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The Baby issue Birth Recovery | Baby-Led Weaning Tricks for Surviving the first 3 Months Fertility, the Natural Way Traveling with little ones nwkidsmagazine.com

May 2013


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editors’

Corner

As I travel around teaching and attending conferences, people often say to me, “Portland…oh you guys have all the greatest resources there…so much opportunity for parents and babies!” I have to agree and it’s a pleasure to share just a sampling in NW Kids’ Baby Issue this year. Each year as I teach prenatal classes, care for new parents, and facilitate new moms groups, I hear about what is important to parents and parents-to-be, and each year I look forward to the opportunity to connect amazing parents to amazing resources. None of these are hard to find right here in the Portland Metro area. I regularly get questions about craniosacral therapy for babies, so we have a wonderful article explaining what it is and why this treatment is so popular. We also feature advice you wish your girlfriends might have shared; traveling with baby, starting solids, and how to survive those early months with a newborn. As much as I see the joy in new parents, I am reminded that many do not get there in the expected fashion. Our feature on infertility and complementary treatments belongs smack dab in the middle of the Baby Issue, helping us remember that parenthood is not a right for everyone to enjoy; it is a gift that some get easily and some have to go to great lengths to achieve, and it warrants our sensitivity to those still struggling through it. Wish your sisters would have told you more about what happens to your body AFTER the baby arrives? We have a little info you might want to include next time you are chatting up a planning prone pregnant mama. And for those that need support outside the circle of our awesome breastfeeding community, we share a great review of a book about positive mothering through bottlefeeding. I am proud to be able to share all of these resources with the coolest city of babywearers, baby bonders, and baby supporters of all kinds (check out the online feature at nwkidsmagazine.com, about carriers by age and stage as well). Our babies are lucky to live in this city of options, and they are lucky to have you all as parents. Kimberly

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“One thing about having a baby is that each step of the way you simply cannot imagine loving him any more than you already do, because you are bursting with love, loving as much as you are humanly capable of- and then you do, you love him even more.” - Anne Lamott, Operating Instructions: A Journal of My Son’s First Year


Contents May 2013

Cover and Contents Photography by Campbell Salgado Studio campbellsalgado.com

8 Book Review: Bottled Up: Speaks to Formula Feeding Moms...And the Rest of Us 10 My Birth Recovery Discovery 11 Resource Guide: Birth Recovery 12 Craniosacral Therapy for Infants 18 Fertility Help, the Natural Way 21 Resource Guide: Fertility Help 22 Baby-led Weaning 24 Calendar of Events/ Mama & Baby Events 28 Found Around Town: What’s New for Baby 30 Tricks for Surviving the First 3 Months 36 Traveling with Little Ones

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magazine Publisher / Advertising Director Michelle Snell michelle@nwkidsmagazine.com

Advertising Inquiries: 503-282-2711, ext. 1 sales@nwkidsmagazine.com

Editorial Beth Friesenhahn beth@nwkidsmagazine.com

Design Robyn Barbon robyn@folkloremedia.com

Kelley Schaefer-Levi kelley@nwkidsmagazine.com

Accounting & Business Services Heather Rex heather@nwkidsmagazine.com

Guest Baby Issue Editor Kimberly Bepler Kimberly@abcdoula.com Account Manager Laurel Ackerman laurel@nwkidsmagazine.com Client Services Coordinator / Client Ad Design Karel Chan karel@nwkidsmagazine.com

Connect With Us: • Phone: 503.282.2711 • email: contact@nwkidsmagazine.com • Facebook: facebook.com/nwkids • Twitter: @nwkids • Pinterest: pinterest.com/nwkids NW Kids is published monthly by Miche Media, LLC. Every effort is made to ensure accuracy; sometimes we make errors. Please let us know when we do and accept our apologies. Printed locally; Please recycle.

Listings ABC Doula..........................................................13 Amanda Arp.......................................................16 Andaluz..............................................................39 Baby Boot Camp................................................11 Barre3...................................................................7 Beanstalk............................................................13 Bella Stella...........................................................9 Bennett Suzuki Violin Studio.............................15 Bernie Fagan Soccer Camp................................25 Black Wagon......................................................36 Blossom Clinic....................................................21 Camp Meadowood Springs...............................34 Catlin Gabel........................................................25 Child’s Play Toys.................................................36 Child’s View Montessori.....................................34 Chinook Book.....................................................36 Coffee Kids.........................................................11 Do Jump!............................................................32 EcoBabyGear......................................................16 Fine Art Starts!...................................................32 French American International School Camp...25 Harmony Road Music Center.............................16 Hi 5 Dental.........................................................19 Inner Guide Expeditions....................................34 International Leadership Academy...................29 K12.....................................................................17 6 | NW Kids Magazine

Kidopolis............................................................16 Kids’ Backyard Store...........................................37 Lake Oswego Hunt Riding Academy.................34 Laughing Planet.................................................35 Learning Palace....................................................9 Legacy Health Systems........................................3 Little Fruit Farm Montessori...............................36 Mad Science.......................................................33 Mamababy Boutique.........................................13 MetroArts...........................................................34 Metropolitan Pediatrics.......................................9 Morgan Stanley..................................................16 Motheroots Counseling.......................................9 My Masterpiece Art Studio................................33 NW Children’s Theater........................................25 NW Surrogacy Center........................................21 OMSI...................................................................29 Oregon Artist School..........................................34 Oregon Children’s Theatre....................................7 Oregon Children’s Theatre Acting Academy......23 Oregon Coast Aquarium....................................36 Oregon College of Art and Craft........................35 Oregon Episcopal School...................................23 Oregon Hope Chinese School............................35 Oregon Zoo.........................................................33 Pediatric Dental....................................................2

Placenta Power..................................................21 Pod + Kin...........................................................13 Portland Early Learning.....................................34 Portland Early Learning Baby Sign Language..........................................11 Portland Language Arts....................................19 Portland Rock Gym............................................29 Portland Spirit......................................................2 Portland Trampolines.........................................37 Radius Art Studios.............................................35 Royal Ridges.......................................................32 Sante Mama.......................................................21 Schoolita Alegria................................................33 Simply Signing NW...........................................15 Sit Still Salon......................................................19 Soccer Shots.......................................................40 Spanky’s Legendary Consignment....................17 Spielwerk...........................................................16 Steamers and Screamers...................................16 Summa Academy..............................................15 Sweet PEAS Kidzone..........................................34 Tidee Didee........................................................13 Westside Montessori International...................35 WeVillage...........................................................32 Willow Tree Wellness.........................................19 World of Smiles..................................................15 Zenana Spa........................................................11


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Bottled Up: Speaks to Formula Feeding Moms... And the Rest of Us by Motheroots Counseling In this world, mamas need all the support we can get! Suzanne Barston provides passionate, personal and researched support for formula feeding moms in her book, Bottled Up: How the Way We Feed Babies Has Come to Define Motherhood and Why It Shouldn’t. She challenges the current “anti-formula culture,” examines breastfeeding in the context of women’s real lives, and proposes we empower breastfeeding and formula feeding mothers in their choices. Throughout the book Barston encourages women to support and trust each other, and notes how divisive judgment has been in this arena. She does all of this in a conversational style that draws you in and keeps you reading. Barston began her own journey into motherhood as a confirmed breastfeeder, but her son’s health took her on a different path. Her physical and emotional struggle began with breastfeeding and ended with formula feeding. Along the way, she experienced the intense shame and guilt that plagues so many moms when they plan to breastfeed and cannot or decide not to. Barston found the jungle of fear-based media only added to her despair. Once Barston saw her son thriving on formula, she was convinced that this decision did not have to feel so bad to her or others. Her own journey left Barston wanting to offer mothers information “to replace the guilt and shame of not breast feeding with the confidence of knowing they are nurturing their infants.” As counselors, we see so many mothers in anguish about the decision to formula feed, 8 | NW Kids Magazine

when it is critical for them to feel supported in making the best choice for their families. We are grateful Barston has opened this conversation. Her blog, FearlessFormulaFeeder.com opened the door and her book expands the dialogue. Bottled Up highlights the complexities women face in making decisions about feeding their infants and raises questions specifically about the impact on working women and those trying to manage postpartum depression. What we find most refreshing is she reminds us that as a culture we can trust ourselves to make the right choices for our children without guilt, shame, and fear. How would our lives as mothers be different if we felt confident that we were doing the best for our children rather than worrying we aren’t giving them enough? Ultimately, Barston hopes “all women will have the freedom to find their own formula for mothering,” a goal reminding us we are all in this together.

Motheroots Counseling is a collaboration of independent therapists, Gaby Donnell, LCSW, and Laurie Cox, LCSW, providing specialized support to women and their partners surrounding issues of fertility, pregnancy, birth and the postpartum period.


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Photographs by campbell salgado studio

My Birth Recovery Discovery by Malka Geffen I wish my sisters, mom, doula, birthing class instructor, or the ladies on The View would’ve told me what I could expect once I was done “expecting.” At baby showers, we often discuss where and when we will give birth, pros and cons of cloth diapers, or name ideas for the baby. Some moms share their birth or breastfeeding stories; others don’t want to distress us momsto-be. However, very few women ever discuss the details of their birth recoveries. Like others whose births didn’t go as planned, I had a drug-free, freight-train labor that ended with a third-degree episiotomy and severe internal tearing from forceps delivery. I lost about 40% of my blood volume, which led to many more interventions while in the hospital. I was discharged two days later with the vague advice to “take it easy” for six weeks. To me, taking it easy meant I could bounce my baby to sleep and walk her to the grocery store. I learned later that I was meant only to lie in bed and breastfeed during those weeks. Oops. In the meantime, I found great support in our Portland postpartum healthcare community offering some unique modalities. Once I felt comfortable being touched in my most-injured area again, I sought out Beth Yohalem-Ilsley at Mississippi Health Center. Beth is trained in Holistic Pelvic Care™, intervaginal work that helps increase blood flow to the muscles of the pelvic floor, encouraging relaxation, building strength and speeding re-

covery. Beth was emotionally supportive and explained everything to me before I even took off a shoe. She applied very gentle pressure on tight spots of my pelvic floor. I was amazed to feel the pain lessen just as she felt the tightness release under her touch. As my pelvic floor was healing, it became clear that my rectal pain was a separate, but equally important, matter. I had to face the fact that my troublesome hemorrhoids from late pregnancy, turned ridiculous after the birth, could be to blame. I was extremely surprised to learn that a naturopath in town could remove them. With some trepidation, I went to see Dr. Ami Opal, co-founder of Yew Medicine, who performed a painless in-office procedure called the Keesey technique. Ami had me lie on my side and then inserted a metallic electrode through which she sent electrical currents to shrink the internal hemorrhoids. Within a couple of days I noticed much less discomfort and decreased pressure in the entire area.

It was a big step getting to the point where I could comfortably sit and nurse for hours. What I needed next was to build the core strength with which to carry, wear, and bounce the baby without experiencing a lot of pain. continued on p. 12

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Several practitioners suggested I meet Wendy Foster and learn about Mamalates™, pilates exercises she tailors specifically for prenatal and postpartum mamas. At my first session, Wendy checked my rectus abdominis, (the “six-pack” muscle) and found I had significant diastasis recti. This separation of the muscle is not uncommon but was a new concept for me. In our sessions, I learned diastasis recovery exercises to do while also engaging the pelvic floor. This work helped me reduce the separation, taking stress off my back and supporting my organs.

Birth Recovery

resource guide: Baby Boot Camp 503.831.1009 babybootcamp.com Beth Yohalem-Ilsley Mississippi Health Center 503.282.5358 mississippihealthcenter.com Dr. Ami Opal Yew Medicine 503.477.7594 doctorami.com Wendy Foster Mamalates 503.459.8936 mamalates.com Metropolitan Pediatrics 503.295.2546 metropediatrics.com

During conception and pregnancy, I spent so much time considering the arrival of my kiddo that I did not ask questions about what happens after. My postpartum future was simply where to get birth announcements and how long to take maternity leave. I learned fast that being postpartum is its own ballgame, which people rarely talk openly about, and that amazing resources exist in our community to help us navigate a successful birth recovery. (See Resource Guide for more details.) Malka Geffen is a new mom living in Portland. With an MFA in creative writing from Mills College, Malka now helps small business owning mamas with their writing and editing tasks at jotpdx.com. She blogs about her journey to/through motherhood at immaculatebaby.wordpress.com.

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Gaby Donnell Motheroots Counseling 503.287.2295 motherootscounseling.com Kathleen Kelley, PMHNP Counseling and Medication Management 503.830.3215 kathleenkelleypmhnp.com Sante Mama 360.253.2229 santemama.com The Tummy Team 360-952-CORE thetummyteam.com Zenana Spa and Wellness Center 503.238.6262 zenana-spa.com


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Craniosacral Therapy for Infants by Korin Rasmussen, DC

As a chiropractor who treats babies, I’m often asked when craniosacral is needed for newborns and infants. The short answer is: almost always. What Is Craniosacral? Craniosacral Therapy (or CST) is a gentle, low force manipulation technique (about the weight of a nickel) that releases deep tension and dysfunction in the body with the intention of improving wellness and performance. Since I am also a chiropractor, I like to explain the difference between CST and a chiropractic adjustment. An adjustment is like Mt. St. Helen’s erupting: big single action leading to big change. CST is more like erosion: many small actions leading to big change. Both have the inherent effect of changing the shape and function of the mountain but with drastically different approaches. Why do Babies Need it? Birth is inherently challenging work, both for mama and for baby, even when birth is gentle and non-invasive. If labor is fast, some babies don’t have enough time to mold to the canal. If the pushing phase is long and arduous, babies can have dysfunction in the plates of the skull and other soft tissues in the body. Newborns’ skulls and bodies are incredibly malleable but 14 | NW Kids Magazine

when dysfunction is present, it can affect everything from sleep to gastrointestinal function to feeding. The most common reasons I see babies in my office are torticollis, nursing and feeding issues and ‘colic’. Torticollis is a big word that means asymmetrical neck position. It can be caused by traumatic birth, from spending too long in a car seat or swing, or by in utero positioning. Left untreated, torticollis can affect feeding, head shape and neck strength and function. Tummy time is also important in dealing with torticollis; body work like CST and chiropractic can profoundly improve baby’s enjoyment, acceptance and progress with tummy time. Feeding Issues If a baby’s skull or neck and throat tissues aren’t moving functionally, it can greatly affect his ability to create suction or to latch properly, which can lead to breastfeeding challenges and slower weight gain. Another common feeding issue is tongue/lip tie, where the frenulum (the tissue under the tongue or where the lip attaches to the gums) is too thick or tight, thus impairing the baby’s ability to suck. This can lead to pain with nursing, slower weight gain, breast refusal, and infant


exhaustion with feeding, and can ultimately affect milk supply among other issues. CST following a tongue tie release helps the tissues of the mouth, jaw and throat integrate the big changes so that baby can cultivate a better latch, increase suction and become a more efficient feeder. Colic Colic is traditionally defined as crying for extended periods of time for no discernible reason. As the mother of an infant who cried inconsolably for long periods of time, I can attest that giving it a name doesn’t make it any easier to deal with at 3 am. Often, colic is blamed on something in the milk or formula, but many times a baby’s tummy discomfort is due to structural imbalance in the diaphragm, hips or the spine. Releasing this tissue through CST can increase comfort and soothe digestive upset. Craniosacral therapy is one of the most gentle and effective forms of body work for infants. In the Portland area we’re lucky enough to have several exceptional practitioners with outstanding experience. There are chiropractors, massage therapists, doulas and lactation consultants who utilize this modality to help their littlest clients achieve optimal health. Korin Rassmussen is a chiropractor and craniosacral therapist who believes laughter and homemade soup will solve 90% of life’s problems. She swears like a mother and fiercely loves her two daughters, one of whom has autism. She has a private practice near Mt. Tabor serving the whole family.

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Fertility Help, the Natural Way by Jenny DuVander

When I struggled to get pregnant, it was hard to know where to turn first. Luckily, Portland has a wealth of resources for women and couples trying to conceive. For some, the path leads to medical fertility treatments like in vitro fertilization (IVF), when eggs are fertilized in a lab, or Intrauterine Insemination (IUI), when sperm is placed directly into the uterus. Personally, I began my journey to motherhood seeking a more natural approach for whole-body wellness. It landed me in the office of Molly O’Neill, a naturopathic physician and acupuncturist with a special focus on fertility. “The more overall health work we do the better for fertility,” says O’Neill, who coowns Bloom Natural Healthcare in northeast Portland. “Women and couples come see us at all different stages of the fertility journey. While some are new to the process, others have tried for years to conceive.

Acupuncture O’Neill uses acupuncture to treat issues like stress, hormone balance and digestion, all of which can affect fertility. Acupuncture is an ancient healing practice in which thin needles are inserted below the skin. Specific points can stimulate ovulation, open fallopian tubes and calm the uterus. “This is all good for fertility because it reduces stress, improves blood flow to the uterus and ovaries, and works towards

optimizing overall health,” O’Neill says. It can even improve sperm quality in men. O’Neill’s patients often receive treatment every two weeks, before and after ovulation. And you don’t have to wait for signs of infertility to receive the benefits. “It can likely help you conceive sooner.”

Achieving balance Liz Richards, an acupuncturist and owner of Blossom Clinic in northeast Portland, uses the Chinese philosophy of yin and yang to help her patients conceive. “A lot of fertility patients take a very yang approach to getting pregnant. They’re trying to conquer something.” Instead she tries to help them nourish the yin, the receptive and feminine side. She recommends at least three months of acupuncture for fertility. During that time, she helps her patients with herbal therapy, nutrition, relaxation and overall wellness. “It’s a very rewarding practice,” Richards says. “I have patients who just can’t believe they’ll ever be pregnant, and flash forward a few months later and they’re pregnant.” About half of Richard’s patients are working with a medical doctor. “They’re getting tests done, or they might even be doing IUI or IVF.” continued on p. 20

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For those who, like me, end up undergoing in vitro fertilization, research shows that acupuncture on the day of embryo transfer can increase the rate of pregnancy by 50 percent. “The fertility clinics are very familiar with the protocol and welcoming to acupuncturists,” Richards says.

Nutrition and Herbs Acupuncture is often coupled with nutritional counseling and the use of herbs. Richards will prescribe dietary changes based on a Chinese diagnosis, which involves looking at the tongue and reading the pulse. Often this points to adding traditionally “hot” foods, such as soup, peaches and summer fruits, and limiting raw foods or dairy. Traditional Chinese herbs may also be prescribed, or western herbs that balance hormone levels. “Herbs are great to promote and increase blood flow to the uterus, help with egg and semen quality and can regulate menstrual cycles,” says Nicola Moll, a licensed acupuncturist with Magnolia Healing Arts in southeast Portland.

Relaxation The most accessible fertility treatment might be whatever helps you de-stress. “Stress plays a huge role in infertility in both men and women,” Moll says. Like a bandit, anxiety steals the progesterone building blocks that support gestation. Instead, it redirects them to make the hormone cortisol as part of the “fight or flight” response. But when you can’t get pregnant, “just relaxing” is easier said than done. “Psychological studies have shown that being infertile is as stressful as being diagnosed with cancer,” says John Hesla, a physician specializing in reproductive endocrinology and infertility at Oregon Reproductive Medicine, one of several fertility clinics in Portland. “Women who have

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higher stress levels at the time of their fertility treatments have lower pregnancy rates than women who are less stressed.” Where needed, he recommends yoga, acupuncture, massage or even counseling to help achieve results.

Massage Besides relieving stress and promoting overall health, massage can increase circulation to the abdomen and pelvis. “I have had great success with Fertility Bodywork,” says Lori Reising, a massage therapist serving fertility patients at both Bloom Natural Healthcare and Blossom Clinic. She uses techniques to release the lower back and pelvis and abdominal massage to increase blood flow and energy to the reproductive organs. “It also allows for greater movement between the ovaries, fallopian tubes and uterus and can help the uterus into proper positioning.” Reising says freeing emotional trauma is important, especially if a client has had a previous loss. “We want to release that trauma so the body becomes open and ready for the new life to enter.”

Jenny DuVander is a freelance writer, consultant and mother of twins. She writes about Oregon’s people, environment and causes at jennyduvander.com


Fertility Help resource guide: Bloom Natural Healthcare 503.223.3741 bloomnaturalhealthcare.com Blossom Clinic 503.287.0886 blossomclinic.net Insights To Health Clinic 503.501.5001 insightstohealth.net Magnolia Healing Arts 503.975.9798 magnoliahealing.com North Portland Wellness Center 503.493.9398 northportlandwellness.com Northwest Surrogacy Center 503.233.2818 nwsurrogacycenter.com Portland Natural Fertility Clinic 503-244-0500 portlandnaturalfertilityclinic.com Redbird Healing Arts 503-740-5464 redbirdhealingarts.com Willow Tree Wellness 503.281.0030 willowtreeclinic.com

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Baby-Led Weaning by Jordann Kearns, RD

Baby-led Weaning (BLW) is based off the book of the same name by Tracey Murkett and Gill Grapley. The name tends to confuse people because it actually has nothing to do with weaning. It is sometimes referred to as Baby-led Solids which is a better description. BLW is a way of introducing solid foods that allows your baby to stay in control of what he is eating. Generally, foods fed with a spoon (purees) are skipped and the baby starts with easy-to-hold solid foods. The most common worry with BLW is that your baby will choke if given solid foods before purees. It’s important to do your own research on this topic and discuss it with your pediatrician. I reviewed the Choking vs. Gagging section in the book many times, read BLW blogs, asked other moms about their experience, and even watched YouTube videos that showed gagging so that I would be more comfortable with the process. It is important to know that gagging is a natural, safety response meant to prevent choking. Because a baby’s gag reflex is farther forward in the mouth than adults, the gag reflex is more easily triggered. Babies are rarely bothered by gagging, but it can be terrifying for any parent. Although it seems impossible, it is important to stay calm, as you want your child to continue to have a positive experience with solid foods. I see many advantages to this feeding approach. As a dietitian specializing in Intuitive Eating, I find it very powerful to watch my baby eat intuitively. It is my job to protect and nurture this innate ability. BLW has helped 22 | NW Kids Magazine

me to trust that my baby can self regulate when it comes to eating. She knows when she is hungry and full, when she doesn’t like the taste, and when she wants more. She stays in control of what goes in, experimenting with flavor, texture and color along the way. With BLW, I‘ve learned to trust her signals and withhold my own agenda to the eating experience. BLW also helps us set the precedent of not preparing separate meals for our daughter. At meal times, the foods on her tray are the same foods on our plates (with thought given to common allergens). Overall, I’m pretty sold on Baby-led Weaning but I have a few disclaimers. The authors of the book are going to make you think you have to do BLW 100% or it won’t work. I haven’t found that to be true at all. We do use some pureed baby foods because frankly, they’re convenient. But when I feed with a spoon, I try to stay very mindful of baby’s signals. I don’t do airplane spoons into the mouth in an effort to get one more bite in. If she’s not opening, it means she’s not eager for the food, so I trust she’s finished. Also, if you are unable to read the original book, I would suggest reading the cookbook. It is a concise version with all the information you will need to know about BLW. Jordann Kearns, RD is a registered dietitian and the creator of TheIntuitiveMama.com. She leads Intuitive Eating support groups at Portland State University for students struggling with food issues. At IntuitiveMama, she shares her journey raising her daughter to be an Intuitive Eater.


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Monthly

Calendar

Performances May 1-4

Newmark Theatre The Jefferson Dancers

Portland’s most advanced dancers, age 1418, give their annual spring performance. $15.25-24.25, Wed-Fri 7:30pm, Sat 2pm & 7:30pm. jeffersondancers.org

May 3-5

Sesame Street Live Can’t Stop Singing

All of your favorite Sesame Street characters together onstage. $12-62, Fri 7pm, Sat 10:30am, 2pm, & 5:30pm, Sun 1pm & 4:30pm. sesamestreetlive.com

May 4-5, 10-12, 17-19, 24-26

Northwest Childrens Theater – Cinderella

May 17-18, 24-26

Journey Theater Arts Group A Little Princess

Based on Frances H. Burnett’s novel about a princess mistaken for a poor orphan and the power of a young imagination. $9-14, Fri & Sat 7pm, Sun 2pm. journeytheater.org

Mother’s Day Events May 12

Adoption Mosiac - Run Mama Run

Run and cheer on others to celebrate moms of all kinds and support community adoption resources. Crafts and breakfast (with hot cocoa) too! $45, kids free, 8:30am. runmamarunpdx.org adoptionmosaic.org

May 12

Run Like A Mother

This Broadway-inspired musical will have you dancing along with familiar characters from this classic fairy tale! $18-$22, Fri 7pm, Sat & Sun 12pm & 4pm. nwcts.org

Run a 5K to celebrate motherhood and benefit My Little Waiting Room drop-in hospital childcare. Registration fees vary, 8am. runlikeamotherrace.com/city/ portland-or/

May 11-12, 18-19, 25-26

May 12

Experience the seasons with best amphibian friends Frog and Toad in this variety-show style performance. $18-30, Sat 2pm & 5pm (except May 25), Sun 2pm. octc.org

Choose from brunch or dinner and spoil a special lady with fine dining on the beautiful Willamette or Columbia river. $29-68, boarding times vary. portlandspirit.com/mothersday.php

Oregon Children’s Theatre A Year with Frog and Toad

Portland Spirit Mother’s Day Cruises

Please confirm calendar events and performances as scheduling changes may occur. 24 | NW Kids Magazine


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May 2013 May 12

rhymes, songs, and more. $3, 10:30-11:30am. taborspace.org

Give Mama some precious time to herself while Dad or other caregivers play with the kids! Play rates starting at $4.95, 10am-3pm. steamersandscreamers.com

May 1, 8, 15, & 23

Steamers and Screamers Mother’s Day Break

For more Mother’s Day events please visit our online calendar at nwkidsmagazine.com

mama/baby Events Mons and Weds in May Zenana Spa - Prenatal Yoga

New or experienced yogis welcome. Learn and practice fluid movement throughout your pregnancy! Drop-in $17, new students free, 5:30-6:30pm. zenana-spa.com

Weds in May

New Seasons Market Concordia - New Parent and Breastfeeding Support Group

Presented by Renaissance Childbirth and Postpartum Professionals. Open to all those involved in new parenting (including the babies!) for information, resources, and support. Free, 10-11:30am. newseasonsmarket.com renchildbirth.com

EcoBabyGear - 4 Week Interactive Music Class

Kindie rock musician Aaron Nigel Smith is committed to getting kids moving - to music! $40 for all 4 classes, call 503-233-4167 to register. 10:30-11:30am. ecobabygear.com, aaronnigelsmith.com

May 4

Milagros Boutique Babywearing 101

Learn about different baby carriers and how to use them, or get some on-the-spot help with a carrier you already have. Free, 11am. milagrosboutique.com

May 6, 13, & 20

Andaluz Waterbirth Center Open House

Visit the center, meet the midwives, and learn about options and services. Free, register at info@waterbirth.net or 503-885-0228, 5:30pm. waterbirth.net

May 9-10

Beaverton Library - Babies Need Early Literacy, Too!

Bring your baby (up to 12 mos) for sensory play with books and take home a free board book. Free, call 503-350-3600 to register. Thurs 6:30-7:15pm, Fri 11-11:45am. beavertonlibrary.org

Fris in May

May 11 & 18

No kid is too young to be exposed to another language! Bring your brighteyed little one to hear Spanish through

A 2-part class series for parents new to signing.

TaborSpace - Spanish BabyTime

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EcoBabyGear & Portland Early Learning - Baby Sign Beginner Basics


Walk away with around 40 basic signs to use with baby! $45, 11:15am. ecobabygear.com, portlandearlylearning.com

May 15

Andaluz Waterbirth Center Prenatal Breastfeeding Class

A comprehensive class for mama-tobe and her partner to learn the basics of breastfeeding. Free, register at info@ waterbirth.net, 7pm. waterbirth.net

May 19

Pod + Kin - Homebirth Cesarean Support Group

A healing and non-judgmental support group for moms who planned a homebirth but ended up having a cesarean. Free, 1:303:30pm. podandkin.com, homebirthcesarean.com

May 18-19 Dozer Day

Kids get to ride real heavy construction equipment (with a professional, of course!) and work with them hands-on! Benefiting the Nutter Family Foundation. $5-10, 11am4pm. dozerday.org

May 19

Kenton Street Fair

Spend the day in this adorable North Portland neighborhood with vendors, yummy treats, live music, and a skate ramp and pony rides for the kiddos. Free, 10am6pm. kentonbusiness.com

May 23

Summa Institute Educational Symposium: Responses to Bullying - What Works

May 23

Renowned educators and community leaders come together to educate parents and caregivers about the bullying epidemic and how to combat it. Free, 5:30-8:30pm. summainstitute.org

Learn ASL alongside your toddlers, using music, games, and activities. $8 suggested donation, 9:15-10am. simplysigningnw. com, artalacartepdx.com

May 24, 25-27, 30-31

Art a la Carte PDX & Simply Signing NW - Play & Sign: Toddler Talk

Events May 18

Preschool of the Arts Portland Puppet Festival

Puppetry galore with performances throughout the day and free puppet crafts! $5 per show, day passes available, 10am-4pm. cappuppets.org

Rose Festival - CityFair

Flock to the waterfront for treats, live animals, shopping, rides, fireworks (on Fri May 24), and more. $7, kids 6 and under free, free admission on May 30. rosefestival.org

May 25-27

Oaks Park Multnomah County Fair

It’s fair season! Kick it off with rides, mini golf, a petting zoo and other animals, live entertainment, roller skating, and more. Free, 12-7pm. multnomahcountyfair.org

Remember to check the NW Kids online calendar for dozens more outings and activities each day. Share with friends, subscribe to the RSS, add directly to your calendar, and more features. There’s something going on you don’t want to miss!! nwkidsmagazine.com NW Kids Magazine | 27


Mamalates Essential Birth Recover Kit created by Wendy Foster

at mybirthrecovery.com, $39

Bed Nest Co-Sleeper

at Eco Baby Gear, $550

Vans Infant Classic Checkerboard Slip-ons at Black Wagon, $28

found Changing Clutch by JJ Cole

at Child’s Play, $20

NoseFrida

at Bella Stella, $16

Black Tuxedo Onesie by Lucky Lilly

at Buyolympia.com, $18 28 | NW Kids Magazine

around Town

Bummis Super Whisper Wrap

at Milagros Boutique, $13

Kringelring Wooden Clutching Toy by HABA

at Spielwerk Toys, $14

Chewbead Necklaces

at Coffee Kids, $30 - $36

Natural Nipple Butter (2 fl. oz.) at Santé Mama, $13

Baby K’Tan Carrier

at Mama Baby Boutique, $50


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Tricks For Surviving the first 3 Months! by By Kimberly Bepler, IBCLC Postpartum Doula, Baby Care Educator

Photographs by Campbell Salgado Studio supporting tummy time

How to survive those first crazy 3 months of newborn life? Having worked with 1200+ babies—and their tired but thankful parents— here are a few of the fairly universal tools, tricks, and concepts I have learned to help parents understand and care for their babies.

“melting baby” and “pooping” positions (shown below) – perfect for eye to eye conversations and gentle counter pressure on the belly to help remind baby what needs to happen for a happy life. (The faces they make can be pretty precious too!)

Weeks 1-2 are about warmth, food and trust. Skin to skin solves most situations! Baby stays warm, regulates to life outside the womb, bonds with parents, and cues you when they are ready to feed. Don’t worry about much else other than baby’s needs and your needs. Find some good ways to hold baby skin to skin and rest whenever you can. This window of baby sleeping after eating (as long as baby is getting enough food) only lasts for the gestational week 40 through 2 weeks of life or so (longer for preemies). Baby will change—quickly! Enjoy this sweet time and let people pamper you a bit (also a good time to rest your uterus…you won’t regret giving yourself time for recovery).

Weeks 5-6 are about connection and struggle; the beginning of great new developments— and also the peak of crying for most babies. Social smiling begins at this stage though, so parents feel that flood of joy coming back from their infant after the many months of giving with little return on their ‘investment.’ Baby is going through huge changes in their body and brain however, and need more soothing than before—particularly in the evening. This is a great time for the yoga baby hold or the milkshake hold, along with a bit of white noise and some bouncing (yoga balls are very popular). “Just get through it” is a refrain that a lot of parents use during this stage (It isn’t you, it’s them.) Though this period can certainly be challenging, there should also be sweet times of quiet alert baby to enjoy. In between, just soothe as much as you can. This is also a good time to make sure you are swaddling securely, as babies can become little Houdini’s at getting out of their blankets. This is the peak age where babies are learning to sleep a bit longer, and swaddling increases their quiet sleep significantly. It is often the first step in effective soothing.

Weeks 3-4

involve waking up to the world and digesting more food! It starts with baby becoming more alert during the day (but not exactly more sleepy at night yet…bummer!) Baby is getting the hang of breastfeeding and processing greater amounts food—and consequently becoming gassy, grunty, and less easy to put down! This is a great time for the

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Weeks 7-8 can be tough on parents--and on their

relationship! The culprit? This period often signals a change in baby’s development and digestion. Still fussy in the evenings, babies are starting to organize a bit and finally sleep longer stretches at night. Digestion becomes a big focus for babies as they often consolidate their elimination habits about this time, and poop less often at night (going down from 10x a day to just a few--or even less sometimes). I recommend lots of tummy support at this stage. Bicycling the legs, including holding the legs in for 10-15 seconds, tummy massage, being worn in a carrier and walked or bounced, and utilizing the supported squat (see below) all can really help baby move through this stage. (It is short‌I promise!)

Weeks 9-10 signal an awakening for babies. They become more alert (you can even see more of their eyes now!), more playful, and a bit more predictable. Parents say babies go to bed sooner (Phew! Midnight bedtimes are normal for newborns, but tough on tired parents.) Little ones begin to organize their napping schedule somewhat, and are starting to space out their feedings a bit more than in the first two months. This is a great opportunity

to work on more tummy time, to prepare them to get ready to move on their own.

Weeks 11-12 will really reward you with some

amazing differences. Babies will now show more interest in their world, want to play on their back and tummy, and demonstrate a wide variety of sounds and expressions to tell you more about their personality and needs. Their cries change, they become more purposeful about their movements, and more delightful to play with overall! They often have more head control, and begin to enjoy the world in a bigger way. This is a great time for showing your baby a new view of the world, and enjoying all the new tricks your baby will be working on as they begin to move under their own power. This is often the time when parents say things get A LOT easier, and babies are easier to read. Congrats—you made it!

Kimberly Bepler is the owner of ABC Doula Service, a lactation consultant, a postnatal educator with the Providence and Legacy Health Systems, and a doula trainer with CAPPA. In addition to mothering her two kids, her passion is understanding newborns and helping parents relate to them. abcdoula.com.

over the shoulder

shushing in milkshake

newborn tummy to tummy

newborn sling hold

Leg Press

Melting Baby

pooping position

standing baby squat

baby yoga NW Kids Magazine | 31


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Traveling with Little Ones Article and photographs by Mariah Fairben The first time we traveled with our daughter, I made my husband practice breaking the stroller down and packing it up until he could do it blind-folded. We now have two girls, ages 2 and 4.  We fly to see family several times a year and are much more efficient now. Sometimes, we don’t even take the stroller. (Crazy, I know!) Even if you bring a stroller, wearing your baby in a carrier to free up your hands is key, especially when traveling alone. When I had a baby under the age of about 9 months, I lugged my full-size Boppy pillow with me (a travel Boppy is available now.)  It saved my arms when I was holding a sleeping baby for two hours. Nursing, bottle feeding, or pacifier sucking on take-off and landing are recommended to help baby deal with pressure changes. You may also need ID (birth certificate or passport) for your baby or child if they are flying for free as a lap child. I recommend traveling with your own car seats as renting them is usually not a good experience. The decision for me is whether to take a car seat for the plane ride or to check it. Up until the age of 2, we held our squirmy girls. However when the girls first turned 2, they really needed the car seat in order to sit still. We have the backpack carrier for the car seat, but I’m pretty sure we look like packhorses when we travel with it. Once our older daughter could sit still, I didn’t feel like just the airplane seatbelt was sufficient. I found this great product called The Cares Safety Harness which works really well for us (and we can check our giant convertible car seat). When I pack for the plane I organize several different-sized zippered pouches in my larger 38 | NW Kids Magazine

bag and each of my girls has a small backpack with a few toys that they have chosen. The pouches contain such things as diaper changing items, snacks, a few different activities like crayons or silly putty, and maybe even a new toy. And as soon as I get on the plane I set up camp. I have a small plastic bag, like the diaper disposal bags, and I put it in the pocket in front of me which minimizes my visual chaos. If you have a newborn you should be prepared for a blowout (babies have a knack for pooping frequently  on planes, so bring more diapers than you expect to use!) but with an older toddler it’s tempting to skip the backup clothes. You never know when someone is going to get sick or spill a full drink, so I generally bring an extra outfit for each of the girls and an extra shirt for me and my husband. While this is rarely used, I never leave home without it. These tips have helped us get through the chaos of ten-hour travel days.  My only other advice? Don’t be embarrassed to use technology. You know having your 18-month-old watch Sesame Street is not what you do every day and other passengers will appreciate the quiet it provides. Traveling with babies and toddlers can be overwhelming; follow your instincts and trust that you are doing the best you can. Safe travels! Mariah Fairben is a stay-at-home mom to two girls. She has a degree in industrial design and loves organizing, baking, and creating.


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Profile for Michelle Snell

NW Kids May 2013  

The Baby Issue

NW Kids May 2013  

The Baby Issue

Profile for nwkidspub