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Kidney Research Institute Learn@Lunch Tuesday, March 6 Noon – 1 p.m. Northwest Kidney Centers Renton 602 Oakesdale Ave. SW, Renton

www.nwkidney.org Phone 206-292-2771

Join us on Facebook and Twitter. Hear the latest news as it happens!

Dialysis Connection

years first in the world

Volume 1, Issue 1 · Winter 2012 NON PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID SEATTLE WA

700 Broadway • Seattle WA 98122

PERMIT NO 3768

Return Service Requested

The dangers of dialysis with a catheter By Dr. Leanna Tyshler Northwest Kidney Centers chronic kidney disease medical advisor

Don’t miss this chance to hear Dr. Jonathan Himmelfarb, director of the Kidney Research Institute, talk about the connection between kidney health and heart health. Bring your family too!

Most patients start dialysis treatment with a catheter – a tube that goes through the neck vein directly into the heart. A catheter should only be a temporary access to your blood for hemodialysis until a fistula or graft is ready to use. Northwest Kidney Centers is committed to getting all of our patients away from catheter use as soon as possible. Why? Because catheters are dangerous.

RSVP

syrenka.slettebak@nwkidney.org or 206-720-8540

Let’s all celebrate! Anniversary parties at your center

first in the world

Watch for the invitation. We’ll see you at the party!

 Cleaning your blood is harder, so you feel sicker and have poorer health long-term.  Higher risk of illness and time in the hospital.

 Make a plan to change your dialysis access. Talk with your nephrologist, surgeon and health care team to get a fistula or graft as soon as possible.  If you’ve been told that a fistula or graft isn’t possible for you, ask for a second opinion. Broadway patient Frank Carter Brown, Jr. dialyzes safely through his fistula.

• a special anniversary gift • refreshments

 Risk of life-threatening infection is 5-10 times higher.

What you need to do:

From mid-February into April, patient celebrations will take place in each center for two days, so everyone can attend on the day of their scheduled dialysis run.

years

 Risk of death is 2-3 times higher than with a fistula.

The only way to reduce your risk is to get rid of the catheter.

Fifty years ago, Northwest Kidney Centers became the first outpatient dialysis center in the world. A lot has changed since 1962, but one thing is the same: You, the patient, are the reason we are here. That makes the parties at our 14 dialysis clinics very special events for everyone!

At the party, you will receive:

The longer you dialyze with a catheter, the higher your risk:

Questions about access? Ask your nurse educator, case manager or your nephrologist as soon as possible.

 If you already have a fistula or graft, take care of it to avoid the need for a catheter.


Dialysis Connection

2

Kidney Disease Quality of Life Survey 2011

                                                                                                    Patients with belowaverage scores

26%

Patients with average or above-average scores

74%

Number of surveys given 942

How is your quality of life on dialysis?

Meatloaf to warm you up on a chilly day

This survey measures five different areas related to quality of life. These areas range from the emotional to physical effects of treatment. We compare your score to what other people of the same gender, age and type of dialysis said about their experience.

by Katy Wilkens, MS, RD On these cold, dark days of winter, when you finally make it home through the rain and traffic, you want some good comfort food.

If your answers show your quality of life is below the average, we gather your nephrologist, nurses and social workers to create a care plan to make things better for you.

This meatloaf recipe is a winner. Make it ahead of time, pop it in the slow cooker before you leave in the morning, or throw it together and slip it in the oven when you get home. Quick and comforting!

This year, Northwest Kidney Centers developed 418 plans of care to help our patients improve their quality of life.

In March, Northwest Kidney Centers’ safety committee will lead emergency drills at each unit. This helps us to be prepared in case of disaster. It will not change your care on the day of the drill at your clinic. This is a good time to make sure you have a Northwest Kidney Centers emergency magnet at home. The magnet lists important phone numbers for your dialysis center. Please contact your nurse educator if you don’t have one. For more ways to be prepared in case of a disaster, talk with your nurse and see the Surviving a Disaster information sheet, available at all units or at www.nwkidney.org/emergency.

3

Dialysis-friendly recipe

Every year, our social workers administer the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Survey. Your answers help us understand how well you have been doing with daily life since you began dialysis.

Get ready for disaster drills in March

Page 2

Dialysis Connection

This recipe also gets rid of ketchup, which is often the culprit when it comes to adding too much salt.

5 WAYS to be prepared for a disaster:

1 2 3 4 5

Your Grandma’s Meatloaf

Always keep a week’s supply of medications on hand. Make sure all your contact information is up to date at your unit with three different ways to reach you. Have a backup travel plan so you can get to dialysis in an emergency. Build an emergency kit. Ask your nurse for a complete list of items to include. Keep emergency diet food in stock, just in case you can’t get to a dialysis appointment.

For more ways to be prepared in case of a disaster, talk with your nurse or go to www.nwkidney.org /emergency.

We take flu vaccinations seriously! We are pleased to let you know that 93 percent of Northwest Kidney Centers staff members got the flu vaccine last fall. As of December 2011, 87 percent of patients got the vaccine. This is an excellent leap toward keeping everyone at Northwest Kidney Centers healthy this season! If you declined the vaccination, there is time to change your mind. Talk with a nurse at your unit to get answers to questions or to get the vaccine.

1½ pounds ground beef 2 eggs, beaten 1 onion, chopped (or 2 tablespoons dried minced onion) 1 cup oatmeal 2 tablespoons brown sugar cup tomato paste ½ cup fresh parsley, sage and thyme, chopped (or 1-2 tablespoons dried herbs) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Place in a greased 8 x 5-inch loaf pan. Bake for about 1 hour, until the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees. Nutrition information for 1/8 of the recipe: Calories: 258, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 21 g, Fat: 10 g, Sodium: 105 mg, Potassium: 359 mg


Dialysis Connection

2

Kidney Disease Quality of Life Survey 2011

                                                                                                    Patients with belowaverage scores

26%

Patients with average or above-average scores

74%

Number of surveys given 942

How is your quality of life on dialysis?

Meatloaf to warm you up on a chilly day

This survey measures five different areas related to quality of life. These areas range from the emotional to physical effects of treatment. We compare your score to what other people of the same gender, age and type of dialysis said about their experience.

by Katy Wilkens, MS, RD On these cold, dark days of winter, when you finally make it home through the rain and traffic, you want some good comfort food.

If your answers show your quality of life is below the average, we gather your nephrologist, nurses and social workers to create a care plan to make things better for you.

This meatloaf recipe is a winner. Make it ahead of time, pop it in the slow cooker before you leave in the morning, or throw it together and slip it in the oven when you get home. Quick and comforting!

This year, Northwest Kidney Centers developed 418 plans of care to help our patients improve their quality of life.

In March, Northwest Kidney Centers’ safety committee will lead emergency drills at each unit. This helps us to be prepared in case of disaster. It will not change your care on the day of the drill at your clinic. This is a good time to make sure you have a Northwest Kidney Centers emergency magnet at home. The magnet lists important phone numbers for your dialysis center. Please contact your nurse educator if you don’t have one. For more ways to be prepared in case of a disaster, talk with your nurse and see the Surviving a Disaster information sheet, available at all units or at www.nwkidney.org/emergency.

3

Dialysis-friendly recipe

Every year, our social workers administer the Kidney Disease Quality of Life Survey. Your answers help us understand how well you have been doing with daily life since you began dialysis.

Get ready for disaster drills in March

Page 2

Dialysis Connection

This recipe also gets rid of ketchup, which is often the culprit when it comes to adding too much salt.

5 WAYS to be prepared for a disaster:

1 2 3 4 5

Your Grandma’s Meatloaf

Always keep a week’s supply of medications on hand. Make sure all your contact information is up to date at your unit with three different ways to reach you. Have a backup travel plan so you can get to dialysis in an emergency. Build an emergency kit. Ask your nurse for a complete list of items to include. Keep emergency diet food in stock, just in case you can’t get to a dialysis appointment.

For more ways to be prepared in case of a disaster, talk with your nurse or go to www.nwkidney.org /emergency.

We take flu vaccinations seriously! We are pleased to let you know that 93 percent of Northwest Kidney Centers staff members got the flu vaccine last fall. As of December 2011, 87 percent of patients got the vaccine. This is an excellent leap toward keeping everyone at Northwest Kidney Centers healthy this season! If you declined the vaccination, there is time to change your mind. Talk with a nurse at your unit to get answers to questions or to get the vaccine.

1½ pounds ground beef 2 eggs, beaten 1 onion, chopped (or 2 tablespoons dried minced onion) 1 cup oatmeal 2 tablespoons brown sugar cup tomato paste ½ cup fresh parsley, sage and thyme, chopped (or 1-2 tablespoons dried herbs) Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Place in a greased 8 x 5-inch loaf pan. Bake for about 1 hour, until the internal temperature reaches 165 degrees. Nutrition information for 1/8 of the recipe: Calories: 258, Carbohydrates: 19 g, Protein: 21 g, Fat: 10 g, Sodium: 105 mg, Potassium: 359 mg


Kidney Research Institute Learn@Lunch Tuesday, March 6 Noon – 1 p.m. Northwest Kidney Centers Renton 602 Oakesdale Ave. SW, Renton

www.nwkidney.org Phone 206-292-2771

Join us on Facebook and Twitter. Hear the latest news as it happens!

Dialysis Connection

years first in the world

Volume 1, Issue 1 · Winter 2012 NON PROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE PAID SEATTLE WA

700 Broadway • Seattle WA 98122

PERMIT NO 3768

Return Service Requested

The dangers of dialysis with a catheter By Dr. Leanna Tyshler Northwest Kidney Centers chronic kidney disease medical advisor

Don’t miss this chance to hear Dr. Jonathan Himmelfarb, director of the Kidney Research Institute, talk about the connection between kidney health and heart health. Bring your family too!

Most patients start dialysis treatment with a catheter – a tube that goes through the neck vein directly into the heart. A catheter should only be a temporary access to your blood for hemodialysis until a fistula or graft is ready to use. Northwest Kidney Centers is committed to getting all of our patients away from catheter use as soon as possible. Why? Because catheters are dangerous.

RSVP

syrenka.slettebak@nwkidney.org or 206-720-8540

Let’s all celebrate! Anniversary parties at your center

first in the world

Watch for the invitation. We’ll see you at the party!

 Cleaning your blood is harder, so you feel sicker and have poorer health long-term.  Higher risk of illness and time in the hospital.

 Make a plan to change your dialysis access. Talk with your nephrologist, surgeon and health care team to get a fistula or graft as soon as possible.  If you’ve been told that a fistula or graft isn’t possible for you, ask for a second opinion. Broadway patient Frank Carter Brown, Jr. dialyzes safely through his fistula.

• a special anniversary gift • refreshments

 Risk of life-threatening infection is 5-10 times higher.

What you need to do:

From mid-February into April, patient celebrations will take place in each center for two days, so everyone can attend on the day of their scheduled dialysis run.

years

 Risk of death is 2-3 times higher than with a fistula.

The only way to reduce your risk is to get rid of the catheter.

Fifty years ago, Northwest Kidney Centers became the first outpatient dialysis center in the world. A lot has changed since 1962, but one thing is the same: You, the patient, are the reason we are here. That makes the parties at our 14 dialysis clinics very special events for everyone!

At the party, you will receive:

The longer you dialyze with a catheter, the higher your risk:

Questions about access? Ask your nurse educator, case manager or your nephrologist as soon as possible.

 If you already have a fistula or graft, take care of it to avoid the need for a catheter.


Dialysis Connection - Winter 2012