Mid-America

Nov. 23, was the first basketball game played in the

newly refurbished Lamkin Gym. Photo by Todd Weddle.

The volleyball team plays Peru State University at Missouri Western. The Bearcats played all their tions.

home games

at Missouri Western because

of renova-

Photo by Riiss Wevdert.

Plumbers cut pipe for the iMmkin Gym renovations. The final project cost Northwest $6.1 million. Photo by Kerrie Kelly.

192 Gym Hassle


CHANGING LOCATION Marckmann After year

Matt

By As the

tall

of

semester began, students returned expect-

ing to see the renovations of

Lamkin

Gym

completion. Instead they were surprised

nearing

to see thai

Lamkin's renovations were only beginning. The hea\ \ rains of the summer months had slowed construction acti\ilies.

The changes

Lamkm

in

were

teams gain

a

most

vast, but the

important changes were the adding of a student recreational center at the north

construction,

end of the building, the

total

new court

refurbishing of Bearcat Arena and the addition of

on the south end of the gym. The volleyball team was inconvenienced the most by

offfices

the project, as they

games

at

were forced

home

to play their

Community College

Missouri Western

in St.

Joseph.

"We knew

what we were up against before the

season began," Head Coach Sarah Pelster said. "So

much

traveling time

The travel took a

made

toll

it

a very difficult year."

mentally and physically on the

volleyball team, but the "Cats

on the court and

was tough

"It

in

to

still

had a good showing

the classroom.

keep up with our studying since we

were traveling so much," Hayley Hanson

The Noilhwest basketball teams also the

gym

construction running

late.

said.

felt

the

toll o\

Both teams had

share practice time with the volleyball team

Martindale

a bother, but as

arena,

in

Gym.

"Not ha\ ing a

new

to

it

gym

at the

beginnmg of the year was

soon as we played our first game

made

the time seem worth

it."

in the

basketball

player Jamie Hoberg said.

it

With all the disturbances from the work on Lamkin. was a peculiar year in Northwest sports. "All the problems with the

we were

facility," volleyball player

The students were

own

gym were

behind us and

excited to get a chance to play in the

Jenn

new

Pittrich.

also excited about having their

recreational facility

where they did not have

to

share time with varsity athletics. "It

was great

that the students finally

had an

athletic

area of their own," Kevin Pitts said. "I just wished

was

a

little

With the completion of Lamkin, ushered

in

it

bigger." a

new

era

was

Bearcat sports.

Sports 193


TEAM

l/l/th

a

skill

making

for

TRIU

baskets and

Bearcats

blocking

shots, Donnie Taylor

had

a

cessful

Dannie Taylor

enjoy taste

sucse-

of victory

nior year.

With more than anyone else on the team, Taylor aver-

aged

1

5 points and four

bounds per game. Taylor tive for

With

saw the year as

posi-

a

lot of

adversity,"

we got used we played a

Taylor said. "Once to

each other,

was

play ball

men's team

to play semi-

going to try and

new Bearcat Arena. The 'Cats brought a new attitude and excitement to the game as they scored a winning season with several down-

season brought the 'Cats face-toface with rival Missouri Western.

still

and then would have

James Holberg scored 14 points during the game, a career high.

I

to look at

my career more

closely," Taylor said.

Although Taylor excelled, he did not regard himself any

John Golden said this victory was especially memorable because of the long-standing rivalry between Northwest and

Mo-West. "There had been a rivalry between us and Mo-West for a long time,"

better than his teammates. really did

"I

not think about

Taylor said.

it,"

"I

looked at

everyone being equal. Every-

one

did

Lamkin

felt the pres-

The first conference game of the

was

professional basketball. "I

the renovation of

the

to-the-buzzer victories.

good game." His plan

Gym,

sure to give fans a reason to pack the

the team.

"We had

By Mike Johnson

re-

what they needed

to

do to get the )ob done." Getting his job done and

doing his part for the team,

was

Golden

said.

Ricky Jolley

the better team."

Donnie Taylor's layup

in the final

20 seconds and

inability to get a shot off in the

team's

with a come-from-behind 85-82 victory. Led by Taylor with 16 points and Darrell

reer

eased by the Lions with only seconds remaining.

shooting baskets.

With 10 seconds

Wrenn

with 15, the 'Cats

to go, the 'Cats

narrowly beat the

Lincoln Blue Tigers. The score was 69-68 favor

Off the

Court

when Derrek Smith was

free throws.

Smith nudged the "Cats

in

Lincoln's

Landing both to a

one point

victory, 70-69.

"A

couple of the early games were

was ultimately good

helped us

in the

for the team.

long run," Holberg said.

down

to the wire,

which was good because we were used to it later on." All was not perfect in season play. In the game against Central Missouri State University, the 'Cats

rallied to lead

first half.

by as many as 14

game ended with

However,

in the

second

CMSU

half.

The

a Northwest loss of 85-81 despite

Ricky Jolley's 24 points.

>

Another big victory was the 74-62 win over Pittsburg State University. The team trailed for much of the first half, but a steal and subsequent layup by Steve Simon sparked Northwest to pull ahead.

The 'Cats enjoyed

their best start since

a 5-0 conference record and

Holberg said although the games created tension, the experience "It really

194 Mens Basketball

fouled.

attempts to score against Pittsburg State

The Bearcats won 74-62, advancing them to the semifinals of the MIAA playoffs. Photo by Jon Britton. University.

boasted a 22-9 lead in the

past the Missouri Southern Lions

Taylor found a promising cain

final

possession gave Northwest the win, 66-64.

The 'Cats slipped

conference. Photo by Jon Britton.

"The win showed who

The fourth conference game, played against Southwest Baptist University, came down to the last 40 seconds as Golden sent a pass to Chad Deahl who dunked the basket. Although SBU tied the score,

SBU's

Head coach Steve Tappmeyer signals to his team during the playoff game against Pittsburg State University, which the Bearcats lost 68-62. The Bearcats had an 11-6 record in the

1

though the team saw their record place

tie

1983 with

1-4 overall record. Alslip to

9-4 and a 3rd

with Northeast Missouri State University, continuedl

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;


II

players

still

had confidence

the conference or as "I

thought

low as

we had

in their

chances

to place as

high as second

in

sixth.

a chance of placing high in both the regular season

and tournament championships

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about

a

QO percent chance of both."

Golden said. Coach Steve Tappmeyer agreed with Golden and cited teamwork as the primary reason for the success the team enjoyed. "The first year I was here we won the conference tournament and we had an automatic bid to the NCAA." Tappmeyer said. "This team was

The knock was louder Missouri, 100-75. The

third-place standing as the "Cats lost 74-69 and ended the season with a 1

"It

time

a first-round

home game

the

game

against rival

196 Mens Basketball

Holberg

said.

room

after the

game.

in the

locker

"'It

was

a really emotional and sad

We worked really hard and got so

in the

"I

thought

it

was

a

good season,'" Golden was no animosity or

together as a team. There

said.

"Everybody stayed

rivalry."

Despite the playoff disappointment, the "Cats' season of wins brought

SBU

two nights

i

it.""

Although the team did not achieve conference championship. Golden

Conference Tournament.

However,

and 18-10 overall.

hurt really bad,"

close and did not get

as the "Cats beat University of St. Louis-

game earned them

1-6 conference record

looked back on the season with pride.

knocking on the door of reaching the same type of success."

MIAA

Forward Doniiie Taylor passes around a Mid-America player. During the game,\ Taylor doubled his season average by scoring 30 points. Photo by Todd Weddle.'i

later sealed their

a

new brand

of basketball that fans packed the stands to see.

y


Doniiie Taylor goes up for a hook shot as a Missouri Soulhern player attempts to block. Taylor wored 16 points during the Jan. 26 game against Mo-Southern.

Photo by Jon britton. Center Ricky Jolley dribbles on the inside

and

five rebounds in the final

Hcarcats

won

S5-S2. Photo b\

game

Jon

to set

up a

shot. Jolley

had

11 points

against Missouri Southern which the

Hritton.

Simon prepares to block as a Southwest Baptist University player Steve

attempts to drive the hall to the basket.

The Bearcats

SHV in MIAA

the semi-finals

lost

74-69 to

game of the playoffs. Photo by Jon

Britton.

Sports 197


Women s Mo-Western

Basketball

MIAA2-14

Overall

Record B-20


WINTER WRAP UP Shelly Jermain led Bearcul scorers wiili 14 points

and grabbed

eight rebounds in the souri Southern.

game

against Mis-

During the game against

University of Missouri

down

Schear pulled

a learn high of

Louis. Cindy

at St.

a career high 17 re-

bounds.

Wayne Winstead was

NCAA

Di\ ision

II

21st

among

active

women's coaches'

total

wins. His career-winning percentage

.606 put

him 57th on

the D-II

oi'

list.

The 'Cats saw their school record losing streak of 16 games end in the game against Northeast Mis.souri State Unviersity with a score of 84-69.

The men's basketball team enjoyed a six-game winning streak, the longest streak since an 8-0 start in 1991.

In the

game

sity, six

with

against

Emporia

State Univer-

players .scored in the double figures

17

points by Ricky Jolley,

16 by

Donnie Taylor, 14 points by DeiTck Smith, 13 points

by Jamie Hoberg, 13 points by

Scott Fidler and 10 points by

Chad Deahl.

Head Coach Steve Tappmeyer had his 90th win in the game against Missouri Southern on Jan 26. Jolley scored in the double figures in each

of the

last five

games, the longest streak

for

any 'Cat basketball player.

Steve Simon juinps up for the shot us Missouri

Wistcni players attempt

went on

to place

by Jon Britton.

to stop liim.

The Bearcats

.hdin the MM/4 Conference. Photo


During the football kick-off Jennifer English performs with the Flag Corps. The Flag Corps showed team spirit at every home game. Photo by iMiira Riedel.

The Bearcat Marching Band drumline does the "Hokey Pokey" white waiting for the football team to return to the field. The pride of Northwest was featured at all home football games. Photo by Jon Britton.

Bobby Bearcat clowns around with band members during the game against East Texas State University. The band played at various parades and games. Photo by Jon Britton.

200 Flag and Band


AND

SIGHT

SOU D Mike Johnson and Kim Todd VViih tluizs twirling and instrunienis plasing. the

Bcaaat

Band and Flag Corps entertained

MaiL'hintz

with sight and sound.

Aceording sic,

to

A! Sergei, assistant professor of mu-

direction ofthe Flag Corps and

turned over to John Fnt/i

at

"Enlzi was in charge of the group for the

"He and

first

did a fine job." in all

Marching Band

IMorthuyest

time,"

the students under his direction

Flag Corps took part

banners raise

Marching Band was

the beginning of the

semester.

Sergei said.

Music and

fan's spirits

activities.

Jennifer English, one ofthe two Flag Corps captains,

team performed up

said the

"We

to expectations.

did a good job," English said. "I

pleased with practicing.

how

things went.

The work was

wards were well worth

all

We

spent a

was very lot

of time

often difficult, but the rethe effort."

One ofthe highlights for the Flag Corps was demonstrating its abilities at the Homecoming parade and game.

"We

enjoyed Homecoming," English

seemed

to

be really

in

said.

"We

sync as a group. There was

nothing better than performing to an enthusiastic

crowd."

When

the

City Chiefs'

Marching Band performed at a Kansas game at halftime, band member Kenna

Lambertsen was nervous. "It was kind of intimidating, but we had played there before," Lambertsen said. "That was really cool because they

knew who we were and cheered."

Although there was a large number of freshmen

in

band, Lambertsen said the quality of their performance did not suffer.

"We

thought that

really did not,"

it

might make a difference, but

Lambertsen

said. "In fact,

it

it

sounded

better a lot of times."

Entzi said both the Flag

Corp and the Marching Band

performed admirably.

"The students were

all

in the

Flag Corp and Marching Band

outstanding and put

in a lot

of extra time

perfecting their skills," Ent?,i said.

Northwest's Marching Band and Flag Corps' talent kept audiences enthralled as the flags turned and the

band played on.

Sports 201


A my Krohn makes an attempt to score I

he crowd

cheered

for

Louis. The Bearcats lost the

game

against Missoiiri-St.

77-70.

Photo by Russ

Weydert.

Cindy Schear

as she helped

North-

lead

west through the season.

Scoring

Cindy Schear

a

nine point av-

erage and a .535 free throw

Schear

percentage,

clearly

stood out. She led Northwest

21

with

and 21

points

re-

bounds against William Jewell.

Schear had 16

sists, eight

13

steals

played

in

as-

blocked shots and

258 minutes

in

27 games.

Although she had a great

Schear acknowledged

year,

team's

the

successes

through a tough year.

"We were

a

young team and

kept our hopes up," Schear

"We

said.

never had the

feel-

ing we were in a losing year. It was a learning year. thought I

in

the future. Northwest would

be a powerful team."

Schear especially enjoyed the year because of a rough previous season. "I

had a rough time

last

Schear said. "I was contributing

(this

year," like

I

felt

season]."

Schear shot and scored a successful season.

Off the Court Cindy Schear reaches for the basketball.

Schear averaged nine

points a game. Photo by Jon Britton.

202 Women's Basketball

Justean Bohnsack looks for an open teammate in the game against Northeast Missouri State University. The Bearcats

won

after a

16-game losing

streak.

Photo by Jon Britton.


EXPERIE CE

I B

Johnson

Mike

y

because of the \oung cluh." Winstead said. "But the\ pla\ed hard and with a

Showing experience leads to success, the \\t)men's came back from a 15-game losing

basketball team streak to

win

six

After a rough

of their next 10 games. start, the

Bearcats rebounded with a

84-69 win against Northeast Missouri State Uni\er-

lot

of competitiveness."

in the

game

against Southwest Baptist University, a season high for

Amy

Krohn's 20-point binge against Pittsburg State

second

seventh time she had scored double digit points and

The 6

1

,

"Cats

won

but faltered

in

game against Lincoln, 7(Sgame against Missouri-Rolla, 62-

their next

the

was

the fourth time she sc(Med

10 rebounds in the

rebounds

in

game

place.

a successful season.

Head Coach Wayne Winstead said although the difficulties, it was a positive experience. "We knew there was a possibility we would struggle

against

in a

game

SBU, marking

of court time

the

one game.

gave up even though we

team faced

20 points

Ickes said the team never gave up.

The season ended with a 6-20 standing. The 'Cats did not tair well in the Ml.A.A Conference with a 2-14 standing which put them in a tie for last

50.

through lack

a non-starter.

during the season. Shelly Jermain scored 14 points and

half.

shows

Several pla>ers had solid seasons, despite the youth

of the team. Sandy Ickes scored 13 points

The Tats" 54 percent shooting from the field uas the best shooting game o\' the season. The team also hit a high when they scored 2(^ freethrows during the sity.

Effort

"It

was

really challenging," Ickes said. lost a lot.

We

"We

never

worked hard."

Despite the losses, solid effoii from players ensured

Justean Bohnsack looks for an openiiif; at the Missouri Western f-aine. The win aganst the (iriffons was the Bearcats

'first for

the season. Photo by Ritss Weyderl.

Sports 203


Parlicipanis in the iiuraimiial cross couiur\- meet hei;in the nice after the gun fired.

is

Intrumurals provided students on oppintionty to compete and have fun.

Photo h\ Mike

Reiff.

Intramural Winners Swimming:

Kappa Sigma Alpha

Fratern/ty-Tau

Sorority-Alpha

Epsilon

A/fen-Chad Dennis

Women-Bottom Feeders Golf: Fraternity-Jerry

Young/Logan Noecker

Sorority-Heather Hamlin/Emily Nelles

Men-Jeff Moser/Steven Lossman

Co-Rec Sand

Home Run

Volleyball: Wild

Dogs

Hitting: Fraternity-Nate

Davis/AdamCourter

Sorority-Kamm\ Pingel/Beth Lewis Men-Steve Bonderer/Bryan Dickerson lA'omen-Tricia Peters

Longest Drive Contest: Men-Chad Robbins 285 yards

Women-Jnc\a Peters 75 yards Flag Football: Fratern/ty-Alpha Kappa

Lamda Ekabs

Soront>^AIpha Sigma Alpha Red

Men-Wild Dawgs 1/1/omen-Ladies of First Wilson

Cross Country Teams: Fraternity-Ph\ Sig Soror/t>AAIpha Sigma Alpha Men-Cat Daddy Individuals: Fratern/t^Ryan

Mahoney

Soror/ÂŁy-N ikki Hensley

Men-Derrick Hoger 1/1/omen-Karen Hoger

Battle of the Beef: Roids

Freethrow: Men-Larry Walls/Bryan Mercer l/1/omen-Sharon

Tamehus

Reebok Spot Shot: Men-Bryan Mercer l/l/omen-Janet Frohlich

Racquetball Singles: Fraternity-Kurt Fink

Men-Jeff Baker l/l/omen-Alison Doyle

Doubles

Fri.>;ern/ty-Kurt

Fink/Mike Steelman

Soronty-Jennifer Kelly/Karne Hernck

Men-Joe Chelovhar/Anc Howe Bad Comi)any team player. K<ny Sihraiiun. shoots iliiriiii; an inlranuiral basketBad Company won the intermediate championship. Plioto by Bretl

ball gciine.

Dwyer.

204 Intramurals

Wk


CAMPUS

COMPETES Dorrel Intramurals

Lance

By Anew

recreation center, better sportsmanship and an

made

increase in participants

a successful year for

provide an

Northv\est intraniurals.

Gym

As Lumkin

^~:

Arena over the

fall

was being turned uito Bearcat semester, some of the events sched-

uled for the semester were unable to be offered. Ac-

Bob Lade, Northwest

cording to

most of the regularly scheduled events for the

fall

semester went on as planned.

"We were usually did," offered

able to

Lade

in the fall

do most

said.

alternative

intraniurals director,

the things that

ol

game plan

we

"A vast majority of our events

were outside anyway.""

The traditional intramural events continued to be the most popular. Sports such as basketball, flag football, Softball

and volleyball were

Walleyball was

student's favorites.

still

growing new game among

the fastest

students in the program.

The

intraniurals

program was

a student run

program,

as they did e\erything from officiating the games,

having meetings to discuss an events rules before

its

season started and scheduling events.

"The students did basically everything, they ran the program and we had a very good staff this year," Lade said. "The times I had to step in were when there was a disciplinary problem.""

With any

intraniurals program,

sportsmanship

played an important role to the program"s success.

Sportsmanship w as as students

would be

if

at a

much

better level at

Northwest

were warned of what the consequences they practiced bad sportsmanship.

"The sportsmanship this season was much better than it was last season," Lade said. "Our staff emphasized

good sportsmanship and we

reali/e that they

also be taken

were out here

away from

a

to

tried to

make people

have tun. Points could

team

for

poor sportsman-

ship, so that too helped.""

Students involved in intraniurals also thought good

sportsmanship was "I

Hays

better.

thought the atmosphere was not as said.

"Everybody knew

would not be

that

tense,'"

Tom

bad sportsmanship

tolerated."

Intraniurals provided students not playing a varsity

sport a chance to

prowess.

Many

compete and show

their athletic

took advantage of this opportunity.

Sports 205


TRUE BELIEVERS Hanrahan

Galen

Players rely By Believe

it

was what Ripley

or not? That

said

many

times on his famous television program. That was even

on rituals for

what some college and pro-athletes said sometimes. Superstitions were a big part of our lives at times.

were even

luck before

common

world of athletics

in the

at

They

North-

west.

Bearcat men's basketball Assistant Coach Del

games

Morley admitted he was not always at

superstitious, but

times he could recall doing certain things before big

games.

"My best game

of

came when

right,"

Morley

my

left

my

career as a college basketball

my left shoe on before my "Now even as a coach I always put before my right."

player

I

put

said.

shoe on

Morley did not notice

that the basketball

team did

anything superstitious before games.

"From his

own

was nothing we did

a team stand point there

together as a team, but

I

certain things,"

was sure Morley

that

each player had

said.

Outside Northwest, professional athletes were wrapped up in there own superstitions. Even former Chicago Bulls basketball great Michael Jordan had his own pre-game superstitious ritual. Jor-

dan always put white dust on his hands and then shook it

off into the face of the courtside announcers

at

Bulls

home games. Another "Cat athlete who had her own was basketball player Justean Bohnsack. "I

always bounced the

once before

ball three times

superstition

and spun

it

Bohnsack said. "In high school, I would always wear the same black and gold colored pony tail for my hair." These were sports superstitions that Bohnsack had done

in

I

shot

it

at the free

throw

line."

high school that had carried to her day in

college as a 'Cat basketball player.

The women's

basketball team also had a supersti-

tious ritual they did before

games.

"After the pre-game talk with coach, a quiet talk as a team,"

Bohnsack noted ers could say a

that

Bohnsack

we always had

said.

during the quiet time, the play-

team prayer or just have a moment of

silence.

So whether you believed or not, superstitions were at Northwest and throughout the rest of the

played out

sport's world.

206 Athletic Superstitions


.\ssi\iani

Coach Del Morley always puts on

his left

shoe

before his right. Morley started this after one of the best i;ames of his collei;e career. I'holo hy Tony Miceli.

Bohnsack shoots a free throw. Bohnsack always bounced the ball three times and spun it once. Photo hy Tony MiceU.

Jiistean

The basketball team gathers in the locker room. Prior to every game, players pictured the outcome of the game. Photo hy Tony Miceli.

Sports 207


John Holcombe goes through practice.

on

his form-running during track

Holcombe participated in cross-country as a walk-

athlete.

Photo b\ Laura Riedel.

John Holcombe stretches before cross countiy practice.

Holcombe did not

receive a scholarship from Northwest to

participate in varsity sports. Photo b\ Laura Riedel.

Cody Buhnneister fights for

the ball during

a game against

Washburn. Buhrmeisterwasawalk-onathletewho gave recruited players more pressure to do their

208 Walk-on Athletes

best.

Photo by Liiira Riedel.


V^WALK-ON ATHLETES A

Sealy Coming onto

Kenrick

By

walk-on was an athlete

who was

not recruited.

There were many schools across the country

championships with players

The major

won

that

like these at their disposal.

and the walk-on was, the recruited athlete who signed acontract to play forateam had to follow the guidelines stipulated in that team's contract.

hopes of making

in

challenge

it.

recruit, the

team poses

A walk-on just came

out on their free will and practiced with the team

Unlike the

an established

difference between the recruited athlete

w alk-on could quit

at

any time

without the repercussions of losing their scholarship.

Walk-on safety

football player

who was

Division

Cody Buhrmeister. a free 1993 Snow Bowl

selected to the

All-Star football teain, thought that being a

II

walk-on athlete was a challenge altogether. "I

had

to

work harder

Buhrmeister

The

said.

in

order to get that money."

"That was the biggest pressure."

fulfillment of being a walk-on could either be

rewarding or simply devastating.

"No one expected me to succeed." walk-on track John Holcombe said. "So this put a lot of pressure on me to either produce or get out of the way."

athlete

The pros and cons of being low

athlete's "It just

a walk-on athlete

weighed and could

not always easily

result

were in

an

self image.

depended on the person and their work ethic,"

Holcombe

said.

to contribute or

"Being a walk-on, no one expected even

last

me

very long on the team."

The sentiment of making

the

team was always

a

rewarding one.

"When made it. there w as this great boost of energy I

made me

feel

good

inside." Buhrmeister said.

Richard Alsup was pleased when he saw the remarkable "I

improvement by

the walk-on.

wanted everyone

Alsup

said.

From

"And

I

to excel

and

it

excited me."

encouraged them each time."

the perspective of others,

one would think

a walk-on's status or role on a team

was of

that less

significance than his counterpart.

"No one expected you to contribute or even last \ ery long on the team," Holcombe said. "This became a mi.sconception because some of the greatest athletes in college were walk-ons themsehes."

Buhrmeister and Holcombe proved that walk-ons could be a viable part of the team.

Sports 209


210 Groups

Division


^^'.

^'''''

We

came from

had our own

all

walks

individual

of

life

and we

interests,

but

00 groups active on campus,

with over

1

there was

SOMETHING for everyone.

Greeks were kicking

off

another year

with Rush while other groups were also

TO make their

trying

mark. With Stu-

dent Senate recognition of the controversial

group GALTAN, homosexuals

had an organization where they felt they

could

really

BELONG.

While some people were beginning their first

full

year as

official

groups, the

Bearcat Sweethearts were waiting see

if

TO

their organization would continue

to exist. But

it

seemed no matter what

the interest, there

was always some-

thing to be involved

IN

GROUPS ^ Members of Amnesty International staged a walk across campus to spark interest in their organization. Amnesty was dedicated to preserving human rights and preventing cruel treatment of people worldwide. Photo by Jon Britton.

Groups 211


Creating Awareness OF Black History ABC stresses

education

concerning oneself and others

e-'^%


ABC.

ABC

Wilson and Dcnickcsh Abraha. Back Row: Karen Walker; Jcrmell Har-

tal

Luther King

ris;

ot

Jr

stressed

adviser;

cious Piisnc; Carleanc Haukins; Crys-

They sponsored a candlclighl walk in honor of Dr. Martin

ABC

Wmui,

Front Riiv^: Liz

Limita Rdulaml; Tina Braekclt; Pre-

liie

importance

Mark Pichon; Daniel DcLlmhos;

Pamela Perry; Trc\

a Allen

and Fatums

Kassim.

education concerning oneself

and others.

Members of faniiJN

ABC

adopted a

Christmas time and

at

donated clothes and to\s

lo

them.

Aecounlinj; .SoLieU Ironi Row: Kariiii .

ILiniann; Debbie Over; C'alhy Hner;

Accounting Society They sponsored guest speaker John

McCune

ot

McCilada's anil

Lisa Whitney; Amic Blackburn; Johnna Ridenour; Karen Brand and Kristin llainkel;

Piilien.

They held

social events in-

cluding bowling. pi//a and a

Christmas party.

The group

pro\ ided account-

ing majors the opportunity [o interact with

each other and the

professional

community.

Community senice

MeKenzic. Row 2: Crystal Thea Linipus; Joan Hayden;

R>an O'Rourke; Tim

Houlette; Karen

Hawkins; Lori Bradshaw; Dena Mathias and Robin Casey. Back Row: Dave Hancock, adviser; Kevin Harrington; Joe Desmond; Jamie Morey; Christopher Kates; .Scott Christuse; David Wahlert; Ryan Mahoney and Jason Ezjell.

involve-

ment included Missouri Senior Citizens tax credit.

Ag Ambassadors. Parsons;

Ac,

Ambassadors

Row: Melissa Duane

adviser;

Hardy and Molly Back Row: Dawn Hoover;

Jewell, adviser; Julia

They promoted Northwest through recruiting from home tovMis and

Front

Nancy Diggs.

giving tours of the

Morris.

John Sidden; Henery Blessing; Allen

Huhn and Tonva

Stiens.

agriculture department.

Members tional

attended the na-

liilure

1

armer's of

.â&#x20AC;˘\merica coinention.

Members must ha\e completed

.M)

credit hours

and ha\ e

a

GPA.

2..^

Meetings were held once a month.

Ag

Club. Front Row:

Shields;

A(.

Members

Club

homes and sang Christmas

car-

A.

s

|i

o n

s

o

r

e d

umer and T.

Homecoming

float.

geared toward agriculture

w as

They held weeks.

a\ ailable lo

Row M J.

J.

L.

Stephens;

inter-

Hildebrand: T. Williams; S.

MeCray; D. Boldt; A. Barton and C. Holbrixik.

M.

This social organization vsas

ests but

Shields.

Akey; W. Taylor;

a son; D.

a

Riggan; M. S;uiger; J.

KRciirdon; R.Allen; A. Slaughter; J. John-

barnwarning dance, a barbecue

and entered

R.

Hcha eriUidJ. Mather. Row 2:

Hill: J. Plaster: J.

Plaginan; A. Becler; I

M. Jackson;

Parsons; K.Rowlings; J. F.ngcl;

R. Shirley; D.

nursing

\isited

ols.

The y

M.

Row 4: C. Douelus; S. Bondcrcr;

Springer;

M.

Morris;

J.

Vincent; S.

Blessing; S. Beeler; B. Marsh;ill; C. Flcak;

C. Hunt and H. Neess. Back

Row: N.

anyone.

Bennett; B. Gulshall; D. Oligschlaeger; C.

two

Jack.son;E.CouLs;J.Batterson;J.Malter:C.

meeting.s every

Hildebr;ind; H. Behrens; S.

Vamer ;uid G.

Boherbuc.

Organizations 213


Ag

Row:

Council. Front

Jodi Akey;

Leasa Wilkerson: Jay Engel: Melissa

Ac Council

Parsons; Russell Shields and Audrea Bcelcr.

Back Row: Hollie Behrens;

John Sidden; Matt Janssen;

Mike Jackson and

Erii:

Couts:

Scotte Hansen.

Members

represented

the

all

other agriculture organizations

and planned the agriculture banquet.

They sponsored a

bake

sale

fund-raisers

concession stands,

that included

and a dance.

To be elected to the Council, members met one of the following requirements: elected to be

an agriculture council representative or the vice president of

any ag organization.

Agronomy Baragary;

Club. Front Row: Beth

Amy

Slaughter; Joni John-

Agronomy Club

son and Jodi Akey. Back Row: Audrea

Howard

Beeler; Clark Jackson; Kacera;

Tom

Zweifel. adviser and

They promoted portunities in

Rhonda Hengceler.

Members

the career op-

agronomy.

offered soil probes,

plant motints and seed samples to

high school

FFA

chapters.

Meetings were held once a month.

The only requirement

member was

an

be a

to

interest

in

agronotny.

Alpha Chi. Fomt Row: A. Blackburn; C. Stalone; S. Colton: K. RatlitT; A. Eason;T.

Whciton; D. Millsaps; B. D. Anthofer.

McKenzie; C. Patton; T.

Gillispie;

J.

Ingels; S. Blunt; S. Barber; C. Michels; A.

Thomas; A.

Row

3:

Schnak;

Bertoldie; L.

B.

Dew and J. Blair.

Rubinstein: D. Pavlich; A.

S.

Root; R. O'Rourke:

P.

Wanningcr; K. Proctor; D. Steelnian; R.

Mahoney; M. Higginbotham; G. Gubser; S.

Brewer: E. Headlee and D. Goold. Back

Row: J. Johnson; J. B.

Hull: S. Roth; D. Stark;

Wardlow; D. Fneling: Dr

sponsor: T. Davis; K.

J.

Eiswert.

Van Winkle:

Fnicht. sponsor: A. Riggs;

Alpha Chi

Woodward and

Row 2: D. Gib.son; D. M.; K.

J.

Dr. R.

Fitaw and D.

Members

protnoted academic

excellence and exemplary character

among Northwest

stu-

dents.

The group's name was

de-

rived from the initial letters of the

Greek words tneaning

truth

and character.

Members were juniors or seGPA's in the top 10

niors with

percent of their class and repre-

sented

all

academic

disciplines.

Suink.

Alpha Mu Gamma. Front Row: Heidi Gehrman; Louise Horner, sponsor; Pannla Baklage: Heather West: Stacy Dettro; Tina Jacobs;

Nancy Ontiveros;

Andrea Schneider and Sara Crutcher.

Back Row:

Wyman

Borts:

Tami

Channing Horner, sponsor; Chrisiel Orlniann; Elizabeth

Alpha

Mu Gamma

Members watched

foreign

films.

They informed people about

Lichtas;

Cottinghani; Jennifer

Gum;

Kelbat and Lia Ruiz.

Lesley

other cultures through films.

AMG

visited the in

sane carols.

214 Organizations

Nelson Art

Kansas City. At Christmas Parties members

Gallery


AMG Sparks Cultural Interest QQHISIQ

An

Drgani/ation

Gamma.

QQ

[S Q]

Q

ilial

language honorary with a special interest

ciivcrsiiy to

LuhniLil

campus

in

language students. said \arious activities pro^

Horner

said.

pate and

The

"We

talk to the students."

got the opporiuniiy to partici-

do things together."

first acti\ity

lined up for winter

was

a

group got together and sang Christmas carols

at the

AMG had activities every month, which were at

languages and

to get

cultures

dilf ereni

w as

the t)rgani-

"Usually people were not aware what was

happening

was also

we exposed ihem

so

in their cultures

Ac-

the beginning of the semester.

a

chance for us

to get together

"It

and do

fun activities."

Caplanbelieved

AMG was a way of providing

experience to students

otherwise be exposed Maryville.

"There

Caplan

Homers".

planned

was

the organization

together and celebrate culture. Learning foreign

a cultural

Christmas pany. According to Sara Crutcher, the

a nios le night e\er_\ semester.

The objective of

ihiough films and interaction," Crutcher said.

we showed movies and had

come o\er and

speakers

to

and opportunity.

"For Miformation.

They also had

/ational nioiio.

gramrned lor the organization were geared wuilI information

boiiiii'iiry hri}ic)s

Mu

AMG u as a national collegiate foreign

Channing Horner

Foreitju hinijuiuje

had sMupatlietic under-

standing tor other people was Alpha

it

who might

not

area like

in a rural

Mo.

really v\as not a lot to

life.

do

exposed students

said. "It

ways of

to

really

It

culturally." to ilifferent

provided the only

breakawa\ from .American culture."

cording to Tina Caplan. the group v\ent on vari-

ous

trips,

Gallery

in

including a

visit to the

An

Nelson

Kansas City. Mo.

Sue Aloi iiimci

Alcmlifrs ofAl!>lki Alii

opporluinly

Tiiui

(o

i/fl

Caplan hangs a

i/udarist

Dom;

(

..iramij </ist ii^s iif)iomiiii) n'cnls tluniuj

nivolvci! with

Nieill

MljcrnU

poster puhlicizing a

who perlormcJ a

ll'c

liiIiuics ,iihl Itimlihujc

Kansas Lily

iiiinaMii

variety of Spanish

liiiJ

nmUutl I'holo

AMd

hy

Alpha

ly.ii'i'

Luir.i

sliiifoih ihe

Ku\h!

Mu Gamma

frcm./) selections

sponsoretl

Photo hy Liura

RieJel

Organizations 215


Alpha Tau Alpha. Front Row: Leasa Wilkerson; Allison Nelson: Marvin

Alpha Tau Alpha

Hoskey, adviser; Julia Hardy; Teresa Poland;

Kim Donaldson and Karen

Cox. Back Row: Kayla Nelson; Daniel Lucas; Brandon Craig; Donald Moore;

Roger Smith; Ryan

Wood and

The group promoted profesimprovement and leadership development of agriculsional

Michael

education majors.

tural

McKiddy.

They placed

1

st in

community

service and received

100 per-

cent metiibership award at National

Conclave.

They

also participated

in

Earth Day. Social activities included picnics

and a

chili supper.

AMA. Front Row: Marci Willrich; Amy Pashek; Crystal Wilson; Rebecca Haines; Chalanda

AMA

Woods; Angela Cox

and George Jackson. Back Row: Sande Richards Stanley, adviser; Jeni Crain;

The group provided

learning

experiences with field trips and

Kelly Burger; Jennie Hansen; Lori

marketing speakers.

Westercamp; Patrick Bailey; Nathan

m They

Kclim and Kirk Barnhart.

and spring picnic and annual

held pizza parties, a

fall

faculty-student basketball game.

They also participated in the Hallmark community challenge.

Some members attended a tional conference in

New

na-

Or-

leans.

Amnesty International. Front Row: Ted Roedel: Heidi Schneider; Frances Grandanette;

Amy Gudenrath; Theresa

Amnesty International The group

Whclton and Miki Tokunaga. Back Row: Jackie Miller; Nate Bogent; Jeff

human

Chad Gammon; Kevin Gogan

to stop

Miller;

and Jody Holland.

called attention to

rights violations

and

tiied

them while increasing stu-

dent awareness.

Meetings were held weekly.

Members worked

with

Maryville High School on

start-

Amnesty chapter. They held a Christmas party and

ing an

concert of different b;uids for

Am-

nesty.

They also wrote about the death penalty in Missouri.

Row: Sheila Wensel and Roxie Green. Back Row: Dana Art Education Club. Front

Eckles: Janii Johnson; Kerry

Art Education Club

Het/ler; Jackie Miller; Julie Watt;

Mandv Wright and Denise

Rieschick.

Members were

required to

join National Art Education Association.

* The

group sponsored guest

speakers and an

art auction.

They attended

the Missouri

Art Education Association conference and visited other teachers

and students interested

They

also

promoted

in art.

art

and

educated others about the department.

216 Organizations


Auction Becomes Annual Event QQH mStSBIQDIIBIil

A able

smi|ik' luiidraising acli\it\ prcncil pint

enough

Education

to

make

the e\

li-

annual tor the Art

eiil

and

sale as Jund-raiser

work

Irimi aliniini.

works

the remaining

were exhibited for

Half of the proceeds

estimated

"The

make

"We

sale.

to a pre-established

the other half

It

.^0

ever put m\ work on exhibit or

scholarship fund and

was returned

to the

artist.

.An

pieces of art were auctioned.

The

handmade Christmas cards

project began bv putting a recycling bo,\

the art education

then pressed onto

we were going

Members used

an annual e\ent."' Sheila Eckles said.

for the envelopes

went so well

that

were \ery impressed hy the response

v\e

on w

Ith a

"We

received."

felt.

the sheets ot

handmade paper

and cards, which were printed

Christmas

tree design.

sold the cards at the auction," Johnst)n

"Someone had

The work of the siudcnts. laculty and alumni was accepted on contract with an estimated price. Art Club members numbered each piece,

cards together

with a description and the

to repeat the project next year."

"It (the

putting

auction) taught

work

title.

me

into a gallery,"

the skills used for

Jami Johnson

said.

In a gallery

it."

room for used copy paper. The paper, w hich was mostly white, was broken down into pulp fibers and combined with colored fibers. A square frame screen was used to pour the paper into sheets of fiber which was In

to

e\ ent

do

to

tor a fund-raiser.

A

would be auctioned and went

I

would know how

Ihe club also sold art

students and taeuiiN lor an auction and a sale.

use art exhibition

1

("lub.

The uroup sohcltcd

jury ot faculty and students decided which works

Members

"If

said.

similar.

The month.

v\

the idea to tie the groups of

Ith a

piece of grass or something

We sold them for$3.5()and we Intended

entire project

was completed within group Intended

In the future, the

more time to the The group planned

cate

fund-raiser. to take an ac-

Educa-

tive pari in the Students Art tors

a

to dedi-

Conference held by the MisArt Educators Conference

souri

Association.

Some members

also planned to

attend the National Art Education

Conference

Kansas City. The

in

conference included seminars during the day. entertainment

and an

art

"The campus was were here." Eckles U)

night

at

show.

make an

not

said.

impression.

aware we

"We

tried

We

were

not going to be a quiet group any-

more." Students

in

were

the club

re-

quired to join the National Art Education Association, be an art educa-

meetings

tion major, attend three

and

1

hours of work a year.

Kris

Undenoood

Jim anti Ian Fall observe art eiiucalwii iiHclioii

pieces at the art

The works of

/or a fund-raiser and submitted students

and faculty for

art were uscii

by

the auction

alumni,

and

sale.

Photo by Sheila Yoder

Organizations

217


Association of Computer Machinery.

Row: Merry McDonald; Gary McDonald; Tina Etvternianis; Shanon Front

Elliot

Association

Of

Computer Machinery

and David Cottle. Back Row:

Richard Delmer; Brian Peterson; Phil Heeler and

They held

Tim Champion.

a

programming

contest.

Speakers gave presentations

on current cotiiputer science topics.

At the

Location of

Satellite

Regional Programming contest, they finished 2nd.

Disks were sold to computer .science classes.

Baptist Student Union. Front

Row:

Amy

Aebersold; Stacie Kirkpatrick; Becky

Denton and Heather Wineinger. Row Christina Givler; Theresa Harr;

Baptist

2:

New; Sherry

Becky Hunsucker; Jeremy

Ezzell;

Brandon Crowford and Karen

Student Union

They provided an environtnent to cotne together in Christian fellowship.

Wheelharger. Back Row: Brian Sparks;

To

give to the community,

Frank Hall; Mike Freeman; Tim Brechbiel; Jason Ezzell; Markee

they took rnission

Warrick and Darren Kins.

vival teains and a food pantry

trips,

had

re-

scavenger hunt.

Becky Denton, Karen Wheelbarger and Markee Warrick received summer mission recognition.

Bearcat Sweethearts. Front

Row

:

Heidi

Beebe; Jean Plagman; Teresa Wiseman; Angle Otte; Kim Pietrowski; Janice Osborn and Joann Hall.

Deecy Widen; Shannon issa

Row

Bearcat Sweethearts

Members

2:

Foster; Mel-

Becker; Christina Stone; Kelley shirt

Yagel; Jennifer Fink and Jenn Crocco.

Back Row: Marcia Guyer; Stacey Hope Droegemueller; Sonya

raised

money

through hamburger feeds and T-

and hat fund-raisers.

Sweethearts sold their infa-

Benson; Traci Casson; Alissa Miller;

mous Barbecue Catnip. They worked on game

Rebecca O'Brien and Angie Hennic.

dance and send-offs.

Grell;

atten-

During the season they kept

in

touch with players' parents and recruited in the off-season.

Beta Sigma Phi. Front Row; Debbie

Fannon and Geraldine Bade.

Beta Sigma Phi The group protnoted cultural development fellowship and :

friendship of non-traditional

women

students.

Members had

a banquet and a

trip to outlet malls.

They sponsored helped flood

relief

a

swim team,

and provided

the hospital auxiliary with assistance.

They

also set up a scholarship

for non-traditional

218 Organizations

women.


The Team Behind THE Team CuinixuL'd

BIlBGBBfi B^BOD

IB

BBQDB

ncmis the Boaivai Sweet-

lo p;isi

heans had been

cmsIoiicc. I'J43 had been one

in

of the besi.

more inone\

said

In

''->}

ilie

ihan

Sweeihearis had ilie |iie\

ions tour

dud provide supporljor Jooihdll learn

The Sweethearts burger feeds and

ihc

Sweethearts was

ot the

to

to recruit

Northwest. Sweet-

lamilics.

campus lours to plasers and their The Sweethearts corresponded with

two

tboiball

parents throughout the

players"

season to keep parents informed on the 'Cats'

years.

Sweetheiirts raise monile

purpose

hcarls ga\e

Rebecca O'Brien raised

A

incoming football players

raised I'-siiirt

money and

ham-

ihroiigh

hai lund-raisers.

record.

Rumors

would no

flew that the Sweethearts

Car washes were also oigani/ed and attempted, but they were always rained out.

longer be an organization after the dismissal of

was the hamburg-

wife was the former Sweethearts sponsor, but

Christina Stone's fa\ orite fund-raiser

hamburger feed w here members sold ers to spectators at

home

Ibotball

Head Football Coach Harold "Bud"

already

started."

coach had the actual power ai.so

sold their barbecue

sauce that they had become sauce. Barbecue Catnip,

pany and shippetl and

sell.

known

for.

was made by

in for the

a

Sweethearts

The com-

to use

HM

receixeil

niel

0"Brien

lalse.""

"Everyone worked together during the feed," Stone said. "We always sokl out before half-time

The Sweethearts

His

O'Brien quickly dismissed these rumors. "That was entirely

games.

Hlliott.

said.

"We

with the new coaching staff and

new names

sponsor would

The head

tor sponsors.

decide

to

who

the

be."'

The Sweethearts defended

their organization

against an editorial written

in

the Nortlmcs!

The article claimed the Bearcat Sweethearts" name was "degrading and se.xist."

Missdiirian.

Letters to the editor

showed

Sweethearts disagreed with the ticle

and members said

ar-

their organi-

zation pro\ idcd spirit to the football

team and

to the

"We were said that roles to

were

all

campus. offended when she

we were taking submissive men." OBrien said. "We

the ones that

sold hamburgers. ting the

men do

on

riding

gave tours and

We were not all

the

let-

work or

their coattails.""

Despite the ditferenl contlicts within the organization. Stone said they stuck together to work them out.

"We always met with

a couple of

dillerences," Stone said. "But

we

took lime to work everything out."

The Sweethearts did work

to-

gether and proved to have a successful year: one

than

Kalhy I'ciiniil

lihiivy /'.irciils

which was

better

the past.

in

Hic}iion-Boldr

Sipalhcarl len lo

ii

Fnk

tjn't'i

/)ros/)fclii'f foolhiill

The

a tour of ihi

player nnd

his

Sweelheiirli were responsible for

hclpiin! out iinlh rei:riiilmenl in the olf-seiison

Photo by Liiini

Rieiiei

Organizations 219


Headlining Performers The word boredom

BQiaa

minds of students on

became hard

Northwest campus.

It

to find activities that kept students

busy so they ioolved

grammers

often crossed the weary the

Campus

to

for the fun

Activity Pro-

and excitement

that

was

hidden in Maryville, Mo.

Campus Activity

The members of CAPs and

Proc) rammers hrincj

entertainment for everyone

tried to find out

dents.

sat

down

in the

what was hot

spring

for the stu-

The executive board attended two confer-

ences for the National Association of

Campus

Activity and tried to get a feel for what the

student body wanted.

Ellen DeGeneres and Suzy Bogguss were just a couple of performers to set foot in

Mary Linn

Performing Arts Center. Members had fears of disappointing the campus, but with headlining

performances,

'When we

1

liked

it

felt

was nice

to

it

was easy

to

keep them happy.

picked something that everyone

so good." Heidi

Gehrman

said. "It

keep the campus happy."

CAPs was

a diverse group of individuals al-


Row Tara Van Ryn McDonough. Back Row:

Bike Club. Front

and

Bike Cilib

Jell

Ciilliii

t The> promoted inicrcst

in bi-

:

\\.imslc\; Brian Peterson and

John Hum.

cycling in Northwest Missouri. B

Mcnihcrs went on daily rides

and met once a month.

The organization sponsored Timex Fitness Week. Some members participated in a

1

a

moun-

.^K road bike race, a

tam hike race,acountr\

ride

and

Wish Kide.

Blue

Kc\. Front Row:

Caldwell;

Bl *

UH Key

P.J.

Hies

promoted leadeiship on

campus

as a Iratemal or;jani/ation.

f Members v\ere required

Anns

Karl

J.

Pal

anil Kl'\ in

Kooi. Back Row:

licnl

Skaggs; Mike

Ik-il/;

V\ nllvrl

Miehael

McLaughlin, adviser:

and

Jm.'

I

liompson.

to he

involved in other activities ;ind be

in

the lop one-third ot'theircla.ss scholasticallv.

The dance

sjioup sponsoied

Mcmlx'iN p;ulicipated

coming with nding

Tower

in the spniiy.

in

the Tovver

HomeQueen

a car with se\eral other

in

group membei's.

CAPs. Front Row: Lisa Wimbcrley: Jennifer Clark: Heidi Gehrnian; Gina

CAPS They

GcL-ses

pro\ ided a balanced

riety ot aelisities

\

a-

which enter-

lamed and educated

the students

sponsored celebrities

Howie Mandel, Ellen

like

DcGencrcs and

Knsli Dallas; Krisly Dennein 2:

Danielle

Freeman: Rcbckah Piniek; Sheila Baker; Elizabeth Curtis: Brooke Cyphers: Becky Bohrman; Colleen

and community. The_\

;

and Chrislina Gar/a. Row

.Su/y Bogguss.

The organization otl'ered monthly comedy acts in the Spanish Den and nunies in Mary Linn Performing Arts

Cooke and Kevin Fuller. Back Row: Ke\in Goj;an: Fric Thonieezek: Miehael Harmon: Johnathan Meyer: Ke\m Harrington: Sclh Mackey: .Miehael Morris and Richard Trulson.

Center.

Cardinal

Haniann;

Cardinal Key Goals

set

by members

ser\ ice lo the

They held

community.

tund-raisers tor the

.luvenile Diabetes Foundation.

to

Amy

Karmi Pashek: Mihoko

Yamazoe; Jennifer in-

eluded scholarship, leadership

and

Key. Front Row: Blair;

Aimee

Chadwick; Shanon Ellioli and Dr. George Fero, sponsor. Back Row: Rodney Pierson: Darin Stephens; Jer-

emy Saeker: Miehael Reiff: Tim Davis: Da\ id Zwank and Robin Bybee.

The group gave presentations community ci\ ic groups.

Members were recognized Homecoming parade

during the

by driving a convertible, co-

sponsored by the Mary ville Host Lions.

Organizations 221


CARE.

Front

Row: Dawn Ford; Jaynic

Mandarich and Lisa Newman. Back Row: Dennis Esser;Jeanna Powers; J ill

CARE This organization provided

Wright and Elaine Headlee. the

and educational

resoiiives

background

tor studies against

drug and alcohol abuse.

They sponsored Alcohol Awareness Week and Spring Break Week. Social events included a datiee

during Alcohol Awareness Week. Their purpose was to educate

Northwest students about alcohol abuse.

Chi Alpha. Front Row: Shanygnc

Mortimore; Carrie Peterson; Sarah

Chi Alpha

Wellcr and Static Kirkpatrick. Back

Row: Rebecca McElwee; Pat Watts and Brian Whilaker.

Their purpose was to glorify

God through the outreach of college students.

The group supported the Assembly of God church.

local

They sponsored catiipus-wide meetings of Christians and held various

spirit

days.

Meetings were held every

Sunday evening. All Northwest students were

welcome.

Chi Phi Chi. Front Row: Mindy

Fiillon;

Rebecca Bennett; Ryan O'Rourke; Christie Noel and Jennifer Clark. Back Row: Paul Roberts; Kristin VanWinkle; Bruce Smith; Tim Champion; Rhonda Richards; Sara Yarkasky

Chi Phi Chi An environment was provided was

that

free

from pressures of

drugs and alcohol.

Members adopted

and Matt Foster.

a

highway

and raised money for Camp Opportunity.

Social activities included a treasure hunt and spaghetti dinner.

A their

dragon was adopted for

mascot and

their colors be-

catne silver, green and navy blue.

Chinese Association. Front Row: Hsiao-Chuan Sur; Tai-ching Chen; Shao-Chen Chang; Chia-Sung Sin; Seaw-Chang Chin and Bee Heang Ong. Row 2: Shaocong Ou; Tsui Wai Yin; Tiong Cheng Tan; Chi-Yuan T/ou; Chan Pui Chung and NgHui Cham. Back Row: Anlhea Chu; Gerald Kiamer, adviser; ChekTan; Say Leong Chang; Elvin Ng; Xiaolin Fin and Da\

id

Chanc.

Chinese Student

Association They helped

international stu-

dents adapt to their environment

and promote Chinese culture and intercultural interaction. At Thanksgiving, members hosted families offering food, clothing and companionship.

They held val

a

Mooncake

Festi-

New

Year

and a Chinese

Celebration. Diversity of metnbership increased.

222 Organizations

was


Alcohol and Drug Free Interaction Biau

man asm

Chi Phi Cln\ goal uas

lo

show

th.il

males and

helps ihe

community while having jun in their

own way

was

alcohol and diuiis.

As

diiig

and alcohol awareness increased, the

as thcs ehaniied their

Chi Phi Chi

we

fun and helped the en\ ironment in the process."

the pressures oj

alcohol and druc)s,

had a picnic

better. V\'e

Beal Park where

afterward

organi/ation went ihrouyh a iransiiional phase

Wiihout

know each other

gel to

tcmalcs coLikl inicraut without the pressLiies of

"People a

mascot and colors.

group were thinkins;

in the

mascot tor se\eral >ears." Bruce Smith

"We

decided

m

said.

go with the dragon. The colors

changed from white and roNal blue

to siKer.

raise

a

camp

They

money

lor ahuseil

It

Opportunity,

and neglected

also held a spaghetti dinner to

for the organi/ation.

"The spaghetti dinner was

"We

Jason Whiting said. tickets then

grilled.

Camp

Chi Phi Chi supported

which was children.

ot'gettins:

at

cooked

the fundraiser,"

went out and sold

ourselves and sersed

it

it."

e\ ervother week

to discuss their

many actuities.

The group had other activities like the annual formal w here they all dressed up and went to St. Joseph. Mo., to dance and eat. The group also

including

Chamber

Commerce

had an informal.

green and na\\ blue."

The> began meeting e\er\ week rather than the

of

of

w here they were associate members. Mar\ This ga\e students a \oice in town government. The group also adopted a highway and each semester went out to a one mile stretch of town \ ille.

and picked up trash.

"We

divided the road into sections," Stacy

Schwaller

said.

"Each group would work and

"The informal w Smith

said.

as a

"We held

it

dance we had every in the

fall,"

Conterence Center

and hired disc jockeys and photographers."

A

treasure hunt

was another

highlight and

included some interesting items.

"We got a

sheet of items to get and

we had

to

obtain them in a specific amount of time," Whit-

"Then the group that got most items won. They ranged ixim a dead rose and a shopping bag

ing said. the I

to a kitchen sink."

Schwaller enjoyeil the different acti\ities.

because

"1 liked the activities

gave us something

it

do outside

to

school and work." Schwaller said.

Although

their

purpose was to

provide a drug and alcohol free en-

vironment, they did not force their \

lews on others.

"Our purpose was to show that a good time without

we could have it."

Whiting

demn

it.

said.

We

"We

did not con-

did not allow

just

it

al

our meetings."

Drug and alcohol

free,

Chi Phi

Chi stayed clear headed and focussed on raising money for a cause the\ believed in and on having fun.

Mike Carolyn Willn ioh'inij

iiniJ

Jot 7I1S0II

Tim (kimj'ion work on

a piazk hejore one of

im-kly mecUn(!'i

Manhm

piiW in olber acUvilies

Superhowl

piirly.

( In

Pin

(

l;/'s

often met lo parlici-

like

nf skalimj

iinJ a

Photo hy Cbris Twctfr.

Organizations 223


Campus. Front Row: D. Blunt; M. Spalding; A.

Christian

Johnson;

S.

Northup; R. Bruntmeyer and H. Chi.

Row

2:

Christian Campus

Wen

They hosted

N. Charley; D. Adwell; A.

Drydale;

E.

Schmaljohn.

Pavlicek and

Row

T. Justus;

3;

Meinecke; B. Ebers; Lucas; T.

Van Ryn;

L.

J.

a banquet in Feb-

ruary to honor elderly

Reed; B. Ebisch; K. Ryan; D. Cox; K.

K

It

B,

women.

doubled the si/e of member-

ship.

Lucas; D.

Members

Ming; D. Hopf;

held Bible studies

and Christian services.

Neffand M. Wilson. Back Row: D. Swink; D. Stark; S.

T. Schmaljohn; T.

The

Wheeler: G. Bailey; R. Charley; D. Markt;

J.

Dunivan;

J.

Stark; A.

Gani-

son; K. Rash; K. O'Rilev and F. Hall.

Front Row; Tisha Tapia; Kenna Lanibertsen; Elaine Headlee and Heather Perry. Back Row: Stacey

Circle K.

grotip held

campus-wide

meetings tor Christians.

1

Brewer;Dianne Burns; Tracy Jenkins; Rene' Reuther and Lisa Noone.

t


Focusing on

Community Service Tho

HDBBDIi

siiuk'iii

\idod hclpUil

become

Iwlpiui)

and ga\c

an

sludL-iils

had iibbons printed oul that said 'Norlhwesl

drug

hand

a sincere desire in

acti\e in

community

Another aspect of Circle

its

nienibers to

ser\ice.

K was

its

brings sludails closer locjether

\olunteered to

\isit

ti\ities like bo\^ ling

comniu-

Members

nieni to children and senior citizens.

with and participate

w

nursing homes. .Mso.

ilh

m

ac-

the residents ot various

members \olunteered

big brothers and big sisters to students

at

as

W'ash-

ington Middle School. Although this was not a required ucli\itN,

it

was one which was encour-

aged.

Elaine llcatUee said the group was iinoKcii

ui

According

to

Winkler. Circle

"And

to

do just

According

to

also

We

we

Quality,

that."

K

Tisha Tapia. Circle

also do-

nated cU)thing to children tor the Salvation

Army Christmas Tree in Wal-Mart. Circle K members also volunteered vices during the Homecoming parade

their ser-

by hand-

doughnuts and hot chocolate for specta-

ing out

than five hours a

"We

Camp

with our support ot

were able

tors.

said.

had also pro-

ided

"Members helped these young students do homework and deal with any areas they were had a special project tor red ribbon week.

K

games and equipment to Camp Quality, a special camp lor children w ith cancer. "Circle K was all about making a positive impact on the local community." Winkler saiil. V

a variety ot activities.

having trouble with," Headlee

is

We gav e them out to the siinlenls anil

tree.'

tacultv."

Troy Winkler. Circle K president, said the group required

ci

ot the Kiuaiiis Cliih, pro-

scr\ice,s

opportunits lor leadership training in ser\ice.

Q Lendini)

hiaikh

members usually spent more week working on different

V\'mkler said

projects. "It

was

definitely hard work,"

Winkler

said.

"But members gained valuable communication

and leadership ous

skills

by participating

in the vari-

activ ities."

Membership was side activ "It

was a problem because

activ ities

ally

a problem because of out-

ities.

had the time needed

we were

"It

w ere so many

said.

"Nobody

devote

to

re-

to ihe things

doing."

Even with gave a

there

on campus." Tapia

lot to

the time problem, the group the

still

community.

was also extremely rewarding

to

help

community service members a wonderful

people," Winkler said. "The projects gave

all

of the

sense of lullillment and satisfaction." Circle K. a student organization w Inch a positive impact on the

was an

made

as a whole,

national organization with chapters

throughoui the nation. tion

community

which made

It

was

also an organiza-

a significant contribution to

Northwest's reputation as a university quest tor excellence

stilled a

in its

that in-

students.

Kim Todd

prefttimjor the J,m

ÂŁ1.11111

liiiidkt:

Dhim-

Hiinii looki over

luimphlcl

The jroup wai ichaUncf

uhitkiUhon Photo -

2.5,

f.irc/c

K

meclini) it'lnlv

a Muscular Dys(ro/)by Walktilhon

by Laura

nhoiil p<irlicipiitm(j in the

Riedel

Organizations 225


Delta Tau Alpha. Front Row: Sue

Harson; Melissa Parsons: Dawn Hoover; Molly Morris and Mandy Brown. Back Row: Steven Root: Matt Jensser: Henry Blessing: Mike Jackson

ary fraternity that recognized

and Sara McClelland.

those achieving high academic

Delta Tau Alpha was an

It

agricultural hmidr-

standards.

They held an

initiation

ban-

quet each spring.

Requirements for membership inckided being in the top 35

percent of class and completing at least

three semesters.

The group met twice on Wednesdays.

English Honor Society. Front

Row:

Michelle Akins; Heidi Gehrman:

Amy

Coenen: Carol Patton: Prem

Honor

English

a

month

Society

Balasubramaniain: Jenny DcBlauw

Requirements for member-

and Chanda Clary, sponsor. Back Row:

ship included having at least a

Loree Sheldon: Tanya Drake: Mike Johnson: Wayne Chandler: Joe Loudon: Wynian Borts: Randall

3.0

GPA

1.5

hours of English

The group held

Maginn: Elizabeth Cottinghani and

Cammie

in

classes.

raise

money

Sublette. to the

a booksale to

for students going

1W4 Sigma Tau

Biennial Convention in

Delta

Mem-

phis.

They sponsored

a Teacher's

Appreciation Day.

EXCEL.

Front

Row: Jason DeLong: New: Shalom

EXCEL

Tracie Schaer: Theresa

Barber: Rosetta Harris: Andrea Riggs: Shannon Keane and Ron Neely. Back Row: Richard Trulson: John Bankson: Christian Hornbaker; George

McClure: Tim Davis; Larry Freyberger: Curtis Heldstab, adviser

and Jeff McDonough.

The group engaged in activities that protnoted teamwork and broadened members horizons and enhanced leadership skills.

Activities included rapelling,

playing water polo, spelunking, hiking and camping.

EXCEL

at the

end of January

was disbanded.

FCA. Front Row:

Lisa Crouse: Heidi

Beebe: Natalie Schwartz and Shana Vasatka.

Row

2:

Sarah

FCA

Elliott: Julia

Randolph; Alissa Miller: Melissa Becker: Kristin Schmaljohn and Kari

Sellberg. Back Row: Kristin VanWinkle: Hope Droegeniueller: Andy Huedepohl: Shannon Wheeler: Jamie Hazen; Maria Portz and Michael Elliott.

The group had joint

activities

and meetings with Maryville

FCA Huddle and Northwest Area adult FCA High School, chapter.

They sponsored a hayride w ith a guest singer, went Christmas caroling, held sporting events and Bible studies.

FCA with 30

226 Organizations

doubled membership

new

students.


Recruting For Adventure A new year brings with ninjis. hut

liEaBBii

endings us ueli.

it

not onl\

iil'u hciiiii-

One Ndrlhuest mga-

The

Lack oj interest iwd decreasing

up oj

to

EXCEL

break

ot

the

(irgani/alion I'ail

was

EXCEL

may ha\e

promising their

tuttiie

group deeided

eould no longer

it

Shannon Keane a

whieh was

semester, to take the plaee

tornier Northwest Rangers.

cause othiek

'"it

w iih

tornied during the

membership leads

ment with

ni/ation had to see both ot these during the

academic year.

members. Roselta Harris saw her nnoKe-

Its

Howe\er

looked,

liie

exist.

This decision eame alter

body of members \(Ued upon

the group's

future in late .lanuar\. But not onl\

the

the organization as a positive one.

in\ol\ement) had helped. ..when

Northwest Rangers.

larris said. "It

how

taught

would

was

the

was

a

was

I

shyer,"

lot

I

would

not even think

arise. ...Just a lot ol stuff,"

Another member. Tim

ries.

I

me better leadership skills,

handle issues that

to

volvement and hoped

said the group disbanded be-

ot interest.

1

(the

He wanted

to

col lege years and

l)a\

to take

is,

enjoyed

from

it

to look

be able

back on

remember the things he did.

example, going skydiving and other "The.se were

his in-

memo-

fond

my

five years of

his

for

activities.

going

to under-

decision based upon a lack of interest, but also a

graduate college and

decreasing membership.

many memories in there as could ." Davis said. One of EXCEL's goals was to dispel the

The

letters that

make

EXCEL stood for expe-

meaning of the letters that spelled EXCEL, but was also the group's misthe

sion.

That

w as exacth w hat

like to

cram

as

I

riences and challenges e\()l\e leadership. This

was not only

would

I

the oreani/ation did lor

common misconception of its association with the ROTC. The organization was to be advised by officers in the ROTC, but any student, with or w ithout military invoKement. couki be a member.

Other than ha\ ing

EXCEL

to

come

u|i

with a name,

had other important decisions

to

make.

They had to ct)me up w ith a constitution, decide upon a structure and how it was to grow. Heldstab said the members themselves drew up the new constitution and took it to .Student Senate for approval.

The organization's activity of the fall semester was a trip to Hunter's Cave in Ct)lumbia, Mo.

The group

also held minor activities, such as

rapelling.

Tim Davis

said

EXCEL

planned to do many

more events in the future, however, many of them were tentative. nan attempt to recruit ne winembers.l.XCl-X I

held an the

"EXCEL Week" in

the

fall.

week included water polo and

"We

had also spread

Activities of rapelling.

tlyers, but a majority

of

was through word of mouth by

the recruitment

members." Curtis Heldstab

said.

Unfortunately, this "word of mouth" was not

enough. Despite the group's efforts to grow and its plans forthe future, the organization could no longer survive without the growing support of

members.

Susan Lo nnwr A\emhi't\ oj EXi'EL, jormcrly the

('oUen Uiill

JiiriiKj

ihilhiiiileil I'i'KiKsc

oj

ij

ci

ROTC Ranjjen,

rupcl

huk

of

mkrai Pboio by

Em

doim

EXCEL

licmomlration on Fimily Diiy

Biirlii

Organizations 227


Flag Corps. Front

Row:

Amy

Artz:

Heather Perry; Jennifer Beekman; Jennifer English;

Tonni Fore;

Bickford; Kori Sundberg and Jennifer

Lindberg. Back Row:

Flag Corps

Amy

Arlette

Leuthold; Courtney Cerbin; Angel

Dukes; Sandy Willams; Amanda McManigal; Jenn Crocco; Amanda Griffen and Audrey Miller.

There were

1

8

members

in the

organization.

They hosted a competition

for

high school flag corps.

During half-time, they per-

formed

at

a

Kansas City Chiefs'

game. Flag Corps entertained at half-

time with the Bearcat Marching

Band

FMA.

Front

at

home

football szames.

Row: Kori Sundberg;

Kyndra Peltz; John Gilmore; Shawn McCollom; John Sellmeyer; Kim Lee and Cassandra Harper. Back Row: Kirk Barnhart; Tom Riley; Todd Wen/el;

finance professional

Ryan Blakestad; Brian Doornbos and

munity.

Scott Christensen.

FMA They

.selected

an outstanding in the

com-

Students were offered the opportunities to share thoughts and

ideas about the field of finance.

FMA

maintained communi-

cation between finance students

and professionals

An

in the field.

investment team tried to

conquer the stock market.

GALTAN. From Row:

Kathleen Kennedy; Patrick Mahoney; Mike Mahoney and Kclli Mahoney. Back Row: Richard Trulson; Jon Stroeble;

Jeremy Oleson and Graham Sisco.

Galtan They

raised education of gay,

bisexual and lesbian issues.

Members provided

support

for gay. bi.sexual and lesbian

people and their relatives and friends.

GALTAN members went on a retreat to look at the past

and

plan the future.

Their jalopy entry. "Little

Mermaid's Ursula" won in the

Geo

Club. Front

Homecoming

1st

place

parade.

Row: Diane Krueger;

Rebecca Hodges; Lora Ogden; Tara

Van Ryn and Lisa Marie Sikorski. Back Row: Melody Jaco; Jeff McDonough; Doug Swink; Maria Port/; Jenny Ingels and Myra Lay.

Geo Club To those

interested in geogra-

phy and geology, they provided academic and social

Geo Club

activities.

increased environ-

mental awareness.

Members

raised

money

through annual rock and mineral sales

and hot-n-sloppy

sale.

They went on canoeing and caving

trips.

Members sponsored

the geo-

science departmental picnic.

228 Organizations


Breaking

Through

Barriers

Despite harriers hoiiioseMials expected to

QQHDQia

face

when coming

out.

Gays and Lesbians To-

GALTAN.

gether At Northwest,

proved

to

be a

homose7(uals come loijclhcr throiicjb CiiuccUio}! ii}hi

campus

n'coi]uilio}i

ning

1st in

the

who were concerned

nized,

campus.

They became Student Senate recogdoubled their membership and educated

In

August,

tions to

presenta-

freshman seminar classes. These meet-

ings allowed students to talk to homosexuals and

The

presenters

were homosexuals or heterosexuals,

that either

heterosexuals and ask questions.

were related

GALTAN

to

homosexuals or friends of one.

visited

Audra Clipson"s freshman

some (.|ueswas right in

.seminar class and she said despite tions students asked,

doing the

"Some

GALTAN

of the questions the class asked the

were prying

said. "It

was

into their sexual life in-

stead of nice, general questions, but the guys

handled

it

well."

a retreat to discuss

what ihe\ had

and what the future held for the

in the past

Member's responses seemed

organization.

posi-

tive.

"We

got a

accomplished," Kelli Mahoney

lot

was a successful year." Membership did not depend on sexual il\ but support. The group was designed as a support said. "It

.

group

that

allowed heterosexuals

to join

and

talk

openly with homosexuals.

.sessions.

guys were inappropriate," Clipson like they

with their acceptance on

the parade.

at

The) w ent on done

Mermaid's

GALTAN also sokl coffee, nuit tins and

doughnuts

GALTAN offered small

"Little

Homecoming parade and wincompetition, boosted members

success.

students about homosexuality.

Heterosexiuils iuui

their jalop\.

l-jitenng

Ursula." in the

Mahoney, whose brother was homosexual, was surprised that there v\'as no negative

said she

response. "It

went over

Mahoney

well."

really

"There was not any negative comments

who came

out."

Adam Crump Mahoney tried to

agreed with was a suc-

that the year

however he

cess,

said.

to those

GALTAN

said

accomplish too much loo

soon.

"We

achicNcd the goals

out to do, which

was

to

we

set

inform

people about homosexuals and not

discriminate against them,"

to

Crump

"But we got involved

said.

Some

too soon.

people would not

we

accept this overnight and needed duce

it

our time and intro-

to take

smoothly and slowly."

With one year behind them

as a

Senate recognized group,

GALTAN

began focusing on the upcoming years and new ways to

educate about homosexuality.

Kalhy (i

ALTAN /iiimi

Slum

Aliisf

itsked

ifHi'slioiis tihii

hclii

ilciys ivui

common jereitl

lislfii

to

HiLjdon-lioliir

memben

by

Kelli

Pctlrkk

to

Miihoney

the iiudieiKe

/larciist'

ksbiam on

iim/

Mahoney amwer The mcelnuj

publii <ni\imteii iiboiil crjm/)HS tinJ to help dispel

misconceptioÂťi about people ivith iij-

seyiial

orieithitiom

Photo by (hrii

Tucker

Organizations 229


GTU.

Front Row: Jenny Ingels; Lora Ogden; Angela Boudreau: Lisa Maria Sikorski and Kerisa Olson.

Mike Gaftney; Tim

Row

Hill;

GTU

2:

This hotnir society promoted

Jeff

McDonoiigh; Brian Becker; Dr.

the awareness of

Charles Dodds. advi.ser and Douglas

the einironiiient.

Back Row: Kevin Koon;

Sleelnian.

Twenty new

geography and nienibeis were

Tyler Kisling; Brad Guthrey; Christoinitiated

pher Richards; Brian Doornbos and

during the

fall

seme.s-

ter.

Doug SwMik.

They planned Geography Awareness Week.

Speakers for geography awareness enhanced classroom lectures.

Requirements included being in the

HALO.

Amy

top 25 percent of class.

Row: Alejandro Ching;

Front

Daniel; Lorena Castro; Alex

HALO

Ramirez and Gladys Courtney. Back

Row: Heather Riley; Andrea Woods; Ron Rambaldo; Katherine Ramirez

Members

attended a leader-

ship conference in Chicago.

and Marshon Morris.

They observed Dia de Murtos when the de-

a Hispanic holiday

ceased were remembered.

The amount of Hispanic stucampus doubled during their first two years. dents on

Lectures were presented to various groups on campus.

HALO hosted a Hispanic artist

from Mankato

Heartland View: Front Row: Angela

Tackett;

Kim Todd; Row 2:

Laura Widmer,

adviser: Kate Harrison; Pat

Heartland View

Preni

Balasubramaniani; Fay Dahlquist and Christy Spagna.

Maxwell-

State.

The magazine won 4th place Best of

Show

at the

ACP/CMA

convention.

Schurkamp; Cherie Thomas; Daniele

Heartland View was a

Schlomer; Jennifer Lynn and Karissa

gional travel and leisure maga-

Row

Boney.

Jack Vaught; Mike

3:

Johnson; Dyann Esser;

Amanda

Schulze. Back

Denny; Dennis

St.

Endicott and

Row:

Ann

zine covering a 200-mile radius

of Maryville, Mo.

An All-American award was

Julie Watt; Blase

Smith; Brian Weaver; Bruce Cambell;

Jon Lewis and Derrick Barker; Scott

Pummell and

re-

given to the rnagazine by Associated Collegiate Press in 1993.

Their only requirement was hav-

Tricia Ware.

ing served one semester

on one of

the other student publications.

HPERD.

Front

Row:

Kerri Johnson;

Deborah Johnson; Janet Reusser; Heidi Meiiiders; Michelle Kliegl; Niki Turner and

Wendy

Janel Frohlich;

Dalton.

Back Row:

Vaughan Bishop;

Jet't

Donahue; Angela Rodier; Kate Walthall: Stacia Wilkens; Jeff

and Chuck Miller.

Moscr

HPERD Four different aspects were taught: coiporate fitness, therapeutic, managerial and niiniicipal.

Pizza was sold during the

Homecoming parade and ball

They held

Weekend

in

a

Timex

Fitness

October with a

mile road race.

1

five-

5-mile bike race

and a mountain bike

230 Organizations

foot-

game.

race.


Presenting Hispanic Culture Hispanic American Leadership Oruani/alioii,

HALO. accoMiplislied more only

L'*

mcmhcrs and

a

than expected, w

tuo year

ith

1

HALO

Workinc)

and

to

increase numbers

educale,

HALO finds

time lo cjive to the

and

raise

community

money

at

a Hispanic

992. The\ decided there

\v

convention

in

as a need tor such an

orsiani/ation at Northwest to increase the lumi-

was a need

for a Hispanic .Xmericaii

we needed

to

do something

for the

commu-

and we wanted to give something back." By working with Admissions. HALO in-

creased the amount of Hispanics on campus.

Members also

\

isited

high schools to encourage

Hispanic students to attend Northwest.

H.ALO found

ber ol Hispanic students on campus. " I'here

wanted

Castro said. "The\ had opened their doors

to us

history.

Founders Loiena Castro and Angela Garcia disecnered

"We nit\ ."

lime to present lectures to vari-

ous groups on campus. They spoke to freshman

recruitment

seminar classes, multi-cultural classes and other

and a retention of Hispanic students on campus."

organizations about their views on the North

Castro said.

.American Iree Trade Agreement.

support yroup because

HALO

not only supported

American cuhure on campus, but get in\(ii\ed in

community

the

Hispanic

lounii lime to

service.

One com-

munits project thes sponsored was a Valentine

Dance

lo

raise

mone\

for

group homes

in

Mo. HALO wanted to help support the comnumits because it had supported ihem even though there was no Hispanic communiiv in Marvville. Mo. Maryville.

"We hoped

to increase the

awareness of His-

campus and educate the student body on Hispanic culture." Katherme panic students on

Kamiie/

A

said.

taco dinner fund-raiser

in

September,

helped them prepare for the cost of their celebration,

May

Cincode Mayo, May 5th. A banquet

was planned, with dances, folklore music, tradional dresses and skits.

HALO was an active organization throughout the year, despite their low numbers. Their deter-

mination and desire that

made them an

stood out on campus.

Sberri hkCorkiuiiiih

organization


Green Thumbs Learn to Grow BBnaDDBQiiiaQiiaia BQISia

The main purpose of the Horticulture Club was to further their knowledge of horticulture by

no one, other than herself and Chad Pierson, took

participating in field trips to botanical gardens,

advantage of the opportunity

such as the Botanical Gardens

manage

in St.

Louis, Mo.,

various industries and the selling of plants.

Students gain horticultural

LisaGrinshow thought

and fund-raisers

being a

it

was disappointing

and

to organize

group had

the facilities the

that

in

their

was so easy," Walker

said.

control.

member of

"1

loved

it,

it

perience tending plants than she would have received by just taking classes in the curriculum.

of the year."

"It

Club helped her gain more ex-

that

"Sometimes forgot what I would be doing. It was a shame no one came here at the beginning

the Horticulture

experience through field trips

that

Walker thought

me to identify different horticulture and know how to work with them."

I

Walker increased

helped

crops

Grinshow

from

number of

the

Horticulture Club took care of

the old greenhouse that

was located

from

The group

herbs and

Transfer student Karen Walker began reorganizing the greenhouse

at the

homes. Along with house

to nursing

east of the

Administration Building.

to

v

make money

the greenhouse with

in

plants, the Horticulture

gan moving plants

other activities. In October,

to the south side of the build-

where most of the heat was.

Walker planted

for the club.

Besides working

beginning of the

plants.

egetables with hopes of selling them

school year. Walker cleaned the inside and be-

ing,

plants

their parent plants.

also began organizing a donation of aloe plants

said.

Members of the

clips taken

Club also participated

in

members traveled to St. Joseph. Mo., with Alpha Tau Alpha and the Agronomy Club to the Haunted Barn. Because of an increase in membership and earned money, the group was able to plan more activities for the future.

The Horticulture Club earned most of its funds from

their annual plant sale they held every fall.

The sale earned the group a total of $130.67, which would go toward group activities like field trips to Botanical Gardens in Des Moines, Iowa, and St. Joseph. Mo.

Members were

not only given hands-on expe-

rience but the opportunity to

work

were interested

field that they

in a specialty

in.

Those who

were horticulture majors had various career fields to

choose from, such as managing a green-

house, landscaping and seed research. But, one did not have to be a horticulture major to join the organization.

join the

group was an

Adviser Johanne

The only requirement to

interest in tending plants.

Wynne

said love of plants

was

the reason people joined the group.

thought a

"I

plants," in the

lot

of people were interested

in

Wynne said. "There were theater majors

group. They were tied together by liking

plants."

Fay Dablquist Kami

Wiilkir ktuli

irinlcrmonlhs .iH'e

by

(

ofjlora /'MS

(o

pLinls Âť? ihe old i]recnhouie JuniuJ

Walker i involvement tn

iiifpireil

Tucker

her (o

ciillii'iflc

the

(fee

HorlKidlure (luluind

her interest in plant

li/t

Photo


Horticulture Club. From Row: Jodi Akey: Johunnc Wynne, adviser;

HORTIC ULTURE ClUB Tlic LiroLip duniiii

r;iisL-d

:iniiiial

llicii

They tciok care ol

Alejandro Ching and Mvlanc Morgan.

pkinis lo sell pkini sale. restorini; the

old greenhouse.

They also visited hotanieal gardens and Industries on

edii

cational trips.

included going to

.Activities St.

Joseph. Mo., during the Hal-

loween season

lo the

Haunted

Barn.

IFC.

IFC The group was

Row

the governing

participated in the

Big Brother program and Tovs

They held "Studettes

They Trial

Ruistc:

Ryan Mahoney;

L.indcs

,iiul

Rusliii

Brian Weaver;

.Seott

Huegerieh.

Back Ri)w: TievMi Haines; Darin Lee;

Todd

Keiser;

Tom

Vieregger; Seott

Norbin and Mare Von (iorp.

lor Tots.

on

2:

Rainboll; Jeff Roe;

Mark

fraternity system.

Members

Row: Steven

Front

Michael Caklwcll and Sle\c Lovcll.

at

the dating

game

Northwest."

also sponsored "Hazing

by Dave Westol."

* Members were required to beloivj to a tralernitv

.

IRA. Front Row: Rachel Brown and Leigh Gerken. Back Row: Kinihciiv

IRA The group promoted literacy and news strategies and methods

Roval and Dionne Ivanko.

for teaching reading.

They had children

vv

a

book drive

ho were

v

for

ictims of the

Hood. This was the organization's first

year

at

Northwest.

Membership requirements

in-

cluded local dues and optional international dues.

ISO. Front Row: Natalie

ISO

Tomoko

The group's goal was to help each other learn American ways while also showing people their

own

culture.

They had

a cordial dinner in

April where a group from each

country did a denuinstration

Renec Bergene;

Fiimalu; Denieresh Abraha;

Hiraoka; Mayiinii Ozawa;

Daisy Semu; Miki Tokunaga; Misaki Hirakuni and Gladys Courtney.

Back

Row; Karen Butler; Prasanan Kahnan; Tomasina Tavai; Gordon Fernando; Ayinan Bodi; Johannes Kelinian;

Tom

Bales and Faluma Kassim.

ol

their culture.

They

also had activities such

as a dinner for

new and

old stu-

dents and a bowline niuht.

Organizations 233


Miming Conveys Christian Messages With a message

way

to

convey

to

be shared and a talented

any problems of the members or the group.

Koiaiah was a Christian orga-

it,

nization that displayed

its

message with an

artis-

Practices relaxed the

time

Koiaiah was established by Kevin Gullickson

Performing arts spread the word of

1992 after he had seen a performance of a

group similiar

God

throughout Northwest

to

Koiaiah and

felt led

by

God

to

The purpose of Koiaiah was to spread the word

God and

peiforming

the

message of Jesus through

arts

of mime, drama and music.

style, at cities

ith a

the

showed people

was not

that Christianity

just

church and that being a Christian did not have to

Each member of Koiaiah had an indi\idual

St.

in

various

satisfaction

Joseph, Mo.,

of the organization belonged

performing groups

decided to continue

witnesses for Jesus Christ. The fellowship with

be boring."

Neb., and Chariton, Iowa.

Some members

loose," Brian

reason for Joining and each received personal

churches and nursing homes

to similar

let

helped people to be better

personal message and

this

such as Chilicothe, Mo.,

Omaha.

said. "It

by performing

Members accomplished various skits, each w

come and

""We could

Whitaker

other Christians and the ministering e.vperience

establish such an organization at Northwest.

of

members, giving them a and the stresses of

their studies

school.

tic twist.

in

away from

in high school

and

"I

was

led

from the organization. by

God to

to

me." Paula Starling

in

Koiaiah brought

stick

w

ith

mv

me

Koiaiah, so

it

meant

said. ""Most of the

to Jesus.

It

a lot

people

helped

me

to

de\otions and to stick with God.

in college.

Koiaiah met weekly

to practice their skits for

upcoming events, study

the Bible

and

Giiui Beltz

to discuss

Diupu stil

Cnitihtii /iMifs

Till'

Sim

Box

"

lit'fsc/f (riif)fif.(

by

lu'r u'aiiii/iJoiiK/s

Thtpurl'OH- of Kohiuih'i

iii

(lie

sfals iinis lo s/)rc.ii/

thtu'ori{ofCoJiwdlhcmmti(Ji:ojki\ii Pholohy(.hn't Tucker

I

an

}!.

t'clii'.oiindttiC'i

VilLulf

jiKc ttdiiil\jor iheir

234 Organizations

SlhuryilucMorlmwrcjor ,1

pirjoinuiiice

Hcdhh Girf CenUr KoLihib mimhers facilikikd mc

lit

of

m:me iind draiiui lUli PholobyClvn Tiictfr


Kappa Omicron Nu. Front Row:

Kappa Omicron

Jackqulyn

Nu

Alissa Miller rccci\cd the annual

Kappa Onneron Nu Schol-

arship.

N

human en\ironmenlal

sciences honor society required

GPA

Row

to

be

top 25 percent of the

in the

Bundy;

Killccn ConiiollcN; Mclod\

2:

udwig; Jciinitcr

.Sligar;

Kim

Allen and

C'liidi

Beth

WcckK;

l.andis.

Back

Row: Linda Boehm; Stephanie Howard; Nicole

members

ha\e a 3.0

.Siillendcr:

Trocsscr and Karen Slccncr.

.â&#x20AC;˘\ngic

I

This

Nicole

Pratt;

Barbra Rubinstein; Kalhy

.Seoll;

or

Chrislin Rosa;

.Missa Miller and Christv Lee.

and must ha\e taken 45

class

credit hours.

*

They

orjiani/ed a finals party

a bowling party and pi//a party.

KDL.\. Iroiu Row Ain> Wright; ;

KDLX

Jennifer Stewart.

â&#x20AC;˘ I'hey proviiletl the college community u ilh a campus radio

Row

2:

Sandy John-

son .Man Hainkel; Angela Bonella;

Andrew Young; Sharon Johnson; Cherie Thomas; Mike Turner and John

station.

The

.Scoll

Phelps; Jay Leighter; Sheila Yodcr and

radio station ga\e broad-

casting students the opportunity

Jasinski,

adviser.

Brian Whitaker;

Cjorden Highland; Robert Boyd; Brian

Denny; Nathan Ihomas; .Xaron Luke; Jim Krahbc and Heath Headslrom. Row 4: im Brinks; Marriott; f)\;inn St.

hands-on experience.

for

KDLX

placed

top three

in the

I

of all college radio siaiions

in the

Tammy

ing on-air promotions like 1()6X

Baeehi; Alisha Paiagi; Kathleen Kennedy; Jeff Brown; Brian Lanning; Kurt Osinundson; Kory Schramm; Brandon Mmsener; Keith

Week and "

contest.

I.odzinski and Chris

service

KIDS, [-ront Row: Kim Piall; Lisa Noone; Christina Ciar/a; Michelle Rogers; Bobbi Woodward; Mariea Oilmen; Cliarron Mains .ind Dawn l-ord. Row 2: Lisa Crouse; Tracy Jenkins; Theresa Whelton; Wendy Waigand; Suzanne Garrett; Kristin

country

Students worked on organiz-

I'ind the

X"

KIDS As

a

community

volunteered to

project, they babysit

at

Headstari.

The group

vv

as concerned with

individual's dedicated to stu-

dents

and

form of a big brother

in the

sister organization.

welcome Halloween party.

Amy Gustin; Jan [razee; .Amy

Sehendel and Jodie Beardsley. Back

Row

:

Van

Activities included a

back party.

Hughes;

Mozga.

Lynnette Lee; KenGrave; Kristin \Vinkle; Craig

Kingcr: Dustin

Kern; Calhleen Welsh; Lisa Ough;

Melanie Brown and Jenniler Di)U';an.

Christmas party. Valentines party and a year-end bash.

Kolaiah.

KOLAIAH They spread gospel

Front

Row: Vinita

Millhouser; Brenda Eibiseh; Staeie Kirkpatriek; Shanygne Mortimore; for Jesus

Youmans and Dawn

Sarah

Gardner.

Christ through the performing

Row

arts.

Christina Gi\iler; Catherine Manning;

Members perfomed Maryville. Mo..

Omaha. Neb;

Chillicothe. Mo., and City.

Mo.

at

in

Kansas

area churches and

nursing homes.

S

2:

Kcri Peterson; Paula Starling;

Rebecca Hunsucker; Jeannie Neitzel;

MeKnight and Dara Cox. Back Row: Brian Whitaker; David Morton; Rebecca McElwee; Brent Ebers;

Jenifer

Michael How land; Pal WiiUs; Angela Wooden and Mike Freeman.

Social activities included

meeting

in

members" rooms.

Bible studies and fellowship.

Organizations 235


KXCV/KRNW. From Row: Amy Wright; Shari Dreessen: Kimberly Hill;

Houseworth; Cherie Thomas and Kim Todd. Bacl< Row: Alan Hainkel; Chris Gregg; Taniara Bacchi; Nathan Thomas; JetT Brown; Jim Krabbe; Kara Bright; Kirk

KXCV/KRNW

Andrew Young; Heather

Sheila Yoder;

Wayman; Aaron Luke and

The station sponsored Les Brown and His Band of Renown, the Kansas City Symphony and Rohedoux Resident Theater's produetion of Miracle

Mark Person.

Worker.

They produced spots

for

Northwest image campaign.

The

station

added a 38,000

watt transmitter and therefore,

expanded

its

Chillicothe,

LDSSA.

Front

Row:

signal to reach

Mo.

Krislen Huber;

Stacey Brewer; Kathryn Olsen; Leslie

Koinun and Rachel Haney. Back Row: Holly Stewart; Elder Ormer; Elder Rasmussen; Joey DuFrain and Kristen Proctor.

LDSSA Âť The organization's purpose was to edify and the fellowship of

LDS and non-LDS students. The group held weekly meet-

ings at 7:30 p.m.

on Thursdays.

LDSSA was a religious group that

had formed an organization

on the Northwest campus.

M-Club. Front Row: Melissa Creglow; Theresa Quijano;

Amber Cremeens;

Rachell Hill and Kara

Fritz.

Row

son;

M-Club

2:

Sherri Reeves, sponsor; Joseph John-

Lucy Caputo; Cindy Schear; Mary Henry; Rheba

Shelly Jermain;

Eustice and Richard Flanagan, sponsor.

Row 3: Clarence Green; David Wahlert; Mitch Dosland; Chris Blondin; Renee Hahn; Nancy Huppert Tanya Drake; Brandi Jorgensen and Back Row: Larry Walls; David Hobbs; Greg Mefford; Don Dolweck; Dave Benson; Shannon

Jennifer Nore.

Members donated to United Way, Flood '93 reform, blood drive and the Red Cross. They held the Hall of Fame banquet and All-Athletic Awards banquets. One must have lettered in a varsity athletic in order to be a

member.

Wheeler; Anne Northup; Carrie Wood; Stacie Segebart and Susan

MENC.

Front

Row: Michelle Hensley;

Sharon Colton;

Ann Homan;

Newhouse.

Amy

Achersold; Beth

and Krista Cendroski.

Row

2:

Dawn

Hascall; Michelle Lance; Marianne

Steeg;

Darcy Mickelson; Cori

Manarrez; Milissa Ma.xwell; Stephanie Fraves; Vanessa Mannasmith; Milissa

Hellerand

Mandy Sparks;

Amy Guenthner.

Carlile;

Drew

MENC

Julie Smith; Stacy Tripp

Back Row: Shena Grenier; Brian

Hildal;

Dan

Sears; Bryan

They hosted Junior High Contest,

District Contest

and con-

ductor, Erik Westberg.

Members

attended the Music

Educators National Conference

Convention

in

January.

Social activities included a

Smith; Michelle Neuerburg; Melissa

picnic and serving senior recital

Hooker and Karla Thayer.

receptions.

236 Organizations


Expanding THE Air Waves History seemed to repeat

KXCV

true.

BEaSQ

y().5

in for a bright future.

1993 on a high note

On

Success reaches

sends

new

th;ii

It

to

KXCV

signals

Aug.

.^0.

199.3

to reach Chillicothe, .38,()0()

in

was

88.9 the national

puhlic radio altiliate on the Northwest

was

ChillicotheMo. as

itself.

& KRNW The

station

campus

expanded

its

signal

KXCV W.5 & KRNW

KXCV

88.9.

then

became

The whole expan-

sion process to Northcentral Missouri look three

"It

was

the staffs idea and

we went

lo the

University adrninistration with the thought that

we could

acquire a federal grant to cover 15

percent of the project."" Sharon Bonnett, station

manager,

said.

riie station

"We

also continued lo

Bonnett

in

felt

seek

actively

siill

who had gncn

in

in.

in the past,"

said.

received a

minimum

of two federal

grants.

The station also continued to support their commitment to Northwest students employed on their operation staff. Seven professional employees and thirty students made up the KXCV

ing

"We

than $17,000

addition to listener-supported funding,

In

need for national public radio

"There was no public radio or television

More

1993.

pledges from those

staff.

Northcentral Missouri. "" Bonnett said.

continued their yearly on air fund-

pledges from area listeners were taken

The Uni\ ersity covered the other 25 percent of the project. Bonnett admitted that there was a in the area.

that

problem.""

KXCV

years to complete.

w ho did not

one before would soke

to

raising drive in

Mo., with the addition of a

watt transmitter.

have access

concluded

terms of success.

KXCV

that b\ putting out a signal to those

"Maintaining the componcni of student

train-

was very important to us," Bonnett said. "We

had weekly workshops

were coordinated

that

with the foreign language department, since a

component of our student

big

training dealt with

pronunciation."

Broadcasting inajor Kirk Waymaii worked

at

KXCV because of the professional radio experience

it

gave him.

"The type of programming the station had

gave

me a broader sense of mv

talents. ""Way man

said.

Other highlights included

KXCVs

staff

members assistance with the production of audio

New Image Northwest The Missouri Broadcasters Association awarded the station 1st place in the area of promotions and an honorable mention in news features. The station also debuted the new "Audioadvertisements for the advertising campaign.

Reader"" service.

The

service served visually

impaired and physically handicapped individu-

who had

als

difficulties reading.

The ongoing goal was to broaden

the appeal of

national public radio. "I

and

could not imagine it

was nice

to

life

without public radio

have worked

in

something

that

you believed so strongly in," Bonnett said.

Cnilen Hiinrcihan Ktilhlcm Kennedy /irc/xiifs/or an ( .)Âť

Mo

Auil

to,

I'hoto

KXLV

sii/iuil ii>iis

oii-iiir nUerrieii'

ninmiicd

lo

rmib

on

KX(V

Chillicolhc,

by Tony Miceli

Organizations

237


Millikan Hall Council. Front

Row:

Jenny DeBluuw; Teresa Wiseman and

Back Row:

Jennifer Krai.

Kelli

McNett; Danielle Pillow and Corie Rasmussen.

Millikan Hall Council The group provided programming tor residents of Millikan HalL

They sought provements

make im-

to

in the hall

and pro-

vided leadership opportunities.

They also sponsored

a

Planned Parenthood program.

The council held Beach Bash

the Millikan

as their big social

event.

Newman

Council. Front

Row:

Crystal

Wilson; Malinda Boechman; Heather Perry; Colleen

Newman Council

Prem and Shannon

Keane. Back Row: Heather Greene;

Michael Maher; Ke\in Harrington; Adrian Gettemoeller and Kristm Prem.

The group provided fellowship ;md

activities to students witli

a

Catholic emphasis.

Members

attended the

MACCS

convention, various retreats and a

Chicago Service week.

They

also joined the Adopt-a-

Family program.

Newman highway

Council adopted a

for clean-up.

The organization held a Mardi Gras and a faculty

social.

North Complex Hall Council. Front

Row Kim

Ray;

:

Amy Crozier; Damian

Gabyn; Jennifer Dougan and Kristin Hughes. Back Row: Paul Lohman;

Studbendiek; Christian

Lisa

Hornbaker; George McCure; Matt Baber and Sara

Still.

North Complex Council The group sought

to give stu-

dents a safe living environment.

They offered opportunity recreational, social

for

and cultural

growth.

Members tional

held various educa-

programs as well as a skat-

ing party.

They

also held a hall council

meeting every Tuesday night.

Northwest Missourian: Front Row: K.

Underwood; T. Hobbs; J. Puis and C. Spagna. Row 2: S. Whitaker; H. Townsend; F. Dahlquist; R. Dittmer;

M. Smith;

Meyers; A. Tackett;

S.

Mohamad

and T. Dodson.

Row

3:

S.

M.

Johnson; S. Woolfolk; L. Klindt; C.

Cook;

E.

Sportsman; K. Madden;

4:

Daniels;

J.

Vaught; M. Murphy;

M.

Hulti; C. Tribesch;

J.

L.

Rathje; K. Sparks and R. Bruntmeyer

Back Row:

R.

Weydert; N. Olson; M.

Breen; G. Cassell; H. Wilson; D. Breez; S.

Cleverley;

S.

Pummell and D

Barker.

238 Organizations

The group published a weekly paper.

They were awarded with

a

Five Star AU-American.

I.

Edwards; C. Walker and K. Boney.

Row

Northwest Missourian

The Missourian changed printing contracts from the

Mary\ille Daily .Atlantic

Forum

to the

Telegraph News.


Newman

Builds

Community Fellowship and worship

hroiii^hl

ing to students involved in

Spirit

moiv mean-

Newman

Council

with community service projects and fun activities.

According

tionsotticer. the

to

Heather Greene, public

rcla

main purpose ot'the council was

"building community." Greene stressed that

Council reaches Jor

ijreater focus

on prayer

|iro|eels outside

They were

involved

in

many

activities outside of religion

to

work

kitchens

HI

pt)orcommunities.

Mike Maher

"What

Council participated

in

Homecom-

ing with a house decoration and selling hot choct)late and popct)rn at the parade.

They

homeless center and soup

in a

community

said

an important part

New man

ot

Maher said. Newman members

iiig

the

also held lun acliviiies

every Friday night including movies, board

games, dinner and

roller skating.

During Lent a more serious side was taken "Journey" when about 40 people gathered

w

Series where professors like Sharon

for a .^O-minute prayer

Council also took ihcir service

was

really being a Catholic Christian

sponsored, for the third year, a Last Lecture

Newman

work was

Council.

gospel,"

also

Browning gave a lecture as if it were their last ever. The Passion Play, another annual event, was being changed into a non-traditit)nal format and would move off of campus to performances at various churches in the community.

Campus Minister service

about was living out baptisms and follow

and worship.

Newman

Week members tra\ eled to

Chicago

Newman was open to everyone and members did not necessarily have to be Catholic.

Marwille. Mo. During a

ol

Spring Break Ser\ ice

ith

ol

all

once

came

these aspects

a

week. Greene said

together in a family

atmosphere.

"There v\as a

real

sense of lamily and

1

joyed all of the people in Newman," Greene "It just

seemed

natural to get involved.

en-

said.

I

also

community service." After four years as campus nnnister. Maher was in his last year at the Newman Council and he talked about his experience and what liked doing

Newman

had accomplished over the years.

"This was

my

first

experience as a pastor

Maher said. "Over the years, w hat we had accomplished was greater outreach. leader."

Through electronic mailing, brochures and programs, our V isibility had increased. was most I

proud of our connection with groups and strong with other campus ministries." Members also took time out tor them.sel ves.

ties

In

October, they traveled to the Lake of Ozarks for a resort retreat.

Morning and evening prayer

with discussion was held, but the main focus was lor students to just relax. Eight

members

also

traveled to St. Louis for an education focus at the

Missouri Association College Catholic Convention for

workshops and speakers.

l-Acn with already high

miy involvement,

campus and commuCouncil was reach-

Newman

ing for a greater focus

on prayer and community.

Kahssa Boney

Adniw pliy

Cofltfinofl/fr,

Cfcris

ihe botirii ijiinu; Risfe,

f /oKSf s/ioiisorf(i iicl/i'ilics

iomjortahle ietUn^

hy Liura

TmhsLh ami Kevin

til l/)f

Ntinnm

llou'.e

Htirnni^toii

The

Newmm

every Friday ni^hl tjh'mg ituthvli n

lo relax attd

uimniui liurmij the semester. Photo

Riedel

Organizations 239


Hall Honorary Supports Success The National Residence

Hail Honorary

was a

group tliat lionored students wlio made outstand-

IS

Q 03 la

ing contributions to

tiie

residence hails.

outstandini) proi^rams

contributions

at least

GPA." Evelyn Mayer said. "They had to be

involved on campus and show a positive attitude

towards residential

and

of

RAs. those involved

NRHH

were students,

in hall council,

really involved in their hall floor

were members of

Members had campus

NRHH,"

to

Shari

or

RHA

Smyers

said.

be involved consistently

in

really

to

"Showing that a person was involved and worked with other students

make

said.

their experience in the residence halls a

success and showing that they cared about

Northwest."

NRHH

was formed so

Hall Council Adviser of the Month, Residence

Month were

Month and Program of the

presented.

Nominations for these awards were voted on by each

and then were submitted

hall council

nominations

all

"We

to

NRHH to be voted on the first

of every month.

read

nominations submitted by the

all

hall councils then individually

our decisions and put them

Smyers

"If there

said.

was

work of those

stu-

we would make box

in a ballot

a

tie.

we would

re-

read the nominations and re-vote."

Besides sponsoring awards, the

to

RHA then gave

the Residence Hall Association.

Wednesday

activities.

Smyers

voted on several awards that were

monthly. Awards such as Student of the Month

or

government

"Consistency, that was what was really important,"

NRHH

presented by the Residence Hall Association

Hall Assistant of the

life."

"Many members

the college

ticed.

two consecutive semesters and maintain a 2.3

make

labored hard to

experience more enjoyable would not go unno

"Members of NRHH had to live on campus for

Members reward

who

dents

NRHH

also had

social gatherings.

"We ner,"

had a barbecue and a Thanksgiving din-

Smyers

"We

said.

tried to

activities,

mix meetings with educational

our business agenda and social activi-

NRHH was an hon-

Mayer said. "Because

ties,"

we wanted our members

orary organization,

have some fun and

from

relief

to

their regular

v\ork."

The group met once a month and was trying to revise itself for the future, for this reason, the

group was not

NRHH

as active as in past years.

was responsible

for earning

ing themselves. During the raised

$2.()()()

as carpet

through

and bedding

\

fund-

all

summer members

arious fund-raisers such

sales.

With

this

money

the

organization sponsored a scholarship and also

decided to show

appreciation toward

its

mem-

bers by paying half of the cost of the sweat shirts

they bought.

"We

to show members but also to promote on campus." Mayer said.

bought sweatshirts not only

appreciation to our

NRHH NRHH into

supported those

making

life

who

put extra effort

the residential hall

in

more

comfortable.

Ruby NiUioiutI RcsiiifMcc Hiill

Dittmer

Hoiwrnry hoUi

H.ill ioimtjc to discuiijulure fi'fiih

ihipsfor

240 Organizations

sli((JfHls

mvolved

m

(lie

ti

meeliiii)

iii

Pirnii

The i/roii/i provuiai schoLu-

kills

Pholo by Tony Alai/i


NRHH

NRHH

I

nilcr Chaiullcr aiul

was to honor those that made significant

Their goal

siudenls

CDMtnbuliiins lo ihe residence

D;i\c

:

Back Row;

Mark

Amy

Het/.ler;

Pavlich;

Megcrson: Jcn-

Evelyn Mayer.

Light; Shelly Pfister;

Kenna Laniberlsen JenSmyers and Kelly :

nifer Kaut/; Shari

Yas;er.

halls.

become

()

I

From Rou

.cigh Gcrlvcn; Melissa

a

member, a siucampus and

deiu had to live on

maintain a 2.5 GP.\.

Thes \()tedonall nominations tor .Student ot the

Month, Resi-

dence Hall Assistant Month and Program

ot

the

ot

the

Month.

102 River. 1

They

Man

02 RiVHR

enlisted public interest

explore, enjoy and preserve

lu

scenic resources ot

the

United

w

the

-Stales its forests, waters.

ildlife

From Row;

Jessica Pratka;

Duibcr; Ronnie Long; Cyndi

Wagner; Kelli Harpstcr and Bruce Owens. Back Row: Joe (iodfirnon; David sor;

Kill/; Dr.

Ted

.Scilen;

David

EaslerUi, spon-

Jason Green

.iiul

D,i\ nl

Bennett.

and wilderness.

Community

service involve-

ment included planting trees, environmental education and habitat

improvement.

St)cial

events included zoo

cave trips, canoe

trips,

floats

and

uildlife observations.

Order Ot Omega. From Row: Lcihini Greenfield; Jennifer Blair; Dustin

Order of Omega

Bieghler; Jennifer Noller; Lauree Cro-

The group honored outstandGreeks within the system.

ing

Activities

Week,

included Greek

a Christmas party and an

Alyssa Sehnaek and Aimee Chadwick. Back Row: Kevin Kooi; /ier;

Knsli Schey;

Hawley; Mike Wallet; Jeni P.J. Amys: Kevin Koon: Ryan

Mahoncv and Michael Caldwell.

awards banquet.

Aimee Chadvv ick. an elemeneducation major, was

tary

awarded a post-graduate scholarship from the National Order of Omeua.

Panhellenic Council,

Panhellenic Council It

was

the governing

body

for

lour sororities.

all

.Activities

included putting up

a Christmas tree with a bulb for

each sorority and one for Panhel.

The group went on get to

know each

From Row;

Brcnda Limbach; Nanice Lipperl; Lauree Cro/ier; Julie Belik; Jodi Bergren; Kelly Beuger and l,inh Nguyen. Back Row; Shelly Hainee; Lee Ann Vetter; Marcy Dickman; Snady Staker; Angela McNerncy; Coleen MeMahon and Courtney Haney.

a retreat to

other better.

They began improving Greek relations and put more emphasis on know int; each other.

Organizations 241


Perrin Hall Council. Front

Ryan; Denise Hopf;

Jill

Row: Katie

Wright; Elaine

Headlee and Diana Martin. Back Row:

Perrin Hall Council

Paula Starling; Becky Bohrinann;

They

Jeanna Powers; Dana Hayden; Barbara

Lowers and Cathleen Welsh.

orgatii/ed

two

hall pro-

grams, a lingerie party and a informative presentation about bats.

Fund-raisers included a penny

war for the United

Way and sell-

ing hall T-shirts.

Residents participated

Homecoming

in

activities with a

floor decoratins contest.

Phi Alpha Theta. Front

Falcone, adviser;

Amy

Row: Janice

Light and Kara

Phi Alpha

Dettmann. Back Row: Brian Stanfield; Joe Fortclka; Joe DuFrain and Chris

Armiger.

Theta

Membership requirements cluded a

GPA

}.()

a\'erage of

in-

and a history

.^.1.

Social activities included a full

picnic,

Christmas

Halloween and

parties, initiation

and

a regional meeting.

The group recognized and encouraged those students of tory

who

his-

excelled in historical

scholarships.

Phi

Beta Alpha. Front Row: Jana

Budde; Annie Grah;

Amy

Kitlie

Drydale;

Pashek; Julie Belknap; Janelle

Denney and Cindy McCarl. Rou 2: Karmi Hamann; Angela O'Grady; Lisa Bird; Patrick McLaughlin, adviser; Gerald Kramer, adviser; Neil Neumeyer; Tanii Lichtas; Jamie Davis and Misty O'Connor. Back Row Julie

Phi Beta Alpha Activities included

two bowl-

ing and pizza parties.

They

invited a speaker to

come and

lecture about

resume's, etiquette and

how

to

:

Sackett; Brian Smith; Chris

Kates;

dress for success.

The group toured

the

Shannon Glasford; Michael Loper; Sean Wiedmaier; Collin Wamsley; Chad Spate; Kayleen Rash and Dawn

E\eready plant

Hayes.

and how they had changed

how were made

to find out

the building blocks

throueh time.

Row: Kim Piatt; Dave Pavlich; Stacy Reineke; Bobbi Phi Eta Sigma. Front

Woodward and

Katie Ryan.

Row

2:

Cathleen Welsh; Lisa Kay Sanders;

Ryan O'Rourke; Jennifer Gum; Alyssa Schnack and Lora Ogden. Back Row: Cindy Young; Kristin Van Winkle; Andrew Lancaster; Derek Frieling; Maria Portz; Doug Swink and Brenda Ryan, adviser.

Phi Eta Sigma

The group planned an

initia-

tion every spring.

The organization recognized academic achievement by those during their

first

year of college

and encouraged excellence throughout their college years.

They

invited speakers to dis-

cuss such topics as resume writ'

inc and Northwest traditions.

242 Organizations


Hall Involvement Helps Community pnJc

Tukiiij;

ISQHD H

eg

Various

m

Bi

HuD

activities suppori

dence

hall

make

on campus the

the sinallesi resi-

hall

on campus we

felt that

charits b\ having a

penny war. Hach floor had

with the most pennies.

communitN iinohe-

The war became very competiti \ e w hen memwould put nickels and

ment was what made Perrin stand out." Dana

bers froin other floors

Hayden. president

dimes instead of pennies

said.

members

Hall Council

whole in\i)l\ement

tried to get

ot their residents

by various

activities.

Wright,

who

cups.

in the

on the winning

lived

that raised nearly S.^O said

third floor

everyone was w

illing

to help out.

Known on campus

for

its

their

"Perrin Hall had done an exemplary Job

Wright

With

A

in

went around and everybody put

just in

our cup," Wright

we

total

raised a

was very

said. "It

of money."

lot

Way

of $S7 was raised for United

through the penny war.

said.

A recycling competition was held floors for three weeks.

money

competitive and

part to protect the earth.

Jill

"We

recycling program

headed by Elaine Headlee. residents did

recycling,"

a

cup where pennies and other coins could

plastic

be placed, the winner of the war was the tloor

best.

"Since Perrin Hall was the smallest residence

Perrin

campus and community

what the\ had duMO. Pcrrm

in

Hall Council thrived to

the

betu een

receiving a recycling piz/a party.

They

sponsored a competition with their brother

Another lund-raiser involved resident

all

winning floor

tants,

who were

also

director

hall

retreat in Hxcelsior

with questions about recycling.

Residents of Perrin also raised

the assistant hall director

They offered

monev

for

assis-

and the

money Springs. Mo. raising

hall

go on

to

a

services such as cleaning rooms,

doing laundry and running errands lor residents

They

for a small fee.

and tucked residents

also read bedtime stories in at night.

During Family Day. Perrin Hall hosted a face painting booth at the carnival.

free

Over 200

faces were painted by hall members.

"We

painted

paw

prints

dents and their family

Wright

on the faces of

members of

all

stu-

ages."

said.

To show

their

Homecoming

spirit,

residents

of Perrin Hall decorated hallways with various

themes. First floor was decorated to the theme of

"101 Dalmatians," Second floor "Winnie the

Pooh," Third floor Disney movies and Fourth

was Mickey and Minnie Mouse.

floor

To

unify the hall, T-shirts and sweatshirts

promoting Perrin were ordered. The T-shirts

were designed by Hayden. thought that the T-shirts showed the rest of campus that even though we were small, we worked together and were a close, cohesive group of young women," Melissa Farley said. Hav ing made the hall their home away from home. Perrin Hall Council worked to ensure "I

the

their residents a

many

comfortable community, with

activities that involved the entire hall.

Ruby

Dittmer

Jmnifer Chiindler, KiiHe kyaii i/riim

iiicds durini)

Pcmn

ii'iis ifcf

for

nxyclmij proi)ram

lis

iiiui

Jemi Crocco

liisciis'.

a Renin Hall Council meeting

imallest residence hall on Pliolo

campus

by Laura

i(

was

pro-

Allhougb well

known

Riedel

Organizations 243


Men

Anxiously

Await Changes HmDDDUQB IBQIil]

Q g] m m Q II 01

Even though residents of successful in

programs and contributions

was

of Phillips Hall sponsored a football throw.

"We made

year as a men's residence

its final

a football player out of cardboard

and put a hole

hall.

Phillips Hall Council meetings

ery Thursday

Members reward outstanding

During the Family Day Carnival, the residents

Phillips Hall anx-

iously awaited changes to be made, the hall

discussed

at

at

were held ev-

7:30 p.m. Several topics were

these meetings; one of which be-

in

where the player's hands

it

were, " Jeff Moser said.

"Participants were to

throw a football through the hole like the player

was catching

to

make

it

came a reality. The council discussed acquiring a new pool table. Members of the council appointed a com-

residents had to be involved in hall council.

mittee to look into buying a pool table and in

given pesos. Every person

December, with money from

activity

was given 10 pesos and

being

attendance

ment fund, the pool

The

money ball

table

improve-

was purchased.

for the United

Way

by having a volley-

tournament and raffling off the

was

nice to have

parking spot."

won

hall

one month. the hall director's

Tom DeBlauw

was conpark when

said. "It

venient to always have a place to

others always had to look for a place."

who

residents

residents of Phillips Hall also raised

director's parking space for "It

their hall

In order for Phillips to

in

look

the football."

sponsor such

activities,

The

attended council meetings were

who went

sponsored

at floor

to a hall

five pesos for activities.

The.se pesos were then u.sed at the end of the

semester to buy certain things from the front

desk such as pop

tarts

and

residents of Phillips Hall the hall

ed

hall

VCR

hoped

rentals.

that

from an all male residence would motivate residents.

The

changing

hall to a co-

James Scrogin and DeBlauw were responsible for writing the proposal to

co-ed residence

make

Phillips a

hall.

The new plans for Phillips involved a wellness hall.

"They were looking

at

having

it

be a co-ed

wellness hall with wellness programs and making the hall tobacco free," Steve

Warren

said.

"Phillips Hall had one of the biggest weight

rooms on campus. We planned to purchase exerequipment such as a tread mill and an exercise bike, we were also going to find out if cise

we could aerobics

The

turn

part of the

room with

a

TV

basement

into an

and a VCR."

residents wanted to improve their hall's

image. "Phillips Hall

of being in."

all

was

trying to

work on

its

image

men and going to have women move

Warren

In its final

said.

year as an

all

male

hall the residents

of Phillips pulled together and sponsored

many

successful events. Residence waited for the fol-

lowing year when the changes they had finally come into effect and would complete Phillips Hall Councils purpose of making the hall a better place to live.

prompted would

Phillips Hiill Council to he

made

to

tfcf

Northwest Week

Ruby

Dittmer

members

iiuliiiitc their

hall.

The council made

activities,

addition of a jooseball table

position on chiinges

ÂŤ

decisions regardinij

weight room improvements and the

Photo by Chris Tucker

244 Organizations

i


Hall Council

Phillips

Members sponsDred

Asa t'untl-raisert'orthe

Way

a li)ur-

tournament.

iin-t'our volleyball

they rattled oft

I'niteil

ttieir tiall

director's parking space.

They proposed and clianges

antici

would be

pated

ttie

made

to their residence hall.

ttiat

At the Famil\ Day C"arni\al the hall sponsored a football

throwing contest.

Pi

OMhX-A

Members convention

Pi

attended a national in

Nashx

ille,

â&#x20AC;˘ They completed projects and turned

Tenn.

national

them

in as a

chapter recei\ ing six out of top 10 in the country

A

long paper

in international

business was presented state

Mo.

convention

m

at

the

Springfield.

/%

pn


New

Ideas Activities

Promote

With a focus on promoting events, the PubHc Relations Student Society of America, offered

hands-on experience an organization

in

to

members.

which members worked on

promotional campaigns while gaining experi-

experience while working on

promotional campaigns

informed of

all

actions relating to the account.

PRSSA members worked on

PRSSA was

such as working for ISO.

several acounts

Gregory's Church

St.

and for Student Senate during elections

public relations majors."" Kris Schechinger said.

we would publicize their we would take picutres of the candidates and we would promote them," Stacey Grell

"We

said.

ence before going out into the work force.

Students gain hands-on

express their creativity, while the client was

"PRSSA was

"For Student Senate

a student-run organization for

took on different accounts for people and

promoted

More

their events.""

than just an organization,

members of

PRSSA "We

were also friends. were a very comfortable and open

group.

Sheiia Murray said.

"We

all

elections,

"Depending on the account, someone would write letters, someone would target the

community and someone

PRSSA was "Not

got along

Promotion

In

Motion, the group's on-campus

ence.""

were

Members of PRSSA

di\ ided into indi\ idual

account teams and

was lo service and Each account team was given

their responsibility

satisfy the

client.

lee

way

to

target the

known on campus.

not well

in the

Murray

group but

it

majors were

was a good experi-

said.

Members w orked with accounts as they would

public relations firm, offered the services of an actual public relations firm.

would

a lot of public relations

involved

well.'"

else

schools.""

work force. "Because of working with accounts in PRSSA, we were not as intimidated by compain the

and

nies

work

felt

PRSSA that

comfortable about going out

force,"'

Murray

also offered services to the campus,

were rarely used.

"Not many knew

we offered services such

that

making brochures,

as

in the

said.

tlyers

and writing news

Murray said. Members of PRSS.A sponsored several fund-

releases."

raisers for their

conventions

Northern Iowa and

bake sale during

worked with

at the Lini\ ersity

of

Events such as a

in Florida.

Homecoming and

they also

American Cancer Society during Daffodil Days. All monies raised during Daffodil Days remained in Nodaway County. PRSSA was a great resume builder for its the

members.

"A

my

majority of the experience that

resume' had come from

I

had put on

my working

with

PRSSA." Murray said. Members of PRSSA were recognized each semesterforhaving attained theirnational bership. their

mem-

Graduating seniors were honored for

achievements and what they had accom-

plished throughout their academic careers.

While

still

in college,

PRSSA gave

hands-on

experience to members.

Ruby

Diltmer

FloruLi PRSSA com'fiidOH held PRSSA lopoiIiom pliWnedjorNew Orkiiin Pholo

BitiJ BiMiier Jjsciissfs the

The ncyl

hy (J'ns

246 Organizations

iii

ii'.is

Tucll'er


Pre

Med Club

Pre

The group w

ramiliaii/cd pru-

Row

They had

medical

dillerent

The\ met every other Thiirs dav.

PRSSA Members worked on accounts Chiuch

tor ISO. St. Gregory's

and Student Senate. Fund-raisers included a bake

which helped

and

raise

cons entions

at the L'nisersity

mones Florida

in

of North-

ern Iowa. I

The group

pro\ ided hands-on

experience lor public relations majors.

Psi

This group

Chi

w as a national

psy-

chology honorary society.

Members ti\ ities.

Held

participated in ac-

including a social part\

trips

and speakers.

M e m be rs h were

a

i

p req u re me n t s i

minimum

.VO

GPA

psychology and placing

in

in

the

top 25 percent of their class.

Psych/Soc Ci.ub ^ The organization pnnided psychology and sociology majors with experience in

their

tields. '

Community

ser\ice invoKe-

ment included working with group homes. Activities included Dr. Josh

Leamon speaking about

h\ pilo-

sis,

held a Halloween party tor

the

group home and had a

trip to the

Facility.

Da\id;

Graham;

Jcniiilcr

KcvanHvans; Barbara Howcry; Irwin;

Shalom Barber;

Fia

field

Clarinda Correctional

Back

Manchester; Phil Tompkins; Jer-

ein\ Grunualt and

fields.

for their

JcrinilLM

Row; Shcron Jacobs; Holly Martin; Gary Chancy; Mieah Breekenridgc;

and a barhecue.

C"hris

sale,

;

.-Xmy

Sehullcs and Trisha Vaughn.

se\eral guest speak-

troni

ers

Rin\

I'orolcsano; Ke\ in Rhodes; Shannessy

events included

rollerskatinj;

2:

l.>dia

incdi

ith tlie dit'terenl

Social

From

McKim;

Sortor; Melissa Slrnad and Tara Sloan.

and schools.

cal tields

Cluh.

Jcnniter Wcbcr; Lori

spectj\e pre-pri)tessi()nul health

studenis

Med

Spray; Susan

1 '^\

-mf

Kim

I.orbinder.


Religious Life Council. Front

Row:

Monica Howard;

Tricia

Keri Peterson;

Religious Life Council

Rusch; Stacie Kirkpatrick; Bendd Ebisch and Dawn Gardner. Back Row: Jeannie Nutzel; Rebecca McElwee;

John Bunner; Kevin Harrington; Brian Sparks;

They promoted

The group had community service involvement including \

isiting

nursing homes.

Social bowling,

and

RHA.

Front

Row: Tim DeBlauw;

Row

2:

Cenne

Brixike Barron; Sherri Muse;

Curtis

Dawn

Mitchell; Jill

Woixl;

Wilson; Shannon McNerney;

Jackie Schimmel; Doety Corless; Gia Roe

and Peggy Shioh.

Row

3:

Ross Bremner;

Jason Demiiui; Barry Hiirtman; Sisco; Matt B;iker. advisor;

Graham

RHA

David Shidler;

The group was

ball,

and bowl and

tour-

Awards included most

spir-

ited delegation

Hiatt;

Andrew

Scott;

Toby

shake, rattle

monopoly

a

Back Row:Kevin Mueller; Mark

George McCure; Christian Hombaker:

resi-

Social activities included a

masquerade nament.

Hetzler;

the governing

body and voice of all the dence halls on campus.

Lohman; Jenn Manley; Ed Lee; Cathleen Welsh and Elizabeth Niemeier. Paul

Mike Hughes;Thom

night, concerts

a chili dinner.

Tracy Maisel; Dari;ui Galyon and MichRogers.

included

activites

game

Heldstab; Leigh Gerken; Cheri Flippm;

elle

on

campus.

Mike Freeman; Darren King

and Michael Maher.

unity between

religious organizations

all

gram

at the

tion of

and top 10 pro-

National Associa-

College and Universities

Bra.snahan and James Serogin.

Residence Halls.

RIGHTS.

Front

Row: Heidi Cue: Kim

KirchotT; Lance Fredrickson; Lisa

RIGHTS

Lawrie and Katie Ryan. Back Row: Lori Flint; Angelia Knight; Scott Allen;

Tom

Riley; Douglas Martin and

Amy

Muenchrath.

They spoke to freshman seminar classes about assertiveness, healthy relationships and

munication

com-

in relationships.

The group planned

activities

including Operation ID and the fund-rai.ser Jail-n-Bail.

RIGHTS held

Personal Safety

Week.

Members reached

1

.300 stu-

dents throuszh lectures.

ROTC Color Guard.

Front

Row: Laura

Sampsel; Greg Ebusole; Theresa

New

and Shannon Keane. Back Row; Sha-

lom Barber: Rosetta Harris; Joel Heinzeroth and John LaBarbera.

ROTC Color Guard Board of Regents finalized plans to phase out the program.

They provided for football

a color

guard

and basketball

games, parades, organizational

programs and graduation. For a community service activity,

they presented colors for

the Veteran's

248 Organizations

Day Memorial.


Presentations Teach

Rape Awareness Willi oiil\ nine iiKMiibcis. R;i|X'

Ha\c To Slop

la

nBQDB

lieshmen during summer testing

awareness

them along with students. "It was necessary to speak with

about rape.

The group \\ as requesieU lo

speak

b\ Dr.

Ann

Idle

Ro\'.

treshnuin seniinar elasses. In

to all

pre\ lOLis years,

Assertiveness luui

K Going To

iiKivascil canipiis

RIGHTS

v\as in\ iled

by eerlain

main

instructors to give their presentations. Ilie

focus of the presentations was assertixeness.

communication help

RIGHTS achieve their c)oals

healthy relationships and

communication

in re-

reached appro\imatel\

I. .^00

stu-

dents by talking to the freshman seminar classes

and the students had

a great response to the

RIGHTS presentation. "We had really positi\e comments." Cue

Doug Martin

said. "It

show the kids how

said. "'After

were interested

Heidi

in the

campus

disciplinar\ and

it

opened the students up and made them more aware of the occurrence of rape." also

Along with freshman seminar

RIGHTS made

classes.

a presentation to the parents of

allowed the parents

to

and

to

educate them on rape prevention."

RIGHTS was

.Another big activity for

Personal Safety

Week

an open house, had a

the

held in November. Dur-

more presentations, held

trust

walk and gave

self-

defense classes.

RIGHTS

co-sponsored dur-

week was Operation

ID. Students could

Another ing the

our presentation, the students

the parents

Northwest."

to

to protect thcm.selves

ing the week, they gave

lationships.

RIGHTS

came down

bcloiv their kids

educate

to

activity

get any possession, such as stereos or televi-

engraved and registered

sions,

computer.

paw ned,

national

a

in

an e\ ent of a theft and the item was

In

owner would ha\c

the

a better

chance

of getting their possession returned to them.

Another

activity that received positive re-

RIGH

sponse was the Jail-n-Bail. 10 most wanted

that included

list,

IS had a top

such campus

personalities as Michael Walsh, director of en-

rollment. Dr. Denise Ottinger, dean of student

and Trent Skaggs, president of Student

affairs,

Senate.

Once, they were arrested and placed

one hour or

until

For the students and RK^HTS, the

was

c|uite

"It

in |ail for

they raised $15 for their

bail.

.lail-n-Bail

enjoyable.

went really well," Martin

"The

said.

people, as the day went on, really got into

Also, the people

in thejail

it.

seemed to be enjoying

themscKes." After the Personal Safety Week.

how much support

realized their

the

RIGHTS

campus had

for

program.

"We

just

had so much support," Cue

was overwhelming believed

in

to

said. "It

know how many people

our cause."

RIGHTS main

focus was to educate and

crease awareness of rape. Through their activities

in-

many

during the year the group achieved

their goal of educating students

on

how

to pre-

vent themselves from being victims of rape.

Anuvuia McManicjal

mCHTS

member Scotl Allen joim

Day RIGHTS

in

ipomorcii the cvcnl

Week Pholo by Mike

on Jiiil-n-Bml

in liiiil

Penonul

Siijety

iiurtnij

Reifj

Organizations 249


RTNDA.

Front Row:

Heather

Houseworth; Kathleen Kennedy; Angela Bonella; Sheila Yoder: Kelly

Yagel and Aaron Mansour. Back

Row

;

Chris Gegg; Alex Gazio; Blase Smith:

Matthew Breen: Ken While, JetY Hardin: Kirk

Wayman

adviser:

and Anne

Hendricks.

Sigma Alpha

lota.

Front

Rovi,

:

Beth

Ann Homan; Stacy Tripp: Shelia Yoder: Dawn Hascall: Becky Mathers: Melissa Megerson and Julie Smith.

Back Row: Marianne Steeg: Darcy Mickelson; Leslie Koenen: Kristen Proctor: Michelle Neuerburg: Jennifer Elliott;

Debbie Antes and Milissa

Heller.

Sigma

Gamma

Row:

Epsilon. Front

Lisa Marie Sikorski; Kerisa Ol.son;

Jenny Ingels; Randal Stern: Christopher Reeves and Rebecca Hodges.

Back Row: Doug Swink: Brandon Hamilton: Darin Lee: Wade Wagoner: John Pope and Dwight Maxwell.

Sigma Society. Front Row:

Staci Lock;

Dawn

Jennifer Weber; Lori Graheu;

Ford; Karen Constable; Melissa Strnad

and Charron Harris.

Row

2:

Barbara

Howery; Christina Stone: Tiffany Nincehelser; Carrie Paulson; Michelle

Newbert and Susan Lorimor. Row 3: Amy Barmann; Denise Worley: Amy Kralik: Jennifer Warren:

Rebecca Denton; Brenda Mikels; Stacia Timmons and Jennifer Krai. Back Row: Kristin McKenzie; Holly Martin: Traci Casson: Danielle Pillow: Michelle

Gibbs; Sheila Wild;

Amy

Gustin:

Melanie Brown and Jen Schults.

HUHE


Women

Sing

High Notes The women's music bership

\\

as on ihc rise.

fraternity whose memSigma Alpha Iota prided

tiiemscKes on being a successt'ul urgani/alion.

DBDQ

To join SAI, the prospective memberhad to be a

music major or minor or must have had nine

hours ot music classes. Actives also had

Frakrnily learns iihoul

music and enjoys

membership increase

an overall 2.5

GPA and

ha\ea .VOCiPA

their meetings, the organization di.scussed

Day and

car washes.

it was not intentionally a fundmembers also performed singing tele-

.Although

ha\c

raiser,

in

then

grams upon

request, but the\ did not charge for

Howe\er. they accepted dona-

these ser\ices.

only Rushed new

spring," Belli .Ann

1

m

members

the

loman said. "However. Rush

functions were held throughout the \ear.

Some

and candy for Valentines

as deliv Cling balloons

to

music classes.

"We

At

upcoming e\ents and planned such fund-raisers

tions.

Another tund-raiser pated

working

in w,as

that the

at

of our unctions w ere formal events, w hile others

test

were informal, they were basically a way for us

ber of hours meinbers worked.

I

to get to

know

know

the pledges

and for them

to get to

pledges had to

till

out an information sheet

complete w ith two reccommendations." said.

partici-

Music Con-

held on campus. S.Al was paid for the

Money

that

SAI

raised

was

num-

useil for \arious

materials.

us.

"Before the actives decided who to give bids to all

SATs

the Distrct

"One of the recommendations had

Homan to

come

from a private instructor and the other from another professor in the music department.

"We

money

used our

we bought punch bowl

a

camera

for ordinary items like

new

for our historian, a

for our parties and used funds to

cover expenses during Rush functions." Ionian I

said.

Rush expenses included piiniding

refresh-

ments for members and Rushees.

Members

of SAI traveled to

Tan-Tar-A, Mo., for a three-day

music convention.

"Tan-Tar-A was an annual

state

convention for music educators that

was always held January,"

the last

Homan

week

in

said.

At Tan-Tar-A, members

at-

tended several clinics and work-

shops that covered different areas of the music

field.

went to several workshops that taught me how to prepare a band for "I

contest and

how

to teach lessons in

class," Stacey Tripp said.

Members who went to Tan-Tarreceived a better knowledge of

what Missouri was doing music

field

SAI was for

or

in

the

of education. a professional fraternity

women who were music majors minors who loved to sing and

help the community.

Ruhy Alcm/icrs

c.isl

rolfi^

Ditlmcr

lo Jclcrmiiie "

lirolhtrofthe Aloiilfc mihic

!(/)

nuiior

III

o/.f tjroup of

miiMi

Si()mii

women wilh

Pholo hy

who

Alpha

ii'dl

be

lolii u'lis

tin niteresl

or

Lliir.i ku'Jel

ORGANIZATION.S

251


Providing Leadership FOR Management The Society of Human Resource ManageSHRM, was organized in order to help

S Q] 13 Focusing on

[SI

the realities oj the

loorking world

The group held two meetings

a

month. The

meeting focused on business aspects of the

ment,

first

introduce students to the realities of the working

organization. This included what the different

world.

offices had

"To add to knowledge of human resource management and to develop networks and contacts for a better chance of getting a job." was the purpose of SHRM. according to Penny DeJong,

needed

SHRM

was

the largest professional interna-

tional as.sociation

enhancing the

and they were devoted solely field

of

human

resource man-

Since the local chapter of

SHRM wasjust in its

beginning, the international organization only

had

1

2

weeks and what they dis-

cussed what the group needed to accomplish as a whole.

The second meeting usually consisted of a who had worked in the personnel area, which included individuals who had worked with hiring, job termination, training

this was the first full year of members was an important

members. As recruiting

and benefits.

DeJong

agement.

SHRM,

in past

guest speaker

adviser.

to

done

do for preparation. Then they

to

said the purpose of these speakers

to "introduce us to the realities

of

human

was re-

source management."

Along with meetings other activities.

group gathered for

the

SHRM travelled to Hallmark for The

aspect to the groups year and they planned to

a tour and to talk with a personnel officer.

continue to expand and increase membership.

guide discussed with the group what would be

Shaleen Roth said their main goal was

on

recruiting.

to

focus

expected of them when they graduated and entered the professional world.

As

a

more

howling

social activity, the

and get

to relax

to

group also went

know each

other, as

well as a Christmas party.

SHRM for the

included testing procedures

members

in

order

to gain junior or senior certifi-

cation in the field of

human

resource manage-

ment. These procedures were given to enhance

job possibilities

They

in the

personnel area.

also had scholarships available to stu-

human

management

field

or other fields that were closely related.

The

dents in the

resource

national headquarters included an internship

program.

"We

were trying

program

locally."

members would

to establish an internship

Roth

said.

"This was so the

gain experience while in

Maryville."

SHRM was a group founded to provide members with helpful products and services.

They

were also focused on enhancing students" leadership qualities in the

ment

human

resource manage-

field.

They worked toward giving members knowlthat would be needed to

edge and experience

gain a job in the field after graduation.

Kristy Miuiden Idnu Dierking posts a sign ahoul Society of Aliiiiiiijfmfiil cKliiniies.

iiiiJents

252 Organizations

Human

Rfsoiiaf

SHRM prepared persomiel manaijement

for the professionalfieU. Photo by

Cbns

Tmhr


SHRNL

SHRM The ment

in

personnel manage-

Dierking;

Jaiiii

I'hcrcsu

New and

Perry;

Kim

Panicla

.Shaleen Rolh .md

.Spiitis;

Shaiucl Carlson.

protes-

the

enieiiiii;

liir

Row:

Sherry Lewis. Back Row:

griHip pivpiiivd studenis

maionni:

Front

koh Ferguson;

sional tiekl.

onK memtx-rslup

I'heir

quiremeni uas phasis

to lia\e

le-

an em-

personnel manage-

in

ment.

While

the

group only met

bi-

monthly, they planned fundraisers,

a

Hallmark tour and

guest speakers.

SMS/AHEA.

ironl

Row:

.lack(.|ul)n

Kelly Pratt; Kalli\ B lul y Zimmcrnian; Mielielle F.llis and Karen Constable. Back Row: Linda Burkan; Christy Lee; Stephanie Howard; Mark ii

SMS/AHEA Boehm was

Linda

SMS/AH KA

the state

Croniley; Nancy

president.

The group doubled bership IVom 20 to .-\eti\ities

mem-

the

W'akeliekl and

Soma

;

Huppert; Lisa Slrneln

.

.^0.

ineluded a spring

tashion shov\, departmental

Christmas partv and special pro-

grams

tor etiquette.

Members \olunteered Nodaway Nursing home.

at

the

SMSTA the largest student delegation to ]')')}

tion in St. Louis,

.State

Conven-

Mo.

Members helped poll votes concerning the Washington Middle .School bond

Ui.indy Piall

Person.

The Northwest chapter was attend the

SM.STA. From Row: Theresa Whellon; Kiin

Row

2:

,\llcn:

and Kara

Lisa Gasiorowski;

Michelle Happerniann;

lU'cky

Bohrmann; Rosetla Harris and Lniilie Allen. Back Row: Lisa Allen; Amy Light; Ryan Blaue; Tammy DeJong and

Ann

Schcndel.

issue.

Guest speakers included Larry

Don Meyer and

Deaton.

Sherri

Strating.

South Complex Hall Council. Front

Row: Kostas Kapelis; Cheryl

South Complex

McEnany;

Hall Council

ren;

Amy

Natalie Banks; Billee

and Angle Lullmann. Hall Council began reworking

War-

Gudenrath; Doely Corless

Row

2:

Leigh

Gerken. adviser; Jenn Manley; Craig

and an incen-

LeBlanc; Angela Kralotil; Robin Bybee; Steve Adams; Bobby Chaney

acti\ities

cluded going to a haunted house

and Amy Light. Back Row: Roy Cleniens;Dave Shidlcr; Andrew

and on a

Lancaster; Ravena Christensen; Kelby

their constitution tive

program.

Some

The formal.

social

in-

ski trip.

hall also held a spring

Mieras; John Schaefer and Gene Cassell.

Organizations 253


SPJ. Front

Row: Tana Leutung;

Klindt; Karissa

Boney; Jody

adviser; Teresa

Lisa

Slraiich,

Dahlquist.

Back Row: Katie Harrison;

Amanda

Endicott; Dennis Esser;

Lonelle Rathje; Michael ReitT; Kristine

Underwood and

SPJ

Hobbs and Fay

Sheila Yoder.

Members chapter

new

chartered a

in the tall

of 1993.

The freedom of student was promoted.

press

Ail journalism/broadcast jors

ma-

and tninors were welcome.

They sponsored guest speakand a resume' workshop.

ers

This organization offered students an outlook on the professional field of journalism.

Steppers. Front

Row: Cheryl

Stalone;

Meghan O'Riley; Linh Ngtiyen and

Steppers

Paula Jack. Back Row: Tracy Aljcts;

Requirements for member-

Jen Norman; Tammy Thompson; Niki Hensler; Keri Lucas and Maggie

ship were a 2.0

ORdey.

ability.

GPA

and dance

Members danced football

They took

camp

at

home

and basketball gatnes. 1

st

place

in Lincoln,

Placed

1st

Fight Song,

at

at

summer

Neb. Nationals for

Home

Routine and

All-Around.

Meghan O'Riley and Maggie O'Riley were named as AllAmericans. Student Advisory Council. Front Row: Jackie Pratt; Marsha Richardson and

Angela Meierolto. Back Row: Lisa Marshall; Jim Morris; Marsha Gates; Lesley Kellar and

Tammy

Peters.

Student Advisory Council Provided academic assistance

and advisement student

in all

aspects of

life.

They placed 2nd

in the inde-

pendent clown diMsion of the

Homecoming parade. The council sponsored movie

a

series.

Intergenerational and diversity

Row: JenMeghan Leslie Hagan

programs were held.

Student Ambassadors. Front niter Blair; Julie

Mathiesen;

O'Riley; Angi Salisbury;

and Michelle Larson.

Row

2:

Jennifer

Dougan; Becky DeYoung; Michael Caldwell; Loree Sheldon; Lucy Caputo; Kerry Koenig and Jeanette Kimes. Back Row: Kevin Kooi; Jeni Schug; Mark Cromley; Mike Wolbert; Karl Hertz; P.J.

Amys; Doug Swink

and Jean Dollard.

Student Ambassadors They provided

tours for pro-

spective students and other recruiting

work

for Northwest.

Ambassadors participated

in

Freshman Orientation, Fatiiily Day, Sneak Preview, Presidential

Scholarship

Day and Home-

coming.

One new zation

was

aspect of the organithe use of

Ambassadors.

254 Organizations

Phone


Student Leaders

Promote Northwest Thc>

BDm

Q

IB

B IS

ing;

v\ere scon duiiiii: spmij! semester, lead-

pnispcclixL' sliklcnis aroiiiKl ciinipus

usirii;

II

IUBBBQISBUB

their best recniitiiiL; luetics to huikl the stiulent

bod)

at

Northuest; the\ \\ere the Student Ani-

The Ambassadors

the

Admissions

at

Northwest weiv there

to

help the Admissions otTiee. gi\e lours to prospeelise students and answeraiiN i|uesiionsthe\.

office,

play key

Ambassadors

orlheir paients. ma_\ ha\e had or

l-.\erv

campus

KM) to 120 students

tall.

filled

out

become an .Ambassador.

order to obtain this position, one must ha\ e a

2.7

GPA

Student Ambassadors hosted several activi-

and

on campus throughout the year

I'revievv.

at least

three semesters

lel't

at

the

like

Sneak

Day. 1-ieshman Orientation

l-'amily

and Presidential Scholarship Day.

"High school students applying dential Scholarship

and

in-

to help

Meghan O'Riley w ith the students

out the Admissions staff." said.

for the I'resi-

came and went through

and we were Just basically there

terv iew s

applications hoping to In

the

community.

role in recruitiiiLj

prospective students

abt)Lit

.*>

I

the interview.

ties

bassatliiis.

While helping

Ambassadors and some recruiters. Then they went into a room v\ ith about .Ambassadors for

""We ran errands vr visited

about Northwest."

their parents

Something different

to

come about was the Ambas-

use of Phone Ambassadors. These w ere

University.

There were

tv\o sets of interviews that appli-

sadors hired to call prospective high school

cants went through.

students to answer any questions the\

were held

in

have had.

inters iew ees

w ent

Ambassadors

The preliminary interviews No\ ember, this was when to a table ol fi\ e or

si \

currenl

for an inters iew. Atfer the appli-

catii)n process, they

were interviewed by

all

might

"The Phone Ambassadors were a little more O'Riley said. ""There were six of

personal.""

them we used

and

as guinea pigs

I

thought they

did fine."

Awards were given

for

went above and beyond

Ambassadors who

their regular duties.

was named Student AmbassaNovember because of the

Merrit Brinknian

dor of the Month for

extra effort he put toward activities the Student

Ambassadors were doing. "I was named as Ambassador of the Month helping ties

we

iiut

Brinkman

did,"

During Homecoming bassadors joined

w ith

their

Being a

tor

with various extracurricular activi-

in

said. festivities

the spirit and

Student .Am-

won 2nd

place

house decoration. part of the Student

Ambassadors was

an honor. O'Riley thought that one

ot the

most

rewarding aspects of being an Ambassador was helping

new

or prospective students learn about

Northwest. ""!

was the

first

person that some of

the.se

people met and the best thing was helping them decide on what school they were going to,"

O'Riley

said.

Student Ambassadors were viewed as a key recruiting tool by the University

and a symbol of

student leaders.

Sara Meyers StuiltiU Amhiiiiiuior /itircMls l/)f

tom/iulfrs

i/iii'c ill Ifiisl

60

lours

Dom; Sunnk iboin Dhimie

m

ibt'B

a

ircek

D

Ou'fiis

Diii'rs tiiid her

Ulmiry Amlnnsiulon

PImlo by Imnifer Miilloi'

Organizations

255


Spiritual Routes

Guide Worship Holding worship services and helping others

^QBiiiaii BBiiiuiaia Religious services offer

support

and

to

activities

everyone

were the main

activities for the

Wesley Center.

help an area that was affected by the floods.

saw some houses

The Wesley Center was Methodist denomiwas open to anyone regardless of denomination. Wesley held an informal midweek worship on Wednesday and went over to the First United Methodist Church for Sunday

during the

worship.

life,

nation, but

"Midweek worship was day classes," Sarah Partlow to get

back

to

our

a break

from every-

said. "It

allowed us

large part of

Wesley was service.

their

involvement with

west floods. to the

Mo.,

clean-up efforts after the Mid-

Some

of the students that ventured

tlooded area had not been affected and

were shocked by the magnitude of

"Even though

I

was not

mud

up

to the

We

second

floor."

The Wesley Center west,

first

block for

held a support group

new

The group allowed

students to North-

for the students to

discuss their problems and concerns of college

"1

know people

got to

boat as

1

that

were

was," Kristal Turner said.

people and

I

got

my

it

1

met

feelings out.

It

same was a good

in the

"It

new made it

a lot of

also

easier to get through the week."

According

In the fall students traveled to St. Louis, to help with the

had

support system. Through

spiritual routes."

Besides the different worship services, a

community

that

highly active

to in

Sellberg,

Wesley became

Homecoming because

of their

Wesley entered a jalopy, "Pete's Dragon" and Sellberg was a Homecoming queen finalist. strong student council.

the flood,

directly affected by

the flood," Kari Sellberg said. "It

was

Amanda McManujal

great to

A hke Fncnuw Uika tookiei til

ibc

Walty Lniier- Weslty n\en'i\i

jrec ijooiii iind tlislrihuled than lo iludenis for snacks

Pbolo by

Liurii Rittld

Sludmls voice Cciilfr

could /)/uy

256 Organizations

coiicfriis durini)

The Center provitkd i/iimcs or ;iisl di/lc

<i

u weekly meetmil

tit

tbf

Wesley

reltixnul tilmosphere so students

Pboto hy

Liiirii Riedel


Senate.

.Student

Student Senate The group was

'

body of

Paula Holtmun; Sura

the szoveming

students and organi-

all

Row:

Front

New man; Dau n C"oolc\

.

Fniilic

Jessica LIgin;

Still;

Elisc Sports-

man; Dcnisc Way; Daw n Gardner; Ann Marie Shea and Lisa Noone.

Row

2;

Kerry Koenig; Monica Naiiss; Gina

zations.

Social acti\ities included

Bash. F'ancake

Ash

Breaklast.

Tower Service Award and the Board ot Regents Who's Who. C'onmiunity service invoKenicni includeil the

blood

.iiiiuial

Gccscy; Brian Marriott; Lisa Siubbendiek; Theresa New; Cori lililrits; Heidi Gehrman; Michael Caldwell and Anne Baea. Back Row:

Mike Dymond; Kevin Speihs; Joe Desmond; Trent Skaggs; Andrew Scott; Kevin Harrington; Chad Spate; ,\lison

dn\e.

Tau

Dovic and Kevin Mueller.

Phi

Upsilon,

l-ionl

Row:

Hrin

MeGinnis; Jennifer Dickson; Mindv

Tali Phi Upsilon

A

Blair and Charissa Browning.

empha-

social sorority that

Hrin Gray;

Dawn

Row

2;

Milburn; Jenny

sized coninuinity ser\ice, such

Baker; Billie Bov\niaii and Traei

Lupus Foundation. Toys Tots. Food Pantry and nine

Grelehcn Rust; Sandy Rugan; Tami

as the tor

McMulin. Back Row: Melissa

Dodson and

Pratte;

Kristin Hill

hours ot indi\idual coniniunitx ser\ ice.

â&#x20AC;˘ They won deiit

1st

clowns

place nidepen-

lor

pomps and

papierniache and 2nd place for

costumes.

Their activities included a winter informal and a spring formal.

Tower Yearbook The publication was recognized as one of four yearbooks in the country in the

Hall of

Ail-American

Fame.

Recognized as a Five-Star AilAmerican student publication.

Tower recieved

Show

of

at

.^th

place Best

ACP/CMA

conven-

Tower Yearbook: Front Row: Laura Widmer. adviser; Kathy HigdonBolar; Ruby Diltmer; Gina Bcltz; Jennifer Mallon; Krislv Madden; Sue .Mohamed and lay Dahk|insl. Row 2: Sara Meyers; Angela Taekelt; Merri Hutti; Chris Tucker; Mike Johnson; Tami Dodson and Karissa Boney. Row }: Stacy Cleverley; Kris Underwood; Amanda McManigal; Kenrick Sealy;

Russ Weydcrt; Jon Lewis; Blase Smith and Tonv Miceli.

tion in Dallas.

The publication was

a 336-

page disk submission book.

Wesley Center. Front Row:

Amy

Gubser; Jenni Barnett; Kari Sellberg;

Wesley Center They were involved

in

Kristal Turner; Natalie

com-

munity service by helping with flood relief and ministry.

Social events included an

opening barbecue, welcome meal, holiday banquet and an

end of the year celebration. First year friends. activities.

Schwartz and

Beth .'\nn Homan. Row 2: Kori Sundberg; Julia Randolph; Gina Gubser; Monica Howard; Kcrri Johnson and Marjean Potter-l:hlers, campus minister. Back Row: Cindy Young; Kris Ehlers; John Bunner; Brian Bliss;

Don

Ehlers.

campus

minister: Melanie

Brown.

Christmas

Friday Funs and mid-

week worship were some of activities the

the

group participated

in.

Organizations 257


Greeks Emphasize Pride w

Alpha Gamma Rho

cancer,

The

This social and professional fraternity for in the agriculture field

ith

took a valued part

men

fraternity

was

also

working toward the

to foster academic

and social

skills in

producing

quality men.

"Parents' day

last

spring was one of the best

events

we had," Henry Blessing said.

really

good

came.

We

""We had a

turnout, almost ever\'one"s parents

sponsored a picnic and rented buses.

We gave our parents a tour of the

school and of

for Tots

AGR

of

donations.

came around Christmas and Quality, a

camp

Fmlcmily

mmbcn

Nortbinal

h.ni nine (/'ifct orijiwiZiiUons

chooie from

the

helped out the foundation with

Camp

Lilk lo

Pholo hy

for children

stuiimk iiboui su/iiim;

on

ii/i

ciim/iiis

/or Rus/'

/or men

lo

Lriirii Riedel

Kelh A Utwiieyimd Ixrmotlxr. Aljiinsm,

tlmw pies al Alpki Si^mi Alphi

manben fcicW/f SffcrmuTiwd Colkn Prem Family Day's aimival cjiwe a look at

L<imf)U5

258 Greeks

This group worked with the blood drive, Headstart children, a Big Brother program, the

March of Dimes and

the

American Cancer So-

ciety.

The AKLs joined Alpha Sigma Alpha

in the

house decoration competition during Home-

the school farm."

Toys

onjanaitions PIkiIo

by Tony Mali

BQimiaB Hard work pays

Alpha Kappa Lambda The purpose of the Alpha Kappa Lamdas was

also sponsored a parents" day in the

spring.

parents

community

in the

pects of today's society.

men

also part of their

purchase of a house for future chapters of AGR.

community with several activities. The group acted in a highway clean-up program to fulfill the environmentally sound as-

AGRs

was

service devotion.

coming and won Overall House Decoration with a scene from Aladdin.

They

also raised

money

for social causes.

off with

awards and recognition


Alpha

"Our

spa^hciii dinner raised

Ke\

"We

said.

in

J.

Rainboll;

D. Jewell, adviser;

2:

S.

Webb;

in

J.

Blessing and Reisic;

S.

A. Dagan and S. Varner. Back

sersice

J. ;

R.

Mailer; G. Bahrenbrung;

J.

Marshall;

M.

Jessen; D. Ma.wvell and A.

Kussman; M. Janssen; L). Koppen. Row .^;

comnumits and decorated the basement tor the two nights." The .AKLs became more toand campus involvement

Blessing;

:

Sidden: H.

J.

Heinzeroth; R. Shields; E. Jackson

Kooi

sold tickets to the

cused on ci)mmumt\

Rou

Rho: Front

M. Jackson;

Huhn. Row

nione) tor ciurselves as well as tor cystic fibrosis,"

Gamma

Shields:

Row;

B.

Batterson; C. Hunt; R.

J.

R. Shirley; K. Rawling.s; C.

Hildchrand and C. Fleak.

1994.

"We

were one

ot the smaller

on campus and we had to get behind our projects." Kooi said.

Alpha Kappa Lambda New

"We

Front

get

branched out and started

to

more involved with thecom-

munitv and the campus instead ot'just focusing

The

on

fraternity

.Associates.

Row: Chris Hcndren; Ronnie Karnowski: Steven Kidder; Aaron Loughlin: Brett Bagby; Daniel Hammerbacherand Matt Morton Back Row: Jim Ashley; Dorian DeShon;

social."

became more

Alex Francis; Evan Neal; Alex Roorda; Andy Stowe and Daniel l.athrop.

focused on chapter goals and

communitv involvement.

Alpha Sk.ma Alpha Alpha Sigma .Alpha was a soworked hard for its

rority that

Alpha Kappa Lambda .Actives. Front Row: Kevin Kooi; Kevin Koon; Craig

philanthropies. Cleaning up the

highw ay. supporting the Special

Olympics, raising money for hurricane and tlood victims as well as a softball tournament tor S. ,Iune

Smith

(a

home

for the

handicapped) helped the Alphas

win the Alpha Sigma Alpha National Philanthropy Award. "It

telt

David. Back Row: Scotl Chrislensen: Patrick Laster;

Award, we

were doing something for others." Becky Butlersaid."Wegot recognized for helping other people and sororities were

dom

Alpha Sigma Alpha

New

Associates.

Row: G. Akalan; A.

Lovell;

J.

Smolik; K. Eychaner; A. Duden; E.

The Alphas were also inin Homecoming activities. They came in 2nd place skit

"The Wonderful World of Woody," and in 4th place w iih

Sehrt;T. Liverman and 2: J.

M. Weiss. Row

Velazquez; M. Mayer;

J.

Lucas; A.

Houston; K. Martin; J. Stansbury; C. Hunter; B. Hassig and K. While. Back Row: K. MeKenzie: J. Nolan:

S.

Ruddy; A. Mandarieh; J. Callahan; A. J. Rae Hck: J. Gaddie;

Orr; A. Wright:

their tloat "101 Dalmations."

During Greek Week, they won the tricycle race and were the overall

;

Chad Nourse.

Front

volved

Homecoming

Cory Clevenger: Steven

Seim; Craig Kingery Randy Fisher and

sel-

recognized tor that."

with their

Jackson; Brian Olson; Jeff Noike; Paul Miller: Trevor Gustafson and Derrick

cool to win the Na-

tional Philanthropy

Hahn and James Ulvestad. Row 2: Kevin Heese; Tim Davis; Jake Gronbeck; Chad Dennis; Bobby Zancr and Jeff Oswald. Row .^: Shanon F.lliotI; John Leanard: Andy Hall; Dan

S.

Knipp;

T.

Renner and D. Crouch.

winner of Greek

Games. They also won aw aid presented

for

the

most Greek

Participation.

"Although we were and we wore the same

all

Alphas

letters

we

were all individuals, and thought that was important." I

Butler said.

Alpha Sigma Alpha Actives. Front Row: T. Drcnnen; K. Burger: A. Sailsburry;

M. Larson;

O'Sullivan.

Row

2:

J.

Hupka and

L.

Miller:

S. J.

Hansen; R. Haines; T. Quijano; H. Wiemar; B. Butlerand K. Zook. Row 3:

K

Easlep; S. Vehe; C. Coleman; K.

Lopez; H. West;

S. Barr; J. Elgin; J.

Curtis and S. Born.

Row 4: S. Deltro; N.

M. Rogers; C. Woods; M. Zimmerman;

Hansler: D. Milrose:

By Tower

StajJ

Wilhelm; E.

L.

Weekly.

Greeks 259


Promoting Togetherness member experienced differently. made the college experience more than just classrooms and books." Joe Thompson said. "I do not know what Northwest would have been without it. That w as not to say it was all wonderevery "It

Delta Chi Focusing

Dii

brotherhood, the Delta Chi

fra-

on two main philanThey worked with the United Way and

ternity concentrated efforts

thropies.

the Headstart children

"We Chad

on a regular

ful,

because

Way we

"We had a Christmas party and

tive year the fraternity tion, they

won

this

award. In addi-

placed 2nd with their

Book" and 2nd

in the

Variety

float,

Show

"Jungle

with

"Men

in the bat

1

st

sponsored an anti-hazing

speaker in the spring to give support to members.

"Ha/ing was

really negative,"

"We would

rather build up our

than to tear

down

Rich Diaz said.

members

rather

their confidences."

Brotherhood was an aspect of the Delta Chis

Aliirio Ahilsiilriilii iiHii

Daiuiy Smith

Phi house Cnei^s

t^iimt:

(ildiil

hiick every

ineekeiui lo lirepiire for the ujiLonntuj yeiir

(

Ills

(

hi

hushes

ill

summer for

the Iklln

(ireek

Photo hy Tony A

work Iiif/i

Aiiron Ihttc, helfn two youngsters blow bubbles. Delta

heljied out Juriihl the cimnuil Heniistiirt Christiiuis

Photo hy Luira Riedel

260 Greeks

iiiiy

seivice while taking pride in the together-

ness they shared.

"We promoted "We had a

said.

diverse.

We

parly

school a tight

lot,"

bond, yet

Steve Lovell

we were

all

did not have to conform."

participated in se\eral

community

ser-

vice activities including the Big Brother protiram and

race and the canoe races.

fraternity

Phi fraternity promoted

academia as well as brotherhood and commu-

They

Disney."

During Greek Week, the Delta Chis placed

common

Delta Sigma Phi The Delta Sigma

had a canned food drive."

1

DcUii

ups and downs."

Greeks work toward

The Delta Chis also excelled outside of community service when they were awarded Homecoming Supremacy. This was the 7th consecu-

Siiimti

its

concentrated most on the Headstart."

Ferris said.

The

did have

basis.

planned an Easter Egg Hunt and for the United

On

it

siaiaiiiaH

canned food drives. The Delta Siss

goals


D. Cole;

V\ ilkcp<on;

March of Dimes.

philanthropy the

They joined dance

a

efforts

tor the

Mu

Phi

iih

vv

in

They won the National Chapter loroutstantlint: achievement

award

and Dr. Jim .Smelt/er won the national Charles E. Bartel award lor

However,

in

Pr/ybylo took over as

fall Jell

the

in

activities resulted

u

Siiiilh:

D. O'lX-ll:

M.

M.

Radford; B.

J.

Row

.^:

T. Busby;

Walker; T. Magner; B. Becker. M. l^indes;

P Ciaecio; B. V.in Wcrden; D. Hannain: R. .Miitioney; Cininiii I

Hiirsl.

M;i.son;T. Edw;uxis:G.

R.ingcl ;uid D. DePrenyer. 1

Tlioinpson: B.

Glastoal and B.

C. Kokkinakis; P. Maa|uc/;

laves;

M

and

R

Holziipl'el;

M.

K. Cixik; S.

J. Fitts;

VMieelen Row 4: K. Ci;invH;T.

\\ alerllekkC.

C. M.iiKhesier;

Back Row

them taking 4th place with

house decoration. 4th place l

2:

Glcsingcr; D.

J.

;

Nelson; J. MeGuia-;

J.Coinbs;B ^oiini;;C.\Volter:J.Iscmhagen;

the Delta Sig adviser.

Homecoming

VV civcr: R. Dl;i/: S.

Row

Gr.iv

J.

McWilliams; R. Redman:

handicapped.

outslandini; adviser.

Row: G.

Front

IX'lla Chi.

also contributed regularly to their

m e clowns and

.^

(heir

in

cos-

d

in

r

:

Fniesehl and

.A.

Nelson; A. Balte;

.Schmidt.

McLaughlin;

Betlgcr; C.

J.

M. King;C.

R. White;

T.

Lxw is G. Gregory; S.

S. B;irton; J.

ln,ine;S. H;irrillundD.

I^iwson.

papierniache clowns. They also

Homecoming

held a

dinner for

l.ovell;

Edward Born and Alex Luers.

Row

Chris Freeman; Jason

2:

berlain;

Delta Zeta As

international

largest

the

Panhellenic sorority. Delta Zeta

memhers worked hard to meet local and international expectations. Members worked hard to offer time and money

to the

community.

Delta Zeta helped with

Camp

and held their annual

Christmas party with the DeltaChis

and an Easter Egg Hunt with the Alpha Kappa Lambdas for

Johnson; Spencer Hires; Douglas Sleelman; Dean Owens and David

Rosenbohm.

Row 3:

Community

Jung and Tyson Robinetl. Back Row; Dr. Jim Smeltzer. adviser; Mike Gaffney; Brad Diltmer; Gary Wipperman; Mark Tweed; Scott

Gcbers; Mike Swarlhoul;

to

for Tots, flood relief. United to their international

Associates.

l.angner;

philan-

was important for us to help communitv anyway we could

with our time and money." Jenny Sligar said. "It helped the

image and helped people

in

Marissa Barbosa.

Way

Speech and Hearing Impaired.

Greek need

in

community."

the

Clow;

From Row

aura Rasinussen; Angela Walker;

Mandy

"It

the

New

Deta Zeta

Toys

thropy. CJallaudet University for the

F,d

Rvan W.ilker and Frank Honn.

Courtney Dowden; Lea Ann Vetterand

service also took

form by donating money and

Kevin Moody; Joe

Purviance; Chris H;uley;

Jeiemv Wil/ke; Travis Rolh; Aaron

I.

Headstall children.

Cham-

Tim Brinks; Chad Jordon; C.J.

Sclietllcr: Bill

(Quality

Row: Michael

Delta .Sigma Phi. Front

Stephenson; Sean Siebels; Steven

alumnus.

Row

2:

Kerrie Kelly;

Stroburg; Bobbi Smith;

Amy

Tanya Lope/; Melissa

Burri;

Shelley Stangle and Danielle Caruso.

Row

.^:

.â&#x20AC;˘\mv

Hermreck; Beth Knight;

Lara Schulenberg; Kerrie Scott; Becky Doyle; Jennifer Hurst; Angela Fletcher

and Shari McDougal. Back Row; Kelly

Kennedy; Christine

liismont; Kathleen

Lydon; Lisa Kav Sanders; Stephanie

Cammie

Mclntyre;

Sublette; Melissa

Karie Deal and Angic

Overfield; Wriuht.

members received during Homecoming

Delta Zeta recognition

by placing

ration

.^rd

in

the

category,

house deco1st

with

papierniache and costume clowns

Delta Zeta Actives. Front Row: S. Schmidt;

2:

and

1st in

Variety

Show

skit.

Caplan; A. Chadwick:

L. Tiemiur. R.

Pingel; D.

During Cireek Week. Delta Zeta

T

Dollard; A. Schnack and

J.

Groom;

Bergren.

J.

Row

Kohler; K.

J.

Edwajds; A. Otte; M. Mark; M.

Dickman and C. Lucas. Row }: H. Houseworth; M. Arts; K. Levis; B. Cook;

was awarded for publicity sponsored by Tau Kappa Epsilon and recognized by Sigma Phi Epsilon

T. Dickmiin; A. Palagi; A. Foral: H. Voss;

with a philanthropy award.

Beaver.

Row

Huddle;

W. H;ulow

For social events Delta Zeta

at-

tended mixers, sponsored an alumnae tea and a colonnade club for parents.

M. Ough; K. Kirkkuid; K. Boney and T. 4:

K. L^mdis; ;

Ingels; N.

Ogden; J. Cram; L.Giraid; J.J. Howard and C. Cummings. Back Row: K. Benda; A.

Bums; C.

Walthall; S. Roth;

Schug; C. Ux-; T. Booth; A.

McMahon;

By Tower

J.

K. Cecil; C. Hoag; A.

J.

Nielsen; L.

T Wood;

J.

McNemey; C.

Dunning

;ind S.

Williams.

Staff

Greeks 261


Breaking Stereotypes items they donated was a Christmas

"When we Phi Belonging

to the

Mu

Greek system

left

for

tree.

Christmas break we gave

our tree to a family," Fink said. "They apprecito

some was

ated

it

more than we

did."

believed to be one of the benefits of attending a university.

Not only did they provide students

with the feeling of sisterhood and acceptance, but the Phi

in the

community and around

the world.

Two

Greeks enhance leadership

Sigma Phi Epsilon

Mus also taught about the importance

of helping others

This fraternity was very involved lanthropy

ALS

in its phi-

(Lou Gehrig's disease).

of the biggest activities throughout the

Dunng Homecoming, they held a teeter-totter

Homecoming and Greek Week and the Phi Mus swept in the awards during both. For Homecoming they won Overall Su-

five-day marathon to raise money. Because of

year were

premacy, Overall Parade Supremacy and Best

Homecoming was

Overall Clowns. for

all

involved

a big event

any organization on campus.

in

"Working on Homecoming and Greek Week was more a part of the made me feel like I

campus," Stacy Fink During Greek

excelled participating in the Greek games. They took Best Song and Most Creative Song for Greek Sing, Greek Games and was awarded the Social Service award from Delta Sigma Phi. The Phi Mus par-

ticipated in

several

community

service

projects.

Among those

were tutoring, food drives, clothing drives

and

their philanthro-

pies with Children's

Miracle Network and Project Hope.

Around Christmas time they participated in

an Adopt-a-Family

program. One of the

AiujeLi

Thomas

coiir/iflcs

111

tricycle race

ihi

of Phi

Gmk

Mu

Week

Greek Week uujs

iff rtsiiif to ijii'e

111!

o/)/)or(H-

nily for fraleniiHes anii sororities to

compete and

lo

pro-

molt their orijanizalioii Photo hy kuss Weyderl

262 Greeks

festivities the Phi

Mus

ALS

They were also presented Award given by the national

foundation hon-

the

Buchanan

organization of

Sigma Phi Epsilon. They were one of 27 chapters out of 265 chapters across the nation to receive this award.

"We were

said.

Week

their great donation, the

ored the Sig Eps.

a fraternity that believed in giving

and helping the community, rather than helping

and

excellence


Mu New

Phi

Associates.

Fioni

RowiJcnny Schneider; \\hiiiK\

Amys

out ourselves," P. J.

The Sig Eps believed

said.

de-

in

veloping a strong charaeler for

members.

their I'ellow

man

"Becomiiii; a balanced

through academics, athletics

Heidi Landcn; Tiffany Eastwood and

Stacy Dowling.

Row

Titfanie Gronc;

Shannon

ice as well

as constant

impnnementot

selves

our most important

\^'as

our-

aspect," Ainys said.

2: Jonell

Stone;

Foster;

Suzy

Tammy

Scheckloth; Patty Adams;

Maudlin; Tasha Miller; Cindy Manila; .\iiclte

and commiinits ser\

Amy Galloway;

RiKich; Jenifer Yeiung;

and Mercedes

I.eiilhokl

Ramirez. Back Row: Sara Kohn;Tonya

McCormiek; Jaymic Mackey; Jennifer Martin; Annie Fraundorfer; Nicole Scull; Kath\ Jackson; Heather Yurka;

The Sig Eps were

also con-

Heidi Uirkeslrand and Marei Mobley.

cerned about the Greek reputation.

"We

pressures

the

reali/eii

on (irecks h\ the

that v\ere put

community and campus," .â&#x20AC;˘^nns said. "We were conchanging ourseKes

stantK

come away from Icadcis the

"animal

the

become mthccommunitN and on image and

house"

to

campus."

coming, the Sig ing skit

Variety

HomeEps Homecomin

won 1st place at the Show for their skit.

"Bobby Bearcat Meets Weird World of Walt." l-'rom working with helping the

mg

nity

the

ALS

community and

the outlook the

Eps were

oreani/ation

Thomas;

C.

Higginbolham; L. J.

L. Cro/.ier;

Fndsley;

J.

Westercamp and K. Koenig. Row 2: Weese; S. O'Riley; K. Johnston; L.

Sirohman; K. Hardlicka; A. Chase; N. I.ippert;

D. Weiss;

Klines;

J.

Row

J.

Stark

A. Huston; R.

3:

Brown;

J.rStiens; K.Seck; M. Werner; Cunningham; P. Holtman and L. Fishier. Back Row: S. Sherlock; K.

C.

Pryor: C. Chilter; B. Culel; A. I'alerics; D.

I'raunderfer;

J.

and

Spreil/.er

J.

Abbott.

to

commu-

a diversified

Northwest.

at

Row: K. Haley; Michels; M. L.

.Aclixcs. I-Yonl

pre-

had on the Greek system,

the Sig

Mu

A.

and K. Gragg.

Actively in\ol\ed

ser\

to

Phi

Sigma Phi Epsilon: Front Row: Scott M c L a n Monte Davis; Billy McGuigan; Kevin Berg; Matt Marque/, and Malt Van Weelden. Row 2: P.J. .Amys; Chris Wagener: Brian Starkcy; Shannon Len/; Scott Diesing and Trevin Haines. Back Row: Carl Marion; B r e M h\ s Da\ d Catherall; Darin Lee; Randy (jruhn: i

;

i

Sigma Sigma Sigma The purpose of this sororitv was to build a strong womanl_\ character. With concentration

Andrew

ii

;i

1

1

i

;

Spire and John Benson.

on high scholastic attainment and leadership

roles,

learning

responsibility, respect

and repu-

tation

was an important aspect

of this Greek soroiity.

"We

focused on education

and we worked really hard

to get

high grades," Angle Hopkins

Sigma Sigma Sigma New Front

Row Kathy :

Associates.

Rives; Sarah Young;

Tiffany Hardman; Julie Sehaiic; Margie Panerriere; Courtney

said.

Members

took part

m

Megan Horn. Row

com-

munity service projects, such as the

Adopt-a-Family program,

the Children's

the

national

Amy

2:

Hill

and

Brooke Thrasher;

Lindsey; Angi Erisman; Heather

Ridder; Nicole Riley; Becky

and Sarah Gagnon.

Row

3:

Vacek

Michelle

Mercy grant from

MacMohon;

Sigma chapter,

Daniel le Thorp; Tiffany Marr; Rebecca

canned food drives,

a teeter-tot-

ter-a-thon, with the

Epsilon fraternity for

Sigma Phi

ALS

(Lou

Geheric's Disease) and thev

Lynette Humphreys;

Szabo; Tiffany Gates and Traccy Sibbermson. Back Row: Kelly

Kuchner;

Dawn Dempsey; Anne

Carlson; Keri Lucas;

Dana Northcraft

Christy Maslowski; Jennifer Schlamp;

Johna Kaye Schuster and Debbie :ontinued

Queen.

Greeks 263


Sigma Sigma Sigma Actives. Front Row: J. Lawrance; C. Swenson; K. Hawley; J. Noller; A. Hopkins; L. Hagan and J. Belik. Row 2: L. Greenfield; B

ternational and the

cer Society.

"We

Limbach; M. Bennington; H. Lowe; H. Lawless; B. Boehner; A. Kirkpatrick; L.

hood

Nguyen and A. Blackburn. Row Jacobs;

M. Remick:

B.

lot

De Young;

L.

Hopkins

Herron; K. Terry; A. Bleich; L. Boehm; Hart; J. French and L. Dingwerth. Back Row: K. Truelove; H. Williams: J. Biga; M. Smith; S. Staker; N. Ottmaner;

J.

Thompson;

and

J.

C. Peel

sister-

do a

community service,"

of

T.

Foos; M. Christensen; C. Haney; L.

K. Bennerotte; S.

had a really strong

that ptilled us together to

3;

Slageman and M. Hackett. Row 4: T. Hovak; K. Hawkins; A. Benlzinger; K.

Amnesty InAmerican Can-

also sent donations to

*

said.

Their national philanthropy was

Robbie Page Memorial. With

the

money

the

that the Tri Sigs

donated

Children's Mercy Hospital,

to the

the institution purchased dolls. These were used to help explain surgical procedures to the children.

During Homecoming the Tri

Norman.

Sigs entered the

Sigma Tau Gamma. Front Row:

Justin

HoI'man;

Brad

Cornish:

Paul

Meinecke; Jason Bush; William Atkins

and Garry LaBelle.

Row

2:

Sierck; Nate Carter; Paul Stoll;

first

completely

recyclable float which received 5th

Two

place.

of their clown entries

got 2nd place and they received 4th

Scott

Dave

place

Walden; Mike Hunt; Mike Gozlee and

Row: Ray Morley; Chris Kates; Brad Guthrey; Brad Chris Jones. Back

that

Variety Show.

in skit at the

"We

had so many different

were involved

ferent things."

Lawson; Michael Loper; Douglas

girls

Dailey and Kelly Locke.

They did not

had a

in

Hopkins

girls

many

so

said.

dif-

"Our

of different interests.

lot

just focus

on Sigma,

they really got involved on campus."

During the Greek ties the Tri

Week

activi-

Sigs received Outstand-

ing Greek Organization. Highest Chapter Average Grades. Highest Initiated

Tau Kappa Epsilon New Associates. Front Row: Patrick Trahan; Heath Heiden; Matthew Hansen; Ji[n Robkc and Jared Simmons. Row 2: Kirk Pickett; Jason Hampton; Jim Murnan;

Moody and Matt Thies. Back Row: John Ronchelto: Ryan Stadlman; James Davidson; Mike Hayedorn; JoScott

seph Brainier

;ind

Average Grades, Highest

Pledge Class Average Grades.

Most Positive Image on Campus and in the community and the award for Best Scholarship Program from Alpha Kappa Lambda.

John Schaad.

Sigma Tau

Gamma

Members of the fraternity Sigma Tau Gamma represented what it meant to belong to a diverse group Northwest.

at

"We

had people from different

backgrounds and everyone came together."

Tau Kappa Epsilon Matthew Barry

;

Actises. Front

Row:

Brian Marrion: Dustin

Bieghler; JetT Roe; Chris Johnson ;uid

Jamey

Stone.

Row

2:

Patrick Trahan;

Patrick Halsted; Kevin Frunkenberger;

Matthew Horlen;

Jeffrey Wilson:

George

Schaefer; Bradford Tunis; John Schiuid and

Jamie Schicmieyer.

Row

3:

Zachary Perdue; Russel DeVries; Eric Michael Hofmeister: Heath Milks

and Aaron Shipley. Back Row: Todd Kraii/: Jerry Young; Scon Horlen; Lynn Hornberg; Logan Noecker: Jeremy

Boucher; Kevin Spiehs: Tyler Hendershot;

Tom

Miller and Jason Hampton.

264 Greeks

said.

"Every-

not have to put on a

show

tor any-

body." Their goal was

to

promote well

being with brotherhood. This was

achieved through various

activities,

such as nights out together at soror-

Michael Reilf:

Jason McCabe; Christopher Richiuds;

Burtis;

Bob King

one was themselves and they did

ity

mixers, their

fall

informal and

spring formal.

Another goal of the Sig Tau"s was to provide the community with

good leaders teach

men

for the future

and

to

social responsibilities.

Several changes occurred during the 1994

academic year. The Sig


Brotherhood

Through Dedication Tail's

underwent

;i

b\ their alumni to

re\ie\v

reorganize the Northwest chapter.

I

Although there u ere changes, they were dedicated to comniiimeni to coninninity ser\ ice

in

helping the elderls and ph\sicall> challenged.

One

Focusiiu) on iiccuiemics

organization thai the Sig Tau's worked

with throughout the year was

BACCHUS, Bring

Alcohol Conscit)usness Concerning Ce)llege

and community service

Out

Students.

The SigTaus also helped out w ith the Multiple Sclerosis Foundation w ith tund-raiser walks.

to raise

KHs

also

money

for this organization.

The

Horace Mann

chil-

worked with

the

dren on an Easter Egg Hunt.

They

recci\ ed the

chapter rating. The

Top TKE Aw ard. a superior

TKIa

also received the Na-

Alumni Award. "It was an honor to recei\e Award." Patrick Halsted said. lional

TKE

Top

the

The honored award reflected the Greek's commitment to the community, good grades, rush turnout. pre\ ious awards and invoKement on campus. "It

was something we alw ays strive for." Brian "'It was very important because we

Marriott said.

Tau Kappa

Epsilon

The sense of brotherhood and understanding was what the members of Tau Kappa Epsilon experienced dining and alter pledgeship. Their national philanthropy was the Special

Olympics. The

TKHs

held a Three Point Shoot

had only won

it

once

in

each decade, the '60s,

we

'70s and 'SOs. Being an officer at the time that

won

the

award was very special

for

me."

They also held their annual social e\ cuts of the TKE Fog and TKF: Island. Brotherhood was more than community .ser-

year like the

\

acts

ice

and social

occasions.

TKE

For the

organization

it

was an understanding and caring for one another that went along

with their membership.

TKEs were

"The

a

bunch of different guys who had being in school and being

fraternity

in

mon," Marriott

"We

were

a

in a

comsaid.

bunch of

guys who got along and cared about each other."

By Tower

Staff

Kcvtn

Frtinl^itihirijcr

Riiih

(Jummiui Lo<jan

titui

Noecker fioiir / lenhey's syrup over

Pill

li

/uHCliOMS atlracl

TKE (

bris

0/ icf trfiim

like ihii

new members

fruleritily

Rusii

were hehi lo

lo

ihe

Pbolo by

Tucker

Greeks 265


Although getting through another year of classes kept

most

had our own ways

of

of

us busy,

we

still

spending time.

While some students spent their evenings at the bars, others chose to socialize

during happy hour.

avoided the bars

Some

people

ALTOGETHER and

found entertainment elsewhere. Volunteers devoted their extra time

and energy to helping others, while straight

A

students spent some of their

time studying.

With Roberta

Hall construction under-

way Greek women were forced

DIFFERENT

living

to find

arrangements.

Whether we were vegetarians or atheists

there

out

IN

was always someone standing

PEOPLE 4^ Huntsman donates blood in the J. W. Jones Student Union Ballroom. The Blood Center of Greater Kansas City visited Northwest and made it possible for students to donate blood between classes-

Jennifer

Photo by Tony

266 People

Miceli.

Division


People 267


Amy Joe Dufruin,

Coursen.

MBA

MSBD Social

Studies Ling,

Andrew

Tammy

Sears.

MBA MBA

Shawn Wake. Theater Jason Weidner.

MBA

Wr,

il

it

diabetic

a

taiiiily iiienibei"

coma and

had lapsed into a

the family

was faced with

the choice of having a life support system

Facing death through

unplugged or staying hooked will existed, family

from

A

up'.' If

a living

members might be saved

Living wills were often a topic of discussion and controversy.

should be ended. .Students thought differently on the issue.

that painful decision.

Although neither Jody Pol/in and Kevin

was a legal document drawn up by a lawyer. It was for people to decide if living will

artificial

tose

Elmore had

and for how long.

living wills, they

"I prefeiTed life

want

It

was

Mohammad

Elmore

Kirklin

Amos. Geography

Debbie Anderson. F.lem. Ed. Anderson. Fam. & Env. Resources Nicole Anderson. Elem./Early Child Ed. Mimi Arts. Public Relations Ann Attig. Ag. Business Isao A/egami. Business Mgnil. Patrick Bailey. Marketing Larrv Baker. Vocal Music

Julie

Kirk Barnhart. Marketing/Finance/Econ. Sheila Bailon. Fam. & Env. Resources Shannon Bass. Speech Comm, Tommie Bates. Int'l Business Brian Becker. Geography Heidi Beebe. Government

Debbie Belik. Geography

Brian Bellof. Music Ed.

Kathryn Benda. Int'l Business Jeffrey Beneke. Industrial Tech. Michelle Bennington. Elem. /Early Child Ed. Sonya Benson. Public Relations Jodi Bergren. Business Mgmi

Todd

Bersdolt.

Geography

Dustin Bieghler. Mgml./lnlo. Systems Pamela Binek. Merchandising Ryan Blakestad. Finance Henry Blessing. Animal Science. Kari Bobst. Physical

Ed

Linda Boehni. Merchandising Jennifer Boldl. Elem, Ed.

268 Graduates/Seniors

will

intervention,"

said.

Living wills were prepared

in

case unfore-

did not want to be hooked up for more

than two weeks," Polzin said.

Living wills were considered for situations in

ÂŤill

Tom Alger. Sec. Math Ed. Cindi Allen. Merchandising

have a living

seen circumstances anived.

in a

Al-maani, Comp. Science

to

parent, minister or spousal

"1

Sara Abildlriip. Finance

was to be put in members and loved ones.

best to discuss what

"Anyone who chose

Emergency medical technicians demonstrate hoolsing up an I\' and applying oxygen to an injured student.

Kara Ackernian. Public Relations

did not

should have the will respected regardless of

wills an accident could be an unexpected turn student's life and some decided to have a li>ing .just in case. Photo illustration by Tony Miceli.

I

period of time," Elmore said.

LIVING in

over death, but

to be in a vegetative state for a long

the will with family

Being

had strong

feelings about them.

support should be used for the coma-

patient

Some said death should

not be planned and others said suffering

w hich

artificial

support was needed.

By Tami Dodson

f^

o ^


Bill Boliniicr. C;iii:i Billies,

^.;i«^sfl

Ay. Business Public Relations

Kell) Booth. Business Ed. \\\m;ui Boris. Spanish Jerr\ Boucher. Histors Jane Bo\unan. Psychology John Boyd, Broadcasting Tina Bracket!. Psychology

Rick Bradshavv, Accountins; Amy Biady. Klem./Early Child Hd. Kara Bright. Broadcasting Dehora Briscoe. Personnel Mgnit./Psych. .\iny Biockniann. Recreation

Bioun. Sticiology Kenneth Brown. Geography Rebecca Brown. Accounting

("linloii

Mark Brunner, hlem.

Z<^<^LnQLii

Ed.

Kalhy Bundy. Eani. & Env. Resources Kelly Burger. Maiketing/Mgnit. Eric Burlis. Broadcasting Robin By bee. Public Relations Jane Callee. Accounting Chad Callahan. Histoid Lori Campbell. Elem. Ed.

Tom

Cappel. Ag. Business

Traci Casson. Merchandising

Aimee Chadwick, Elem.

Ed./l.. Dis. Ed.

Jenniler Chandler, Psychology

Say Eeong Chang, Comp. Science Scott Christensen, Comp. Mgnit Sysiems/Accountuu Charles Christopher. Library Science Robyn Clark. Earn. & Env. Resources Tina Cline, Public Relations Deandrak C<igdill, Accounting Sharon Colton, Music Ed. Terry Comslock. Recreation Karen Constable, Eani. & En\ Resources Bienda Cook, Comp. Mgmt. Systems/Geography Rusty Cooper. Comp. Mgmt. Systems Wendy Cotton. Elem. Ed. .

Lisa Craig. Business Ed. Jenniler Grain. Marketing

Ellen Cramer. Marketing

Rhonda Crocker. Geography

Wendy

Dalton. Recreation Stephanie Damm. Elem. Ed. Jamie Davis. Marketing Timothy Davis. Math/Econ.

Angelle Day. Management Brian Dean. Biology Jenniler DeBlauw. Elem. Ed. Stephanie DeFoor, History Tammy Deke. Elem. Ed. Rebecca Denton. Eam & Env. Resources Debra Derickson, Finance Kara Dettmann. Social Science Brian Devlin. Biology Russell DeVries. Comp. Mgmt. Systems Rebecca DeVoung. Public Admin. Tracy Dicknian. Bio. /Psych. Harold Dittmer. Agronomy Jean Dollard. Public Relations

Colleen Donovan, Sociology Sandra Dozier. Psychology

Angel Dukes, Elem. Ed. Robert Duncan, L. Dis. Ed. Amy Dunekacke. Fam. & Env. Resources Brett Dwyer. Broadcasting Anita Easum. Fam. & Env. Resources Tina Ebrecht. Business Mgmt. Deena Edwards. Dietetics Michelle Ellis, Fam. & Env. Resources

Amanda

Endicott, PR/Journalism

Rheba Euslice. Physical Ed. Rhonda Eustice, Marketing Kevan Evans, Biology Deborah Fannon, Psychology Stacey Famam, Business Mgmt. Brandi Farrar, Psychology Jennifer Fick. Sociology

Seniors 269


yis Jeiini talked on the phone with her boyfriend from hack home, someone knocked on the door. She opened the door to

Three's

see Eric, her boyfriend

either

guy got a

To some

CROWD

from campus. Surphone before

prised, she quickly got off the clue.

students this scenario

knew of

the dual love affair, the other

two may or may "I

Esser said.

"I

was very good about

Esser experienced four or five love

distance apart.

always dated guys from different

"I

towns," Esser said. "'You had date people from the

to

be stupid

to

same town when trying

Angela Rodier found hiding the truth from two men was difficult. She also learned Esser"s rule of never dating two men from the same town was valuable. "It was the worst experience I ever had," Rodier

not.

never had one where everyone knew,"

Dawn

in the triangle lived a

this.""

was familiar. The most common love triangle was the hometown companion and the school companion. While at least one party of the triangle

angles and said the other two males involved

it.""

tri-

said.

The two men Rodier dated were acquaintances on campus. One night, the men were talking at a party when each discovered that the other to one's

was dating Rodier. She was

invited

room. Once she was there, the other

man came lurking out of the shadows. Rodier never dated either of them again. Although most people did not want to admit their involvement in a love triangle, they did have friends

who would

testify to

their misbehavior. "1

had a

lot

of friends

who were involved in

love triangles, but they either got caught or

got

ulcers

Clevenger

from the pressure, '"Cory

said.

While students daytime soaps

all

over campus tuned into

to find their favorite love

tri-

angle stories, they could easily have found

Dawn

Esser knows the danger of love triangles. Thev often ended

when

the third party found out. Photo illustration by Chris Tucker.

Stacy Fink, Education Anita Fisher. Biology/Ed. Jennifer Fitch. History Carolyn Fobes. An

Dawn

Ford. Eleni,

Ed

Dehhie Ford. Child Care Administration Christian Foster. Wildlife Ecol. & Cons. Susan Foster. Biol./Psych. Leslie Fowler, Geography Angela Freeman, Merchandising Natalie Fumatu, Sociology Chad Gammon, GeograpRy Spencer Garden. Public Relations Doug Gardner. Geography Marsha Gates. Ag. Business Heidi Gehrman. English Eric Gentry. Public Relations

John Giesken.

Industrial,

Tech.

Greg Glesinger, Public Relations Diane Goold. Elem. Ed. Tracy Gotto. Psychology Lori Graham, Molecular Biology Jacque Green, Business Roxie Green, An Ed Odell Greene. Management Stacy Greene, Elem. Ed. Leilani Greenfield, Accounting

Stacey Grell. Public Relations Craig Grove, Agronomy Gina Gubser. Library Science. Amy Gustin. Elem. EdShawn Hacker. Indrusirial TechLeslie Hagan. Elem. Ed. Renee Hahn. Public Relations Alan Hainkel. Broadcasting Kanni Haniann. Accounting Maria Hannon, Fam. & Env. Resources

Jon Hansen, Ag. Business Julia Hardy, Ag. Ed. Daniel Harkness, Comp. Science

270 Seniors

the best stories

on campus.

By

Sherri McCorkindale


fiÂŁL!ar.Q


Keith Lod/inski, Broadcasting Kristine Loft, Sec. Ed.

Daren Long. Geography Kelh Lovitt. Psychology Daniel Lucas, Ag. Ed. Jolene Luers, Psychology Heidi Lutrick, Merchandising Sarah Lynch, Fani. & Env. Resources/Psych.

Angela Lyons, Merchandising Brently Maas, Ag. Business Tanira Mahnke, Chemistry Aaron Mansour, Broadcasting Sandra Marr. Psychology Lisa Marshall. Personnel

Mgmt.

Douglas Martin, Theater/ Public Relations Holly Martin, Pre-Professional Zoology

Dena Mathias, Accounting Julie Mathiesen. Pre-Professional

Zoology

Melissa Maxwell, Music ffd. Candy McBrooni. Accounting

Mick McCauley.

Public Relations Sara McClelland. Ag. Business

Debra McCloney, Accounting Sherri McCorkindale, Public Relations

Mindi McCoy, Art Ed. Mary McDermott, Merchandising Jeff McDonough, Geography Rebecca McElwee, Psychology Thomas McGrail, Comp. Mgmt. Systems Kristin McKen/ie. Accounting Renee McKibben, Merchandising Sandra Meyer, Recreation

Brian Meyers, Graphic Design Paula Michaels. Sociology Christina Michels, Elem. Ed. Brenda Mikels, Elem. Ed. Alissa Miller, Fam. & Env. Resources Carla Miller, English Francie Miller, Music Ed. Kristy Miller,

Tom

Accountmg

Miller, Public Relations

Amy

Milroy. Marketing Kathleen Miner, Elem. Ed. Lisa Miskimins, Merchandising

Darcey Moeller, Public Relations Sulaika Mohamed, Journalism Bradley Mongar, Comp, Science Colby Morris, English Ed. Jeff Moser. Physical Ed.

Don Munsch,

Journalism Barbara Murphy, Elem. Ed. Mary Murphy. Marketing Sheda Murray, Public Relations Edward Myers, Business Industrial Tech Tiffany Nincehelser. Psychology Theresa New. Personnel Mgmt.

Emilie Newman, Elem. Ed. Jody Nielsen. Elem. Ed. Matthew Noel, Education Jennifer Noller, Marketing Matthew Norlen, Sociology Shannon O' Boyle, Psychology Kelly O'Connell, Elem. Ed. Misty O'Connor, Business Mgmt.

Meghan 0"Rilev. Elem. Ed. Stacy 0'Sullivan,"Bio./Psych. Robbie Oehlert/, Broadcasting Amie Ogden, Elem. Ed. Keiisa Olson, Geography/Earth Science Kurt Osmundson, Broadcasting Michelle Ough, Theater Ed. Bruce Owens. Wildlife Ecol. & Cons. Chris Palmer, Government Melissa Parsons, Animal Science Pamela Parsons, Fam. & Env. Resources Amy Pashek, Marketing

David Pavlich, Geography Ronald Pendegraft. Sec. Ed. Susan Pennington, Elem. Ed. Chris Peters,

272 Seniors

Comp. Science


A,

Ithough "going to the bars" seemed to be

a term tor night-time partying,

turned

it

some students

the day-scene

College students chose happy hour as a

into an afternoon event.

"Happy hour drinks were sold cheaper." Amy Hudson said. "For a bollle it was SI .20 and $\.50 tor pitchers at The I'ahiis," The Palms had happy hour Monday and .Saturday between 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. and lure

Chadwick said. "Bui was more exciting." fine,"

customers they also gave tree

to

on

pi//,a

Fridays.

Hudson, who usually went every Friday and .Saturday night said more college

stu-

dents went to The World Famous Outback, w hile more town people went to The Palms. Banender Carla Bolles said the weekends were more popular at The Palms. "Students visited The Palms mostly on Fridays," Bolles said. "On the weekends

town people came out and stayed

a

little

longer and drank."

Aimec C'hadwick. who was a regular at The World Famous Outback, preferred

way to unwind after a stressful day of classes.

"We

usuall>

drew

a pretty

good crowd,

mainly college students," Jeff Vanfosson said. "It

was

a

good w ay

for the students to

relax after a hard day of classes."

The Pub, which had major renovations, was trying to sec how business went. "Fverything was up in the air because we just

reopened," Kelly Fgmister said.

Homecoming

started to

approach

"When we had

Happy hour was a place to relax, while others were ready to let loose and ha\e tun.

By Sue Mohamed

"Last semester,

the

1

where

went about every week,"

was really nice because of atmosphere and fun to go Just for the "It

everyone knows your

social standing."

Happy not as

was Weather

hour, according to Chadwick,

crowded

as

it

was

at night.

also pla\ ed a part for the congregation during

happy hours. "If the

weather was nice,

crowded," Chadwick while

when

it

said.

was usually

it

"But once

in a

name

started getting cooler, people

visited the bar just for conversation."

Chadwick

hour

REGULARS,

happs hour because of the social ambience.

Chadwick said.

Happy

regular happy hours on a permanent basis."

said that visiting the bar during

happy hours gave her the opportunity

to

mingle and meet friends "1 just sat

around, drank, talked, giggled

and had a good time," Chadwick

Chadwick

said although bars

night, in the afternoons there to

said.

were fun

at

was more time

spend with friends. "If

you preferred the night

life that

was

,1.

C. Spearry concentrates on playing pool at

The Palms. Students found relief from stress during happy hours. Photo by ,|on Rritton.

i-

c

Dana

â&#x20AC;˘-".

~fT

I'clcrson. Finance Michael Pelersiin. Comp. .Science

Marl\

Marketinj; Picrson. Zoology

Piclicin.

Rodney

Jennifer Pittsenharger. F.lem. Kd.

Jason Pomrenke. Geography Tandria Potts. Marketing Deryk Powell. Public Relations

& Env. Resources. Colleen Prem. Psychology Donna Pruitt. Fam. & Fnv. Resources Kristin Pryor. Elem. F.d. Fori Puis. Education William Purviance, Psych./.Sociolgy Rohin Quinn. Recreation Michael Raffurty, Bio./Psych. Jacktjulyn Pralt. Fam,

Kayleen Rash. Marketing/Mgnit. Michcle Remsburg. Accounting

Rhonda Richards, Recreation Saonse Richardson. Pre-Med

Tammy

Roden. Accounting

Jennifer Rodler. Marketing

Michelle Rogers. Fam. & Env. Resources Candace Rosewell. Education

Seniors 273


Shaleen Roth, Personnel Mgmt, Travis Roth. Geography

Tonya Rother. Marketlng/Mgmt. John Roush, Int'l. Business Michelle Rumelhart, Psychology Tricia Rusch, Child Care Administration Jeremy Sacker, Physics Laura Sampsel, English Michelle Sanger, Animal Science Jeffery Schuanke, Accounting Cindy Schear. Ag. Business

Roger Schieber, Management Terry Schoonover, Elem. Ed. Jennifer Schug, Puhlic Relations Heather Schuring, Elem. Ed. Stacy Schwaller, Elem. Ed. Sara Schwanke, Psychology Daniel Sears, Music Ed. Kay Sedorcek, Recreation Laurie Seelhoff. Elem. Ed. Danna Seger, Education Kari Sellberg. Math Ed. Daisy Semu, Accounting Stephanie Shaffer, Vocal Music

Todd Shane, Recreation Kevin Shaw, Geography Loree Sheldon, English Ed. Teresa Shields, Art Su-Mei Shih, Accounting Jodi Shirrell, Fam. & Env. Resources Tsui Yen Shuni. Marketing

Adam Simmerman,

Sec. Ed.

&

Jennifer Sligar. Fam. Env. Resources Beatrice Smith, Psychology Blase Smith, Broadcasting/Journalism

Bruce Smith, Bio. /Psych. Ecol. & Cons.

Shannon Smith, Wildlife

Stephanie Smith, Broadcasting Tracy Smith, Recreation

Sharon Smyers, Graphic Design

Hooi-Suan Soh, Comp. Mgmt. System Susan Soh, Comp. Mgmt. System Jeff Sortor. Geology Jennifer Sortor, Molecular Biology Kimherlie Spotts, Personnel Mgmt. Brian Stanfield, Philosophy Kelly Stanfield. Public Relations

Doran

Stark,

Technology

Andy Starkbaum, Geography Beth Starkey, Geography Douglas Steelman, Geography Michael Stephenson, Sec. Ed. Amy Stevens, Marketing Melissa Stills, Elem. Ed.

Beveriy

Stoll, Public Relations Christina Stroburg. Elem. Ed.

Michael Swarthout. Physical Ed. Doug Swink. Geography

Zach

Talikatzis,

Meredith Tarieton, Fam.

&

Government

Env. Resources

a

Tomasina Tavai, Government Roberta Teneyck, Accounting Cherie Thomas, Journalism

Dan Thomas,

Physical Ed.

Thomas, Recreation Michael Tiedeman, Agronomy Lori

Angella Tipling. Education Brian Tipton. Math Ed. Kimberly Todd. Broadcasting Kristina Tolliver, Elem. Ed. Ginni Troglin, Psychology Mark Tweed, Finance Kristin

Van Winkle. Education

Paul VanVactor, Industrial Tech. Trisha Vaughn, Biology/Psych.

Tabatha Verbick, Comp. Mgmt. Systems/Statistics Tammy Voegele, Elem. Ed. Heather Voss, Psych. Cyndi Wagner. Wildlife Ecol. & Cons. Lisa Wakefield. Fam. & Env. Resources

4


Mot most students, a trip to the grocer>' store was not complete without a stop by the meat On

department.

the other hand, \egetarians

spent their time in the produce department

buying

life

for

and vegetables for dinner.

fruits

Shopping

Amy

who had been

Miller

a \egetar-

decided

to

become

a vegetarian lo

lose weight," Miller said. "I cut out

meat and I

ate only vegetables.

felt alter

Not

all

doing

people

that

I

and stuck with

who were

red

all

liked the

w ay

it."

\egetarians were

raised as vegetarians. Both Miller and

Ann Barker came from meat-eating

Lee

families.

was not a vegetarian until a friend told me about the inhumane way animals were "I

treated

and

killed."

Barker

it

was

better for

Imm

your health

said.

"If

cows and then nou

you fed

to

be a \eg-

the grain to

ate the cattle,

it

was

a

double process, ^'ou might as well just eat the grain yourself." protein from a combination of

peanut butter and nnlk. "I did research on this." Imm said. "It seemed we did not need as much protein as we were told we needed."

Being a vegetarian was a popular way of Students chose to give up meat for a

life.

variety of reasons, whether

weight or

to

become

it

be to lose

healthier.

By Tami Dodson and Kalhy Higdon-Bolar

their daughters being vegetarians, but later

decided to change their attitude as the

showed they were committed

to

stu-

being

VEGETARIANS

a vegetarian. "I

said.

family, especially

while to adjust to

were meat 1

search for the greens

used to be a strong meat eater," Miller

"My

my

dad, took a

my being a \ egetarian. They

eaters, but

Healthy

said.

Barker's and Miller's parents were against

dents

was

Imm got his

ian for .seven years. "I first

"It

etarian,"

the

department was a way of

in this

because of animal rights and said en\ ironmentalls better.

changed

their diet since

started being a vegetarian."

There were advantages and disadvantages of being a \egetarian. Not always getting a

balanced diet was one and cost was another.

"The

price for vegetables

was high," Miller

said. "Becau.se the vegetables

had

sooner than other food items, store

more

I

to

be eaten

went

to the

often."

Barker said

AR A needed a better selection

w ho did not eat meat. "They had things like cheese pizza w hich was okay, but they needed more," Barker said. "Even the Chinese food had too much for students

oil

and

Chris

fat in

it.

It

was

not very healthy."

Imm was a vegetarian for over a year

and intended on being one the Like Barker,

Imm

re.st

of his

life.

chose to be a vegetarian

Amy

Miller prepares a vegetarian dinner. Be-

sides vegetables. Miller relied get protein.

on other foods to Photo by Chris Tucker. Bret Wallace, Ag. Business Larr> Walls, FJem. Kd.

Catherine Walthall. Recreation Brian Wardlow. Geography Jennifer Weber. Medical Technician I,ori Wesiercamp. Marketing/Mgnit. Allie Weyiiiulh. lÂŁlem. Ed. Keith Wharton. Elem./Jr. High Ed.

Kexin White. Geography Jennifer Whitelng. Elem. Ed. .Stacy Wilbcr. Elem. Ed. .Stacia

Wilkens. Recreation

Marsha Williams. Geology Donna Willis. Mathematics Crystal Wilson. Marketing Janet Wilson. Psychology Pui-Ying Wong. Psychology Bohbi Woodward. Psychology Mike Worland. Wildlife Ecol. & Cons. Mihoko Yama/oe. Comp. Science Debra Young. Elem. Ed. Heidi Yurka. Accounting Kelly

Zimmerman. Food Service Mgmt.

Angela Zuber.

Int'l.

Business

Seniors 275


J here were

students

who

did a remarkable

job using their time to study, but some

stu-

dents also dispensed their time to be with those in need.

Volunteers every

at

summer

Camp Quality spent one week with children diagnosed with

Teri Schroer set aside a to help the patients

'it life

Volunteers reach out

meals as a

gave children

during

this

T

made

the difference in their I

life

by

did accom-

plish something," Schroer said.

The Wesley Student Center also did volunwork by participating in flood relief

teer

projects.

horseback

a

chance

swiin and

ride,

Camp Quality

volunteer.

to lead a

one week," Schroer

normal

said.

a trip to St. Louis in the southern areas to help

with the clean-up," Marjean Ehlers, co-director of

Wesley Student Center

said.

"We

pro-

vided labor to help people get back on their feet."

to stay in

The center prepared

a brochure opening

contact with the children throughout the year.

volunteer work for students to relieve flood

Camp who oth-

victims. Services were offered based on the

"There were tons of

activities that

Quality provided for these children,

erwise would be

According

O

week every summer

These volunteers were obliged

in

treatment," Schroer said.

to Schroer,

by spending one

week with the children, she was them enjoy life.

to help

I

"Students and faculty were offered to go on

cancer.

eat their

'if

fulfilling their happiness, then

able to

let

needs of flood victims.

"We

advertised through residence halls

and made sure

"It

on students' response." Kristal

H E R S

was was totally dependent

that the Student Senate

aware," Ehlers said.

Turner went

to St.

Louis to relieve

flood victims.

"We went

to a flood-affected

zone and

picked up toys, food, pots, pans, furniture and garbage," Turner said.

"Some houses were we had to

flooded up to the second floor and tear

down

the walls

and carpets."

Rebecca Lindenbusch said Lee May, Mo., was a community that pulled together and itself. Since there was no help coming from the Red Cross during the flood, the community decided to create the Lee May

organized

Organization.

"The Red Cross and

the Salvation

Army

were not able to give supplies to flood victims

and these people went scrounging," Lindenbusch said. "The money collected from donations went

for cleaning-up

and

renovations."

Lindenbusch said her organization was up for flood victims. saw 5-year-old girls who had no shampoo, deodorant or razors," Lindenbusch said.

just set "I

1

"They came and asked whether they could have some towels and things that girls needed. They would be so thankful and

hugged us with eyes

full

of tears."

Volunteers took time out of their busy lives

Wendy Sapp helps her group play a table game called "Pass the Pizza." Sapp was one of many students who volunteered time at Headstart to gain experience in early childhood education. Photo by Laura Riedel. Justin Abbott

Aaron Abel

Demexesh Abraha Jean-Francois Achille Anbury Adair Patty

Amy

Adams

Aebersold

Sho Akatsuka Jodi Ake\

Amy

Albright

James Aldrich Angela Aley

276 Undergraduates

to help those in need.

By Sue Mohamed


Bonnie Allen Brandy Allen Lisa Allen Stacey Anderson Trent Andrews

Debbie Antes Applenian Chris Armiger Julie

Chris Arnold Amy Art/ Brenda Ashley Mieliael Askren Christine AuBuchon

Annette Avakian Jenny Backes Staey Baier

Dennea Baker Diane Baker Baker Jennifer Baker Jeff

RachacI Baldridge

Rebeeea Balsiger John Bankson Shalom Barber

Bobbie Barbo/a Karena Barclay Jennee Barnes Jenni Barnetl

Monica Barnett Christena Barratl Brooke Barron Sue Baillett

Amy Barton Carol Barton Ryan Bass Aaron Batte Jody Bean

Shawn Bechtol Beekman

Jennifer

Audrea Beeler Steven Beeler Behrens Janice Belcher Tina Benedetti Sara Benedict Deanna Bennett Julie

Renee Bergene Dacasha Berkley

Amy

Berloldie

JD Bever Ste\e Beymer

Amy

Bickford Bindner Douglas Birt Jennifer Black Nate Blackford Jill

7^

f5>

r> <r)

Jennifer Blair

Carie Blanchet Ryan Blaue Brian Bliss

Chris Blondin Traci Bloom Stacy Blum Shari Blunt

Jonathan Bode

Melinda Boeckman Mary Behahoj Rebecca Bohnnann

Roy Bolar Sue Boltinghouse Karissa

Boney

Linda Borst Kent Boss Angela Boudreau Joe Bougher Billie

t

^

.

V

^

:^A4ik

Bowman

Brandon Brand Karen Brand Joseph Brannen

Tim

Brechbiel

Undergraduates 277


c

allege

was a time

for students to explore.

Students found they questioned religious beliefs

they had

After looking gion,

some

when

first

coming

to college.

at all the possibilities

preferred to

Atheism was

become

of

reli-

atheists.

the belief that there

was no

not

in

proof of a higher

in

fit

high school and things just did

terms of religion."

Doherty agreed with the book, "Being

in

Nothingness" written by John Geane Paul. In

power, atheists simply believed there was no

this

God.

tialism that Doherty liked. Doherty explained

Craig Goad, assistant professor of English, "1

atheist until the birth of his son.

bom

severely premature,"

my

until

Goad

son was

said. "It

book, Paul outlined a system of existen-

what he believed

the

world and man came

from.

never had any kind of emotional feeling

orconversional experience,

was

truly a miracle that he lived."

of

"Somehow religion never seemed right for said. "I explored many possi-

me," Doherty bilities since

was an

question

college.

natural forces rather than through intervention

that they did not ask for

He

became an atheist during his freshman year of

higher power and the world was created by

of a divine being. Differing from agnostics

A

Doherty was raised a Catholic, but never agreed with the ideas of the religion.

"In the beginning, the world

Doherty

Daniel Doherty depended on himself for the fate in his life.

was chaos,"

"Out of chaos came conscious-

Through

ness.

ness

said.

the perception of conscious-

came man."

Doherty said through the growing of consciousness, reality evolved.

Philosophy Professor Jim Eiswert,

RELIGION

handled questions and concerns of religion his classes.

between the

in

how to distinguish meanings of God and being

He

taught

watched by a higher being.

would say

"I

that

we

were, indeed, watch-

ing each other," Eiswert said.

grew

"When a child

up, he learned the experience of being

observed by his parents because his parents

were observing the growth process." Eiswert said along with parents watching professors observed col-

their children,

leagues to see

if perfomance

and conduct was

handled well. During Eiswert" s classes, there

were also questions about evolution and the creation of the world.

you subscribed

"If

to the theory

tion," Eiswert said. "I rose

and

my

forth

from

of evolu-

my

parents

parents rose from their parents, so

and so on.

could be very reasonable to

It

say that nature itself

power. Creation

may

was

a self-generating

indeed be an on-going

process. There need not be a beginning to creation, but creation will always be."

Although students were given the opportunity to explore religions,

many chose to

stick

with beliefs they already knew, while others

chose

to

Assistant English Professor Craig Goad, visits

church with

his son.

Goad was an

branch off into something more

unusual. atheist until

the birth of his son. Photo by Russ Wevdert.

By Kathy Higdon-Bolar and Sue Mohamed

Max Bree/c Desiree Brent Angi BrewL'i Cathy Brier Ti>ny Broeknian Douglas Brosle

Melanie Brown Rachel Brown Karen Browning George Bmndagc Adam Buckk'N Jana Budde

278 Undergraduates

O

ax


Brian

Buhman

Amy

Burke JucnueUne Burkhan Mkku' Burks Mflissa Burn Stacey Bushy Nicholas Buswell

Karen Butler Alena Cairns Burcak Cakniak Anjiela Camphell

Camper Tim Cappcl Jill

Philip

Capps

Ann Capra Brendon Carlson Shanlel Carlson Vavcmna Carter

Robin Casey Crystal Casteel

Tale Castillo Courtney Cerbin

Marey Chamas Nettle

Chamas

Michelle Christensen Stephanie Christensen Jennifer Clark Melissa Clark Denise Clay Stacy Cleverley BillCohrs

Gregory Cole Jennifer Collantes Dana Collins Killeen Connolley

Colleen Cooke

Dawn Cooley Michelle Cooper Dorothy Corless Candy Jo Coss HIi/aheth Cottingham

Mark Coulter Kimberly Courtney Amelia Cox Joseph Cox Karen Cox Jeanine Craven

Brandon Crauford Marlessa Crocker Danielle Cross

Dana Crouch Lisa Crouse Jennifer

Crowder

Amy

Cro/ier Alyssa Crunily Heidi Cue Christa Culbertson

Jenny Culbertson Theresa Cullen Ashley Culver Fay Dahlquist Mari Daiber Douglas Dailey Rebecca Dailey

Rebecca Dailey Knsti Dallas Scott Daniels

Ryan Davies

Amy

David

Jennifer Davidson Christina Davis

Gina Davis Jim Davis Kendra Davis Wendy Davis

lom DeBlauw Timothy De Boom Anthony DeCarlo Marina De Jong

Tammy De

Jong

Undergraduates 279


Jennyfer DeLong Gretchen DenKim Derscheid

Mieke DeSimone Scott DeVore Lavenia

Dew

Rebecca

Diltz

Ruby Dittmer Tami Dodson Keiry Doetker Stephanie Doliren

Donaldson Mitch Dosland

Julie

Dougan

Jennifer

Clint Douglas

Courtney

Dowden

Stacy Dowling

Rick

Downey

Becky Doyle Jill Doyle Leslie Doyle Wesley Drahozal Tanya Drake Lisa Drey

Amy

Duden

Dunivan Lisa Dunning Karey Dupuy Alisa Eason

Jerry

Jennifer Easton

Toska Echols Christi Edinger

Susan Edke Indira

Edwards

Jason Eggers Jessica Elgin Michael Elliott Sarah Elliott Kelly Jo Ellis

Rob

Ellis

Dennis Esser Alex Estes Renata Eustice Stacy Evertson Michelle Eyanson Aleatha Ezra Jason Ezzell Richard Ezzell Jodi Fabjan Stephen Fahring

Jennifer Paris

Melissa Farley Daniel Felt Monica Ferguson

Chad

Ferris

Daniel Filger

Chasity Filley Celeste Finegan

Stephannia Fletcher

Chen

Flippin Lisa Flynn

Teresa Foland Katherine Foley Shannon Foster

Mindi Fowler Lance Fredrickson Michael Freeman Troy Freese Paul Frese

Derek Frieling Colleen Fry Daryle Fouike Larry Fuller

Amy

Gallamore Reba Cant Dawn Gardner Suzanne Garrett Travis Garton Christina Garza Lisa Gasiorowski

?fl&M


Renovation causes

women

to

RELOCATE A liixieiy

swept through Ruherta Hall when

was announced

it

cause of renovation plans.

new

to find

would close beGreek women had

the hall

Must ot the girls who chose to li\e off campus found that cheaper living conditions and independence were the best benefits. Nicole Adams of Alpha Sigma Alpha liked

me

more

feel

independent vsiihout a resident assistant

Adams

to living off

campus. For many sorority women, the convenience of being closer to class and a sorority

meeting place was

"It

when I

me

look

.ike

Adams

"The closing of Roberta made

it

harder to

get information to everyone," Cecil said. "It

was easy

to post signs

up

in

Roberta

that told

people what was going on.

money advantage

for

women who lived off campus distance tor those who lived on cam-

most sorority

and the

No

matter the place of residence, soror-

ity sisters still

tound time for sisterhood.

By

Sherri McCorkindale

campus said.

many other sonirity women who

olf campus,

who

to find

lost.

a lot longer to get to

above Molly's," Adams

lived

I

those

had

alternative places to post different functions

pus.

said.

There were also disads antages

just

to live there. Sororities

Ihere seemed to be a

her new-found independence.

watching over me,"

planned

or announcements.

living arrangements.

"Living off campus made

every sorority member, not

lived

lived with se\eral of her

Alphas lived

sorority sisters. Seventeen

above Mollys. Included

that

in

living ar-

rangement were the executive members of .Mpha. Since they no longer had a sorority chapter

room

in

Roberta, they conducted

their rituals

and ceremonies such as formal

meetings,

one of the rooms above Molly's.

The

in

loss of chapter

nience for

all

rooms was an inconv e-

sororities, but

room

adjust-

ments were made. Sigma Sigma Sigma, Delta Zeta and Phi rituals in the

"Rituals in in

Mu women

conducted

their

Union University Club rooms. the Union were not as formal as

our chapter room, but

it

did not affect

sisterhood," Kari Cecil of Delta Zeta said.

Cecil said the closing of Roberta affected

Alpha Sigma Alpha members hold their meeting in a home above Molly's. Because of the closing of Roberta Hall for renovations the Alphas met in an apartment. Photo by Tony Miceli. Gina Geesey Michael Geiger Michelle Gibbs Terri Gillispie

Laura Girard Malissa Gitlins Christina Givler

Lisa Glisczinski

Tasha Godreau Darin Goehring Adrian Goettemoeller Kelli

Gofonh

Tsuyoshi Gohei

Deana Goode Shelly Goold

IB

f.,

D

Holly Graff

Annette Grab Leroy Graham Sandi Greek

Martha Green Carol Gregory

Linda Grissom Molly Green

Ken Grove

Undergraduates 281


David Gruender Amy Gubser Melissa

Amy

Gude

Gudenrath

Gum

Jennifer

Karen Gunia Andy Gustafson Byron Gutshall

Marcy Guyer Amy Haake Jenny Habemian Michelle Hackett

Angelique Hager Melissa Haile Crystal Hainkel Tracy Hairison Elizabeth Hale

Kerry Haley Joann Hall Tara Hamilton Erin

Haney

Mathew Hannam Hayley Hanson Jennifer

Hanson

Karey Hanway Tiffany

Hardman

Jennifer Harkrider Leisa Harmon

,0 ^1

^!^.

Michael Harmon

Tim Harmon Scott HanSherry Harr

\

Milk

Janelle Harrington

Kevin Harrington Lisa Harrington Rosetta Harris Katie Harrison Barry Hartman

Angela Hartmann Ann Harvey

Becky Hassig

Mark Hatfield David Hausman Brandon Hawkins Carleane Hawkins

James Hazen Sara Heath Michelle Heck Joel Heinzeroth

Curtis Heldstab Jennifer Hellebuyck

Jason Henle Michelle Heppermann

Amy

Hermereck

Brian Hesse

Thom

Hiatt

Michelle Higgins Allison Hill

Jeremy

Hill

Stacy Hill

Tomoko Hiraoka Karen Hogel Jason Hoke

Codi Holbrook Kara Holt Paula Holtman Julie Holtz Beth Ann Homan Melissa Hooker

Dawn Hoover Denise Hopf

Angela Hopkins Jolene Hopkins Nicole Hopper Christian Hombaker Scott Honon Timothy Houlette

Heather Houseworth Suzanne Houston

Brandon Howard

ÂŁ


Alternative to the bar

SCENE Jo

week of classes, some The Palms, The World Fa-

were the main reason she was a non-bar

or other bars tor drinks, danc-

person. Gi\lerdid not drink alcohol, because

Christina Givler said her religious beliefs

rcla\ utter a hard

students met

at

mous Outback, ing and pool.

Not

she did not like the taste of

chose other activities. .Sandra Run van went to

few times, but preferred hanging out

the bar a

"My

Some

students frequented the bars.

all

with friends or going to the movies.

was no pressure

there

said.

sort,""

smokGivler

said.

"Some of the people who went

were rather rude."

Some in

to try alcohol, drugs,

ing or anything of the addicting

Some

"The bars were too loud and boring."

Runyan

it.

friends did not drink either, so there

students preferred going to the skat-

bowling alley with friends instead

ing rink or

of hitting the bars.

students were not old

enough

By Tami Dodson

to get

or had to pay a cover charge on an over-

undernight. Raye Lynn Allen was required to

pay a cover charge spent time

to get in the

bar and instead

w ith fnends. Allen

said she did not

feel pressure

"E\en

if

I

from others to go out. was 21 there would be no ,

sure," Allen said. "If

I

pres-

did not want to go,

I

would not go." Other students thought the bars were too

much

like

who

meal markets. Mary Garity,

only drank on certain occasions, said the

main reason students went

to the bars

was

to

find dates.

"A

lot

of the girls went to the bars dressed

rather provocatively to

make

them." Garity said. "The

the guys hit

men ogled

on the

women

because of how they were dressed

and the

women

reasons."

ogled the

men

for the

same

Christina Givler invites friends over for a study brealt and pizza. Givler did not

go

to the

bars because she did not think she had

at the bars.

much

in

common with the people

Photo by Tonv Miceli. Joy Howard Michael Howland

Wen-Chi Huang Andy Huedepiihl Anna ^lughe^ Heather Hughes Kristin Hughes Dirk Huisman Lisa Hull

Rebecca Hunsucker

Nancy Huppert Dionne Ivanko Paula Jack Clark Jackson Sherri Jacobs Jessica

James

Peggy James Stacey James Misty Jeffery Jessica Jelinek

Tracy Jenkins Andrea Jennings Jennifer Jewell Joni Johnson

Undergraduates 283


School

and work

make for

A

over the country, millions of American

or hold

down

an unusual job.

students were realizing that the proverbial

relieved to even have a job."'

"great American job"" economy was a thing of

said his

I

was simply

dents were faced with working or unusual

who was a bartender for The Palms, weekday hours interfered somewhat with homework, but the money had been well

hours just to be a part of the select group of

worth the inconvenience.

in

today's global

the past.

Many

stu-

Judd,

employed. "It

"At

was hard

Rusty Judd

to find a decent-paying job,"'

said. "If

I

had the opportunity

make good money, I jumped did not matter

if

I

had

to stay

at the

chance.

to It

up half the night

LONG HOURS

that

first,

it

was

changed once

said.

"But

got conditioned to work-

I

ing the 7 p.m. to 2 a.m.

accustomed

Judd

difficult,"

shift.

became

I

having only four hours of sleep and after a while it did not bother me. In the end, the

to

money

made compensated me

I

for any lack of sleep."

Rick Sons was

security guard for

a

Pinkerton and believed that long, often odd

hours were also the "norm"" for most students.

was not strange

"It

to see

some

students

working into the wee hours of the morning," Sons said. "I worked nights and usually put in around 25 hours a week.""

Although many students worked on campus, others found working at jobs off campus left their

breaks filled with long hours.

Some were field they "I

40

lucky enough to get a job

were going

worked

all

in the

in after college.

holidays, often getting over

Sons

said. "I once had two shifts on Thanksgiving, working from 7:30 a.m. to

hours,""

11 :30

p.m. straight on. But

thing I wanted to do.

I

I

was doing some-

had hopes of becoming

a police officer in the future. At least,

was

Students holding

down positions they were

"over-qualified"" for

was During his shift, which lasts until 2 a.m., Rusty Judd serves beer to a customer at The Palms. Judd's late work nights sometimes interfered with studying. Photo by Russ Weydert.

Kerri Johnson

Matthew Johnson Robert Johnson Sandra Johnson Shelley Johnson Sherri Johnson Dain Johnston Jennifer Jones

Samantha Jones Scott Jones

Maria Joslin Aaron Jung Joanna Jungers Kostas Kapetis

Jeffeson Karicamhe

Monica Karrenbroek Brian Kassar

Fatuma Kassim Christopher Kates

Satomi Kawashinia

Shannon Keane

Kelly Keiler Dana Keini Todd Keiser Lesley Kellar Joe Kellogg Kerrie Kelly Jennifer Kennedy

284 Undergraduates

my job

in a similiar field."

the

money

was not unique, but it was ulti-

the job paid that

mately important to students.

By Kim Todd


Amber Kenny Scott Kent

Christina Ketller Ritjsuko Kikkawa

Brian Kinder Craig Kingery Traci Kitl Katrina Kjeldgaard Lisa Klindl Julie

Knauss

Jennifer Knight Kristic

Knop

Joseph Koeberl Ching-Chai Koey Jennifer Krai

Monica Kruel Vicki Kukuc/ka Jennifer Kunim

Kay Kun/e John Labarbera

Anne LaBeaume Brad Lager

Rachel Lambros Jeffrey

Lamp

Andrew Lancaster Michelle Lance

Amy Landwehr Clarissa Brett

Amy

Landwehr

Lane Langner

Meredith Larsen Sandra Larson Patrick Laster

Gwendolyn Laudont Brian Lautenschlager Duane Law son

Myra Lay Michelle Leach

Rdward Lee Lynnette Lee Michelle Leeper

Andrea Leitch Shannon Len/. John Leonard Todd Leonard Natalie Lesko Arlelte Leuthold

Tana Leutung

Mark Leven Tami Lichtas Tifanie Lienau Terisa Lindeniann

Rebecca Lindenbusch Trina Liverman Staci

Lock

Kelly Locke

Dustin Logeman Laura Long

Dan Lorch Susan Lorimor Steven Lossman

Amy

Lovell

Melani Luedtke Cory Jo Lukins

Angle Lullmann Tracy Lund Marty Lyle Michelle Mac Chris Mackey

Mahon

Melinda Madison Jennifer Mallon

Brandy Maltbia

Amy

Mandarich Vanessa Mannasmith Maria Manship Staci Maples Kevin Maret Tiffany Man Brian Marriott Brian Marshall

Undergraduates 285


Ericca Marshall Barb Martin

Diana Manin Jennifer Martin

Michel! Martin

Michele Masin Robert Matthews Michelle Maxwell Erin May McAllister

Tom

McBrayer Ray McCalla Cindy McCari Virginia McCarthy Brian

Dustin McCollom Shawn McCollom

Luke McCoy

McCray McCush McDougal

Sheree Scott

Shari Erin

McGinnis Taunya McGuire Suzette

McHale

Kimberly McKenzie Abigail

McKie

Susan

McKim

McKnight

Jenifer

Amanda McManigal Teresa McMichael

McMulin McMurry

Traci Kristin

McNemey

Shannon

Mark McWilliams Eve Mechanic Melissa Megerson Angela Meierotto Heather Meinders Barbara Meinecke

Andrea Merino

Amie Messinger Marcie Messner Johnathan Meyer Antonino Miceli Becky Michels Darcy Mickelson Kelby Mieras

Dawn Milbum Adam Miller Audrey Miller Brenda Miller Crissy Miller Jonathan Miller Michael Miller Barbara Mills Susan Mires Cerine Mitchell

Donna Moore Travis Moore Mylane Morgan Jim Morris

Marey Morris Marshon Morris Michael Morris Molly Morris

David Morton April Moutray

Lisa

Mraz

Cindy Mueller Cade Mullins Jill

Murdock

James

Muman

Jeff

Murphy

Peggy Murray Hitomi Nagasaki Heather Namanny Charity Naujokaitis

Maria Navarro Kevin Neal Jeannie Neitzel Dan Nelrete

286 Undergraduates


Good study

habits

make

help students

the

GRADE who

received the "good grades" and never seemed

was hard work. "It was work," he

to study.

hard to maintain a 4.0 CiPA.

^Jiime

students had

In college a lot

retaining

was

good grades.

not spend

the luck; those

all

much time

riding Still

on getting and

some

students did

that

just

I

Fannon

swim

said.

meets,

life

studied in snippets." Debbie

"When went I

I

just took

my

to

my

learning,

a

w orked

a

little

harder to prepare for

week

studying because taking care of her three

which was the direct

result of study-

ing.

Students

children's

notes with me."

Fannon said she spent a few hours

just

Bolar said he just enjoyed school and

my

in

I

worked

When a test came

it."

hitting the books.

had so many things going on

"I

up,

said. "1 really

who

received good grades real-

ized the accomplishment they had

a

little bit

of extra

made with

effort.

By Don Munsch

children occupied most of her time.

Brian Whitaker spent about five to six

hours per week studying and his spare time

was spent with extracurricular

activities or

watching television.

Whitaker said he mastered most class material

through

memory and added

that

he

often studied the night before a test to be ready. Although preparation

was

the key,

another factor was also invohed. "It

depended on the individual," Whitaker

said. "I

knew some people who could study

two or three days before C.

I

a test

and

still

get a

studied the night before and got a B.

These people looked Whitaker said his studies he

if he

at

me and

said,

"Huh?""

applied himself more to

could be a straight-A student,

but he said one must mix a social

life into

the

equation.

For Roy Bolar, studying came spite of his job at

first, too, in

Safety. Bolar,

who

As for two years spent about hours week studying and often did most of it

had a

Campus

all

1

during the week.

Bolar said the key to making good grades

Debbie Fannon studies for a tests. Fannon would often study during her children's swim or piano practices. Photo by Tony Miceli. Eric Nelson Scott Nelson

Michelle Neubert

Tracy Jill

Newcomb

Newland

Lisa

Newman

Sean Newton

Anh Nguyen

Amy

Nickerson

Dana Nielsen Elizabeth Niemeier Katherinc Niemeier Lisa Noone

Anne Northup April Norton

Anna Nothstine

Undergraduates 287


<^ andwiches,

a blanket and campfire or

snuggling up to a good movie

at

home, were

ideas that compiled a perfect date for

Money

students In

some

who

was simply no money or

time to go out on an extravagant date. as

couple could the

some

still

students pointed out, a

have as much fun without

money was "If

to

do something

really cheap,

would take my date through the McDonald's drive-thru," Damon Holzapfel said. "It just depended on how much money I

had

in

my

pocket."

Students had a hard enough time paying

"A cheap date could be as fun if not better," Huber said. "I did not have to be so formal which made it easier to have a good time."

For some dates, they did not

tight.

wanted

I

I

money.

Kristin

buy the

McDonald's

proved to be the restaurant to take dates when

refused to fork out the money.

cases, there

However,

does not

some

ing their date extra special.

tuition

and rent without worrying about en-

tertainment for a date.

"Sometimes

I was running a little low and was really nothing else that I could do," Jeff Fogel said. "It depended on who I was with. If it was the right person, we could be

there

feel like treat-

PERFECT DATE

walking

in a

cow

pasture and

it

would be

fun."

The average student learned not to expect much and then on those rare occasions when they did get all the trimmings, it made it ail much more special. "I did not expect tons of money to be spent on

me

but

it

was nice every once

in

awhile,"

Jane Taggart said.

Taggart said the term "cheap dates"

in-

cluded more than just being short on cash.

"What thought was a cheap date was when a guy would ask me out, but did not I

have any

real plans for the

ended up asking ail

'so

evening, so he

what do you want to do'?'

night," she said.

Whether they were male or female, most students agreed a cheap date was just as fun as an expensive one. It was up to the couple to make it a good time. With the right ingredients

Damen

Holzapfel and Tara Hamilton pick movies at Easter's for their date. Renting movies was an alternative for a limited budget. Photo by Jon Britton.

it

did not matter how

much money they

had.

By Shelley Stangle

Rebecca O'Brien Darin O'Dell Shelley O'Donnell

Karma O'Riley Maggie O'Riley Ryan O'Rourke Karen Offutt

Noriko Ohno Laura Ojeski Nathan Olson

Nancy Ontiveros Angie Orr Yuki Osawa

Todd

OsterhoLit

Monica Ottnian Melissa Overfield Derek

Owen

Mayumi Ozawa Brian Pace Sally Parrnan

Amy

Partlow

Sarah Partlow Erin Pavlicek Precious Payne Kara Pearson Danelle Pedersen

Kyndra Pelt/ Rebecca Pendleton

288 Undergraduates

Šft


^CA n Cy

^c^


Laurie Schmitt

Douglas Schmitz Suzy Schneckloth Andrea Schneider

Todd Schoenemann Kory Schramm Chris Schreck Karen Schreincr

Lara Schulenberg Shannessy Schultes NataHe Schwartz Toni Scimeca

Andrew

Scott

Cindi Scott Kerrie Scott

Tammara

Scott

Chad Sedore Charles Seetin Stacie Segebart Emily Sehrt Jennifer Seiler

Kim

Seyller

Brad Shain Erin Shanahan

Amy

Sheffield

John Shipley Staci Shipley

Susan Shipley Chris Shores

Andy

Siebert

James Simmons Jared

Simmons

Trent Skaggs

Peggy Skroh

Amy

Slaba

Shawn Sloan Tara Sloan Brian Smith Chestina Smith Jerry Smilh

Jodella Smith Jill

Smohk

Michelle Snell

Susan Snyder Richard Sons Joy Sotter Brian Sparks Kevin Spiehs

Elise

Cara Spire Sportsman

Jennifer Spotts Jennifer Spray

Mattie Springer

Renee Stains Cynthia Starkehaum Paula Starling Sheri Slites

Heather Stevens Holly Stewart Jennifer Stewart

Sarah Stewart Denise Stiens Sara Still

Amy

Stinson

Chns

Stolle

Amy

Stone

Jamey Stone Melissa Stmad

Mandy

Stroburg

David Stuck Renae Sturm Chris Stuva

Nicole Sullender Sherry Sullivan Kori Sundberg Eniilee Sutter

Heather Sutter Yuko Suzuki

Amy Swanson Todd Swartzendruber


was bom-

Residential Hall Association conducted a

barded with tads, and computers were not

panel discussion for Telnet users. Facult\

i^\er> now and spared,

then the uorld

w ith Telnet being

discussed the problem of Telnet addictions.

the latest cra/.e.

"Telnet was very attractive and people got addicted to

it,"

According

Mann

Jackie

Mann. Telnet had games

to

"Mud" and "Mucks" similar to "Dungeons and Dragons." "Mud" could be used

called

for talking to other people or pla\ ing

games.

Mann started playing "Mud" during the summer because she had nothing else to do. "I Mudded" quite a bit during the summer hut

It

Mann

my

did not affect

"When

said.

I

grades, thank God."

first

Cherri Flippin. head of the Telnet wiirkshop. said there w as a grow ing concern about

said

got onto 'Mud',

it

Ifeshmen using Telnet too much.

"The workshop was held issue." Flippin said.

"We

to address this

cerned about the bad effects such as skipping classes and not leasing the

room

to eat or

were our

mam

concerns."

Resident Assistants were also ads iscd design actis

ities to drass the

rooms and

lo

freshmen out of

vn computer

their

tmie."

tered college and felnet had joined the ranks.

it

I

I

Mann made

friends from

oserthe world

all

megabyte from the day

shower. Education, sanitation and safet\

was new, metguss. li took my time because there was nothing else to do '.Mudded' all the during the summer, so wassoe.Kciting.

Taking a

were also con-

learn ass arcness

usage and Telnet junkies. .Addictions sscrc explored as students en-

By Ruby Dittmer and Sue Mohamed

through Telnet. Although she li\ed off cam-

modem Mann had 15

connected her

pus, she had a

that

Telnet.

close Telnet friends

whom

to

she talked to over the phone, ex-

changed pictures with and even also had another

visited. .She

30 Telnet friends she corre-

COMPUTERS

sponded with regularK "Telnet v\as worse than the phone because I

was addicted

"Howes er.

to these people."

the onls

was

to

Mann

talk

to

people was through the Telnet because

said.

these it

was

cheap and convenient."

C'hnsiopherHornbakersaidhe used Telnet lor about three hours a

week.

w hen w as

"First semester

I

not iirgani/cd

I

was on Telnet for about 13 hours a day." Hornbaker said. "It was a new experience. I

new

kept meeting

w iHikl skip

Once in a while to see w ho else w as on

people.

studies just

I

the Telnet."

Hornbaker said to

that

it

was an opportunity

meet people and gain experience, but he

knew w here

to

draw the Imc.

A

line

needed

to

be draw n between fantasy and the real world. "I knew a girl who did not e\'en shower when she was on Telnet." Hornbaker said. "She would have people bring her food. She

did not e\ en go to classes for three v\eeks. She

was addicted. their priority

If

students did not knovs

was

in college, then they

not e\en bother to co to school."

v\

here

should

"Muds"

offer a lucrative

and sometimes

addicting; escape

from

realils.

These computer games alloued

users to immerse themselses in a fantass world where they not only read ahout dragons and odd

AO

environments, but were allowed to interact with them. Photo illustration by Chris Tucker.

Mutihcw .Swisher Rt'hecca S/abo .Angela Tai.kelt

Jane Taggarl Keiji Tanaka Wallcdda Taylor

Christine Scott .lason

Tedrow

Tet't't

Temus

Karia Thayer .Matthew Thies

Angela Thomas

Undergraduates 291


Helping hands around the world,

HOST FAMILIES l^eaving home

to a foreign land

meant being

prepared for changes and adaptation. For

in-

ternational students, the solution to ""home

sickness"

was host

families.

Host families acted as a second home to

He had been with the summer 1993. 'i was happy because we were of the same faith," Nakazawa said. "I was satisfied beduring his stay here. Graeffs since the

cause they took care of

missed

my

family.

needs.

but the Graeffs were

Nakazawa from Japan opted for a host family. His living arrangements were made by John and Teresa Graeff. They were Jehovah Witnesses and met Nakazawa at a Kingdom Kenji

Hall meeting and decided to be his host family

I

John decided

me just

like

my own

family in the beginning,

international students and fulfilled their basic

my new

to take in

family."

Nakazawa because

he was afraid for Nakazawa" s spiritual welfare in the residence halls. "I

was concerned about the immoral activsmoking and drugs," John said. "It

ity like

could have happened and damaged him

spiri-

tually."

Hidetoshi Yanagishima lived with Frank

and Dixie McGary for seven weeks. "During

my

stay with the

McGarys,

I

learned about family relationships and their culture,"

Yanagishima

said. "It

was a

rich

experience."

Jim and Lori Schleusner were the host family for Hirotomo Komori. They housed

seven Japanese students

in the

preparatory

English program during summers for about five to seven weeks.

They had two students

them each summer. learned Japanese ways and culture," Jim

living with "I

said.

"They spoke very

little

English but

we

enjoyed having them with us."

According students

was

hosting international

to Jim,

a

way

guages and cultures.

to learn different lanIt

was

for international students

also the solution

who missed home-

cooked food and had no friends in a foreign land. International students found companKenji Nakazawa and John Graffe spend a Sunday afternoon watching a Chiefs' game. Nakazawa and a few other foreign students opted for a host family instead of living on campus. Photo by Laura Riedel.

Ginny Thomas

Thomas Thomas Thomeczek

Melissa Michael Eric

JeffThombura

Jennifer Thomhill

Bethany Tison Miki Tokunaga

Amy Tomhnson Veronica Tran

292 Undergraduates

ionship.

By Sue Mohamed


Stephanie Tra\ i\ Sl;ic\ Tripp Richard TiuKon Chris TuckLT Jods Turbell Knstal lumcr l,i.va Turner l.iirinda Turner

Van Coolen Ryan Van D\ke Marc Van Ciorp Kddie Van Sickle Bill Van Werden Trudi Vannoy Shana Vasaika Chip Veatch Jennifer

Krisli Vernon Lea Ann Vetter Derrick Vidacak Brooke Viola

Jolene Voris

Wendy Waigand Connie Walker Karen Walker Lonnie Walker Kimberly Waller

Warren Warren Penny Watson Billce

Jenniler

Brian Watts Denise Way Scot

I

Weber

Shannon Weber Daniel

Weese

Wegge

Mcijan

Weiss

Mi>ll\

Kimberly Welch Sarah Weller Laura West Kalherine Weymuth

Theresa Whelton Brian Whitaker Lauren While Billy Whited Jason Whiiing Tressa Whitlinglon Scott

Whyte

Deecy Widen

mf> QM.fi

Jennifer Widner Scott Wiederstein

Heather Wieniar Lisa Wimberley Amy Willers

Clarence Williams Ramona Williams

Amy

Willito

Carrie

Wilmes

Michelle Wilson Michael Will Jean W ingert Travis Winter Teresa Wiseman Carrie

Wood

Andrea Woods

Woods Wookey Amanda Wright Shelby

Jennifer

Brvce Wvble Ry'an Wyllie Mary Yanlis

w^

Sarah Yarkasky Jason Yeager

Cindy Young Jenifer

Young

Michelle Young

Becky Youngs Steven Zimmer Jenny Zimmerman Shad Zion

Melodv

Zvlstra

Undergraduates 293


^5 he ran her fingers over the jagged edge of the key and placed nally, a car that

wanted

to go.

be sitting

It

in her

went off and

it

in the ignition. Fi-

would take her where she

seemed so unreal dream was

the alarm

all

students had

the convenience of having their

whether

it

was

own

theirs or their parents.

car.

Mich-

Masin. who lived off campus, found other ways of getting around. "It was a pain to depend on other people." Masin said. "My biggest concern was getting

elle

Students

rides

find

themselves

me

I

in better

wanted," Flint

said.

"It

did

shape from walking every-

where."

Some

people had problems making

on

it

time for class or group meetings, but others

manage their lime well. was never late because I would always leave half an hour early when I walked," Masin said. Not having a car for classes was one disadlearned to

lost.

For many students, the thought of owning a car was a mere dream. Not

wanted when

put

to actually

own car. Suddenly,

the

I

home to St. Louis and getting to work on

"I

vantage, but not having a car for social events

was another. Without a car, dates were harder to

come by and many times

someone on

a date, students

ask the person to drive.

Some found

was not problem, while others

campus."

"My

Lori Flint also experienced the inconve-

after asking

would have

it

did.

slowed down just a

social life

to

that

little

nience of not having a car. Although walking

when

provided exercise she would have otherwise

nothing major," Flint said.

not have had.

Although Flint's life did not change much, Masin noticed her friends changed when she began spending more time with her friends

"I

hated

it

becau.se

I

did not uet to uo where

STRANDED

it

came

who had

to traveling long distances, but

cars.

"Socially,

my

life

did not change because

had a friend with a car and the same as

me, so we did a

lot

I

interests

of stuff together and she

drove," Masin said.

Although not having a car was an inconvenience, there were advantages to not having a car.

Along with providing

exercise,

most

students without a car found they saved

money because

they did not have to

make

car

payments, pay insurance or buy gas. "I

used

a car, to

my money

I

saved, from not having

buy groceries."

Flint said.

Some students dreamed about owning their own cars, while others made that dream come true. Advertisements about low financing swamped students' mail as they tried their best to save money to purchase a new car after graduation. Getting a car loan

paying

it

off

was

was easy but

the hard part. If students

were lucky, parents bought them

a vehicle for

a graduation present.

Despite the inconvenience of not owning a car and having to

students

still

bum

pus or town, whether Lori Flint hundles up on her havin}> a car

Richard Al.sup, Athletics

Gary Bennenitte. Educ. Admin. Chnstine Benson, Math/Stats. Richard Bobti. Music Biih Bohlken, Speech Jean Bouas, Curr. and Instr.

Ann Brekke, HPERD Cyrus Brown, Math/Stats. Betty Bush. Curr. and Instr, Alejandro Ching. Agriculture

Deborah Clark. Human Envir. Sci. Gary Collins. HPERD

294 Faculty

way

to class.

One disadvantage

was the winter months. Photo by Chris Tucker.

to not

rides off of friends,

found ways to get around camit

be to the library or the

bar.

By Sherd McKorkindale


Ramoiia Collins.

Human

Resources

Ray Councr. Controller's Office

^

^'

^ ^ ^^ ^mMmk

Sandra Cii\, Human Resources Diana DcMolt. Mass Comm. Penns OeVaull, Central Stores Ron ix-Young. Coll. Bus./Cio\ ./Cs. Mike Douthal. Broadcast Services David liasierla. Biological .Sci. Ciuy Ebersole. Military Science Dan Bdmonds. Controller's Office Susan Emerson. Knglish

^^

Marsha livans. Curr. and Instr, George Kero. Hduc. Admin. Richard Frucht. History/Humanities Carrol Fry. F.nglish

FaDonna Geddes. Speech

^^

t

VP

lor Fin./Control

John Jasinski. Mass

^--

Comm.

Diiane Jewell. Agriculture Michael Johnson.

^-'O

r^ !^

C i4l» ikii

Pat Haynes.

Connie Monken, Speech Marvin Hoskey. Agriculture Dean Hubbard. President GaylcHull. K.XCV

ir

Q

Mike Grud/inski. Video Support Dave Hancock. Accounting/Finance Don Haynes. Computing Services

KXCV

Madonna Kennedy.

Library

Mary Fllen Kimble. Library Frnesi Kramer. Music (jerald Kramer. Mrkt./Mgmt. Diane Krueger. Ge<ilogy/Geography

c^^-'-i

o

1^

^

Fred Lamer. Mass Comm. Josh Lcaiiion. Psych./Soc./Coun. Kathie Leeper. Speech Roy Leeper. Speech Merle Lesher. Fduc. .Admin. Arnold l.indanian. Hduc. .Admin. Lori Macias. Speech John McCiuire. K.XCV Patrick McLaughlin. Accounting/Finance

Dale Midland. Fnglish Kalhryn Murphy. Library Richard New. Curr. and histr. Russ Norihup. Mrkt./Mgmt. Don Nothsiine. Mrkt./Mgmt. David Oehler. Theater Bayo Oludaja. Speech

^

<^

Qf%Q

»-"•

O

Denise Oltinger. Student Affairs Speech Larry Riley. Psych./Soc./Coun. Nancy Riley. Curr. and Instr. Thco Ross. Theater John Rude. Speech James Saucerman. F.nglish Michelle Spearry. Human Resources Jeff Pr/ybylo.

/^

Sande Stanley. Mrkl./Mgmt. Pat Stites. Payroll Sherri Strating. Curr. and Insir. Jodell Strauch.

Mass Comm.

and Instr. Georgane Tiniko. Library Nelly Ukpokodu. Curr. and instr. James VanDyke. Mass Comm. Preeti Suppal. Curr.

Chuck Vaughn. Computing Services Kenneth White. Mass Comm. Sandra While. Mrkt./Mgmt. Laura Widmer. Mass Comm. Richard Wilson. Computing Services Esther Winter. English

Johanne Wynne. Agriculture

Nancy

Zelii'f.

Conip. Sci./lnfo.

Sy.s.

Faculty 295


D|isaster{$

Natural Disasters Take

Their Toll

somethinc Else

Altogether

Earthquakes

The earth commenced California Jan.

1

to

shaking the San Fernandez Valley

4:30 a.m. and quit before 4:3

7. at

wreaked havoc. Measuring 6.6

in

1

magnitude on the Richter

Los Angeles" biggest earthquakes caused $30

billion in

According to Time, the earthquake occurred on a fault were not able momitains oil

to identify.

The movement of the

to rise at least a foot,

main and 250 gas

1

Southern it

one of

scale,

damages.

line that scientists

fault line

snapped nine highw ays

lines, left 3.

in

a.m. but not before

caused the local

apart, ruptured an

million people in total darkness and

left

40.000 without water.

The

epicenter, that

apartment building

who

measured 9.3 miles deep, took down

a three-story

Northridge, Calif., and claimed the lives of

in

many

lived there.

Overall the Northridge earthquake claimed the lives of 6 people and 1

many

left

wounded and homeless.

others

Los Angeles was not the only place

in the

world affected by ground-

shaking quakes. In India, more than 200,000 people died from one of the worst earthquakes

in the

country during the past half century. Indonesia

damages caused by earthquakes.

also suffered

Brush Winds up In

to

mph

75

Fires

helped spread wildfires across California.

1993 Time reported 689 buildings were damaged or destroyed

and 186,900 acres had burned

in the

Los Angeles

area, during the raging

infernos.

The

fires, that

Arson was

injured 84 people,

left

about 25,000 residents homeless.

the suspected cau.se of the.se fires. The governor of California

offered a $50,000 bounty for information leading to the anest and eventual

conviction of arsonists. President Bill Clinton declared six California regions natural disaster areas.

Firefighters

were unable

to fight the fires effectively

of water pressure. In some cases firefighters

filled

because of the lack

water tanks with water

from privately owned swimming pools.

The

was difficult for firefighters to control even with over 6,000 hard working men and women on the job day and fires

were widespread and

it

An earthquake of 6.6 doses five interstate highway s including California's major North-South Route. The earthquake claimed 61 lives and caused damages totaling $30 billion. The Associated Press photo.

night.

Mud Slides

Cold Weather and Droughts Across the Northeast, the Midwest and large parts of the South, the

extreme cold weather arctic air with

United States

wind in the

in

January brought an end to the daily routine. The

chills

up

wake of a

to

After a devastating earthquake and destructive

mother nature would never

The land

74 below zero swept across the eastern

Ninty-two deaths were blamed on the cold and snow. Tens of thousands at shelters.

There were record lows

a heat

Mason-Dixon

wave. Nome, Alaska recorded temperatures

line in

was coping with the 30s when it

should usually be sub-zero.

1977 and 1986.

A

dry, hot

August followed by an early

almost more damage than the flood. Crops were planted of the Midwest because of a

296 Ads/Mini

M.4g

expo.sed from the fires

late harvest in

seemed

became treacherous and

system from Hawaii, loosened the

dirt,

forming a thick

threat-

frost,

Numerous

California canyon roads were closed as drains clogged

1992 and spring storms.

most

and havoc

behind.

Residents from Las Flores

caused

late across

mud and

and hea\ y run-off flooded intersections which made dri\ ing hazardous. The ram, melting the snow and wind gusts up to 63 mph swept over the entire 840-mile length of California leaving destruction

The Carolinas to Texas felt the effects of the worst drought since the ones in

it

drenched much of California.

throughout the Midwest also. Ohio received 30 to 32 inches of snow in two days. At least one place well abo\ e the

fires,

up.

ening as the rains riding the subtropical "'Pineapple Express," a weather

blizzard.

of homeless people sought protection

left

let

to

Canyon and Big Rock Beach were urged

evacuate their homes as the rains continued and the hopes of sunshine

diminished as the

mud

slides continued.


Waters

Swamp

the Midwest 1

summer

he

one of the ters in

of 1993 br(»uj;ht

bi^fiest luiturul disas-

American

history as parts

of Iowa. Kansas. Missouri and

Nebraska flooded. tion of melting

A combina-

snow and heavy

rains caused scattered lloodinjj

Man>

across the region.

roads,

such as U.S. Highway 63. were ch)sed in the

Midwest because of

waters. In St. .loseph. Mo..

hij;h

85.(100 residents

were without

water for one week, fhe Hoods left

65.000 people homeless; 51

deaths: 34 million acres of land

Hooded; 50,000 people unem517 counties declared

|)loyed;

federal disaster areas li

10 billion in

and up

to

damages. The Asso-

ciated Press photo.

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Jumping Networks Atk-r l-lcctric

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\L'ars the stage in the Cioncral

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moved

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the

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ot

the

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-lemndeled

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was not ehosen

replaee

Id

Carson as host of "The Tonight

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St'pl.

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Show «ilh

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NBC. The

he annoiineed his

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on CIVS.

With David

I

Diivid

hi'

s«ilih

l.c'ltiTiiuin"

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mov e

In

CBS t'or

a vear. taking

musi-

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NBC

tried to hloek the

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Letterman w on them on "Late Show,"

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human

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The mo\e neeurred uhen David Johiinv

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Mag 299


Clintom

Administration Tackles Issues One opponent

Health Care

somethinc

The Clinton Adniinistialiim

Else

placed First Lady Hillary

AlTOC ETHER

Rodham Clinton

the health care reform effort.

reduce costs so

at the

head of

The goal was

to

United States citizens could

all

afford medical treatment. pri\ ate

care into less expensive practices such as health-

maintenance organizations and reform would also limit the

income of doctors,

hospitals, insur-

and drug manufacturers.

ers

The

health care plan

costs for high-wage corporations, but costs

would increase

for small businesses that previ-

ously had not paid for health benefits.

Health Board to look after inflation and limit

for the Clintons. Investigators looked for in-

formation to show Clinton had used his influ-

Clinton offered deals such as a North Ameri-

ence as governor and directly interfered with

can Development Bank

protect the

in California.

He

also

Mexican government in efforts to sugar and citrus growers of the

United States.

There was concern about the extremely low cost of labor and the low

minimum wage

in

would be cheaper for employees to in Mexico and with no import tax, the companies' profit would be larger than if it was made in America. It

have their products made

make

could increase our markets abroad and us

more competitive

John Lucas

in the

open market,"

The Brady

designed

bill

in gun-related violence

if

it

all

panned

During President

to bridle the increase

was a controversial piece

of legislation.

The

bill

was named

after

James Brady,

The

bill

mandated

the

in the assassi-

nation attempt on President Ronald

1981.

Reagan

in

a five-working-day

waiting period for gun purchases to allow time to run background checks on prospective buyers.

The Brady

bill

met with opposition from the

National Rifle Association and citizens interested in maintaining their constitutional right to

bear arms. Meanwhile, gun-related \iolence was the .second-leading cause of death

and mjury

in

passed

in

the United States.

Despite opposition, the Brady

bill

November.

NAFTA The North American Free Trade Agreement, an agreement between the United States, Canada and Mexico helped destroy some barriers which had hampered trade between

NAFTA,

neighboring countries. President Bill Clinton fought to pass the controversial bill.

Hillary

Rodham

Clinton addresses Congress

about health care plans. Clinton headed health care reform.

The Associated Press photo.

300 Ads/Mini Mag

Bill

Clinton's campaign and

by numerous members of the

press.

discovered was a real-estate deal

Bill

White House press secretary shot

and loan which

danger of going bankrupt,

that

was

owned by James McDougal. While in Arkansas, Hillary Rodham Clinton belonged to the Rose

Law

Firm. She,

although unsuccessful, requested forpowerof attorney over Whitewater in 1988.

A

former

White House aid, Bruce Lindsey, argued that this request was not made to become involved

management of Whitewater. The Clinton's did not write off their

in the

losses

from Whitewater, which consisted of about in

investigator

was named by

the attorney

general to look into the scandal and the

Whitewater.

Brady

in

An

Whitewater following his election, his past was investigated

overall.

would be a pretty good plan Troy Powers said.

was

$69,000. They sold their Whitewater stock

said.

that the

would lead to more controls by government, students were 'It

state regulations to a savings

1992 for $1,000.

Although there was a major concern

out."

15-

Mexico.

as

controls on the medical system

it

incident involved a

that resulted in a considerable financial loss

to

increases of insurance premiums.

confident about

The Whitewater

lower income countries such

and companies

"It

Health care would be reviewed by a National

was Clinton's ad-

world the United States would lose jobs

told the

Mexico.

would cut health care

NAFTA

year-old real-estate and banking transaction

talked to the

The plan would push Americans from

of

versary in the 1992 elections, Ross Perot. Perot

What was known as

Clintons' involvement in to lose the

it.

The one that stood

most was Hillary, who had had a

direct link in the business dealings with

McDougal and who had signed

the papers.


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Sports

To Be Number One

Striving somethinc

1

Cup

the Citizen's

Super Bowl In

Super Bowl XXVIIl the

Cowboys squared

off

her

wanted

Bills

to

pearance, while the

wanted

in

1992,

Philadelphia Phillies four

World

the Phillies with better starting

German

Cowboys

Steffi 1

Graf could

ranking.

pitchers.

Open, Seles had not returned

to

the courts as of March.

Her Parche received two

attacker,

not stop Toronto though.

One man

Students did not understand

3.

the attack, but

was over, the

The Super Bowl

loss for the

said.

made them the only team in

any professional sport

had an idea

it

Valuable Player of the

"But

I

Carter belted a

to lose

home

game wm-

run off Phillie relief

pitcher Mitch Williams in

helped propel the World Series

would happen

championship north of the bor-

Press photo.

today, this thing

four consecutive champion-

ning

in the spotlight

figured the

were

athletes

series;

The Toronto Blue Jay.s celebrate a second World Series title after Joe Carter's ninth-inning home run. Before Carter's hit the Jay's were losing 6-5. The Associated

would happen sometime. "I was stunned," Eric Woods

defeated the Bills 30-

stood out for the

Blue Jays as the hero and Most

fense.

1

John Kruk, Dave Hollins

and Darren Daulton. This did

outfielder, Joe Carter.

years probation.

fense take over the Bill's of-

Bills

the Phillies

at

However. Jim Kelly

it

However,

boasted a line-up of big hitters like

Announcing that she would not compete in the Australian

helped the Cowboy's de-

When

first

Series since 1983, but

the Blue Jays had the edge over

regain her No.

threw two crucial interceptions

Cowboys

to two.

This was the Phillies'

He wanted to ensure

so

note for the Bills as they held a

that

in

Seles would be unable to play,

to see a repeat.

halftime.

match,

to

World Series and claimed their second straight world championship by defeating the the

the left shoulder with a nine-

inch knife.

The game started out on a high 13-10 lead over the

Toronto Blue Jays returned

games

the quarterfinal

Series

The American League

their

Bowl apCowboys,

who were champions

tennis tour-

at

Gunler Prache stabbed Seles

win

in

life.

In

second consecutive year.

fourth straight Super

1

Rothenbaum Tennis Club in Hamburg, Germany when an attempt was made on nament

against the Buffalo Bills for the

The

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In April, Monica Seles was playing

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From Court The \cur spiiriiiiL'

v\()uld sjo

\\ovk[

down

in iiilaniN lor llic

and the hero who

graceliill\

gold medalist and was \oled NB.A's Most Valuable Player in 'S8. '91 and '92.

shaped the sport he was elosely associated with.

Prior to entering the 1

One of the most devastating pieces of news

to Field

982

NBA. Jordan also won the

NCAA title w hile attending the Uni versit>

of North Carolina and was \i)ted the 19S4 Col-

since

Magic Johnson's departure from basketball. Chicago Bull's shooting guard.

legiate Basketball Player of the 'V'ear.

Michael Jordan, said good-bye to the game he

had taken him into a new realm and profession.

was known

.After millions of dollars

for.

Jordan. 31. curtailed his career after nine

years with the Chicago Bulls

in

which he

enjoyed a multi-million dollar salary and

fame as one of

the

most recognized sports

His abrupt retirement after his lather's left

many

fans devastated. Craig Grove,

an avid basketball fan. was saddened by the news.

was read> to made him famous and spend

constant press attention. Jordan lea\ e the sport that

more time with

his family.

who was murdered

Jordan,

in '93.

had said

his

become a great baseball player. Jordan, w ho had not played organized base-

something new."

Sarasota. Fla.

I

major

son. could

ball since his

'"

to pla\

league baseball as a kid and his father. James

w as glad and disappointed that he left the thought it was a good said. idea for him anyway because he needed to try "I

NBA." Grove

worth of product

endorsements such as Nike's Air Jordans and

Jordan said he always wanted

figures in history.

death

Jordan's retirement from the basketball court

high school years, signed a minor

league contract to play for the Chicago White

Sox.

He

attended spring training on Feb.

Amidst speculation. Jordan's nine-\ear in the NBA was one of the most unique

B\'

l.'i

in

Ken rick Scalv

season

feats in sports.

During his career, he won three NBA championships. "91. "92 and '93; he was the

ability.

top scorer from "87 to '92; two-time

fans.

Olympic

Michael .lordan awes the crowd with his dunking; His retirement shocked nian\ basketball

The Associated Press photo.

Educating Northwest about acquaintance rape, sexual harassment, communication

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and assertiveness.

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Educating Northwest and surrounding communities on gay and lesbian 562-1241

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Trials

The Verdict Menendez Brothers

Bobbitt Trial c\cn

"(icitint;

when

moanini;

"

took on neu

l.orcna Bobbitt

with a nine-inch ivitchen

i^nilc

after a night o\ lurced sex

June

her nieniory until she

lost

her car and

began screaming

in

saw the penis

her hand. She

Ihrev\

it

in

out the winding

was found

later

.

w here

near the road

it

in a

and L\

.\fter a

week-long

trial.

John

uas acquitted of abuse charges, l.orena's trial, m January, was based on malicious wounding charges. She received 45 days

went on

trial

which occurred Aug. the

for the

20.

\9m.

at

.Menende/ mansion.

mated S14 million. After being accused, they confessed saying their actions were

m

and molested as children.

The and

iii

Januar\ with

paternity suit against

Reginald

"brief relationship"

with John. Williams

hung

Denny

Ihe case was hauntingly famil-

A

lessly

man. bloodied,

demanded

lies

help-

on the ground. Reginald

who was

at

namian .Monroe

Williains. 20.

and Henry Keith Watson. 29. v\ere attempted murder and aggravated

l..,'\.

Riots

was

7 percent of his earnings.

dratmed out

ol his truck

Else

AlTOC ETHER

Waco Compound

When

the trial ended.

W illiams

was acquitted of all but one charge, simple mayhem. Watson was con\icied on a misdemeanor assault charge. He was released from jail months since the time of his arrest. Superior Court Judge John the

and beaten

Apocalypse. Doomsday or the

ma>hcm.

maximum

of eight years

to

for other charges.

This

left

Wil-

liams with a 10-year prison sen-

just

end of the world, ran through

minds when the David Koresh story began. Since then.

members were

1

1

cult

acquitted of nuir-

der.

On

Feb. 26. almost a year after

the raid by the

Bureau of Alcohol.

Tobacco and Firearms on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco. Texas, jurors convicted five of the cult members of voluntary I

in

prison and an additional two years

I

manslaughter, which carries a penof up to 10 years

alty

for

in prison,

weapon charges and

two

four of

all

charges.

tence and a $ .000 fine. 1

Watson was

driver,

an intersection in Los

Angeles during the

somethinc

photographer frt)m a he-

Ouderkirk sentenced Williams

Denny, a Caucasian truck result of a

a

jury.

January. Beatrice Williams a

ciuictl

s

because he had already served 17

began October 1993

trial

new

licopter.

their parents for an esti-

in

John. She said her son was the

b\ a

charged with 12 counts, including

brothers went on spending

had killed

iar.

1

mur-

binges and bragged to friends the\

mental institution based on an

filed

two .Afncan-.American men.

\i\

der ot their parents Kitty and Jose

evaluation. In

le.

i-.rik

defense, because they were abused

field.

a

The .Menende/ brothers,

The

23.

She

In

Video footage of the event was shot

herhusbancl. John's penis

I.U1 oil

Is

til

put on probation un-

January 1997. He also had to pay

a fine and serve

320 hours of com-

No

sentencing date had been

The

which

trial,

weeks, was moved from

San Antonio because of

muniiv service.

set.

lasted seven

Waco

to

pre-trial

publicity.

World Trade Center On

trial

were

bombing:

five

men

respon-

World Trade Center

sible for the

Mahmud

Ahmad M.

Ajaj.

Salameh. Sheik

Rahman and

Abouhalima.

Mohammad

Omar Abdcl-

Nidal A. Ayyad.

The defendants were accused of murdering Zionist Rabbi Meir Kahane. conspiring to kill Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak and

D'Amato and bomb two vital high-

U.S. Sen. Alfonse

scheming

way

J

to

tunnels and other

New York

City landmarks.

This was one of two trials in which 22 Islamic fundamentalists

were

tried for terrorism.

All five

men were found guilty of

conspiracy assault and sentenced to life in prison

Sheik

without parole.

Omar .\bdel-Rahman was

charged on .Aug. 25 for master mindins the plot lo blow-up the World

Trade Center

in

New

^'ork City.

.Af-

denying his involvement with the bombing, he surrendered in a standoff outside a Brooklyn Mosque. Ihe ter

Associated Press photo.

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Debating Issues somethinc

Women's Health

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11

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cspoiiNC

women's

Clinics

lo

\

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at

health clinics nalmn-

wide. legislators worked to pro-

Kachcllc Shannon was ac-

cused of shooting a doctor out-

duce the Freedom of Access Hntrances Act. The

Clinic

to

bill

debate.

Opponents of

the bill ar-

gued

would punish

tht).se

it

expressed opposition to abortion.

Proponents of the

said

bill

leni,

.Shannon, an anti-abortion ac-

force or intimidation against pa-

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li\isl.

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clinic

earlier

Griffin, clinic

women's

health

look place

m

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when Michael

fatally

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Dr.

David Gunn.

One

went too "I

sh(K)ting

Pensacola.

tients.

student said the

woman

far.

agreed they should have been

there to educate people."

Port/ said. "But

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Maria

to inhibit free

final signature

Clinton

from

liid

Altocether

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conducted an Mass just

outdt)or

outside Denv cr

formally concluded World

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the

crews were overwhelmed during

ihc

and following the outdoor Mass as

I'ivsrIciU Hill

14.000 people soughl Irvaimeni

For Catholics, the Pope's once syringe scare that engulfed Ameri-

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More

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\\

ith stories

in

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by Pepsi as many people

tion stood

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Kris Schechinger said.

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lo

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I

The Food and Drug Administra-

in a lifetime

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the United Stales

Pepsi-Cola was the target of a

no throueh

in

the hot. dustN conditions.

Pepsi Scandal it

Else

of international youth. Medical

February.

in

his

Denver.

visit to

should not haxe

far."

a bill,

speech protected un-

The bill was passed through House and Senate and recencd

Before the piece of legislation

became

io-

\

intimidating conduct and not

made it a federal crime to damage a women's health clinic or lo use

health chnic.

was

it

carefully cralted to discourage

women's

side ot'a Wichita. Kan.

who

During

il

their lues.

by talking with them

tell

how wonderful

it

was

to just get a

glimpse of him. For Catholics

was a very big

il

deal."

case of product tampering. Pepsi

refused to pull

its

product from

stores, standing

by

il

newspapers and on result,

the

with ads

television.

No.

2

As

At the Citadel Military Ciillege

a

drink

soft

Shannon Faulkner

in

in

South Carolina, a female made

company's sales declined only

history b> attending classes at an

slightly.

all-male military college for the

opened

Officials from Pepsi

bottling plants to the

their

time on Nov. 17. Shannon Faulkner.

first

FDA. The

18.

was

al-

FDA discovered no evidence of na-

lowed

tionwide tampering.

tute after a federal appeals court

C)ne

woman was caught

on video

tape inserting a syringe into a Pepsi can.

made over 20

volved

in false

making of

ordered an injunction to the college.

The commotion

The Federal Bureau of ln\ esti-

gation

arrests

in-

tampering claims,

one of the biggest frauds

it

its kintl in

to attend classes at the insti-

Faulkner

when

form. Based on Ihe assLimpiion she

was

a male.

Faulkner was accepted

into the college.

history.

started

out an a|i|ilicaiion

filled

Upon

the notice of

her sex. her application was

The Pope

re-

voked.

Faulkner sued the academy to be

Pope John Paul

denounced

II

the

"culture of death" in his four-day visit to the

United States

allowed

and euthanasia.

address

at

In a

She was granted the

August.

in

court.

The Pope spoke out against abortion

to enroll.

permission of admission by

farewell

Stapleton International

Airport that wa.s attended by Vice

The

was a landmark case was the first time a fe-

ruling

because

it

male was allowed

to attend the all-

male academy.

President Al Gore, the Pope rein-

forced the value of

Pope ,|ohn

life.

['aul II visits thi'

I

nited States

out against abortion and euthanasia.

on a four-day

The Associated

trip.

The Pope spoke

F'ress photo.

Ads/Mini

Mac 307


Alpha Sigma Alpha congratulates our '94 graduates... Lisa

Woods


Train

Wreck Wreaks Havoc An Amtrak Ironi into a

I

,<)s

train traMlinj;

Angeles to Miami

havou

in

Saraland. Ala.,

after a barjie stnick

ened the

hridfje.

wreck, 10 bile,

Ala.,

Amtrak's

niik's

and weak-

The Sept. 22 north of

Mo-

was the worst

in

23-yt'ar hLstor>. kill-

Some

ing 47 people.

were

lill

trap|X'<l in

\ictinLS

a submergwl

passenger car. while others

were

in

a burned engine. In the

dark. 159 sur\ivors clung to

wreckage from a collapsc<l |)ortion of the bridge in the alliga-

tor-infested

swamp. Others

helped rescue passengers. Four of the eight passenger cars w cnt ofl'

the bridge.

Press photo.

10TH &

research seeds,inc Congratulations to the students and graduates of

Northwest Missouri State University

Lafayette

The

Associate<l


State

Show-Me

^3

down

Abductions

Something

State Gains Attention a line of fraternity brothers

with their

Else

The kidnapping of two girls St. Louis shocked many. Angie Housman, 9, disappeared on Nov. 8. Her beaten body was found by a hunter in a wooded area Nov. 27. After

AlTOC ETHER

in

1

Cassidy Senter,

10,

disappeared on Dec.

1,

who

hit

him

The county coroner reported Davis died because of a blow to the head. One student said it gave a bad image to fraternities and sororities. "One bad apple spoiled the whole lot." Brian Weaver of Delta Chi said.

where the

areas

killer

Bill

with

der.

pleaded guilty June 3

to

World

Bill

denied he abused government funds

ond Injury Fund.

Senter's mur-

At 39, he was the only

man

Series

games he played

in.

Webster

charges of public corruption. Webster later

armed criminal action

in

hits.

conspiracy on two

degree murder, kidnapping, attempted

first

rape and

Webster

Missouri Attorney General

concealed his crime

would be found with no evidence. On Feb. 3, Thomas Brooks Jr. was charged

1

3,000

accumulated a .373 batting average

beaten body was discovered in a city alley eight

days after her disappearance. Both bodies were left in

Sept. 29 Kansas City Royal George Brett said goodbye at Kauffman Stadium, when he announced his retirement. Brett was the 8th player in history with over

With

Brooks confessed that he killed Senter when

the start of his

trial

in

in the

late

Sec-

August,

she resisted rape. Police did not believe Brooks

William Roussin, the lawyer appointed

was responsible for the murder of Housman. As of March, her murder remained unsi>lved.

fend the Fund testified against Webster. He said

Webster instructed him ments

to

lawyers

who

to give

to de-

larger settle-

contributed to Webster's

campaign and a "hard time" to those who did not. On Sept. 22, Webster was sentenced to the

Hazing At Southeast Missouri State University,

in

maximum

two-year prison term.

Cape Girardeau, a 25-year-old pledge of the

Kappa Alpha charged

Davis of

1

1

Psi fraternity

men

St.

in the

was

killed. Police

beating death of Micheal

Louis.

Davis endured an

George Brett takes

where he ran

iiis

2Lst season witii the

Carter's Clinic

his turn at bat. Brett retired

Kansas City Royals. Photo courtesy Kansas City Royals.

after initiation rite

Pliarmacy

Congratulations to ttie Students and Graduates of Norttiwest l\/lissouri State University.

Rick Carter, R.Ph. 114

E.

South Hills Drive., Maryville, Telephone: 562-2763

MO

United Telephone -Midwest A Spnni ionipany

Prescription Service For Your Health Care

%i

Needs

ACME FOOD 8e VENDING INC. 803

S.

8TH STREET

Congratulations

MO

Norttiwest Graduates

ST. JOSEPH,

"A Complete Food

64501

& Vending Service"

CONGRATULATIONS TO THE CLASS OF

1994

LACLEDE CHAIN MANUFACTURING CO.

ED POIRIER BRANCH OPERATIONS MANAGER

310 Ads/Mini Mag

to

win

batting titles in three different decades. Brett

her

so the bodies

George Brett

fists.

233-5848

11

in all

13


Local

Community

Additions Revive

With the improvements being made to Highway 36 plans w ere also made for improvements

Highway 136

1

The section ol lliyhwav 136 from Maryville to Ravenwood uould underiio re-

on Highwas 71. which included making Highway 71 south four lanes to Savannah.

pairs in the spring.

Renovations

pen over a

summer

1

to

asphah o\erla\ \souki he

placed on the highvs a\

Missouri Highvvas

and Transportalmn

Department District Engineer Garry Chegwidden

said the plan to

than 100 miles of District

improve more

Highway 136

that v\as

would not be jeopardized,

I

that, repairs to

New

m

.â&#x20AC;˘\tter

improve the 102 River bridge

Businesses

booming metropolis, but to new businesses, was more than a small town. There were three new businesses that started in 1994 including Gourmet PleaMaryville may not have been

sures,

1

.5

somethinc

car-

ried bath crystals, gift wrap,

Else

Altocether

rental store,

opened

in

way between Maryville and Ravenwood. was to the state's attention

by people w ho

ed near the highway and citizens from both

The

hopes

ot an espresso

future for this

growing store held

and cappucino

bar,

This was something Maryville needed." Leslie .Xckman said. "We were a growing community and people enjoyed a selection of gourmet coffee."

January

music selection down the road.

The need for repairs on the stretch of high-

a

ings.

Ow ners Jason Brown and John

schedule.

{o

adding video games and a large

Leverton's opened Maryville

in

in

October. The

shop offered complete automotive repair. (iourmet Pleasures opened

towns.

On

Thev also

Peak Fntertainment and I.evcrton's.

Campbell looked forward

li\

ditferent teas.

2.5 dif-

and

Peak Hntertaiiiment,amovie

and the uulening of the highway from Maryville, to the bridge was ne\t on the

brought

December featureing

greeting cards and wall hang-

Highuas 136 v\ould hap-

5-year span, hut b\ the end ot the

a l-ineh

in

ferent types of coffee

one 24-hour survey. 4,664 \ehicles

passed a checkpoint between the 102 River bridge and

Mount Alsemo. Included

survey were 142 pickups pulling straight trucks

and 76

in this

trailers,

176

Peak Kntertainnient opened on .Ian. 1.

The store speiiali/ed

video rentals. Photo hv

in

Keith

l.od/.inski.

tractor-trailer ries.

^EUEREAD^ Eveready Battery Company, MARYVILLE,

Inc.

IS

served.

MO

Over the years McDonalds has helped Americas students through scholarships jobs and fund drives And were happy to say our

commitments growing, one student at a time

An Equal Opportunity Employer

Ads/Mini Mag 311


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"Celebrating 96 Years of Excellence"

SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA Congratulations To

Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority

Our Graduating

Seniors!

We II Miss

You!

Michelle Bennington

Beth Heimann

Linda Boehm

Lissa

Becky DeYoung

Kymm Herron

Cassie Peel

Monica Dudley

Tina Jacobus

Rachel Peterson

Dawn Emmons

Amy Janeczko

Paula Redd

Leilani Greenfield

Jill

Kim

Heidi Lowe

Grillo

Leslie

Hagan

Hernandez

Kroenke

Jamie Lowrance

celebrating

nearly a century of success at Northwest. Sigma

Sigma Sigma has been named "Outstanding

Jackie Miller Jennifer Noller

Michelle Remick

Greek Organization"

five

out of the last

six years

and was presented with the 1993 National Scholarship Award.

Sigma Sigma Sigma has

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is

a


WoRLb

Lands

Crisis Strikes Foreign Under

Somalia tTwcnt>-ri)Ui I'akistam's were June battle during the

killed in a

month Somalian war. The

|four

[United States tailed to topple

mcnt o! a central go\ ernmcnt composed of three Muslims, three

civil

of Jericho and the Gaza Strip. The

Croats and three Serbs: the creation

fire

new Arab

of 10 partially autonomous prov-

Mu

lorm

Mohammed

and his

many

casualites

were twenty-six Americans and 83 United Nation peacemakers.

The deaths of 8 Americans 1

a

in

clash in earl\ October coupled

with public outcry

at

home,

led

the

Clinton Administration to

pull

back trom aggressi\e United

end

would also be free to own governments and tax

their

the majorits ol Israelites

number of the Arabs were support of the deal, manv people on

both sides were critical of

what

fearful of

it.

Jew

ish

occupied states were

settlers in the

a

mean

them.

to

Others

in Israel

made

easier for Palestinians to

worried that the deal

work

toward control of larger parts of

Is-

March.

John Holcombe had

Manv people his per-

spective about the L'nited States led in\asion into Somalia.

did not like

"I

much

it

at lirst.

we

just

and

let

things happen and not

could not

anything about

around

sit

protect his

PLO

but

w

ith iiHines

was

a plos

power base because problems and many

it

stay

its

long history of integration.

Muslim Bosnia parliament. The war continued with ultima-

the

tums given

to the fighting republi-

They first called place their heavy weapons

cans.

for troops to

-

1

Else

AlTOC ETHER

t

and the Croat Ibices, part of a UN pledge to expand the Sarajevo truce.

The truce look effect when Croatian President Franjo Tudjman accepted a United States plan for joint Muslim-Croat state.

Bosnia's Serbs would also be free to

annex

their land to Serbia.

suffer

NATO

air strikes.

In

March, the

U.S. soldier

in

a

Civil

War

began

when Serbs rebelled over a vote bv the Re-

public Muslims

republics

declared independence trom the fed-

slavian rebels.

in

eral

government.

when

In return, the

Yugo-

ther the president or the parlia-

slavian

government dispersed troops

The

.Associated

Press photo.

control. to pre\ent secessions.

Yeltsin dismissed the legislature

and

and Croats to secede from \'ugo-

Thecontlict started

ment had

jected bv both the Serb voters

i

Kosnian town.

Muslim. 33 percent Orthodox Serbs

power. During which the balance of power was unsettled and nei-

re-

tured yuns

Bosnia

stroyed to

The

was

plan

1

stands over cap-

out with the

Russian parliament

Vance-Owen peace

A

and 18 percent Catholic Croats, deYeltsin battled

governments; and the return of

m ed gove rn me n s

radi-

The uphea\al began in Bosnia. where the population. 45 percent

September. President Boris

the provin-

forcibly transferred property.

the

do

Russia

in

somethinc

between the

vears

in recent

cal Islamic luiulamenialists.

said.

In

it

\assir Arafat to

had weakened

Holcombe

it."

insisted

PLO Chairman

by

groups

war was

under a cease-

under guard or

rael.

States polic) in

cial

new Palestinian

gin eminent would

it

inces with proportional representation of ethnic

a large

.ind in

the

to

states

.Mthough

Farah .Xidui

political rivals.

Among

the treatv. Israel

systems

|Somalia"s notorious warlord

Gen.

was

occupation of the West Bank town

its

on Sept. 21 and

members,

communists against Yeltsin's idea of a free market economy, enclosed themselves

in the par-

iament building. Their goal was to take control

from Yeltsin.

ordered troops to

move

v\

ho

tought not only the Croatians. but also Bosnian

government

troops.

The Muslims began an

alliance

with the Croats and this alliance fought against the Serbs. That

ance in

Rebel Serbs,

aided by the federal government.

fell in

and

the spring of 1993,

the Croats in

push out the rebels.

alli-

when

Western and Central

Bosnia began fighting Muslims for

own territory. On May 1ft. a provisional

their

Israel The treaty

Israeli-Palestinian

was signed by

Israeli

was

peace

put forward by United Na-

Peace

plan

Prime

tions mediator

Cyrus Vance and Eu-

Yasser Arafat, leader of the Pal-

Community mediator Lord Owen. The plan called for a UN-

estine Liberation Organization in

monitored cease-fire; the establish-

Minister Yit/hak Rabin and

ropean

September, ending the war. which began in 1948. They were fighting over the right of Israel to exist to

and the

right of Palestinians

form theirow n Arab nations on

the Israeli occupied

and Gaza

Strip.

West Bank

In

an attempt to move towards democ-

racy Russian President Boris ^ eltsin

dlsassemhled his parliament.

and troops were used defiant law

I'anks

to flush out the

makers. The .Associated

Press photo.

Ads/Mini

Mag 313


ft

>/

t~^-^-ÂŤ

tf/i

I

Lamkin shapes up amkin Gymnasium was out of shape. outdated, and poorly equipped. Lamkin

And

that's exactly

what

it

It

was overcrowded,

Gym needed a workout.

got.

Renovation of the 33-year-old building began last

March, with newly-refurbished Bearcat Arena coming on

ber, followed in

in

earnest

line in

Novem-

January by the opening of the Northwest Student Recreation

Center.

The south addition to the Lamkin is

scheduled to open

in

and concession areas

the for

Activity Center,

summer of 1994.

It

will

as

it

is

now

include offices, the lobby

Bearcat Arena, and an expanded Fitness Center.

The year-long construction may have been an inconvenience

campus and the community,

but

it's

been worth

it.

As they say

in

for the

the fitness

business - no pain, no gain!

NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE UNIVERSITY

314 Ads/Mini Mag

called,


AWA nos

Nominees Receive Gratitude .Sony of the ^ ear: lull Kice and Alan .Menken.

Oscar Nominees Best Actor: Dunicl Day-Lew

is.

"In ihc

W Name

the

Rock

.Song:

Do With

to

It;"

Thompson.

"In the

Name

of the Father;"

and Debra Winger. "Shadowlands"

Name

Best Movie: "In the

Else

Altocether

Emmy's

Comedy:

Comedy: "Seinleld" Best Drama: "Picket Fences" Best .Actor. Comedy: Ted Danson. "Cheers" Best Actress, Comedy: Roseanne Arnold,

"Roseanne Best Supporting Actor, Drama: Chad l.ov\e. "Life Goes On" Best Supporting Actress, Drama: Mary Alice. "Ill

"Roseanne"

IK Aua\"

Best

Stockard Channing, "Six Degrees ol Separation;

Emma

Baker. "Picket Fences"

MkIi.icI Rich. nils. "Seinfeld"

Bcsl Supporting Actress.

Best .Actress: Holly Hunter. "The Piano;" .Angela

"What's Lo\c Got

somethinc

Fences"

Drama: Kathy

Best Actress,

Best Supporting .Actor,

and Anthony Hopkins. "The Remains of

Day"

Bassett.

"

Do

Laurenee Fishburne, "What's Love Got to It;"

Best

Drama:

Best Actor,

Skerritt. "Picket

Album: U2. "Zooropa Soul Ass him. "Runaway Train"

Best Alternative Music

Neeson, "Schindler's List;"

the lather;" Liani

With

of

".A

New World"

hole

Comedy:

Laurie MetcaH.

of the Father."

"Sehindler's List." "The Fugitive." "The Piano"

and "The Remains of the Day" Best Director: Steven Spielberg. "Sehindler's List;" Jane Campion. "The Piano;" James Ivory. "The Remainsof the Day;" Robert Allnian. "Short Cuts;" and Jnn Sheridan. "In the Name of the

Father"

Grammy's Record of the \'ear: Always Love You"

Album

\\

hitney

of the ^'ear: Whitney

Bod\L'u,ii\l-()ri!:inal

W

Houston."!

ill

Houston, " Ihe

Soundtraek Alhuni"

"Seinfeld" recei\es an

Kmmy for Best Comedy

Michael Richards, Kramer, recei>ed Best Supportin^t Actor. I'he Associated Press photo.

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and College Yearbooks


LYMPKS

Reaching For The Gold year-old .Michelle

Kerrigan Attack

Days After years ot endless practice and dedication Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding's dream ot competing in the XVII Winter Olympics competition almost came to an icy halt.

plete.

Kwan.

allowed

finished 2nd.

after national ciimpetition

Harding's bodyguard.

was com-

Shawn

Hckardt.

confessed to police officials to a conspiracN against Kerrigan. Eckardt named Harding's onagain off-again ex-husband. Jeff Gillooly. as the

Jan.

(i.

United States the ice an

as

Kerrigan, the defending

uomens

unknown

champion, got otTof

assailant took

ing blow to Kerrigan's knee.

I

one

strik-

he 24-year-okl

Hckardt. Gillooly. Shane Stant and Derrick

Smith were arrested for the conspiracy. Stant w as charged w ith the assault on Kemgan.

W

Kerrigan was torced to withdraw from the

nh herex-husband and bod\ guard arrested, there were implications Harding was involved.

national competition.

Harding met with investigators for more than

W 1

iih laiiiiK

l.iiding

w

111

and

tricnds. Kerrigan

her second national

watched

lille

and

I

.^-

Imurs but no charges were

Else

Olympic team. After the technical program

Kerrigan was

1st

in

while Harding was

filed

six

and she was

Altocether

place,

in lOth.

After a delay in Harding's long program, her

shoe string broke after her

conspiracy tlnancer.

On

somethinc

remain on the

to

first

jump. The referee

rearranged the order, allowing Harding to

and begin her program

restring her skate after

which she moved

later.

to 8th place.

The only flaw in Kerrigan's program was a jump that was supposed to be a triple, she doubled. Oksana Baiul, of the Ukraine skated as v\ell

with only one flaw and threw

in

an extra

end of her program. Baiul won the

triple at the

long program edging out Kerrigan to take the gold.

On March

saga continued

the

4.

when

Harding was assaulted by an unknown white male. During the attack. Harding received scratches to the face and a sprained wrist. Authorities suspected the assault

was planned.

Olympic Honors The

I

W4 LUiited States Winter Olympic team

games with the best o\erall medal count of 1.^. which was not the only historic finished the

e\enl of the games.

Tommy Moe

was the lirsi .Anicrican to siiike gold winning the men's dow nhill. le also won a silver medal in the Super G w ith a lime of .^2.61 The ski team's success continued as Diann 1

Roffe-Steinrotter had no competition after she

raced

down

the

Super G. The they

won

winning the gold

hill,

ski

in

the

team's success continued as

their fourth

medal w hen Picabo Street

women's downhill. won Lillehammer. Norway winild always be remembered as the site of speed skater Dan the siher

in the

Jansen's final attempt ing the gold

m

at

Ohmpic

woniwomoregold. mihc.'^OOand ing the

first

win the

Bonnie Blair

U.S.

woman to win

fi\

I

e

Nancy Kerrigan recovered trom to

glory captur-

the .^OO-iiietcr race.

,()()()

becom-

gold medals. a

knee injury

silver in figure skating.

Other medals included: Li/ Mclntyre. moguls, silver; short track speed skating;

5.000 relay Randy

Bart/..

and Andy Gabel.

Amy

Peterson.

men's

John Coyle, Eric Flaim

women .'^.000 relay Cathy Turner. Nikki

silver;

Ziegelmeyer and Karen Cashman. bronze; and Turner, short track speed skating ."^OO. gold.

Kiyurf skater Nancy Kerrigan performs btfore the ,Ian. 6 attack that forced her out of National

competition. Kerrigan went on to win an Olympic silver medal. The Associated Press photo.

Ads/Mini

Mag 317


Pop

Star Faces Allegations

The world's biggest pop music

"Dangerous" World Tour, which

starMichaeiJackson found himself

he cancelled because of addiction

under a sea of allegations

Octo-

in

to pain killers.

Adding

ber.

The 35-year-old music

drama, pictures

to the

were taken of the pop

was

star

star" s genitals

and evidence pur-

investigated for sexual molestation

for identification

made by a 3-year-old boy. The Los Angeles Police Department made the allegations public in

poses after the boy described discoloration.

early

to support him.

charges

1

fall.

The

boy,

who was at the center of

the charges, son.

He was

was

.several

throughout the allegations.

Monaco

Jackson settled a court with the

spending sprees with

Jackson. After which, the child

settlement

claimed Jackson made sexual ad-

$20

vances on several occasions.

tions

Jackson camp and friends was one

1

was reported

Newton believed were

had a history

said he did,"

Emmanuel Lewis and film star Macauley Culkin had been seen

bodyguards pressed

with Jackson on occasion.

him and

after his

According

to

said.

"People

money."

were just

When the allegations were made,

the allega-

he did what they

Newton

of having child friends. Television star

The

be over

to

star.

"I didn't think

star

out of

part of an extortion plot

against the pop

of dismay.

civil suit

3-year-old boy.

million.

Jay

Reaction from members of the

The pop music

friend

support as she stood by Jackson

a friend of Jack-

in

Long time

Elizabeth Taylor provided the most

treated to a trip to the

World Music Awards and

Many came to the side of Jackson

Time. Jackson's suits against

a criminal case awaited the

cancellation of his tour.

Jackson was on the Asian leu of his

By Galen Hanrahan

Entertainer Michael Jackson performs at his concert in the former

was investigated for the sexual molestation of a The Associated Press photo.

Soviet Union. Jackson

13-year-old boy.

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!

Justice

In the Political Spotlight Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Bob Packwood Entries found

Packwood's diaries President Bill Clinion's

nominee

first

Imketl

Supreme Court

tor

tions.

justice.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

was confirmed b\ According

l()7th

to the

Associated

Supreme Court

justice,

Ginsburg joined Sandra Das

O'Conner. ajustice since 9S 1

wdman

as the second

I

lawyer for the American Ci\ Liberties

il

Union Women's

Rights Project. During that time Ginsburg. a 6()-year-old

vMimen's rights pioneer, won

many landmark Supreme Court cases,

a lobby-

ajob to his wife, who

right to privacy.

Re\ealing the diaries back-

and gave

rise to

an over-

whclming Senate vote poena the w ritings.

to sub-

What Senate found

led to

Else

Washington. D.C.. Reno was

expected to deal with. Reno

the slate attorne\

Counts.

Reno was Clinion's

Bill

not first

general,

Washington.

in

was

D.C.. belised she

the best

choice. Reno's position dealt vs

ith es

erylhing from immigra-

and narcotics

tion

One of the Reno had

Packwood's efforts to contest charges by 10 women of

eral.

ith

her

uninvited sexual advances S

Dade

for

I'la.

President

w

I

the

tirst

Rciio

to crime.

biggest problems

to face

Waco

was dealing

incident during

year as attorney gen-

was

brouiihi

intu the

new accus-

le-

ers.

gal

argument

tion

that the Constitu-

usually requires equal

treatment of men and

women, a

Packwood w ho dragged

the

Senate into a lurid debate over the intamous

Packwood

radical concept at the time. ries, lost the crucial

\

dia-

ote 94-6.

Ruth (iinsburg S u p r I' m u (iinshurji

womun

Art Supplies

li

Beauty Aids

^-"^"^

Snacks

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

'

'G'^I

**

Datebooks

&

Calendars

j:iv ^i^

is

sworn

Court was

to scrvt

J

tlu'

in as u

u s

t

i

cv

steond

on the Court.

The Associated Press photo.

And you thought we only had books! Health &^

somethinc Altocether

e\ idence of sexual harassment.

at least

able to

the attorney general svould be

be appointed attor-

many people

.Amendment

was

control and handle situations

to

choice for attorncs

Fourth

his

office because she

to

woman

.Although to

Inst

the

ney general. Before going

which waived

spaw ned

Ginsburg developed the

these diaries

Reno was

-laiK't

use the diaries for his defense.

fired

Ginsburg was a

in

was divorcing him. It was Packwood's idea

be ap-

to

to offer

pointed to the court. In the I97()s.

Included

the Senate

Ginsburg became the

potentiall)

to criminal \iola-

were questions asking ist

Press.

him

Boh

Sen.

in

Janet Reno

svas

under

first

woman

as she

fire

for being the

attorney general

faced controversial problems of todas


IN

Final Respects Claude Akins. u commcrcuil spokesman who also played the title "Loho" Jeff Aim, 25, Houston Oilers character

in

roolball

player

who

coniniitted

nation on President

Reggie Lewis. 27. Boston

series with V\'illiam Powell

.^

1

,

56.

Il.ill

of

lame

Dodgers

Academy award-

pitcher tor the Los Angeles

w innnig actor

tor

"Cocoon"

Pahio Kscahar, drug-ring leader Frederico Fellini, 73, Oscar nomi-

Blxby. 59, played

more

in

including the ible

title

hero

"Incred-

in

nated

film director of

Italian

.Strada"

and

"La

"8 1/2"

Loy. 88. mo\

U)3()s,

Nora

Maier. skier

I'lrike

who committed

childstarol

and Julio

Burr.

7(i,

played

title

iiierv

William (loldiny.

somethinc Else

wrote

nalist

Altogether

"And

the

Played

On

Dinah

.Shore. 77. talk --hou host

Band "

Tom Sullivan. 45.

Kansas Democratic

candidate lor attorney general 64.

Telly Savalas. 55, star of "Kojak"

Conwav

Twittv. 59. award-winnini;

(ieorge Mickelson. 52. former gover-

Clockwork Orange"

m

ski run

lhe"Our(iang"mo\ iesand

.\nita Morris.

Kuymond

broke her

George ".Spanky" .VIcFariand.

Julio (>allo. 83. co-founder of Rrnest

characters

who

film

"

World Cup standing

Garry Moore. w

Man

neck while completing a routine

suicide

President Bill Clinton

Ciallo

of the late

ie star

"Thin

in the

Brooks, "Dukes ot ll,i//,ard"s" Boss Hogg Anthony Burgess, author ot' "A Sorrell

Shilts.

television series

N'incent Foster, lawyer and friend of

Hulk"

Myrna

for

Randy

42. author/jour-

Indians

"

85.

Bill

Celtics' cap-

tain

Don Amechc".

television scries than any olheractor

MEMORY

Joseph Cotton, villain in Hitchcock's "Shadow of a Doubt and "Gaslight" pitcher for Cleveland Tim Crews,

Don Drysdale.

suicide

Kennedy

LOVING

nor

ol

South Dakota 78. talk

show host

Toin nomin.ited

actress

of "Nine"

XI.

novelist

of

Pat Nixon. 8

1

.

w

ife

of former President

"

Mason" and

"Perry

"Lord

ol the

Ihes

Stewart (Granger. 80,

"Ironside"

of nio\

ies

Richard Nixon iy5()s film star

Steve Olin. 27. pitcher for Cleveland Indians

such as

Tip O'Neal, speaker

"King .Solomon's

iA the

Fred Gwynne.

River Phoenix. 23.

famous

66. actor

for role as

actor

U.K. Haider-

Oscar nominee for "Running on F.nipty"

man.

.lohn

67. former

lormer Northwest

ard Nixon's chief

h.isketball

of staff

ball co.ich

Helen Hayes.

')2.

lady

ol

first

American

horror

Fame

John Connally.

76, former gover-

nor of Texas; survived bullet from

Lee Harvey Oswald's 1963

and

ra-

Jr..

85.

Hearst

Rodham

James Jordan.

F'wing Kauffman. 76. Kansas City Royals ovMier

Virginia Kelly. 70. President

Bill

Clinton's mother

Brandon Lee. 28, Bruce Lee's son and

assassistar

of martial arts films

82.

Clinton

Ewing Kauffman

57. Michael Jordan's

country singer

"Fantasy

50. Tattoo from

Isl.uul"

Sam Wanamaker.

74. .Xmcrican

character actor

lather of Hillary

father

"Planes. Trains and Automobiles"

le

Hugh Rodham.

Dodger's baseball catcher

John Candy. 4}. star ot comedies, including "Uncle Buck" and

mo\

dio star

theater

Conway Twitty Herve Villechaize.

Randolph Hearst

Hall of

soft-

Vincent Price. 82.

Newspapers .

and

William editor of

1

Poulson. 67.

President Rich-

the

Koy Cunipanclla. 7

who debuted in Me" and

"Stand By

Fred

Munster

Raymond Kurr

house

Mines"

Northwest

Frank Zappa. cult

52.

reggae musician

famous

I97()s


Alpha

A ABC

2 3. 233, 1

Accounting Society

276

306

213

276

247, 268

Ackman, Leslie 3 Acme Food & Vending, Inc. 310 Adair, Aubury 276 Adams, Nicole 247, 28 Adams, Patty 263, 276 Adams, Steve 253,321 AdwelLJohn \9() 1

Adwell, Darrin

218, 276

Ag Ambassadors AgClub 213 Ag Council 214

2

Aidid,

Ajaj,

Ahmad

313

276

Mohammad

Al-maam,

Albertini, Virgil

Albright,

121,

Alexander,

39

Alger,

Tom

Alice,

Mary 315 Tracy

Arts, Minii

Amy

&

277

277 253, 277

Austin, Art

Allen, Cindi

235, 268

Allen, Emilie Allen, Lisa

14,

253

253, 277

Marcus 32 Allen, Raye Lynn 213,283 Allen, Scott 248, 249 Allen,

Allen, Treva

Auxier,

Rod

Benedict, Sara

Blunt, Shari

214, 224,277

114,

Beneke, Jeffrey

152,

1

261

277

Barker, Derrick

230, 238

Barr. Stacy

16

Barry,

247, 277

Banon,

Amy

.321

277

214,222,297 Babe, Laurie

155

WHAT

Batte,

Aaron

222

Bodi,

268 277

Ayman

233

Boechman, Melinda 238, 277 Boehm, Linda 235, 264, 268,

264. 268.

294

312

Berg, Kevin

218,247,268 264

263

277

264

Todd

1

277

Berthclsen, Andrea

213,277 277

145

Bolinger, Bill

Beta Sigma Phi

218

Bolles, Carla

Bettger, Jeffrey

26

Boltmghouse, Sue

Beuger, Kelly Bever,

JD

241

Bonella, Angela

260, 261,277

Bike Club

235, 250

228, 277

Bonnetl, Sharon

257,261,277,333

Amy

241,264,268

Booth, Kelly

264

Biga, Janine

277

Boney, Karissa 224, 230, 238, 254,

Bieghler, Dustin

233, 268

269, 273

277

Bibb, Chuck 3 Bickford,

269

Bonderer, Steve 204

277

Beymer. Steve

221

94, 95, 237

245, 269

Booth, Tracey

261

Bom, Edward

261

OF LORENA BOBBirS ACQUITTAL

DO YOU THINK

B ot pa rt e u c h

111

s

against it (the acquit-

somethinc Else

not think

did not

tliinii

did not think

Ryan Kodek

it it

was was

fair. I

c e

,,f^ punisluncnt.

c/iiatric cart'

"

right.

o

It

Id

s

tlw

42 days.

"

Amy

Stone

and raping tlie

She

fair.

v e

d

w

111

e

little

a

s

a ag-

sort of

gressive,

He for abusing

she should have called the

licr

and

mutilation.

Ektermanis

o

i

was

i t

iuive re-

tal). I

Altogether

li

did

â&#x20AC;˘â&#x20AC;˘/

li

i

322 Index

.

269

Boldt. Jennifer

214,277

Bertoldie,

198,202,203,

Bohrmann, Becky 22 242. 253. 277 Bolar. Roy 224. 277, 287 Boldt, Dandle 213

268

Amy

1

206. 207

233, 277

Berkley, Dacasha Bcrsdolt,

2

Bohnsack, Justean

190

Bergene, Renee

Pam 264

Bogent, Nate

Bergren, Jodi 241,261, 268

Angela 315 Bat, The 59

Tommie

Bode, Jonathan

Benson, Christine

Bergan, Mark

Bassett,

Bates,

Bobst, Kari

178,

Bentzinger, Andrea

261,268 Bartz. Randy 317 Bass, Ryan 277 Bass, Shannon 268

B

277 2

1

200 179,294

2, 20,

173,

277

Barton, Sheila

86

Bill

Bogguss, Suzy 31, 59, 61, 220, 221 Bohlken, Robert 85, 294

277

Barton, Carol

Deanna

Bennett. Nathan

Bobo,

Benson, Sonya

248, 277

Matthew

Bobby Bearcat

241

250

259

Banlett, Sue

Bennett.

Bobbitt, Lorena 305

Boehner,

Barratt. Christena

9

264

Benson, Dave 151, 176, 177, 236 Benson, John 263

257, 277

Barron. Brooke

Bennerolte, Kara Bennett, David

221

Bobbitt, John 305

294

312

275

Amy

268

Bennerotte, Gary

Bennington. Michelle

277

Ann

277

Bennett. Rebecca

Barclay, Karena

Bamett, Monica

Ayyad, Nidal 305 Azegami, Isao 268

Allied Laundry Equipment 315

Aim, Jeff Alpha Chi

91, 253

Bankson, John

Bamhart, Kirk 216. 228. 268

1

Avakian, Annette

213

Allison, Luther

190

Banks, Natalie

Barnes, Jennee

187

190,236,277 Bloom, Traci 277

257, 333

Blum, Ryan

Bametl, Jenni

Allen, Brandy

Blondin, Chris 174, 176, 177. 188,

Blue Key

Barmann.

5

242 27, 28, 268

Gina

213,259

257, 277

Bliss, Brian

261,268

157

188, 190

264

277

264 277

259, 268 Blessing, Stewart

Benedetti, Tina

Banson, John 152

268

Allen, Bonnie

Beltz,

264

Benda, Kathryn

Barker, Lee

218

156.

Auriemma, Dana

277

Bleich, Angela

Blessing, Henry 213. 226. 258.

277

Belknap. Julie

277

253, 277

Rebecca 277 Bank Of Craig 320

Barboza, Bobbie

259

213.214

268

Bellof. Brian

190

Blaue, Ryan

277

Debbie

Belik. Julie

226. 230

Barbosa, Marissa

277

176,

August. Jason

214

Union 2 Baragary. Beth 214 Barber. Shalom 2 14. 226. 247. 248, 277

228, 277

Atkins, William

Ann

Belik,

Baptist Student

216.217

Blanchet, Carie

Belcher, Janice

226, 277

191

Blakey. Louis

Behrens. Julie

221

277

Melody 162, 163 Blair. Mindy 257 Blakestad. Ryan 228. 268 Blair,

277

Behrens, Hollie

248

Blair, Jennifer 214, 221. 241, 254,

Behaboj. Mary

46

277

Bonnie 317

Blair,

213.277

Behounek. Matthew

268

Amie 213,214, 264

Beeler. Steven

Baker, Kathy 315

277

Auffert, Richard

Grain 299

162

Balsiger. 173,

Machinery Atkins, Al

257, 277

213.214.277

Audrea

230

Blackford. Nate

277

204, 277

Baldndge. Rachael

1

157. 277

230,261,268 Becker. Melissa 190.218,226 Beehe. Heidi 218,226,268 Beekman, Jennifer 20, 26, 228, Beeler.

277

Black. Jennifer 73. 277

Blackburn.

Shawn

263

Bixby.Bill 321

Becker. Brian

1

277

Prem

261,268

Ashley, Jim

1

Balasubramaniam,

277

Julie

AuBuchon, Christine

254

Alldredge Feed

Corben

218, 219

26

Baker, Larry

214

178,179 Armiger, Chris 242, 277 Armstrong, Shannon 169,176

Attig,

268

Bechtol.

Baklagc, Pamila

250. 277

Antholer. Doreen

276

11,276

Aley, Angle

277

Association of Computer

276

Bill

Andrews, Trent

Askren, Michael

135

Amy

Aldrich, James

Aljets,

268

22

Baker, Sheila

Ashley, Brenda

226

Akins, Michelle

Bailen, Beth

277

Artz.

Akins, Claude 321

Beaver. Tara

Anderson, Stacey

Art Education Club

213,214,233,276

Akey, Jodi

179

277, 333

Baker, Matt

Arnoux, Michelle

259

Beaumont, Dina

2 1 3, 259

Baier, Stacy

268

Arnold, Roseanne 315

Akalan, Gulsen

235

Anderson, Nicole

Arnold, Chris

305

Beardsley. Jodie

Baker, John

268

i

Birkestrand, Heidi

Bahrenburg, Greg

Baker, Jennifer

268

268

242

Bird, Lisa

Bin. Douglas

Baker, Jeff

1

100

Akatsuka, Sho

Anderson. Debbie

Anderson, Julie

Binek, Pamela 1

Bishop. Vaughan

Baker, Diane

Amos. Kirklin 268 Amtrak 309 Amys. P.J. 221. 241, 254. 263

277

190

277

Jill

Bearcat Marching Band 4, 32, 2(10

Oksana 317 Baker. Dennea 277

216

Bean, Jody

Bindner,

Bearcat Sweethearts

Baiul.

312

Arafat, Yasser 3

Mohammed

Aizley, Carrie

218

216. 268

International

Bilslend, Christopher

Bader Ginsburg, Ruth 319 Bagby, Brett 259

Bailey. Patrick

AMOCO

259

3,

Bearcat Cheerleading Squad 20

II

224

Appleman.

214, 232

10,

Bailey, Gabriel

31)1

1

Bearcat Bookstore 3

Bailer,

216 Ameche, Don 32 American Linen Supply

Ardizzone, Mark

Agronomy Club

235, 236

277

Backes, Jenny

2

223

Beal Park

Altman, Robert 315

Antes, Debbie

224

Amy

Aebersold,

56

Batterson, Jason

Anne 257 Bacchi, Tamara Baca,

AMA

Amnesty

236

Achille, Jean-Francois

Ackerman, Kara

16, 20, 24. 28,

294

Security, Inc.

Amy

,

Alsup, Richard 174, 188, 190,209,

Abouhalinia, Mahniud 305

Achersold,

Bade, Geraldinc

268

Abraha, Demekcsh

AC Lightning

Bacon, Randall

Alpha Sigma Alpha

Alsup, Maria

Abdel-Rahman, Omar 30? Abel, Aaron 276

238

Saber, Matt

204,258,281,301,308 Alpha Tau Alpha 216, 232

212, 213

Abildlrup. Sara

258.259 1

263. 276

Abbott, Justin

Gamma Rho

Alpha Kappa Alpha 335 Alpha Kappa Lambda 28. 204, 258, 259 Alpha Mu Gamma 214, 215

"

lie r

for

Tina

police

and got a

restraining

order. She could have gotten a divorce. "

AJ DeCarlo


Bum.

Slacey

259

BorM, Linda

277

Bons.

Wyman

Bo^nia

35. 214. 226.

269

.113

277 294 Bouas. Jean Boss. Kent

264. 269

Boucher. Jeremy

277

Champion, Tim

Raymond

Bowman. Angel 96 Bowman, Billie 257. 277 Bowman, Jane 269

Bum.

Melissa

Boyd. John 269

Busby. Siaccy

279

Boyd, Robert

Busby. Travis

261

190

235 213. 269

213 269

Bradshaw. Rick

Amy

Brady,

Brady

Tim

Max Brckke. Ann

George 310 Brewer. Angi 278 Brewer. Staccy 214.236 Brier, Cathy 213. 278 236. 269

Bnghl. Kara

255

Brinkman. Merrit

Tim

235. 261

333

Britton. Jon

278

Amy

187.190.191

Brooks. Chris

Brooks. Sorrcll 321 Brooks.

Thomas

3

Jr,

1

278 Brown. Amanda 18 Brown. Becky 182. 191 Brown. Clinton 269 Brown. Cyrus 294 Brown. Becky 183 Broslc, Douglas

Brown. JelT 235. 236 Brown. Kcnnclh 269 Brown. Les 59. 68. 69 Brown. Mandy 226 Brown. Melan'ie 235. 250. 257. 278 Brown. Rachel 233. 263. 278 Brown. Rebecca 269 Brown. Stumpy 69 Browning. Charissa 257 Browning, Karen 278 Browning, Sharon 239 Bruhn. Brent

?>9.

224

Bnindage, George Bruner. Brad

Brunner.

269

Adam

Buddc, Jana

Chor, Steve

279 2.33.

241.

178.

17.3.

230

224. 238

278

242. 278

Campion. Jane 315

Chu. Anthea

Camp

Quality 16. 225. 258. 261.

Ciaccio, Peter

276

Circle

279 168, 176,269

Camper. Jill 279 Candy. John 315 Caplan.Tina 215.261 279 Cappcl. Tim

Citadel Miht.io College.

Deborah

Clark.

279

Clary.

Capulo. Julie

Capulo. Lucy 172. 178. 179. 236.

254 Cardinal

Key

CARE

222

221

Carlile.

Mandy 236 Anne 263

Carlson. Brendon

253. 279

Carison, Shantel Carrol. Angle 333

Carrol

Top

78, 79.

Collins.

230. 23

Dana Gary

294

1

.

247

214.236. 269

Colton. Sharon

Cendroski. Krista

236

Cerbin. Courtney

85. 228. 279

Comstock. Terry

Burger. Kellv

24,28.216.259.

CG Melal

Cecil. Kari

263

261.281

Works 309

DeBoom. Tim

104.279

DeCarlo. AJ 322

183.

DeCarlo. Anlhony

191

279

269 Degasc Feed & Supply 320 DeGcneres. Ellen 59. 62. 63. 220.

218

221

DeJong. Marina 279

238. 279

DeJong. Penny

24 263 279 1 ,

252

Tammy 253. Tammy 269

Deke.

279 279

Culhcrtson, Jenny 1

14,

18,

11

269

Connally. John 321

19,

5. 16. 29,

48. 260,

26L

304 Delta Tau Alpha

279

Cullen, Theresa

Culture Exchange Club

Delia Zela

224

279

Cummings, Colleen 261 Cunningham, Christina 263 Curtis, Elizabelh Curtis, Julie

1

Delta Sigma Phi 260, 261, 262

Culkin, Macaulcy 318

Culver, Ashley

1

213 226 DeLong. Jennyfer 280 Delta Chi

1

279

DeJong.

229

Culhcrtson, Chrisla

279

DeFoor. Stephanie

259. 279

164

Ramona 295 Colonial Manor 320 Collins.

248. 257

329

David

244. 245.

248. 279

279

Culhcrtson, Robert

279

Banner. John

Bundy. Kalhy 235. 247. 253, 269,

Catherall,

DcBlauw.Tom

253. 254

Crumly. Alyssa

269

253

DcBlauw, Jennifer 226. 238. 269

279 269

105

Amy

198. 199

176.

Dealon. Larry

Del.ong. Jason

Cassell.Gene 238. 253

Castro, Lorcna

20. 21

Dean, Brian

218, 228, 243

DeLcmos. Daniel

259

Collins.

Deal.

224

45

20.

Chad 194. Kane 261

Cue, Heidi 245. 248, 249, 279

279

Combs. Jamey 261 Combs. Larry 90 Comic Asylum 10.

Bumbles

Deahl.

Crutcher, .Sara 214. 215

Bill

279

279

Deady. Kristin

Cro/ier. Laurec

Collantcs. Jennifer

Castillo. Tate

Crcmcens, Amber 169. 176, 236 Crews. Tim 321

Cro/^ier,

Coleman. Calandra

279

269

Crowford, Brandon

Cashman. Karen 317 218, 250. 269

279

261

Cole. Gregory

Casteel. Crystal

259

Day-Lewis. Daniel 315

198

Cross. Danielle

226. 227.

1 .

Day. Angelle

279

Crowdcr. Jennifer

269

Tim A. Wendy

Crump. Adam

Caraso. Danielle

Casson.Traci

Davis,

279

Cohrs,

213. 279

Davis.

279

Crouse. Lisa 78. 226, 235. 279

226

A. 2 14. 22

Creklin, Dustin

Crouch. Dana

263

Tim 269

Creglow. Melissa 168. 176.236

Crouch. Angic

Cole, Dale

Davis.

216.261.269 269

32

300.319

Yavonna 279 Carters Clinic Pharmacy 310 Casey. Robin

216

Dawson. Len

269

261

Mike 176 Monte 263

Davis. Nate 204

Davis.

269

Clinton. Bill

Amy

Davis. Michael 310

Craig, Brandon

Cline. Tina

Clow, Ed

86, 87

279

Davis,

Cronin. Carol

229

242. 269

279

Davis. Kendra

216, 279

Cromley. Mark

179

279

Cox, Sandra 295 Coyle, John 317

238,257, 279.

Cogdill. Deandrak

31. 261

279

Cleverley. Stacy

174.

255

Davis, Katherinc

224. 235

Crocker. Rhonda

Coenen,

264

Davis, Jim

Crocker. Marlessa

Coca-Cola 315

220

216

259, 270

Clutter, Call

302

Carter, Joe

253

Clipson, Audra

279

Cox. Angela

Clevenger, Cory

Cline. Charlcne

Carlson,

Davis. Jamie

Davis. Gina

176

279

Davis. Christina

224. 279

Crocco. Jcnn

333

125.316

Career Services

10

Cox. Amelia

Criminal Justice

220

Clemens. Roy

171.

Davis. Carol

Crick Camera Shop 320

279

Clay. Denise

Clay. Kevin

179

172.

Robyn 269 Chanda 226

Davis. Brian

279

Davis. Diannc

294

279

Clark. Melissa

279

230. 233

204

Crawford, Brandon

221. 222. 279

279

213.214 Covington. Colleen 64

Craven, Jeanine

279

Davies. Ryan

Couls. Eric

102

Clark. Jennifer

269

59.96.220, 221.314

.TO7

264

Davidson. Jennifer

Courtney. Kimberly

Cramer. Ellen

The

259

Davidson. James

147

295

Adam

247. 279

David. Derrick

268

Ray

Amy

David.

279

Crain. Jennifer

Citadel Healthcare 312

City of Angels

Daulton. Darren 302

269

Amy

Craig. Lisa

20

Tom

Ann

26

224, 225

Cispcr, Jason

Clark.

Mark

Cox, Karen

269

222

Capps. Philip

Buhman. Brian 279 Buhrmcister. Cody 176. 208. 209

K

Coullcr.

Cox. Joseph

224

Christopher. Charles

Buffalo Bills 302

184. 190.

Campus

Christian

Campanella. Roy 321

CAPs

279

Chrislenscn. Stephanie

Cambell. Bruce

Wendy

Cox. Dara

269

179.

259

Capra.

253

Chrislenscn. Scotl 213. 228. 259.

269

218

Cotton.

Couler.

279

Callahan. Julie

Cappcl.

176

171,

Chrislcnsen. Ravena

269

Chad

Callahan.

170,

Chrislenscn, Michelle 245. 264.

190

165

Danson. Ted 315

David

Courtney. Gladys

Ching. Alejandro 230, 233, 294

Caldwell. Michael 221.

Danner. Pal

Courier.

222

Chinese Associalion

279

Danielsen. Curl

Coursen.

238

279

Daniels. Scotl

Cotlingham. Eli/abelh 214. 226.

Counseling Center

Chicago Bulls 206, 303 Chin. .Seaw-Chang 222

190

Cade. Al

222

269

230

Daniels, Jennifer

100

99.

279

222. 223

Chi Phi Chi

Carter.

8

Mark

Cheng Tan. Tiong

230. 269

Cotier Travel 301

Cottle.

222

Chen. Tai-ching

Cable Vision 299

Carter. Nale

278

Bruntmeyer. Regina Buckley.

c

Campbell. Lori

269

Colter. Patricia

84

Chaves. Frank

159

Campbell. Angela

Brocknian. Tony

Brockmann.

221. 253. 269

Cotien. Joseph 321

Chegwidden. Garry 311 Chelovhar. Joe 204

269

Briscoe. Debora

221. 279

Dallas. Krisli

Amy

Calfee. Jane

Brell.

264

Daniel,

279

254. 257

16

278

279

Cowboys 302

Coss. Candy Jo 279

Cakmak. Burcak

Brent. Dcsirec

Comish. Paul

Dailey. Rebecca

Dallas

101

Stephanie

294

Brenner. Heidi

279

279

264. 279

Damm.

Caims. Alena

248. 333

Corley. Roger

191. 241.

Dailey. Douglas

147

278

Bremner, Ross

Chang. Shao-Chen 222 Chang. Shao-Wei 222

96. 248. 253.

Cosgrove. Jan

247

64. 100. 238

Breeze. Daniel

Bree/e.

Corless, Dorothy

GAA-Renlals 320 Charley. Nancy 224 224 Charley. Roger Chase. Andrea 263 Chavala. S.. M.D. .302

Byre. Kathleen

238. 250

Chang. David 222 Chang. Say Leong 269

Ch;irles

218. 277

Breen. Matlhew

279. 333 Daibcr. Mari

10

264

Bybee. Robin

Brcckcnrldge. Micah

Cork n Keg

259

Dahlquisl, Fay 230, 238, 254, 257.

269

CiKipcr, Rusty

253

247

Dagan, Andy

279

179

Bush. Jason

248

Brasnahan, I'oby

Chancy. Bobby

CiKiper, Pepe

D'Amalo, Alfonsc 305

Wendy

82

Bransielier, Shelly

257. 279

Dalton.

259

264. 277

221, 279

Cooley.Dawn

67

233. 279

113

190.261

Corrado. Hrika

Karen

Brannen, Joseph

Kevm

("banning. Siockard 315

Becky

277

226

D

261.269

Cooke. Colleen

221

140. 142. 143

Buller.

213. 277

CiKik.

263

Cyphers, Brooke

238

Cooper. Michelle

Wayne

Brenda

Cutcl,

Bush. Robert

Butler.

Brandt, Jennifer

Brinks,

294

Bush. Betly

MW

Brand. Karen

Brcchbiel.

264. 269. 333

Bunis. Eric

261

218. 222. 223

Chancy. Gary

Buswell. Nicholas

Brand, Brandon

279

21

Cixik. Brenda

Cook. Chad

223

269 Chandler.

31. 261.

Bun. Alison

279

Chandler. Jennifer 241. 243. 247.

321

269

.^00

bill

Brady. James

Chamberlain. Jason

224

Jack

235. 279 Conroy Painting and Decorating 315

Connollcy. Killeen

Constable. Karen 250. 253. 269

175. 179. 190.

Chamber of Commerce

279

279

Burks. Mickic

Bum.

Burr.

Bowers. Rodriek

Bradshaw. Lori

Chamas. Neffie

Bums. Amy 261 Bums. Diannc 224. 225

277

Bracken. Tina

Cham. NgHui 222 Chamas. Marcy 279

30 Burkan. Linda 253 279 Burke. Amy Burgess. Cary n

Burkhart. Jacquclyne

Boudreau. Angela 154. 155. 230. Bougher. Joe

Chadwick. Aimce 221. 241. 261. 269, 273

269 Burgess. Anlhony 321

259

221

226 24,28, 261, 281

16,

295

DeMoll, Diana

Dempsey, Dawn

263

Dennehy, Krisly

221

Denney. Janelle

242

Dennis. Chad

259

Denny, Reginald 305

Index 323


Denton, Rebecca 218,

DePrenger, Dylan

2.'50,

269

261

Dudley, Monica 3 Duffy, Rcgina

Eustice,

57

DuFrain, Joey

236, 242. 268

Derickson, Debra

269

Dukes. Angel

228. 269

248 280

Derr, Gretchen

Duncan. Robert

Chad 204

Derris,

Dunivan. Jerry

Kim

Derscheid,

280

DeShon. Dorian 259 DeShon, Ron 190 DeSimone, Mieke 280 Desmond, Joe 213, 257 Detmer, Richard

218

Detlmann, Kara DeVault, Penny

Eustice.

Evans. Kevan

224. 280

Evans. Marsha

280 EXCEL 226. 227 Eyanson. Michelle 280 Eychaner. Kayla 259 Ezjell. Jason 213 Ezra. Aleatha 280

Dunnmg.

164

261.280

Lisa

Dupuy. Karey

280

Duvall. Stephanie

247

269. 333

Brett

Dymond. Mike

257

Ezzell. Jason

Ezzell.

Diaz, Rich

Eastwood, Tiffany

Dickerson, Bryan 204

Dickman, Marcy Dickman, Tracy

24

26

Dickson, Jennifer Dierking. Jami

26

1 ,

,

1

269

55,

257

252, 253

Dierks, Robert 329

Guy

Ebke. Susan

263

269

Echols, Toska

280

263

Eck, Jennifer Rae 259

Diggs, Nancy

213

Eckardt,

Rebecca

280

Dingwerth, Laurie 261

Ruby

238, 257, 280.

333 Diven, Brad

190

Dodds, Charles

230

.333

191

191,280

Doherty, Daniel

278

Dohren, Stephanie Dollard, Jean

Fernando, Gordon Fero,

280

170,

236

Eismont, Kelly Eiswert. Jim

Kim

216

Elgin. Jessica

228, 230

Dorrell,Adam Dorris,

190

Damon

213

280

Mike

295

Dowden. Courtney Dowling. Stacy

261. 280

263, 280

Downey, Rick

280

Doyle, Alison

204, 257

Doyle. Becky

261. 280

Jill

280

Doyle. Leslie

280

Dozier. Sandra

269

Drahozal, Wesley

280

Dreessen, Shari

236

Drennen, Tracie

259

Duden,

Amy

259, 280

324 Index

226. 280

Shanon

218. 226

270 259 263

Rob

Ellison-Auxier Architects Inc. 321

Fleak, Chris

Elmore, Kevin

Fletcher, Stephannia

Endicott,

Amanda

9.

230. 247. 254,

Flynn, Lisa

FMA

269

280

Fobes. Carolyn

Endsley, Jennifer

Fogel. Jeff

213,214

270

190.288

Poland. Teresa

19

Foley. Katherine

280

281

Gose, Warren

133,140,141.143 55

270

Gourmet Pleasures 311.334 264

Graeff. John

292

Graeff. Teresa

292

Graf. Steffi 302 Graff. Holly

281

Gragg. Kelly

263

259

Graham. Darren 171, 177 Graham. Leroy 281 Graham. Lori 247. 270 Graheu. Lori

Grandanette. Frances

Amy

Gallelly, Bill

280

263

27, 28, 40. 228. 229.

235 257

Gray, Joshua

281

Greek Week

16,

248

Green. Clarence

216. 270

Green. Jacque Green. Jason

23

Garden, Spencer

270

Gardner, Darrcl Gardner,

68

Dawn

234, 235, 248, 257,

Doug 270 Mary 283

Gardner,

Garrett,

Kevin

Garrett,

Suzanne

261

Carton, Travis

Green. Roxie

224, 333

280

270

Greene. Stacy

270

Greenfield. Leilani 28. 241. 264.

270.312

Grell. Stacey 218, 246, 247,

Grenier. Shena

Garza, Christina 221, 235, 280

Griffen.

Griffin. Donnell

English, Jennifer

Food-4-Less

18

Gates. Marsha

254, 270

Griffin.

Gates, Tiffany

263

Grillo.

Gazaway, Bob

176

105, 201

Poos. Leanne

50, 51

Poos, Rusty

264 176

Erickson. Lee

176

Foral,

Erisman. Angi

263

Forbidden Broadway

Escabar. Pablo 321 Esser.

Dawn

Ford,

270

Esser. Dennis 222, 230, 254,

Andrea

Dawn

Ford, Eule

Gazio, Alex 110, 111

222, 235, 250, 270

Ford, Debbie

280

261

270 212

Gebers. Scott

250

Geddes, LaDonna Geesey, Gina

Gegg. Chris

221. 257. 281

236. 250

236

184.190

Michael 307

Kim 312

Grimm.

Scott

Grissom. Linda 46, 295

105,

Amanda 228

Grinshow. Lisa

261

28

Gregory. Gene 261

Gasiorowski. Lisa

32,

238. 239

Greene. Odell

190

John

281

216.270

Greene. Heather

Forney. Paul

253. 280

236

241

Gregory. Carol

235, 280

259. 260

190.

270

Manha

Green.

English Honor Society

226 200, 228

261

Greek, Sandi

Galyon. Darian

280

216

Granger, Stewart 321

Gray, Erin

Amy

250

Grave, Ken

51

Garrison, Aaron

216. 280

Goold, Shelly

263

Garity,

228

214,270

Grab. Annette 242, 281

280

248, 280,291

Emmons, Dawn 312 263

280

248, 294

Flint, Lori

Flippin, Cheri

25

303

213, 259

281

Goold, Diane

Gagnon. Sarah

Galloway,

127,236

281

192,194,196,198

230, 261

Garcia, Angela

Flanagan, Richard

Gohei, Tsuyoshi

Gaffney, Mike

Gant. Reba

Ellis,

Emerson, Susan 295 Emery, Alice 51

1

228

Flaim, Eric 317

268

233, 270

c Gammon. Chad

Flag Corps

216, 220, 221

Gozlee, Mike

261

Kelly Jo 285

281

Gogan, Kevin

Gotto. Tracy

Fumatu, Natalie

Jason

Michelle

281 Goforth, Kclli

Gotsch. Travis

190

GALTAN

135.214.270

Ellis.

280

John

222

Gallo, Julio 321

Pitts.

253. 269

Mindy

Fink. Stacy 262. 270 Fishbume, Laurence 315

Fitch. Jennifer

221. 259

280

Gallamore,

Randy Fishier. Lynne

281

Goode, Deana

Kevin 190, 221

Fink. Kurt 204

Fisher. Anita

264

65, 280

Caddie, Kathenne

Kammi 204

Fisher.

226. 280

Environmental Services

224. 242

Don 32

Michael Sarah

187.190

250

Fingel,

Ellis.

Entzi,

280

Drocgemueller, Hope Drysdale.

218

Engeike, Jennifer

280

Drydale. Kittie

257

Harold "Bud" 186.

EngeKJay

Drake. Tanya 178. 179. 226. 236,

Drey, Lisa

Elliott.

Elliott.

Dougan. Jennifer 235. 238. 254. 280 Douglas. Clint

Con

Shanon

Elliott.

Douefus, Clint

257. 259. 280

176

230

GabeLAndy 317 Gabyn, Damian 238

131,280

281

Goehring, Darin

242, 280

236 261

Gaa, Jeannine

222

Finegan, Celeste

Godreau, Tasha

Golding, William 321

295

280

281

Goettemoeller, Adrian 238, 239,

295

Fry, Carrol

233

280

Filley. Chasity

Glisczinski, Lisa

Frankenberger, Kevin

218.219.269

Filger. Daniel

161, 218,

65

Elliott. Jennifer

280

Doyle.

Elifrits.

Elliott,

190

Dosland, Mitch 174. 176,236,

Douthat.

Elick. Matt

Elliot.

Lance 333

Dorrcll,

36.

226

280

198. 199

242,261

5,261,270

Golden, John

Pults,

1 ,

190

Frucht, Richard 107, 145, 214, 295

260. 280

Fin, Xiaolin

Eldridge. Desa

269

Chad

Fidler. Scott

322

280

Doombos. Brian

261

214.278

Donaldson, Julie

Donovan, Colleen

22

Pick. Jennifer

Ektermanis, Tina

230

George

Ferris.

254, 255

253

257

Givler. Christina 218. 235. 281,

Glasford, Shannon

264

Adam

Fulton,

257

158

FroeschI,

Frederico 321

Rob

281

97

Glas, Richard

221

179,

Fellini.

Ferguson,

Cara

283

261

Derek 214,

Kara

Fuller,

Ferguson, Monica

276

248, 280

270

280

Fuller, Larry

Ferguson, Michelle 333

280

Anne

Gitto.

280

Fry, Colleen

280

Gittins. Malissa

Goad, Craig 278 Godfimon, Joe 241

226 Daniel

Girard, Laura 261, 281

Freese, Troy

FCA

Don

Einig.

254, 261,269

Dolweck, Don Donahue, Jeff Donaldson,

280

261

Marjean

191, 263

236

Frohlich, Janet 204,

269

Ehlers. Kris Ehlers.

263

Glesinger, Greg

Prieling,

179,214, 281

228 Gingersnap Furniture Sweet Thing: 320

Freeman, Mike 218. 235. 248. 256. 280

Fritz,

243. 280

265

235

French, Jonica

128

Gilmore, John

Dana

Fraunderfer,

Faulkner, Shannon 307

Felt,

Ehlers,

Doetker. Kerry 179, 180, 181.

227. 243.

280

Farrar. Brandi

Eggert. Angela 333

Doetker. Jody

259

Alex

Francis.

Frankenberger, Kevin

Freyberger, Larry

Edwards. Indira Eggers. Jason

Gillooly, Jeff 317

217

Edmonds. Dan 295 Edwards. Deena 48.261.269 238.

Gillispie, Terri 174,

280

Jim

Famam. Stacey 269 Farquhar. Ed 126. 127

280

Edwards. Tyler

Dodson. Tami 238. 257. 280,

183,

169

Edinger. Christi

270

Fowler. Mindi

Freshman Orientation

2. 7. 20. 21.

214

Fowler. Leslie

217

Farley. Melissa

Edmister. Kelly 273. 333

269

Dittmer, Harold

270

Jan

Paris. Jennifer

216. 217

Eckles. Sheila

24,

Giesken, John

280

Foulke. Daryle

Fall.

244. 254. 255

Shawn 317

Eckhoff, Gayla

264

Gieseke, Dave

Frese, Paul

Fannon. Debbie 218. 247. 269. 287

Diesing, Scott

Gibson, Debra

Foster. Vincent 321

Fall.

Family Day

248

242

Falcone. Janice

224, 235, 248

Ebusole, Greg

218, 263. 280

228

270

Freeman, Danielle

Fagan Company, The 318 Fahring. Stephen 280

102.280

Ebrecht, Tina

Shannon Susan

Freeman, Chris

280

Fabjan. Jodi

295

Ebisch. Brenda

Geo Club

Gerken, Leigh 233. 241. 248. 253 Gibbs, Michelle 51, 250, 281

Fraves, Stephanie

F

Eason. Alisa

Ebersole.

Foster, Foster.

281

270

270

222

Freeman, Angela

264, 269

260, 261

Poster, Christian

Fraundorter, Annie

280

Geiger. Michael

Gentry. Eric

Fredrickson, Lance

214.280 Eastep. Kristina 259 Easterla. David 241. 295 Easton. Jennifer 280

Dittmer,

218

156

242

Foster, Matt

86. 214. 220. 221.

226, 257. 270

Team

Porensics

Gehrman. Heidi

228

Frazee, Jan

Dew, Lavenia 214, 280 De Young. Becky 245, 254, 264, 269,312 DeYoung, Ron 295

Dittmer, Brad

Jeremy

E

DeVore, Jennifer 191 DeVore, Scott 280

Diltz,

218. 280

Ezzell. Richard

190

DeVries. Russel

1

Evertson. Stacy

269

Devoll, Eric

295

Dunlap. Pamela

295

Devlin, Brian

168. 169. 176. 269

247. 269

Eveready

3

190

Fore, Tonni

Portelka, Joe

Rhonda

269

259

Dettro, Stacy 214,

168, 176, 190, 191,

Dunkm' Dounuts 298

Dwyer.

242, 269

Rheba

236. 269

269

Amy

Dunekacke.

Ford, Michael

Eustice, Renata 188, 190, 191, 280

Derby, Stephanie

Derman, Jason

280

Alex

Estes,

1

247

Groen. Molly

261

232 281 247. 281

Gronbeck. Jake

259

Grone. Tiffanie

263

270


Groom. Rachel 224,261 Grooms. Mall 190 Grove, Craig 176, 270,303 Grove. Ken

281

Grud/inski.

Mike

295 282

Gruendcr. David

Gruhn. Randy

GTU

247

230

Gubser.

Amy

257. 282

214.257. 270

Gubscr. Gina

Gudc. Melissa

Hanrahan, Galen 333

216. 253. 282

Hansen. Ben

Amy Amy

Gudenralh.

111.236 234 Gullickson. Kevin Guenlhncr.

Gum, Jennifer Gump. Jeremy

214. 242. 282

179

178.

Gunn, Daxid 307 Guslafson.

Andy

Amy

190.

259

235. 250. 270 2.W. 264

Guihrey, Brad

213.282

Gulshall. Byron

218.282

Guyer. Marcia

Gvs'vnne, Fred 321

H Haake.

Amy

Hacker.

Shmn

Hackswonh, Hugan. Don

263. 282

Harr.

Doug

Harr. Scott

282

198

Hedrick, Stephanie

261

271

228

8.190

Heldslab, Cunis 23, 226, 227, 248,

282

282

Harrington. Janelle

Harrington, Kevin 213, 221. 238.

282

239. 245. 248. 257. 282

261

Hamee. .Shelly 241 Hames, Rebecca 216,259 Hames, Trevin 233. 263 Hamkel. Alan 236. 270 Hamkel, Crystal 213. 282 Hale, Eli/abelh 282

Harris.

Brad

Harris.

Charron

176.198

Harris. Jack

189.

190.

236,

271

179

264

Hendcrshot, Tyler

Henle, Jason

100

259

282

Hennig. Angle

213

Harris. Rosetta 226. 227. 248. 253.

282 Harris. Walter

2,50,

Amy

Hendricks,

191

190

218

Bob 140,141.143.186 Henry. Mary 236 Henry,

Hensler. Niki

204. 254

176.

Harrison. Katie 230.2.54. 282

Hensley. Michelle

Hall. Frank

259 218.224

Harrison, Michael

Henzc. Chris

Hall.Joann

218. 282

Hairison, Tracy 282

Hepperniann. Michelle 245. 282

Harson, Sue

226

Herbert Emery Sanitation 306

Jayme

264

Hermereck.

Hall.

176

Hallock. Bill

HALO

230. 231

Halsted. Patrick

Hart,

264. 265

Hamann. Karmi 213,221.242.270 Hamilton. Brandon

Hamilton. Tara

250

282. 288

WHAT

Hartman, Barry

271

248, 282

Harimann. Angela Harvev.

DO

Ann

236

27

Amy

Hernandez. Lissa

Hartman, Julie 333 2X2

BEAVIS

Hill.

Stacy

Hill.

Tim

Horn. Jaysen

175.

Megan

263

29.312

Hornberg. Lynn

247. 264. 271

Horner. Channing 94. 214. 215

Homer. Louise

214

Horticulture Club

236. 271

259

Horton. Scoll

282

190.236

Hoskins. Sonya

282

216. 295

271

Timothy

Houlelte.

233

261,282 Housman. Angle 302

233, 282

Houston, Suzanne

198 261

Hovak. Tara 264 Howard. Brandon 282 Howard. J.J. 261

261

236

Hobbs, Teresa

238. 2.54

Hoberg. Jamie

193.198.199

Hockensniith Electric

Hoerman. Lisa Hofman. Justin

Howard, Joy 283 Howard. Monica 248. 257 Howard. Stephanie 235. 253 Howard. Tim 36 Howat. Robbi 76

320

228. 250

1

Howe. Aric 204 Howe. Kelly 35

271

264 264

Howery. Barbara 247. 250, 271 Howland, Michael 111.235,283

282

Hogcr. Derrick 204

HPERD

Hoger. Karen 204

Huang, Wen-Chi

Hoke. Jason

Hubbard, Dean

282. 333

Holberg. James 194. 196

Holbrook. Codi

II.

Holcombe, John

Hubbard, Renne

Hubbard

190,

208, 209.313

Street

pany

216 Dave 302

Huddle, Nicholc

282

Hudson. 257, 263,282

261,288

Honn. Frank

&

Kymm

264.271.312

Hoof

Herrtin,

Todd

36

Hoogcstrat.

261

273

268

236, 250, 251.

HulTington.

Tom

Hufty. Aaron

261, 271

Adam

283

Hughes. Kristin

235. 238. 283

Hughes. Michael

Horn Steakhouse 320

Hughes. Mike

Huhn. Allen

325

171

283

Hughes. Heather

295

170.

86

Hughes. Anna

5, 24, 25, 26,

1, 2,

226. 283

233

Huegerich. Scott

229, 254, 256. 258. 259

Honken. Connie

Amy

Huedepohl. Andy

257. 282

Homecoming

236. 288

Huebert. Darcy

282

Damen Homan, Beth Ann

271

84. 85

Hollins.

Holzapfcl,

1.36, 1.17,

Dance Com-

Huber. Krislen

Holtman, Paula

283 114.

L38. 1.39. 165. 295

213.282

176,

230

Holland. Jody

Holtz, Julie

259. 282

Houston. Whitney 315

92

Kara

213.282

Houseworth, Heather 250, 236,

12

Tomoko

232. 233

Horion. Malt

Hoskcy. Marvin

Hirakuni, Misaki

Herron.

AND BUTT-HEAD

282.291

271

Hilton Coliseum

Holt,

IS1,19(I

ISO,

Hornbaker, Chris 226. 238. 248.

230,271

Amy

264

264

133. 257

Rochell

261.282

Herrick, Karrie 204

282

Kimberiy

Hogel. Karen

Anne 250 Henggeler, Rhonda 214

235. 250

Harris. Fred

263. 282

Haldcrman. H.R. 321

Heller, Milissa

Hcndrcn, Chris

271

Harris. Jcrmcll

282

Henderson, Florence

282

Harrington, Lisa

Hill.

282

Horlen. Scott

Horn,

Hofmeister. Michael

Hellebuyck, Jennifer

Helms,

Horlen. Matthew

213. 2.59

Hodges. Rebecca

36

Heldenbrand, Shawna 245, 271

261

Harrill. Scott

235 271

282

Hobbs, David

248, 259, 282

Heldenbrand, Lois

218, 282

Jeremy

282

Hopper. Nicole

263

Hoag, Carmen

271

Heinzcrolh. Joel

241

Hill.

Hite, Scott

264

Heiman, Karen

Courtney

Hires, Spencer

259, 27

Heiden, Heath

Hopkins. Jolene

88. 91. 282

213.282

Allison

Hill.

Hire,

218

Heeler, Phil

214

198

Hill.

Hiraoka,

282

Heck, Michelle

66 282

Harr, Sherry

321

282

Heath. Sara

282

27

Wendy

Henry. MaO'

Jr.

230

Hensler. Niki 259

270

Harkness. Daniel Harkrider. Jennifer

Randolph

Heanland View

213. 216. 270

Higgins. Michelle

Hill.

247. 263.264,

Hopkins. Anthony 315

Hill. Kristin

Healthy Choice 316

Hardman, Tiffany

Harpstcr, Keili

270

Haley. Kerry

235

Heimann, Beth 312

Hahn. Rcnee 23, 176, 236, 247,

Andy

242, 243, 247

Harper. Garry

259

Hailey, Chris

190.226.282

82

224, 242. 282

282

333

Hildreth. Melissa

205

Hearst. William

Hopkins. Angela

Higginbotham, Mary

Hilker. Jerry

Headstrom, Heath

263

86,248, 282

Hildebrand. Chris

184

271 Har\'ey

Hopf, Denise

Hildebrand. Danene 213

Harper. Cassandra

264,270,312

Hailc. Melissa

190

295

213. 226, 282

271

Hildal.

295

Tom

Hopewood,

Highway 136 311 brew 236

242

Don

Hope, Nikki

241, 248

Highlander. Staci

261

176

Hagan. Leslie 24, 25. 129. 254,

Hahn, Craig

Hays,

264

264, 282

154

Hager, Angelique

Dawn

Thom

236. 282

Dawn

216

Highland. Gorden

1

Heese. Kevin

270

Tom

2

Amy

Heuer,

.33. 213.264 241.247.264 242,243,271

282 Harmon, Michael 221, 282 Harmon. Tim 282

282

Hackell, Michelle

Haydcn, Joan

253

Harmon, Leisa

2S2

Haberman. Jenny

Hayden. Dana

Dana Mark

Hetzler,

Headlee, Elaine 214. 222, 224, 225,

Hardlicka. Kristin

Harlow,

Krisli

Hazen, James

Harding. Tonya 317

Harlin, Jeffrey

Hawkins. Karen

Hawley,

Haynes. Jesse

250

Hardy. Julia

Higdon-Bolar, Kathleen 257, 271,

Haynes.

159

Hardin. Jeff

Hialt,

213. 282

152.264

Hanway. Karcy 282 Happermann. Michelle Hardin. Chel

282

Hawkins, Carleane

Hayes, Tad

282

Hoover.

Hawkins, Brandon

Haynes. Pat

Hanson. Jennifer

Hooker. Melissa

282

Hesse, Brian Hetzlcr,

Hayes,

50

23, 254, 271

Hertz, Kari

Mark 224. 282 Hauschel.Amy 271 Hausman. David 282

216.259

214

282

Hatfield,

Haynes. Jesse

Hansen, Matthew Hansen, Scotte

24, 259,

Hayedom, Mike

Hanson, Hayley 191, 193,282

282

Guslalson. Trevor

GuMin,

.

270

Hansen, Jon

76, 236, 250. 271

Hassig, Becky

187.190

Hansen. Jennifer

Hanson, Art

282

Gunia, Karen

76

Hammerbacher, Daniel 259 Hampton, Jason 264 Hancock, Dave 213. 295 Haney. Courtney 24 264 Haney. Erin 282 Haney. Rachel 236 Hainkel.Alan 235 Hannam. Mathevv 261.282 Hannon. Maria 270

282

Dawn

Hascall,

59,

1

263

Grunuall. Jeremy

Hamlin, Heather 204 Hamlisch, Mar\in

271

248

213.259

INCITE VIOLENCE IN CHILDREN

DO YOU THINK

"/

c

ho Hi; 111

s

!

I liar

somethinc

F a r-

/)('/-

.vrÂť;;ÂŤ//v

II

li

t

s

o u Id

ifllic

pa rents

more

Else

were

fluence

Altogether

ing to

fio-

on their

let

was their fault if the children behaved incorrectly." Francie them watch

Miller

in-

It,

it

^

"No. he-

"First of

cause I did not

a

t

h

I

a

n k

I

V

s

i

n

d

that kids

Butt

took the

h e a d

charac-

were not

we

children if they were con-

ters seriously. I thought

cerned with what the kids

should give children credit

watch." Mike Powell

I

Bea

knowing they can separate fiction

from non-fiction.

Mike Johnson

"

meant for children, but for more mature people. It was the responsibility of the parents to determine if

were old enough and mature enough to watch the show. " Rich their children

Trulson

Index

325


Huisman, Dirk Hull,

Gayle

Hull, Joni

283

Jaco,

295

214, 245, 271

Jacobs,

Humphreys., Lynette

263

Humphreys, William

271

228

155,

Todd

Jones. Paul Jones,

247, 283

Jones. Scott

21

271

Samantha

2

Jacobs. Shcron

283

Hull, Lisa

Melody

Jacobs, Dalton

Jordon.

284

284

Chad

261

Kennedy, Madonna 295 Kenny, Amber 285

Korte. Chris

Kent, Scott

Kowitz. Rocky

285

Jordan, James 321

Kentucky Fried Chicken 316 Kenyon, Jenny 198

Jaeger, Kelly

271

Jordan, Michael 206. 303

Kern, Dustin

235

Krai, Jennifer

86

Jorgensen, Brandi

Kerns, Scott

123

Kralik,

Jagger,

Hunsucker, Rebecca 218, 235, 283

Jail-n-Bail

Hum, Chad Hum, Mike

213, 259

James, Jessica

Judd, Rusty

284

Kettler, Christina

264

James, Peggy

283

Jung, Aaron

261, 284

Kidder, Steven

James, Stacey

283

Jungers, Joanna

312

Juranek. Connie

259

Hupka, Jennifer

259

283 261

Hurst, Jennifer

Hutti, Merri

122

16

John

235, 295

45, 283

283

Ann

Jenkins, Jean

Jenkins, Tracy

Ickes,

Sandy 233

Independent Elevator Co. 320

Irvine,

Irwin,

Jensser, Matt

226 198. 199,

94.

Kantor, Eric

Duane

213,259,295

Kappa Alpha Si 310 Kappa Omicron Nu 235

283 27

233

Johnson, Andrea 333

Karicambe. Jeffeson

Johnson, C.J.

Karnowski, Ronnie

271

Chance Lydia

261

Johnson, Chad

261 247, 271

261

Karg. Jennifer

271

Johnson, Chris

198,264

Kassar, Brian

Johnson, Clint

176,190

Kassim, Fatuma

233, 246, 247

Johnson. Deborah 224. 230. 27

Israel

313

Johnson. Eric

Kam-Hung

233, 283

James 315

Johnson, Jim

149.

Johnson, Joni

213,214,283

Johnson, Joseph Johnson. Matthew

Johnson, Michael 27

1

13, 128.

254, 283

Bo

181

Jackson. Clark Jackson,

Jackson, Katy

216, 271 1

8,

Jackson, Michael

Kumm.

Kump. Jon

235, 259, 285

Kim

Amy

285

Knight, Angelia

310

271

Knust, Robert

190

Lager, Brad

Lambert, Barry

179

Koenen, Leslie

284 284 284

Jones. Chris

Jackson, Slade

Jones, Jean

22,

WHAT

OF

DO YOU

199,325

264

204

somethinc Else

did

w

s

be equal

right to

for all

r e

-

gale the

women.

I

thought they should have

same opportunity.

Rick Jolley

Kim

233,261 235,261

Amy 285 Landwehr, Clarissa 285 Lane. Brett 285

ALLOWED TO ENTER A â&#x20AC;˘

h ou

se.xes

e

I

d

for

duca

t i

o n a

"She

They

should (let

her

in)

be-

let

in)

be-

long as

a

h

e

't

(be cause

s

I

shouldn

cause as

t

in

m ilia

r

y

purposes. They can sepa-

proved she could do the

academy

rate housing to eliminate distractions. " Lori Otto

tasks required as well as the

discipline involved that the

men she should be given

average female couldn 't handle. However, there was always an exception to ev-

"

the

same opportunities.

Nicole 326 Index

Mark

Landis,

236. 285

263

Landwehr,

271

"Schools s

g

Landes,

242, 253, 285

76

MALE MILITARY ACADEMY

it

s e

Altocether

BEING

not feel

a

259

Korcsh, David 305

SHANNON FAULKNER

Andrew

Landen. Heidi

230, 241, 259

Koppen, Derek

285

Lance. Michelle

292

295

117,

Jeffrey

Lancaster.

261

221,241,254,259

Kordick, Timothy

250, 261

/

Lamer, Fred

234, 235

Koon, Kevin

ALL

261

Lancaster. Burt

Kooi, Kevin

285

Lamb Weston 309

Kokkinakis, Chris

Kelly, Virgina 321

284

Lambros, Rachel

285

Lamp,

Kenkel, Richard

90

Lambertsen, Kenna 201. 224. 241, 245

250

Komori, Hirotomo

271

285

Kohn, Sara 263 Koinun, Leslie 236 Kolaiah

261, 284,333

Kennedy. Jennifer 284 Kennedy, Kathleen 228. 235, 237,

26

THINK

the

284

135,285

254, 257,263

Kohler, Janine

Kelly. Jim 302

198

Jones, Jennifer

233,271

254, 284

190

Kodek, Ryan 322 247

205

10,

Laffey, John

Koehbe, John Koeberl, Joseph

285

264

Laclede Chain Manufacturing Co. Lade, Bob

Johnson, Shelley

Jones, Charles

285

100,

320

248, 285

LaBeaume, Anne

285

Kellar, Lesley

Parts Co.

LaBelle, Garry

Knop, Kristie

Kelimen, Johannes

Jackson, Michael 318

248

146,

284

235

194, 198,

Auto

LaBarbera, John

261

Koey, Ching-Chai

Ricky

L&L

238, 254, 285

216, 271

Jolley.

285

230, 271

Kelim, Nathan

213,214,226,

L

225

284

Kelly, Kerrie

68. 95. 236, 237

271

Johnson, Robert

19,236

191

K,XCV/KRNW

285

Traci

Koenig, Kerry

Johnston, Dain

Kuzma. Rachel

Kwan, Michelle 317

214

Kellogg, Joe

264 2 1 8, 222.

259.271

241

230

233, 284

Kelly, Jennifer

Kutz. David

259

Johnson, Sharon

42 285

Kussman, John

261,271

Knipp, Staciu

Johnson, Sandra 235, 284

285

176, 271

Kunze, Kay

248

Knight. Beth

284

28

162

Jennifer

Kunkel, Kiki

90

Kelbat, Lesley

Johnston, Kelly

48

80 235

Kippola, Karl

263

Kumar, Suresh

Kinger, Craig

Knauss, Julie

284

Todd

261

King, Stephen

Keith, Shelly

263

259,271

Montgomery

65

Johnson, Sherri

Jackson. George

King,

Johnson, Patrick

259

Jackson, Erin

Keiser,

Kukuczka, Vicki

Knight, Jennifer

Keifer, Kelly

Keim, Dana

Kuehner, Kelly

Johnson, Mike 68, 295

213,214, 283 259

Dan

326

,

238, 257, 333

129

Jackson.

1

285

271

Klindt, Lisa

284

Monica

Kruk, John 302

271

Kliegl, Michelle

235

Keeling, Chris

Johnson. Michael K. 226. 230.

J.W. Jones Student Union

213.242,

228, 295

King. Jody

Kjeldgaard. Katrina

241

238, 248,

271

Kruel,

218, 248

Kiwanis Club

Keane, Shannon 153, 226, 227,

284

Johnson, Melissa

Jack, Paula

KDLX

230, 257, 284

264

190

184,

King, Kelli

Kiso.

213,233,284

Kawashima, Satomi

236, 271

Johnson, Kerri

J

Kautz, Jennifer

Krueger, Diane

Kitt,

Kauffman, Ewing 321

170

271

235, 248

264, 284

Johnson, Jami 214, 216, 217

271

Ivanko, Dionne

190

Kinen, David

Kisling, Tyler

284

198,202.203

Krone, Jason

Bob

271

312

Jill

Amy

Krohn.

67

285

Kirkpatrick, Slacie

247, 284

Kates, Christopher

271

Shawn

Kinder, Brian

Kirkpatrick, Allyson

259

Karrenbrock, Monica

253

190

Kroenke.

Krider,

254, 263

Kirkland, Karen

224, 284

222, 242, 295

Angela

Kimes, Jeanelte

151, 271

150.

295

Kramer, Gerald

Krimmel, Brandi 64 Krishanasamy, Patricia

Kirchoff,

253. 284

45.

Kramer, Ernest

Kremer, Eric

Kingery, Craig

236

179

Kapetis, Kostas

ISO

Ivory,

Kansas City Symphony

261. 271

Isemhagen, Joel

lu,

District

259

Jewell, Jennifer

Timothy

Kansas City, Mo. School 302

Job,

Irlbeck, Julie

32, 201,

7,

228 148, 271

Jewell,

233

238, 250, 285

250

Kikkawa, Ritjsuko 285 Kimble, Mary Ellen 295 Kimbrough, John Jr. 190

King,

271

235. 236

Amy

Kratofil.

235

King, Darren

Kansas City Chiefs

Jenson, Scott

Jessen, Joseph

275

Ingels, Jennifer 214, 228, 230, 250,

IRA

283

236, 271

IFC Imm, Chris

214

Kandiah, Suresh

73

Jermain. Shelly

198,203

How ard

Kahnan, Prasanan

224, 235, 283

Jennings, Andrea

O

Kacera,

259

132

264

Krabbe. Jim

285

Kmcaid, Christopher

Kahane. Meir 305

1

271

Jenkins, T.J.

I

271

159,

224

K

214,259

104

Jelinek, Jessica

Jenny

KIDS

Todd

Kraaz.

Nancy 317

Kerrigan,

284

Justus, Taniera

30.

Jeffery, Misty

238, 257, 333

198,236

284

Maria

Dan 317

Jazz Festival

263

Joslin,

283

Amy

Kim

Jasinski.

27

Amy

248, 249

Janssen, Matt

261

Huskey, Caria

Hy-Vee

Janky, Jansen,

Hurst, Brian

Huston,

Mick

Janeczko,

Huppert, Nancy 174, 179, 236, 253,

145

Jacobus, Tina 214,264,312

Hunter, Holly 315

Hunter, Carrie

271

Kovar. Pavel

Riley

there

was a

e ry rule." Hoogestrat

lot

of

Adam


Amy

Langncr.

Lanning. Brian

261. 285

Lohman. Paul

190. 2.15

Long. Daren

Long John

285

Larscn, Meredith

285

Larson. Sandra

259. 285

Lasier. Patrick

259

Lalhrop. Daniel

Laudont. Gwendolyn

198. 285

264. 27

Lawson. Brad Lawson. Duanc Lay.

Myra

LDSSA

261

26

1

.

285

228. 285

2.%

Lorch.

Dan

285

250. 285.333

233. 260.261

272

247. 295

259

Lowe, Chad 315 Lowe. Heidi 264,312

.121

Lowery, Nick

Lee. Cecilia

271

Lowrance, Jamie 264. 3 1

.

27

Lcc. Susan

Leeper. Michelle

Roy

295

Leeper. Trevor

Leitch,

Andrea

Leivan. I.anny

51

Lenz. Shannon

176

Leonard. Todd

254. 285

Leven. Mark Leverton's

285 311

261.271

Levis. Kellie

Lewis. Beth 204

Lewis, Emmanuel 318

M-Club

210. 257. 26

Lewis. Jon

1 .

333

Lewis. Reggie 32

Lian.

Bob

Lichtas.

Lie

179

Tami

Awake

1

9

.

1

1

28

285

Licnau. Tifanie Light.

2 4. 242. 285

241.264

Limbach. Brcnda Limpus. Thea

45. 51. 272

213

M

20.271

Lininger. Stephen

241.263

Lippert. Nanice Litte,

Bruce

131

Liverman. Trina

2.59.

Livingston. Troy

LMP Steel & Lock. Staci Locke. Kelly

271

Wire Co. 320 250. 285 264. 285

Lodzinski. Keith Loft, Kristinc

285

235. 272, 333

272

Logeman. Duslin

263

263, 285

145

238.

2.19.

248

Mahnke. Tamra 272 Mahoney. Kelli 228, 229, 258 Mahoney. Maureen 258 Mahoney. Mike 228 Mahoney. Patrick 40. 228. 229 Mahoney. Ryan 204,213, 214,

Tom

McCabc. Jason 264 McCalla. Ray 286 242. 286

McCari. Cindy

McCarthy. Joe

Mahoney. Shana 1111

McCauley. Mick

Maicr, Ulrikc 321

McClelland, Sara

14,

248

Mallon, Jennifer

257, 285,333

Maltbia, Brandy

285

Mailer. Justin

213. 259

Manarrc/. Cori

236

Amy

Mandarich, Jayme

247. 26

259, 285

222

286

McCarthy. Virginia

272 226, 272

McCloney, Debra 272 McClure, George 226 McCollom. Dustin 286

McCollom. Shawn

228. 286

McCorkindale. Sherri

272. 333

McCormick. Tonya 263 McCoy. Luke 286 McCoy. Mary 190

Audrey Brenda

Miller,

247, 275 228. 286

286 272

Miller, Carla

McGuigan. Billy 263 McGuire. John 261. 295 McGuire. Taunya 286 McHale. Suzelte 286

Miller, Francic

113. 272, .126

Miller.

216.312 Jeff 216 Jonathan 286

.Mclntyrc. Liz 317

Miller.

Kevin 190

Miller,

Miller, Jackie Miller.

Miller. Kristy

272

McKenzie. Kimberiy 259. 286 McKenzie. Kristin 213.214. 250. 272 McKibbcn. Renee 272

Miller. Laurie

259

Miller.

Tasha

McKiddy. Michael 216 McKie. Abigail 286 McKim. Susan 247. 286

Miller.

Tom

McKnight. Jenifer 224. 235. 286

Mills. Barbara

Mel .ain.

Millsaps.

Mclntyrc. Stephanie

261

263

Scott

McLaughlin. Corey

261 221.

Patrick

286

Miller. Michael Miller. Paul

2.59

263 264. 272

235

Millhouser. Vinita

286

Dyan

214

Milrose. Diana

259

Milroy.

Amy

272

Miner. Brandon

190

Miner. Kathleen

272

224

Ming. Lisa

235

Minsener. Brandon

286

238

Millikan Hall Council

Mirano. Oswaldo

179

286

McMulin, Traci 257. 286 McMurry. Kristin 286 McNece. Shirley 57 McNerney, Angela 241.261 McNcrney. Shannon 248. 286 McNctt. Kelli 238 McWilliams. Mark 261.286 Mechanic. Eve 286 Medlin.Tony 88. 91 107 Medved. Michael 236 Mcfford. Greg

Mires. Susan

Megerson, Melissa 241,247.2.50.

Moeller. Darcey

272

Miskimins. Lisa

Missouri Valley Electric Co. 320

&

Missouri Water

Co.

Steam Supply

.101

248. 286

Mitchell. Cerine

159

Mizerski. Allison

Mobilpage,

320

Inc.

263

Mobley, Marci

Modem Improvement Moc. Tommy 317

39. 238. 257,

272. 333

63

Mongar. Bradley

179,230

224. 286

272

32

Montana. Joe

286 16,

Moody, Kevin 261 Moody. Scott 264

Meliose, Diana

247

190 Moore. Michael Moore. Donald 216

Melnick. Jason

184.190

Moore. Donna

264

Meinecke. Brad

MENC

120

272

Mohamed. Sue

Meinders, Heidi

Menendez. Erik 305 Menendez. Lyle 305 Menken. Alan 315 Mercer. Bryan 204 169.

286

Moore. Gary 321 Moore. Mary 156

236

Moore. Travis

286

Morey, Jamie

213 233, 286

Morgan. Mylanc 176

286 286 Messner. Marcie 286 Metcalf. Laurie 315 Meyer. Don 253

Merino. Andrea Messinger,

190

Amy

Miller,

2.10

Mercer. Molly

3

McCartney. Gram

2.13.241.261

Maisel. Tracy

286

McBrayer. Brian 175. 286 McBroom. Candy 272

Miller,

286

272

Memecke. Barbara 259

286

Miller, Crissy

Thomas

Meinders. Heather

240.241

Adam

Miller.

Chuck

94

Meier. Leslie

McAllister.

261

257. 286

McGlaughlin. William

Meierotto. Angela 245. 254. 286

Mayer. Melissa

226

321

236,250, 272

230

257, 286

264

Milks, Heath

272 "

250

286

250, 272

Mikels. Brenda

Miller. Alissa 218. 226. 2.15. 247.

Maxwell. Melissa

Maxwell-Schurkamp, Pat

253, 286

Mieras. Kelby

286

286

295

Midwestcn) Paper Company 320 '

Maxwell, Dwighl

Mayer. Evelyn

Mandarich.

285

164

Tammy

Madlova. Eva

Manchester. Chris

Logan. John 321

Maudlin,

May, Erin

285

263

Mattson, Teresa

238. 257. 333

Krisly

Lindemann. Terisa

268

30

Madison, Melinda 176. 177.285

Maher. Michael

Amy

263

Maltiscn, Julie

Maxwell, Michelle

Magner. Todd

Andrew

Matlhys. Brien

MacMohon. Michelle

228

Ling.

286

Matthews, Robert

Maxwell, David 259

295

Lindscy.

260

176

Matthe, Kelly

295

Lindborg. Jennifer

276. 285

Matsukala. Mario

134.285 Maekey, Chris Mackcy. Jaymic 263 Maekey, Seth 221

Lindaman, Arnold

75.

254, 272

93

Mathieu. Rick

272

213. 272

162.

Mathiesen. Julie

236

Maginn. Randall

l.indenbusch. Rebecca

112.111

Malhias. Dena

318 Midland. Dale

Milhum. Dawn

McMichael, Teresa

1

250

Mathcw, Kip

Mid-Conlinent Micrographics. Inc

286, 313

64 2

Mathers, Becky

230 272

286

McMahon. Colcen 241.261 McManigal. Amanda 228, 257.

190

214, 263. 272

Mickelson. George 321

242. 295

261

Mather, Joseph

Mickelson. Darcy 104, 236, 250.

272

McLaughlm.

286. 294

Masters. Michael

261

272

Maas, Brcntly

Madden.

Amy 241.242.253.271

Mason. Mike Massey. Cliff

285

Macias, Lori

253. 271

Lewis. Sherry

Maryville Travel ."Agency 321

191

Lynn. Jennifer

238

Lumber Co. 320

Maryville

253. 285

Maslouski. Christy 263

Marty

7.

92

Masin. Michele

Leuthold. Arlette 228, 263. 285

Leutung.Tana

Maryville Hood Pantry

285 Lawrence 26.184,187,

Lyons, Angela

27

Forum

Maryvillt' Dtiih

235. 2.36

1.

10

8.

272

Lynch. Sarah

Lesko. Natalie 168,169.176.285 Leslie. Patty

286

Maryville Aquatic Center

Luster.

l.yle.

295

Lesher. Merle

Martin, Michell

Lydon. Christine

02

1

46. 235

285

261

Lutnck. Heidi

285

Leonardo. Joe

259

Angle

190,

285

247. 250, 272

Lund. Tracy

263, 285

Leonard. John

248. 249. 272

Manin, Kristina

1.14

Melody

l.ullniann.

Lemmons. Markeith

242. 286

263, 286

Lukins. Cory Jo 285

285

254. 272

286

Martin, Jennifer

254, 263

Luke, Aaron

215

Leighter. Jay

Ken

213.259.285 286

Martin. Diana

Michels, Christina

Jeff 221, 226. 228.

McGinnis. Erin McGrail.

Martin. Holly

Luers, Jolene

Letterman. David 299

263, 285

272

151.

Brian 235. 257. 264. 265.

Martin. Barb

216, 224.272

Luer^, Alex

1

Marr. Tiffany

Marshall. Lisa

261

Luedtke. Melani

285

18.

150.

Lucas, Jonathan 224. 300

l.udwig.

295

Leepcr. Kathie

Marr. Sandra

Martin. Douglas

Lucido. Pat

2.15

261

Lucas, Jennifer 259

Lucas.

247. 271

Lee. Christy

Leeper.

285

2.15.

Marque/. Pablo

Marshall. Ericca

1

.Myma 321

Lucas, Daniel

Ed 248. 285 Lee. Kim 228

263

272

286

286

McEnany, Cheryl 253 McFarland, George "Spanky McGary, Dixie 292 McGary. Frank 292

165

Michaels, Paula

Michels. Becky

1

272

285

15

Lucas. Christy

Lee.

Lee. Lynnclte

Loy.

224

Marquez. Matt

2

McDougal. Shari 261. 286 McElwee, Rebecca 222, 235, 248,

261

Marshall. Brian

Lee. Brandon

2.10.

263

Marion. Carl

.Marriott.

242

Lowers. Barbara

250. 261

Marfice Jewelry 320

Markt. Kristi

19

McDonough,

285

Markt. Darreen

24. 247, 259, 285

Leanard. John

247. 25.1, 26

285 190

Lovelace. Antonio

Leamon. Josh

2.1.1.

250. 272

McCune. John

McCurc. George 238. 248 McCush. Scott 286 McDerniotl. Mary 272 McDonald. Chris 67 McDonald. Gary 161, 218 McDonald, Merry 218 McDonald's 311

235

285

Mark. Melissa

Lovitl. Kelli

Lee. Darin

76

176.204.285

271

Lee. Christy

236.

3.

Mansour. Aaron

Maret. Kevin

213

Sara

McCray. Shcrce 1

Marckman. Matt 333

285

Amy

1

272

Mc-Coy. Mindi

McC ray.

Manship. Maria

Maras. Mall

247

Lovell. Steve

253

61, 291

Maples. Staci

Leake. Leslie

LeBlanc. Craig

Mann. Jackie

Loudon. Joe 226 259 Loughlin, Aaron Lovell.

Leach. Michelle

Kim

Lossman. Sieve

248

Lawric. Lisa

Lopez, Tanya

Los Angeles Philharmonic

264

Lawless. Heather

259

Lorimor, Susan

285

Laulenschlager. Brian

242. 264

Lopez, Kelly Lorbinder,

248. 253

285 Manning. Catherine

241

Loper. Michael

254. 259

Larson. Michelle

285

Long. Ronnie

271

Larson. Jennifer

Manley. Jcnn

.Mannasniilh. Vanessa

7

Silver's

Long, Laura

190

Larson, Kirk

247

Long. Jennifer

159

Lani/. Lisa

Mandel, Howie 59, 73, 74, 75. 22

238. 248

272

Morley. Del

206. 207

Moriey. Ray

264

Morris. Anita 321

Amie

Mon-is. Colby

Mon-is.Jim

272, 333 224, 254, 286

286

Morris. Marey

Meyer. Johnalhan

221. 286

Morris, Marshon

Meyer. Rosemary

57.

Morris, Michael

131

230, 286

221. 286 213. 226. 286

Meyer. Sandra

272

Morris. Molly

Meyers. Brian

272

Mortimore. Shanygnc 222.

Meyers. Sara 238. 257. 333 Meyers. Zach

Miceli.Tony

144

257,286.3.13

2.14.

235 Mortis.

Ahmed

Morton. David

190 4. 235.

286

Index

327


Moser. Jeff 22, 204, 230, 244. 245.

272

Niemeier. Elizabeth

248. 287

Ortmann, Chnstel

Niemeier. Katherine

287

Osawa, Yuki

Moser, Vincent 190

Niew, Doug

Moss, Martha

86

Nincehelser, Tiffany

Mosser. Shon

16

Nixon, Pat 32

Mott, Jennifer

116

Nodes, Jennifer

Noel, Matthew

Nolan. Angela

Mueller, Cindy

Nolke. Jeff

134,286 248, 257

Amy

248

Murphy.

Murray. Sheila

247, 246.272

My

Little

Ptasnik, Steve

10.

Dana

11.

287

Anna 135,287 Nothstine, Don 295 Nourse, Chad 259 240, 241

248

Nutzel, Jeannie

o

286

18

286

257

102 River Club 241

Navarro, Maria

286

O' Boyle, Shannon 224, 272

286

Nebraska Theatre Caravan,

Neff, Travis

Nelles,

261. 288

288

295

228, 230, 242

O'Grady, Angela

216

242

Ohno, Noriko

288

Ojeski, Laura

288

Oleson, Jeremy

Nelson, Jim

125

Oligschlacger, Daniel 213

Neubert, Michelle

228

Olin, Steve 321

216

Oliver,

261,287

Ken

Pascnta.

Pashek.

Oludaja.

257, 272

250

Newcomb, Tracy

287

Newhouse, Susan Newland.Jill

198,236

Newman. Newman,

Emilie

238, 239

257. 272 222, 287

Lisa

Newton, Jay 318 Newton, Sean 287 Ng. Elvin

222 Nguyen, Anh 224. 287 Nguyen. Linh 241.254.264 Nickerson, Nielsen.

Amy

Dana

287 287 198

328 Index

Zach

241

57

Kyndra

Perkins,

O'Riley. Maggie

Perrin Hall Council

Meghan

254. 255. 272

O'Riley. Seann

Ormer. Elder

32

O'Rourke. Ryan

213.214,

222, 242, 288 Orr,

Ansie

259, 288

176,

190

Person.

242, 243

213. 253

253

Mark

129. 2.36.333

Peterman. Jason Peters. Chris

213

Ramsey, Shad

289

272

67.158 226,257, 289

Randolph, Julia

224

Rangel, Gabriel

Science Club 245

Rash, Keith

273

250 307

11

247

Porotesano. Fia

261

Rash. Kayleen

268

224. 242, 273

289

31,

Rasmussen, Corie

238, 289

Rasmussen, Elder

236

Rasmussen, Laura

261

Rasmussen, Leigh 198

Eduardo 172,173,179

Maria 226, 228, 242, 289,

307

Rasmussen, Pamela

289

Heather

Potts,

Tandria

214

Ratliff, Kerri

36

Potts,

247

238,254, 289

Rathje, Lonelle

Rathke, Jennifer

289

289 Rawhngs, Kevin 213,259 Rausch, Daniel

190,

191,

273

289

238, 289

Ray, Kimherly

Poulson, John 321

Reagan, Lisa

Powell, Andrea

Real Live Brady Brunch. The 98.

289 273, 333

Powell, Mike 326

224,

Pamela

Person. Kara

Political

263, 289,

329 289

Powell, Deryk

228, 238, 289 Pcnry.

Poe. Gina

Potter, Jeff

Ross 300

Perry, Heather

263

236

Ron 174, Tony 190

230

Ramirez, Alex

179, 213,

Posey, Connie

289

Perkins.

Inn 320 Rambaldo, Ron 230

Ramirez, Mercedes

288

289

Perkins. Jenni

Company 297 O'Riley, Karma 224.288 O'Riley.

75,

264

O'Riley Brothers Construction

O'Riley. Shannon

Ramada 273

289

Plagman, Jean

Portz,

272

273 233, 259

Ramirez, Katherine 230.231,289

Portillo,

272

261

Raffuny, Michael

Pizza Hut 39,312

Pope John Paul

Pepsi-Cola 306. 307

Perkins. Matt

254. 288

193

Pomrenke, Jason

228. 288

Perdue. Zachary

Perot,

Kevin

PiUsenbarger, Jennifer

Pope, John

Pennington. Susan

214,288

Radford, Jeremy

Rainbolt, Rustin

Polzin, Jody

264.314

Pendleton, Rebecca

Ontiveros, Nancy

288

Sarah 182. 191. 193

116, 295

Ong, Bee Hcang 222

Oriele,

3.

1

288

Pendegralt. Ronald

Bayo

Rabin, Yitzhak 313

182, 191, 193,

Plaster, Jennifer

176

Casondra

Peltz.

221

273

R

289

261

Plumer, Brian

288

238, 288

O'Neal, Tip 321

Nielsen. Jody 261. 272 Nielsen. Tricia

230, 250, 272

Order Of Omega

287

Newman Council

2

273

.

1

218

218, 289

Peak Entertainment 311.334

Pelster.

Newbert, Michelle

214,

155. 214.

Payne. Precious

Peel.

Quinn, Sieve 190

289

Pavhcek, Erin 224. 288

176

Olson, Nathan

13.

247, 250

Paulson, Carrie

259

Olson, Kerisa

1

226

Peek. Kenny

289

Pittscnbarger. Robert

Pedersen. Danelle

236

Rebekah 284

Pills,

177

176.

Jill

Quinn. Robin

134. 135

Pinick.

176,236,259

232

Kim

Kami

263

Quijano. Theresa

289

Dean 151 Rodney 22

Pingel.

216. 221. 242. 272

134

Queen, Debbie

264, 289

Pittrich. Jennifer

179

247, 261,

Q

244. 245

212. 213, 273

Program

230, 238, 333

289

Pyle, Trevor

Pinkerton

256, 288

Patlon Sales Co., Inc. 320

Olson, Chris

253,

288

Mike

Amy

272

Patton.Carol 66, 67. 82.

Olson, Brian

New, Richard 295 New. Theresa 218, 226, 248,

Amy

Amie 273

204

25. 28.

Pillow, Danielle 238. 250. Pilot

Parsons, Pamela

Eon 273 Pummell, Scott

57. 235. 242. 253.

Chad

Pietrovvski,

288

272

Neumeyer, Neil

242

Pierson.

111

Parman, Sally

Neuerburg, Michelle 112, 236, 250 18,

Pierson.

241

222

238

Puis,

247

Pierson, Dani

84

Panhellenic Council Paperella, Joe

Chan

Purviance, William

245

Pierpoint, Melissa

Pierson,

263

Panessa. Daniela

Pearson. Kara

190

Olsen, Kathryn

287

32,273, 283, 284

Panemcre, Margie

Pui Chung,

Pursel,

22, 23.

Pickett, Kirk

179

190

Mark

Pichon.

241. 242.272

287

Nelson, Scott

182

Pavhch, Dave

Nelson, Eric

Nelson, Kay la

Palmer, Terri

Patterson.

272. 333

176.288 261,272

Karen

Ogden, Lora

261

272

7

289

263

Palmer, Chris

Palms, The

Kim

Piatl.

Paghais 320 Palevics, Astra

27. 28

247 172,

Pub, The

Phoenix. River 321

235,261

Palagi, Alisha

Parllow, Sarah

Ogden, Amie

286

Nelson, Cory

David

Phillips Hall

16

Panlow,

Offult.

235. 286

Nelson, Allison

Phillips,

Paden, Heidi

272

Oehlertz. Robbie

224

Dan

Packwood, Bob 319

242, 272

Oehler. David

Emily 204

Nelrete,

Dexter

O'Connor, Misty O'Donncll. Shelley

1

Neitzel, Jeannie

Phillips.

O'Connell, Kelly

O'Dell, Darin

The 90 Neely, Ron 226 Neeson, Liam 3 Neess, Hesha 213

Mu

Sigma Alpha Sigma Kappa

247

Chi

Puis, Jodi

Philadelphia Phillies 302

Parsons, Melissa 213, 214, 226,

O'Brien, Rebecca 218,219,288

259

Phi

Phi

288

Pace, Brian

Nolhstine,

NRHH

242

242

Alpha Sinfonia Phi Omega Phi 245

P

105

104,

242

PhiMu 16.28.29.261,263.281

295

Northwest Missouruin 73. 219.

Psi

241

Sigma

Phi Eta

122,

Przybylo, Jeff

261

Phi Beta Alpha

Phi

Nauss. Monica

Neal, Kevin

52,59

263,273 156,261,295

Pryor. Kristin

113

Angela

Pfetcher,

Phi Alpha Theta

179.

174,

Northup, Russ

2K6 292

Naujokaitis, Charity

Neal, Evan

238

263

.'\nne

300

Naster, David

156

235

261, 288

Mark

Petit,

246

273

Phelps, Scott

220

Namanny, Heather

Donna

Owen, Derek 288 Owens, Bruce 241, 272 Owens, Dean 261 Ozawa, Mayumi 233, 288

254. 264

238

Nakazawa, Kenji

Nathan

Pruilt.

Norman. Jen

Norton. April

Nagasaki, Hitomi

Pruett.

Psych/Soc Club

Northwest Celebration 112, 113

N

273 1

Motion

In

246, 247

289

236 272

Northwest Jazz Ensemble 76,

272

PRSSA

Peterson, Michael

Peterson, Rachel 3

236, 224,287

Dog China

Promotion

16

Pham, Rosic

Northup,

229. 248

Proctor, Kristen 214, 236, 250, 289

289 235, 248

PHsler. Shelly

Myers, James 333

NAFTA

235

Mary

321

289

Prim. Kelli

273

Peterson,

289

Price. Vincent

Overfield, Melissa

Northcrafl,

The 301

Myers, Edward

264

289

Price. Heidi

Norlen. Matthew

North Side Mall

286

Ottmaner, Nancy

238

Amy

Price.

218, 221

Peterson, Carrie 222, 234, 289

Ken

238. 258.273

Prem. Kristin

289

32

Peterson,

247

Prem. Colleen

317

Dana

257

Melissa

Med Club

Ough, Lisa 235 Ough, Michelle 159, 261,272 Over, Debbie 213

North Complex Hall Council

Murray, Peggy

Amy

Peterson, Emily

288

Otto, Lori 325

1

233

Nore. Jennifer

Murphy, Mary

Store.

1

Noone. Lisa 224. 235. 257. 287

118,295 238, 272

Music

Ottman, Monica

Pre

204

Peters, Tricia

Peterson,

Ottmen, Marica 1

142,160,

14,

273 Pratte.

254, 289

Peterson, Carl

247

Ottinger, Joy

241. 264.272.

Norbin. Scott

Murphy, Kalhryn

Muse, Sherri

259

Tammy

Peterson, Brian

218.261

Jackqulyn 235. 253. 254.

Pratt.

289

Peterson, Angela

249, 295

312

286

Jeff

265

289

Michael

Peterson,

259. 272

Otlinger, Denise

259

Noonan. Brian

Munita, Cindy Munsch, Don 272, 333 Murdock, Jill 286 Muman, Jim 264. 286 Murphy. Barbara 272 Murphy. Gary 245

288

259

Angle

Otle,

Peters.

235. 272

Todd

Oswald, Jeff

272

Noller. Jennifer

286 263

Cade

218

O'Sullivan. Stacy

222

Mubarak, Hosni 305

Mullins,

190

Peters.

Peters. Steve

Osmundson. Kurt Osterhout.

Noetcher, Logan

Mueller, Kevin

250, 272

1K9.

Noel, Christie

286

Muenchrath.

Osborn, Janice

Noecker, Logan 204, 264

Moutray, April 286 Morga, Chris 235 Mozingo Lake 10

Mraz, Lisa

215

214

288

Powell,

Shawn

289

99. 100. 101

Reardon. Kelly

213

10

Redd. Paul 312

222, 242

Redman. Robbie

Powers, Jeanna

261

Powers, Troy 300

Reed.

Prache, Gunter 302

Reed. Nathan

289

Prather, Christy

198

Reed. Robert

100

45, 51

Reese.

Pralher, Jessica Prather.

Tom

Pratka. Jessica

39 241

Amy

Don

224. 289

7

Reeves. Christopher Reeves.

Shem

236

250


Michael

kcill.

221. 254.

2M.

Rixlham. Hugh 321

242

Reinekc. Slacy

259

RciMc. Steve

289

Rcisirolter. Chcrie Reilcr,

289

Rubin

289

Rcltord. Annie

248

Religious Life Council

2M.

Remick. Michelle

Tony

.112

271

Remsburg. Michele Renlro.

273

Rodman. Reggie

42

Roe. Gia

248

Rixr. Jeff

14.233.245,264.289 289 216

Roedcl.Ted

Rogers. Michelle 235. 248. 259.

247, 259.289

164.319

Rohlnien, Duane

289

Romano. Francie

Research Seeds,

.109

Ronchelto. John

Inc.

Reusser, Janet

230

Rook, Theresa

Reuther, Rene

224. 289

Roorda, Alex Roper, David

Theo

Rosier. Steve

Richards. Michael 315

ROTC

Rhonda

222. 273

289

Richardson. Angle Richardson. Marsha

254

Richardson. Samantha

289

179.273

Richardson. Soarise

Tonya

274

Roush, Angela

289 274

Roush, John

289

Jem

190

Roussin. William 310

Schlamp. Jennifer

263. 289

Rowland. Lonila

Schleusner. Jim

Rowlette. 213. 289

RS

289. 333

Riedcl. Laura

216. 289

Rieschick. Denise

289

Riesgaard. .Andrea

Riggan. Jane

2

Ruddy.

226. 247. 289

289 2.10.

Nancy

Riley, Nicole Riley,

Tom

263, 325

Rusch, Tricia

190

Doug

290

248, 274

Schneider, Chris

Schneider,

190

Russell-McCloud. Patricia 18.

263

Rust. Gretchcn

Ryan, Brenda

2

1

242

222

Ryan, Katie 224, 242, 243, 248, 289

174. 176. 188. 190

Rydbcrg, Keith

Roberts-Rinehan. Mary

289

100

WHAT

144.

Schoencmann, Todd

145

Schoonover. Terry

s Sackcr. Jercmv

IS

221. 274

THE BRADY

Schrocr. Tcri

233. 274

316

274

290

Schug. Jennifer 254,261, 274

BILL

261.290

Graham

27. 40. 228.

Skaggs. Trent 22

274

Skerritl.

Tom

Slaha.

Shannahan. Krin

Slcath. Justin

Sharp. Jim

Sloan. James

Sloan.

84

274

Ann Marie

ShelTield.

Amy

Sheldon. Loree

48

290 247, 290

Smelt/cr. Jim 1

1

1

.

257

290 226. 254. 274

Sheridan. Jim 315

Sherman. Lisa

235. 261,274

Shawn

Sloan. Tara

263 191

55, 261

Smith, Beatrice

Smith, Blase

250, 257, 274,

333 Smith, Bobbi

261

Smith. Brian

242, 261,290

Smith. Bruce 222. 223. 247. 274 Smith, Bryan

Dave

248. 253

Smith. Chestina

Shields.

Mike

259

Smith. Danny

211. 214.2.59

274

2.10.

Shidler.

Shields. Russel

176

174,

Sligar. Jennifer

Twyla

248

249. 257. 290

290

Shannon. Rachelle 307 133

.

Amy 290 Slater. Amy 9 Slaughter. Amy 213.214

Shamrad Metal Fabricators 302 Shanahan. Krin 290 Shane. Todd 178. 179. 274 176

1

315

Skroh. Peggy

Shcrwin Williams Co. 320

274

Simmons. Jared 264. 290 Simmons. Tracie 191

Sisco.

290

Sherlock. Susan

276

Schulenberg. Lara

248 290

132.

2.30.

Sims Fertilizer 320 Sin. Chia-Sung 222

201

Kim

228.

Simon. Steve 196. 198. 199

1

Shaffer. Stephanie

Shea.

290

Schuanke. Jcffery

274

228

Sellmcyer. John

Shaw. Kevin

290

Scholastic Adversiising. Inc.

Schreiner. Karen

146

Clinton. Hillarv

Monica 302

Sharp.

Schneider. Robert

290

190.

259

Sharp. Julie 333

Schneider. Lee 32

Schreck. Chris

Robotham. Tracy 189. 190 Roden. Tammy 273

Rodham

216 263

Schramm. Kory 235. 290. 333

82

Tyson 261 Robke. Jim 264 Robinett.

Rodgcrs. .Anthony

144

Schneider. Jenny

257, 289 127,

116

Eva

Schneider, Heidi

289 Rush Printing Co. 306

Robhins. Chad 2CU

Mark

Ruse,

Schneider. Andrea 173. 179. 214,

274

283

Sigma Sigma Sigma 16,24, 28. 29, 263,264,281.312 Sigma .Society 28. 250 Sigma Tau Gamma 48. 264. 265 250 Simmerman. Adam 274 Simmons. David 80 Simmons. James 290

Scyller.

290

264

Sikorski. Lisa Marie

Shain. Brad

Schneckloth. Suzy

290

241

Scrogin. James

290

290

Scon

Scilen,Tcd

Sergei. Al

261

214

2.16,

274

Semu. Daisy

290

Schmil/. Douglas

Rush, Jeni

263

Roach. Whitney

Roberts.

179,

290

Senter. Cassidy 3

261

261

262, 263

274

Sellberg. Kari 226. 256. 257.

Schnack. Alyssa 214.241. 242.

Rumelhart, Michelle

289

Roberts. Paul

233

Runyan, Sandra

228, 248, 289

Ri\es. Kathy

257

Ruiste, Steven

Lia

261

Schmitt. Laurie

295

Rugan. Sandy

Rui/;,

224

Schmidt. Shannon

Andy

263

213. 214.259

Schn, Emily 259, 290

.Seles.

230

Schnialjohn. Tara

.Schmidt. Trevor

259 156.

295

Rinehan. Mark Rink. Shcri

247

295

Riley, Larry

Riley.

289

Julie

Rude. John

248. 249,303

Rihner, Heather Riley. Heather

250

274

.Seim. Steven

292

Sean

Sieben.

290

Seller, Jennifer

Schmaljohn. Kristin 224. 226

320

Rubinstein. Barbra 214,235

1

263

Schlomer. Daniele

233

OITicer Machines

RTNDA

258

247

Sigma Alpha lota 250, 251 Sigma (jamma F.psilon 250 Sigma Phi bpsilon 16,28,261,

263

263

Danna

Seger,

292

Schleusncr. Lori

249

Rubel. Nikole

Riggs, Andrea 214,

RIGHTS

Ann

Royal. Kimberly

264

Schirmcr. Rachelle

Ridder. Heather

Ride Bicycles 320

Kim

Siebels.

Sierck.

Segeban. Stacie 199.

248

Schimmel. Jackie

Richmond. Dell

Ridenour. Johnna

268

Seetin. Charles

274

Schiermeyer. Jamie

212. 213

257 236. 274

290

252. 253

Sibhemison. Tracey

Seelholf. Laurie

241

Schieber. Roger

SHRM

Sidden. John

86

Sedore. Chad

261

Shreeves. Ylonda

W orks

Co. 297

Tammy

Seek.

190.

Inn 334

Son

Sedorcek. Kay

289

Schettler. Joe

Schey. 261, 274

244

Sebanc. Julie

235, 253. 289

321

Shore. Dinah 321

Show-Me

Schuske Metal

Scaly. Kenrick

Sears.

190

Amy

Scher/er. Chris

248

274 Rother,

263

Schenk. Monica

289. 329

Roth. Travis

246. 289.

&

Sears. Daniel

Ryan

Schendel,

Roth. Shaleen 214. 252, 253, 261,

216

Richards-Stanley. Sandy

Scheib,

64

152. 153.227.

.Seals.

Scheckloth. Suzy

295

Ross, Thophil

198,199.202,

307

179

173,

Seaman

Shop& Hop Shores. Chris

290

Scrogin, James

190

-Schcchinger. Kristin

261

235, 263

Tammara

Scolt,

226

Tim

2.10

Scott, Nicole

236. 274

235, 289

Rosenhohm. David Roscwell, Mark

253

Schcar. Cindy

181, 190

180,

Rosa, Christen

Richards. Christopher 230, 264

Richards.

264 George 264

SchalTner.

Root, Steven 214, 226

Ross,

1

Savales. Telly 321

Schaer. Tracie

289

179.

Tim 315

Kayc 263 Schuring. Heather 274 Schvsaller. Slacy 223, 274 Sehwanke, Sara 247, 274 Sehwanz, Naialie 226. 257. 290 Scimeca, Toni 290 Seotl, Andrew 248, 257, 290 Scoti, Cindi 290 Scolt, Kerrie 261, 290 Schuster. Johna

SchaelTer. Paul 299

259

Amy

274 Su-Mei 274 Shilts. Randy 321 Shioh. Peggy 248 Shipley. Aaron 264 Shipley. John 290 Shipley. Staci 290 Shipley. Susan 290 Shirley. Russ 213, 259 Shirrel. Jinli 274 Sh.h.

.Schul/e.

Schaeler. John

Inc.

Rice.

Schuli/ Electrical Inc. 316

153,248,274 289 Sanders. Caroline 289 Sanders. Lisa Kay 242. 26 3 Sanger. Michelle 213.274 Sapp. Wendy 276 Saucerman. James 295

289

Reynolds. Tanya

1

305

213

Shields. Tricia Shields. Teresa

Sander, .Aaron

Schael'er.

2M. 289

250

Schults. Jen

Sampsel. Laura

.50

Reynolds Bindery.

320 289 RHA 7.20.23.240. 248.291 Rhiynes. Kathy Rhodes. Kevin 247 289 Rice. Melinda

289

Schaad. John

273

Renshaw Shannon .

Mohammad

2.59.

1 .

Rwlf. Kilie 198

247, 290

Schulles, Shannessy

Angela 254.

.

Salameh.

Rofre-Slemrotler. Diann 317

190

Renner. Theresa

Reno, Janet

Rodler. Jenmler

Roe. Regina

242

Sackett. Julie

Salisbury

230, 270

Angela

RixJier.

Smith. Dcrrck

AN INFRINGEMENT ON YOUR

236 290 260 I'M,

l')x,

pio

RIGHTS


Smith. Jane

12!

Smith, Jeiry

290

274

290

Smith. Jodelia

Smith. Marisa

Steener. Karen

264

274 274

SMS/AHEA SMSTA 253

Stem. Randal

250

Amy

274

Sneak Preview

254, 255

Stevens, Heather

Snell. Miehelle

290

Stewart, Holly

Snuggs. Christy

56

Snyder. Susan

274

Soh, Hooi-Suan

Denise

290

Solomon. Luther

32

284. 290

274 247. 274

Sortor, Jennifer

Still.

Jon

Still.

Sara

25

Amy

Slinson.

Soul Asylum 3 15

Stiskal, Jiri

South Complex Hall Council 253

Stitches in

Spagna. Christy

Stites, Pat

230. 238

Mike 224 Sparks, Brian 218,236.248,290 Spalding,

Sparks. Krissy

238

Sparrow, Tony

190

Spate,

Spear,

Chad Gene

Time 295

290 Beverly 274

Stites, Sheri

Stoll.

242, 257

Ston. Jim

5

Stone.

Amy

295

Stone.

259. 265

Stone. Jonell

257

Spence. Eric Spiegel.

Sam

Stoner. Jim

Storm. Brian

76

Ston. Jennifer

264, 290

Stowe.

Spielberg, Steven

159,315 263

Andrew

Spire, Spire,

Cara

SPJ

254

Jamey

190

Spiehs, Kevin

290, 322

Tefft, Scott

Street.

Spolar, Antoinette,

101

94

Terry. Krista

247. 250. 290

Stroburg.

Spotts. Jennifer

Spray. Jennifer

274 247, 290

Strong. Chip

290 Student Advisory Council

145

Denny, Dyann

St.

Francis Behavioral Medical

St.

230. 235

Student Ambassadors

St.

Joseph Heating 318

Joseph News Press

Sladlman, Ryan

Sturm, Jerry 7 Stuva. Chris Sublette.

Stageman, Laura

264 Renee 174, 179. 188. 191,290 Staker, Sandy 241,264 Stains,

290

Cammie

Subway 319 190,

Tom

Stalone. Cheryl

33,214,254

Sun. Hoi leong

Stanfield, Brian

242. 274

Sundberg, Kori

Stanfield, Kelly

274

Suogin, James

Stanley, Sande

Stansbury, Stant,

Stark,

295

Suppal, Preeti

190.

Starkebaum. Cynthia

274

290

59

330 Index

236. 250

290

28

222

Kristi

Sweetheart

Cup

10

Thurman. Antwoine 190 Tiedeman. Michael 274 Tieman. Leslie 261 George 307 Timko. Georgene 125.195

290

176 Co. 320

Tinslcy. Tricia

290

292

Tjeerdsma. Mel 334 1

230. 236. 274. 333

216.233.292

Tolliver. Kristina

274

Amy

292

Tomlinson.

261

Wallace. Bret

275

Waller. Kimberly Wallet.

Mike

293

241

170.204.236.275

Walls. Larry

Walsh. Michael 144,

145

159

Wanamaker. Sam 32 Wamsley. Collin 221, 242 Wand, Jim 18, 19, 96, 97,220 Wanninger, Peggy 214 Wardlow. Brian 176, 177.214, 275

263

Van Cooten,

Jennifer

Ware, Tricia

230

Warren, Billee 33,

293

Warren. Steve

VanDyke. James 295 VanDyke. Patt 14.

Waterfield.

1

253, 293

Warren, Jennifer

Vandenburg, Paige 92

1

250. 293

244

Warrick. Markee 19. 134. 140,

143. 152

218

Roben

Watson. Blake

261

170.

Watson. Penny

171

293

216, 230

Van Corp. Marc 293

Watts. Brian 4, 105, 293

Vannoy. Trudi 293 VanRyn. Tara 221.224.228

Watts. Pat

.Van Sickle. Eddie 293 Van Vactor. Paul 274 Van Weelden. Matt 263 Van Werden. Bill 261,293 VanWinkle.

249

Walter Brothers 309

V 11,334

128.

230

Walthall. Kate

125

Value Fair

13.

Walthall. Catherine 261. 275

Watt. Julie

Tison. Bethany

Tokunaga. Miki

293

Walker. Ryan

Vanfossen. Jeff 273

176

Todd. Kim

213.232.293

274

19

Todd. Allison

Walker. Karen Walker. Lonnie

238, 254. 257.

University Players

Vacek. Becky

293

261

Watson. Henry 305

Horace

Tisdel.

Walker. Joel

Van Dyke. Ryan 65. 293 Van Fossen. Chad 190

274

Tipton. Brian

261 238, 333

247. 250

Stacia

Tipling. Angella

Heather

Sweeney,

263

264

Walker. Connie

295

268

253, 275

Walker. Angela

236. 242. 243. 244,

Uphofl, Sara

235, 293

67,

Wal-Mart 18 Walden, Dave

156, 176, 190,

University of Ostrava

263

176, 213, 236

222

Yin, Tsui

Wakefield, Lisa

260,261

18

263

241, 274

Wake, Shawn

United Telephone 310

1

Thrasher. Brooke

Timmons.

295

Swartzendruber. Todd

Starling. Paula 234. 235. 242.

Steeg. Marianne

Emilee

Thornton. Jennifer

261,274

Walker. Cody

Way

233

293

Waigand, Wendy

United Missouri Band 312 United

274

88

Wahlert, David

333

292

Tiller.

290 Sumy Oil Co. 320 Suzuki, Yuko 290 Swanson, Amy 290 Swanhout, Mike 148,261,274 Sutter,

263

Starkey, Brian

228, 257, 290

245

Hsiao-Chuan

Sutter,

274

Starkey, Beth

Starkweather

Sur,

224. 263

Starkbaum. Andy

271

222

190

Ukpokodu. Nelly Ulvestad, Jim 66, 259 Underwood, Kris

292

Throener. Jerry

321

Support Staff Council

Shane 317 Doran 214,224,274

Stark, Judy

290

Super Bowl XXVIII 302

259

Jill

235. 290

Sullivan. Sherry

261,333

Thompson. Joe 221.260.261 Thompson. Kristin 26 Thompson, Stacey 264 Thompson, Tammy 254

Thorp. Danielle

Sullendcr. Nicole

Sullivan.

Thomas, Ginny 292 Thomas, Lori 274 Thomas, Melissa 292 Thomas, Michael 292 Thomas, Nathan 235, 236 Thomeczek, Eric 221, 292 Thompson, Emma 315

Tammy

Wagner, John 80 Wagoner, Wade 250

u Uhde, Matt

245

293

Wagener, Chris Wagner, Cyndi

321

U2 315

Thomas. Cherie 230, 235. 236. 274 Thomas. Dan 274

Thornton. Jacqueline

226. 261

230

261, 274

Tzou, Chi-Yuan

236. 291

22. 23.

w

213.293

85

274

213

Wayne

Voss, Heather

Wai

Thornhill, Jennifer

290

31.

Viner.

235 149,

tion

264

Thornburg, Jeff

Sturm. Renae 164

264. 333

Stangle, Shelley

254, 255

246, 247, 257

246, 247

Si.

254

Student Senate 20, 40, 224, 227.

150,320

Gregory's Church

238, 257

Stuck, David

St.

Center

253

Stubbendick. Lisa

Springer, Mattie 213, 290

Spunarova, Dita

263

26

Strueby. Sonia

263

Spreitzer, Jolinda

261. 290

228

Strohman. Laura

Spotts. Kimberlie 253.

274

Mandy

290

87,

291 102

Stroburg. Christina

Stroeble. Jon

1

Matthew 264,291 Thomas, Angela 214,262, 263.

Picabo 317

Sports Page

Sportsman. Elise 238. 257. 290

84.

Thies,

254. 295

Sport Shop. The 320 31

1

291

Thayer. Karia

253. 295

Strnad. Melissa

30

Turner. Lurinda

Twyla Tharp Dance Founda-

66, 291

Teneyck, Roberta

Temus, Jason

Stringer. Jeffery

Turner, Linda

291

149

Straueh, Jody

66.

1

Villechaize. Herve 321

Voris, Jolene

Tye, Dan 333

Tedrow, Christine

259

293

Conway

233

Von Gorp, Mare

1

Turner. Kristal 256, 257, 276. 293

Tweed, Mark

293

Tom

Volz, Stacy

250

Mike

179

Lea Ann 66, 241.261.293 Aaron 190

Vetter.

Voegele,

293

Turner, Leza

Turner.

293

Viola, Brooke

264

Turner. Denise

Kristi

Vincent, Justin

Tunis, Bradford

Turner. Cathy 3

259 274

Vesey. Robert

Vieregger.

257. 293, 333

Tudjman, Franjo 313

Twitty,

26, 28.

230. 238. 333

Chuck 142.293 Veerkamp. Danny 144 Vehe. Shawn 259 Veatch.

Vial.

264

149,196,197,

190

Vaught. Jack

Vidacak. Derrick

224, 225

213, 291

264, 290

179

Andy

Greg

235

274

228. 293. 326

176

295 247. 274

Vernon.

236,250,251.293

Turner, Niki

263

Strating, Sherri

290

Teale,

218. 219. 250

Stone, Christina

Spearry. Michelle

Ron

Vaughn. Chuck

Velazquez. Jessica

293

259

3.

1

Vaughn. Trisha

Verbick. Tabatha

238. 239

247

226. 293

264

Turbelt. Jody

Taylor, Waltedda

179

Special Olympics Speihs. Kevin

Taylor,

2

151.

26

24,

224. 292

Trulson, Richard 80, 221, 226.

274

Show Shawn

Tran, Veronica

Truelove, Kristy

Taylor, Elizabeth 318

290

257

Troesser. Angle

199,335

264. 190

Stolle. Chris

Spearry. J.C. 152.273

163

162,

Variety

Trahan, Patrick

Troglin, Ginni

Tau Kappa Epsilon 16. 48. 204. 261,264,265 Tau Phi Upsilon 28, 257 Tavai, Tomasina 233. 274 Taylor. Becky 191 Taylor, Donnie 194, 196, 197, 198,

145

Stoll. Paul

157,

Tarleton. Meredith

274 290

Vasatka. Shana

Tripp, Stacy

198, 199

238, 257. 290

Varner.

Tucker. Chris

Tappmeyer, Steve

1

Vanzomeran, Wayne

Tower Yearbook

Travis. Stephanie

291

Tapia. Tisha

2

Melissa

Stills.

290

Sotler. Joy

Tonya

247

179.

Phil

Triebsch. Chris

Taco John's 4. 5. II Taggan. Jane 131. 288, 291 Talikatzis, Zach 245, 274 Tamerius, Sharon 204 Tan. Chek 222 Tanabe. Kaz 179 Tanaka. Keiji

161

Stiens. Phil

Stiens.

Sons. Richard

263

Sliens. Jennifer

Sonic 299

Sortor. Jeff

235. 290

290

238,

2.30,

257, 291,333

236, 290

Stewart. Sarah Stiens,

274

Soh, Susan

198

Tackett, Angela

290

Stewart, Jenniter

290

107.

261. 274

35

Sterling. Jennifer

Stevens.

16.

1

254

Steppers

240. 241.274

Smyers, Shari

213

Tompkins.

Toronto Blue Jays 302 Tosney. Jim 99. 100

Townsend. Bohm 68 Townsend. Heather 238 Townsend, Lilian 48 Towsend's Northwest Power Sales 320 Toys for Tots 26

263. 291

T

22

Stephenson. Michael

253

28,

Tom

247

27.

Stephens. Jennifer

290

Smolik.Jill 259,

291

S/abo. Rebecca Szlanda,

Stephens. Darin

274

Smith, Tracy

190

32

Stephens. Brad

Smith. Stephanie

Swisher. Matthew

10

Stenerud. Jan

216

Smith. Shannon

Sue

Steins.

179

174.

Smith. Roger

230, 242, 250. 254. 255. 274

235

Steinkuehler. Geoffrey

Mehnda 238

Smith. Melissa

Swenson, Cindy 264 Swink, Doug 96,214,224,228,

Steelman. Mike 204

236, 250

Smith. JuUe

Smith,

Steelman. Douglas 214. 230. 261.

Kristin 214. 222. 226,

235. 242. 247, 274

222. 235

Way. Denise

257. 293

Waynian. Kirk

236. 237. 250

Wayne Paper Supply Weaver. Brian

Co. 24, 299

230.233.261.

310

Webb. Russel Weber. Jennifer

259 247. 250. 275


While. Ken 190. 250. 259

Wcbcr. Scolt 293 Weber. Shannon 293

Wcbskr.

While. Kevin

310

Bill

Wcbsicr. Ron

Weddlc. Todd 333

White. Molly

Weekly. i;ii/abelh 235. 259 Weese. Daniel 293

White. Ryan

Weese. Wegjie.

Megan

Weichinger. Tcrri

Whitewater

263

Weiss. Danae

Whyte, Scolt

216

333

Wen/el, Todd

228

Widner. Jenniler

263

Werner. Michelle Wesl. Heather

293

West. Laura

Wiederstcin, Scott

Wiedmaier. Sean Wieinar. Heather

236

Westberg. brik

216. 263.275

Westereamp. Lori

Wild. Sheila

Western Auto Associate 320

Wilhelm. Cherlyn

WestlalLTim 152 Westol. Dave 233

Wilkens. Stacia

238. 257. 333

Weydert. Russ

Wheeler. Shannon 176, 188,

19<).

224, 226, 236

235, 253, 293 \Miiiaker. Brian 222, 234. 235,

287, 293

Whitakcr,

Doug

245

238

While. Darren

10

Wayne

199.

Winter. Lslher

224. 295

293

203

293

Liquor 302 100

293

Williams, Heather

264

Williams. Marsha

275

Williams, Mitch 302

Ramona

293

Williams. Shana 57,261

213

Williams, Tisha

Williams, Travis 190

Amy

293 24. 25

Willis,

Byron

Willis.

Carolyn

Willis.

Donna

223 275

THANK YOU

261

Women's Health Clinic 315 Wong, Pui-Ying 275 Wood, Carrie 174. 179, 236, 293 Wood. Jill 92. 248 Wood. Li/. 35. 147. 213 Wood. Ryan 216

Y Mary

Zimmer. Steven

293

Zook, Kim

Zom,

Joe

259 190

275

Zuber, Angela

Zwank, David 22 Zweifel.Tom 214 293 Zylstra, Melody

221, 275

292

46. 222, 293

293

Yeager, Jason Yeltsin, Boris

313

Shum

274

Yoder, Sheila 235,

Wood. Tiffany 261 Wood, Tony 14, 104 Wooden, Angela 235 Woodruff Arnold 320 Woods. Andrea 2.3(1, 293 Woods. Chalanda 216 Woods, Eric 302

293

293,321

Yarkasky, Sarah

Yen, Tsui

224

218,241,250

Yanagishima. Hidcloshi Yantis,

295

Zimmerman. Jenny 293 Zimmerman. Kelly 253. 275 Zimmerman, Michelle 259 Zion, Shad

198.

Yama/.oe, Mihoko

Willers.

Whitakcr. Shane

Wynne, Johannc 232, 233, 295

86, 87

225

Yagel. Kelly

Williams,

214,216,

Whelton, Theresa

293

Woller, Chad

Amy

\N illiam's

Damian Monroe 305 Williams, Dave 10

261

Ryan

Wipperman. Gary 261 Wiseman. Teresa 218, 238. 293 Wit/ke. Jeremy 261 Wolbert, Mike 221, 254

W illiams.

190

Jefl

Wheeler, Matt

Wyllie.

Nancy

Ziegelmcyer, Nikki 317

Wuebker, Andy 189. 190 Wyhle. Bryce 293

293

ZelilT,

Zhang. Yunliang

179

Winter, Travis

Williams, Clarence

Wheeler,

Terri

216

261

Williams, Barry

218

Wright,

259

Zappa, l-rank 321

222, 242, 243

218

26

Zahnd. Jiw Zaner, Bobby

261

214. 216

293

Wheclbarger. Karen

235. 236

Mandy

Wingfield, Sidney

259. 293

Wilkcrson. Derek

13

275

Amy Jill

259. 293

275

Amanda

Wright,

Wingert, Jean

Winstead.

194. 198

Wright.

Wright,

Winger, Debra 315

263

191. 275

182,

z

250

Wright,

221. 293

293

imherley. Lisa

12 191,

Yurka, Heidi

Wray Salvage 320

Wright. Angle

190

Wilson. Scott

2

.302

Wilkerson. Leasa

We\ muth, Kalhenne Wharton. Keith

293 295

1

Yurka, Heather

33. 273, 283

Wrenn, Darrell

Winemiller. Lucretia 28

79. 259. 247

179.

224

293

2.30.

Willcp..

1

178.

174,

242

1

275

Worley, Denisc

264

Winkler, Troy

Weymuih. Allic 275 Weymulh, Annelle 36. 140.164 Weymulh. Richard

.30.

World Series

247. 275

Wilson. Richard

105

World Famous Outback. The

238

Wincinger. Heather

2.50

Woody Herman Band

Worland. Mike

163

275

Wilbcr. Stacy

2.38.

WiKilfolk. Steven

Wilson. Jeffrey

W

293

Wiederholt. Brian

256. 257.276 214.259

Wesley Center

216.

Wilson Inn 335

Wilt. Michael

Wensel. Kerry

Yultide Keaste

242. 247. 275 21.3,

248

Wilson. Michelle

230. 257. 295,

238

Wixidward. Bobbi 78. 214. 235.

71

Wilson. Meaghan

218. 293

Widmer. Laura

224

Dawn

Wilson, Hawkeyc

293

293

293

W'mikey. Jennifer

Wilson, Janel

293

Wen

Hung

275

213

Widen. Dcccy

Chi.

14, 121

Whiiiingion. Trcssa

222. 293

216 293

Wilson, Doug

223, 293

Welsh. Cathlecn 235. 242. 248

Woods. Shelby

Wilmes. Carrie

Young, Dcbra 275 Young, Jenifer 263. 293 Young, Jerry 204, 264 Young, Michelle 293 Young. Sarah 263 Youngs. Becky 293

259

WcHids, Lisa

293 190

WiUnch. Marci

Wilson.

3<K)

Whitney, Lisa

293

Welch. Kimberly Weller. Sarah

295 293

Whiting, Jason

259. 293

Weiss. .Molly

Jim

275

Whiieing, Jennifer

14

Amy

Willits.

261

Whiied, Jeanette

268

Willito.

Wilson. Crystal 212.

224

Whited, Billy

293

Weidner. Jason

293

While. Sandra

263

Julie

275

White. Lauren

147

42.

295

White. Kenneth

2.36,

250. 254,

333

Yokum, Dwight

61

Youmans, Sarah 235 Young. Andrew 235, 236 Young. Brad 261 Young, Cindy 242. 257. 293

COLOPHON s T.^rd volume of Tower w us primed by Herff Shawnee Mission, Kan,, using linotronie printing. I'he yearbook was produced in PageMaster using Macintosh computers. The 336-page

Northwest MissiHiri

.State L'ni\ eisit>

Jones, 6015 Travis Lane,

book had a press run of 2.750.

The cover

is

four-color process chosen by the school. The end sheets are 560 Teal

Pantone. It

winikln't have been us easy as

il

was

w uhout Ihc help of the following people:

All regular

copy was primed

Kntertainment headlines were

Artwork by

Juile

in lOpt. in

Times. Student Life headlines were

Quorum. Academic headlines were

Watt and Lydia Irwin. Sports headlines were

in

in Lilhos.

Hiroshige.

in Eurostlie,

People

Amato Color

Dean Hubbard

headlines were in Franklin Gothic and Korinna. Organi/alion headlines were

Julie Bogart

Lydia Irwin

Real

Larry Cain

John Jasinski

Student Life, Academics, Sports, Organization and Entertainment were designed by Angela Tackett. Real World Issues and Mini Mag were designed by Jason Hoke.

Carl

Wolf Studios

Chris Kline

Dave Gieseke

Northwest Missouricm

Carole Gieseke

Scholastic Advertising

World

Issues headlines were in Weiss.

Nancy Hall

Patt

Kalie Harrison

Julie

Chuck Hoi ley

.\nd\

VanDyke Watt

Weiss.

Garamond.

Amato Color, 78 South 75th St.. and group pictures were also taken by Carl Wolf Studios. Inc. Some advertising was done through Scholastic Advertising of Incline Village, Nev. Inquiries concerning the book should be sent to Tower Yearbook; #4 Wells Hall,

Inc..

Robert Sunkel

in

All black and white photography were taken and printed by staff photographers and darkroom technicians. Four-color photographs were printed by Carl Wolf Studios,

401

Flmwood

Omaha, Neb.

Warren Gose

Mini-Mag headlines were

in

Ave.. Sharon Hill. Penn. and

Portraits

800 University Drive; Northwest Missouri Slate University; Maryville, Mo., 64468.

Wood

Index 331


Note

Editor's I

come

can't believe the year has

and

I

am

writing

my

final

to

an end

farewell to

Towerland. Not only have I learned more than I

The year

definitely left

ever imagined, but

friends of

my

I

made some of

the best

life.

my Tower

experience than with this group.

Despite numerous pen fights and smoke

we still had time to actually sleep on weekends and even called off workdays because we were so far ahead. breaks,

Although each year with Tower has brought new experiences, the most deserving

without you guys? Office four will never be

jokes, Dunkin'Donuts,

thanks goes to the editors of the books

the same.

Bobbette the snow-

learned so

I

saw

me in my

man,

the first real glimpse of Tower dedication

and

some people one thing was for

OMETHING to reflect on.

Hairdos,

shiort

Halloween

,

Yippee, snowball fights, Ben & Jerry's

much from.

Allison, not only were

Stephanie, in you

you

or anything ELSE we laughing at, it

was

Something Else Altogether.

a

different year

ALTOGETHER.

^^

a great friend but

you gave me the confidence and knowledge to pursue the ultimate task.

felt like

I

tiful

We met our goals the

is this

most beau-

book ever but look at those big photos. matter the weekend or struggle, you

No

guys always managed

to

keep

me

could not imagine a more perfect

laughing.

way

to

I

end

You

kept

me

I

have done

sane and took care of

Although I am wondered about us, sure we were a great team.

less than great stages.

sure

Angela, years.

But those were past years and 1994 was and then some, not only

Angela and Fay, what would

I

still

really

can't believe

it

has been three

We were rookies together way back to

that eerie car ride

on Christmas deadline and

since then you have

become one of my

closest

Not only have you kept me on level ground but whenever needed a laugh I knew where to go. You even went from a design friends.

1

goddess

to a

copy

editor.

As always you did

a

marvelous job with the book, the designs

1994 Tower Editorial Board. Front row: Ruby Dittmer, Angela Tackett. Karissa Boney Fay Dahlquist and Laura Widmer. Row 2: Jon Britton. Russ Weydert, Sara Meyers, Amanda McManigal and .lason Hoke. Back Row Gina Beltz, Tony Miceli, Chris Tucker. Laura Riedel. Kathy Higdon-Bolar and Mike Johnson. ,

:

332 Staff


coming

really are beautiful.

Fay, you are definitely one of a kind. Not

only have you issues but

tal

made me aware of environmenyou bring

term high waters.

when I

1

aluminum

What can

can.

you are magnificent and handled Nour

say.

job with unbelievable ease. all

to the

always think of you

will

1

drink from an

meaning

nev.

your

although

integrity,

where your heart

Oh.

is.

I

adnnie sou and

1

I

still sa_\

truly

rough

is

am si)rry abt)ul

w

in

ing with your

Wolf Man

rape stories. Sara you

making

are definitely a pro at

You have come a

long

an excellent editor.

la\ Dahlquist

Managing Editor/ Assignment

section.

way from a staff w titer I

Angela Tackett

miss your enter-

will

Mom stitries. Kath)

taining

hellish story

Academic

ideas turn into a wonderful

to

Karissa Boney Editor in Chief

smile and keeping us laugh-

ith a

Managing Editor/Personnel

the People section

As always you stayed on top of

looks great.

Mike Johnson Entertainment/Sport.s Editor

e\er\ thing and are one of the most organized

people

know.

I

,Sara

Jason the real-v\orld section looks great.

your suicide puppy.

Russ and Jon. where do thing

is

taining.

would

for sure,

Although leave

all

even begin? One

I

you kept the weekends in

times

at

enter-

wondered

I

if

we

one piece, the year would

not have been the

same without you two.

Whether it was picking photos or grinding at The World Famous Outback, there was always an adventure v\hen Russ and Jon were around. Jon you reall) shoukl ditch the hat. hey Russ, look.

I

Tony, Chris and Laura, the photos 1

know

in this

was

it

a

busy year for you. thanks for giving us your time,

and

last

plaint.

minute assignments without a com-

Thank you

for

your never-ending pa-

tience and always bringing us creative angles to

choose from. Laura. \ mi deser\ e a pat on the

back. Not only did you put up with those crazy

boys

photography department but you

in the

handled them with a country ease

to

be ad-

mired. Thanks defintely goes to you, football is

right

one of the best

in the

book.

Gina. you came on, braved the darkroom alone and even survived a year for a rookie.

my

approving.

What

And look at all that you can

do: print, shoot and write.

Thanks

for

all

of

Amanda and Ruby, you guys jumped in like You were two of the most dedicated have known and

fit

right in with all

v\'ork

would

thank

like to

on weekends

vou

for only

Laura, although

wouldn't be here

if it

dumb

way

soon learned

was more to you than just a food provider

on weekends. You always picked up slack without a gripe.

If

I

ever buy you a

definitely he a lifetime supply of

your laughing

gift

it

will

Kleenex for

mistake

to reassure

Kathy, Mike and Sara, you guys handled

copy with expertise. The

stories shine

and

I

thank you for always staying on top of everything.

You guys made writing and editing look

easy. Mike,

I

was

finally relieved

once you

decided jeans were a necessity for winter and could finally see again. Thanks for always

I

Kiiss

wasn't for you. Thanks

I

It

Weydert

Student Life, Croups, Academics Photography Editor

asked

made, you knew the perfect

I

Jon Hritlon

Entertainment, Sports. People Photography Editor

Tony

Miceli. Laura Riedel. Chris Tucker

Chief Photographers

me, and always made every-

Thank you for everything. There could not be enough room to give enough thanks to my family for their constant

Darkroom Technician

support, understanding and encouragement to

Deryk Powell. Jon Lewis Advertising

thing

do I

seem

my

best.

fine.

I

(iina Belt/

would not be here without you. my goals because of what

have only reached

you have

instilled in

have been given.

gave our best

Tower

I

me. Every opportunity

owe

Blase Smith

Business Manager

I

to you.

book

is

for you.

We

Writers: Stacy Cleverly. Tami Dodson. Lance Dorrel,

We

feel confident

our effort and your cooperation brought an-

Tower to be proud of hope you enjoy as much as we enjoyed bringing it to you. Yes, bummed a few car rides, dealt with I

Kelly Edmister, Michelle Ferguson, Julie

Aaron Garrison, Galen Hanrahan,

Hartman, Andrea Johnson, Susan Lorimor, Kristy Madden, Matt Marckman. Sherri McCorkindale, Sue Mohamed, Don Munsch, Mark Person, Scott Pummell, Kenrick Sealy,

I

my

multi-layered-hush syndrome, lost

temper a few times and found Rogers was. The memories endless and this

is

I

i)ut

Widmer

Adviser

ap-

preciate your understanding with reshoots, calls.

Laura

We

you an accurate

effort to bring

with well-rounded coverage.

my

Shelley Stangle,

Kim

Todd, Kris

Underwood

and Cody Walker

who Roy me are

take with

one chapter of

my

life that

As bidfarewell to "94 wish all the future Towers the best. While we put know for out the best book ever, one thing sure: this year was definitely Something Else will neverclose.

spurts.

not

resent your brain-

the stupid question

it

I

Jason lloko

Production IManager

the help of

your support and encouragement.

seemed no matter

We could not have done there

still

I

other

without you. Ruby,

We could

tasks.

washing the copy editors with headlines,

or

Ruby Dittmer

Copy Assistant

one credit hour, but

contributing staff writers and photographers.

index and took over where none of us could. it

mem-

long hours

gu_\ s put in

book together w ithout

this

for all of

Amanda McManigal Editorial Assi.stant

meet deadlines and sometimes took

and repeated phone

thanks for all the chocolate, but

of our staff

all

on the not-so-glamorous have put

People Editor

on the hectic ones.

bers, not only did

to

Kathy Higdon-Bolar

You jumped

your patience on the dead nights

Amanda, once we got you on a leash you were a God send. You came in on the

the insanity.

the ads

ready to give everything.

Finally, readers this

pros.

I

for

and hard

your hard work.

freshmen

Tower

in

Thanks

I

in

next year you'll actually have more

than 1/2 page to design with.

we could always count on you to bring us

great work. Chris, you always took on tasks

we raked

Altht)ugh

job.

maybe

worked

didn't say her name.

book are wonderful. Tony,

Good

Movers

Student Life/Academics Editor

I

I

I

Altogether.

Karissa

Boney

Photographers: Stacy

Baier, Ross Bremner,

Eric Burtis, Angle Carrol, Brett

Dwyer, Angela

Eggert, Merri Hutti, Kerrie Kelly, Keith Lodzinski, Jennifer Mallon, Colby Morris, James Myers, Robbie Oehlertz, Mike Reiff Kory Schramm, Julie Sharp, Ryan Stadlman, Dan Tye, Jack Vaught, Todd Weddle and Sheila

Yoder

Editor in Chief

^rStaff 333


'^My plan was to build

While most of us were awaiting the end

here, to start here with the

we had and

playei^

of the year,

it

seemed there was always

SOMETHING new going on. We welcomed a new head

from that. Obviously I had got

football

coach and athletic director after the

build

some

ideas with re-

cruiting-a recruiting base that was

more local. If you

took Kansas City to Des

controversial personnel

in

dismissal

athletic

of

November.

Businesses were

still

Moines drew a

changing

in

town,

as the Wilson Motel closed and reopened

to

Omaha and

circle

around that

area, that was

where

I

wanted to get the bulk of our players from. I thought

as the Show-Me

Inn.

Peak Entertainment

and Gourmet Pleasures offered

ELSE

something

for shoppers, while

Value Fair had a grand opening and

that would create a lot

more

interest area-wide

and it would also help create interest

on campus,''

Head Football Coach Mel closing

all

within the

same

year.

Tjeerdsma said.

With the completion

of the

Student

Recreation Center controversy began

about whether faculty fees should be required.

Arena

Fans packed

\(iL into

Bearcat

TO cheer the 'Cats as the

hosted two

MIAA

playoff

men

games.

The year soon came to an end with events we would always

4* 334 Closing

REMEMBER.


Students enjoy the new Student Recreation Center. The center offered many improved facilities. Photo by Tony Miceli.

T;

Members crowd

of Alpha

Kappa Alpha

jOin in with

the

The new recognized by Student Senate in

to support the basketball team.

organization,

charter members: Cynthia Lonita Rowland. Lisa Marshall and Sharon Johnson. Photo by Russ

December, had Shelton.

Crystal

five

Wilson,

Weydert.

Donnie Taylor tries for a three-pointer against Southwest Baptist. Northwest lost by five points to end their season. Photo by Russ Weydert.

Closing 335


A

late

full

new

February

moan gave light to

the

old Mt. Alverno

Convent. Alverno was being

considered for the new state correctional facility to help alleviate the

overcrowded Missouri prison. Photo by Jon Britton.

336 Closing


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Tower 1994  

Northwest Missouri State University Tower Yearbook

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