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A Regional European Framework for Action 2003 –2008


Contents pages Foreword

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Terms of Reference for the European Strategy Group

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1. Context and Introduction

5

2. The Framework

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3. Time Frame and Delivery Mechanism

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Appendices Annex A: Strategic Priorities, Policy Scope and Critical Elements

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Annex B: Typology of Actions to Support Delivery of the Strategic Priorities

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Annex C: Indicative Actions for 2003 – 2004

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Annex D: NW Lobbying Plan: Structural Funds Post 2006 (Agreed October 2002)

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Annex E: Enlargement Action Plan: Activities January – December 2003

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Glossary

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Foreword A Regional European Framework for Action Following consultations with key practitioners, participants at the 2002 NW Brussels conference and sub-regional partners throughout the second half of 2002, I am pleased to introduce the Northwest’s first Regional European Framework for Action (REFA). The REFA was initiated early in 2002 by the Northwest’s European Strategy Group (ESG), and endorsed by delegates from across the region at the ESG’s conference in Haydock in March 2002. The REFA was compiled over the same time frame as the revisions to the Northwest’s Regional Economic Strategy, and has been designed to operate effectively within its overarching framework and priorities. A key aim of the framework is to marshal the significant collective efforts of regional and sub-regional partners, thereby rendering the Northwest a more effective player both with the institutions in Brussels and amongst its counterparts across the growing European Union. Two critical success factors are the ability to speak with a unified voice and to promote a consistent external Northwest brand. This is particularly important in the run up to EU enlargement and the negotiations on financial support to European regions after 2006. Additionally, this framework document signals that England’s Northwest is an outward looking region that is ready to engage fully in policy development and forge best practice partnerships with other EU regions at a variety of levels. Its ultimate aim is to further the long term interests of England’s Northwest and its people in the broader context of an evolving European Union. As a region we are particularly keen to support the regional delivery and achievement of the fundamental elements of the Lisbon agenda. Finally, implementation of the actions outlined in the REFA will necessitate a high level of commitment, clarity and communication among regional partners, and we will review it on a regular basis to ensure its continued effectiveness.

Mike Shields, Chairman European Strategy Group

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Terms of Reference for the European Strategy Group Purpose The purpose of the European Strategy Group (ESG) is to provide strategic leadership to the developing regional European agenda within the Northwest of England, in line with the Regional European Framework for Action (REFA). This to involve promoting England’s Northwest as an outward looking European region.

Overall Objectives ●

To oversee the implementation of the Regional European Framework for Action and promote activities within it.

To advise on priorities for Regional Projects to be supported by European funding.

Cohesion/Structural Funds Policies ●

To develop and provide the Northwest’s continued access to EU Structural Funds post 2006 working closely with the European Affairs KPG.

To contribute to the alignment of the delivery of the Structural Funds programmes under Objective 1, 2 and 3 and the England Rural Development Programme with the Regional Economic Strategy including the encouragement of synergy and exchange of best practice through the Objective 1 PMC and the Objective 2/3 PMRC.

To support GONW on programme performance issues, including strategic guidance to the NWDA on the allocation of the Performance Reserve, as appropriate.

To support the delivery of the Cross Cutting Themes (equal opportunities/social inclusion; ICT; sustainable development), including promoting these principles to the PMC/PMRC.

Competitiveness/eEurope ●

To support maximum use by the region of non-structural EU funding opportunities, encouraging co-ordination with domestic programmes and best fit with the Regional Economic Strategy.

To oversee the delivery of the regional Innovative Actions Programme (NW BRAIN).

An Outward Looking Region ●

To oversee the delivery of the Enlargement Task Group Action Plan.

To support the development of inter-regional projects and platforms.

The ESG will work closely with the European Affairs Key Priority Group through its Chair, Vice and Deputy Chairs to ensure that there is no duplication of effort, and with GONW to link more directly to the Objective 1 PMC and the Objective 2/3 PMRC. Sharing resources and encouraging an exchange of views, both within the NW and in Brussels, is to the benefit of the region. This will be enhanced by collaborative implementation of the REFA via the joint officer support structures through the European Advisers’ Group.

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Section 1: Context and Introduction

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Section 1: Context and Introduction 1 1.1

Why Is ‘Europe’ Important To The Northwest Of England? The European Union (EU) is of increasing economic and political importance to the regions of Europe. The Union represents a home market of 379 million people, soon to be increased to close to 460 million people, where businesses operate under the same rules and regulations.

1.2

European policy and legislation has a direct impact on the prosperity of the Northwest region in a wide range of areas such as environment, employment and other legislation, which affects the region’s businesses. Half the UK’s total trade is with the EU and 3 million jobs within the UK depend on access to the world's largest and richest market.

1.3

The Union is also an important source of funding for economic regeneration, be it through the structural funds, R&D budgets or the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP). As an example, during 2000-2006, the NW of England is the largest recipient of Structural Funds in the UK with an allocation of £1.6 billion. The region’s higher and further education institutions are actively engaged in EU student exchange programmes as well as Research, Development, Technology and Innovation (RDTI) projects.

1.4

Over the last 2-3 years, the partners within the NW region have actively promoted a more outward looking agenda towards other European regions, be they among the current 15 member states (EU15) or within the 10 Candidate Countries. Regional European activities now encompass the enlargement agenda, which is being developed on a region-wide basis. The region continues to access the enhanced Interreg programme to support inter-regional co-operation across Europe.

1.5

Internally, the main European driver has been the desire to deliver the current Structural Funds programmes, ensuring that benefits flow to the region’s businesses and citizens. Recently, a regional approach to the delivery of the three cross cutting themes for all the current structural funds programmes has been put into place. The European Strategy Group (ESG) provides an overarching regional mechanism to develop further synergy between the programmes.

1.6

Increasingly, NW Committee of the Regions (COR) members are able to promote a regional NW agenda in their Commissions as well as in Plenary sessions. The NW Brussels Office was relaunched in 2002 and the Northwest of England House now formally brings together the regional and five sub-regional offices in Brussels in NW premises, providing a central common location. This has led to increased collaboration and joint working as well as sharing of intelligence.

1.7

The aim of this framework document is to provide a reference point for our continued engagement with the institutions of the EU as well as other regions across the Union to develop our exports, increase investment opportunities and utilise EU funding to support the economic renaissance of the Northwest of England. Increasingly, the region will be influencing European legislation, policies and programmes to deliver maximum benefits from EU membership to the advantage of the NW region.

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2

The European Commission’s Work Programme 2003

2.1

One starting point for the regional European agenda is the European Commission’s Work Programme. For 2003, it identifies 3 major challenges for the Union:

2.2

preparing for enlargement;

defining the future of Europe; and

relations with the enlarged EUs neighbours.

In addition to these political priorities, a key economic driver is the development of a sustainable and inclusive economy within and across Europe. This is also known as the Lisbon agenda and was agreed by all member states in 2000. The Union is also actively pursuing the eEurope 2005 agenda in support of Lisbon.

2.3

In 2004, the European Union will enlarge to 25 countries, uniting further the European continent and bringing in 10 new member states from Central and Eastern Europe along with Cyprus and Malta. A further EU enlargement is also planned after this to include Romania, Bulgaria and, possibly, Turkey.

2.4

Changes also need to be made in the way the Union operates to function effectively with 25 member states. A ‘Future of Europe’ Convention has been set up to propose a new framework and structures for the Union to respond to international changes, the needs of the people of Europe and the future development of the European Union itself.

2.5

Changes to existing EU policies will also be made as the Union grows in size. After 2006, there will be major changes to EU regional (cohesion) policy. Significant changes to the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) are also likely over the coming years. A large part of EU funding will shift eastwards to the new member states and the NW region needs to ensure that it minimises the impact on the region of reduced regional funding through lobbying, both in Brussels and in Whitehall.

2.6

The region needs to increase its capacity to engage in other EU programmes such as trans-national activities in research and development, business support, transport, environment, education and skills.

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About The Northwest Of England

3.1

The Northwest of England is the largest region in the United Kingdom outside London and the South East. It is also one of the largest regions of the EU. With a population of 6.7 million people, the Northwest is three times more densely populated than the European average and its £78 billion economy (GVA) is larger than five other European member states (Ireland, Finland, Luxembourg, Portugal and Greece).

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3.2

However, in terms of regional GDP, it is below the EU average at 89% (EU figures 2000), reaching only ninth in the UK league table. At 88 per million inhabitants in the NW, the level of patent applications is also far below the EU average of 140.

3.3

The region is as geographically diverse as it is large, with an urban concentration between and around the two major cities of Liverpool and Manchester and large rural areas to the north in Lancashire and Cumbria, and the south in Cheshire. The region’s economy is built around a number of key sectors including professional and financial services, chemicals, biotechnology and pharmaceuticals, aerospace, distribution, and other manufacturing (including textile, engineering, food and drink).

3.4

The Northwest is leading the way in the use of new technologies with the second biggest digital industries cluster in Europe. It is a founder member of ERISA (European Regional Information Society Association), building on the IRISI initiative. The region has a strong educational infrastructure, boasting eight major universities with strong research and development capabilities as well as a large number of FE colleges.

4 4.1

Regional Context: Three Key Regional Organisations Over the last 5 years, a new regional architecture has developed. In 1998, the Government approved legislation to establish Regional Development Agencies across England to promote a more balanced regional economic development. During the same time, the NWRA has evolved from a voluntary association to a formally incorporated body. GONW is the third regional partner, bringing together a range of Government departments in the NW. These three regional institutions have formally agreed a tripartite Concordat to foster co-operation, collaborative working and commitment to the region as a whole.

4.2

These three key regional bodies are also working together to advance and deliver this regional European agenda. The NWDA has responsibility for economic development, regeneration and competitiveness in the region, which includes the development and agreement of the Regional Economic Strategy. The NWDA then works with a range of partners to deliver the agreed actions within the Regional Economic Strategy, which includes delivery of opportunities arising from this European agenda. The Agency acts as a voice for the region in these matters. Specifically in relation to the Structural Funds, the Agency has been given the strategic responsibility for the delivery of these, working closely with GONW and partners to achieve this. It chairs the Mid Term Evaluations for the Objective 1 and 2 programmes.

4.3

The NWRA acts as a voice for the region and is made up of representatives from the 46 local authorities along with key economic and social partners from business, the trade unions, higher and further education, the faith communities as well as the voluntary sector. On behalf of NW partners, the NWRA adopted the Regional Sustainable Development Framework (Action for Sustainability) in 2000. The AfS provides a foundation for the delivery of a better quality of life for people and communities of the region. The NWRA has declared its intention to seek directly

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elected regional Government at the earliest opportunity, lobbying Government to allow people in the NW to have their say through a referendum in the first wave of regions to move forward the regional agenda. 4.4

GONW acts as the representative of the UK Central Government in the region and includes regional units of the DTI, ODPM, DfES, the Home Office and DEFRA, working with partners to deliver significant domestic programmes such as Neighbourhood Renewal, Housing Market Renewal and rural development. GONW is also the managing authority for the current Structural Funds programmes.

5

The Northwest’s Current European Union Activities

5.1

This has so far been dominated by its role as a major recipient of EU structural funds through Objective 1, 2 and 3, and the Community Initiatives. The NWDA has established a small high level European Strategy Group to encourage regional engagement across the programmes. The Agency is also currently chairing the Mid Term Evaluations for Objectives 1 and 2, working closely with the GONW to complete these against the set time scales.

5.2

The NW is accessing significant funding from the Community Initiatives (Urban, Leader, Equal and Interreg). Since the 1997, the NW has co-ordinated Interreg bids at the regional level through the Assembly and the Interreg III (2000-2006) programme is supporting several Northwest projects, including the NETA project. More projects are under development, covering topics such as regeneration, transport, ICT, environment, cultural and maritime issues.

5.3

The Objective 1 and 2 programmes have appointed six Cross Cutting Theme (CCT) Managers, who are based at the NWRA. The CCT managers are working with GONW, Action Plans partners and individual projects across the Objective 1, 2 and 3 programmes throughout the NW region to ensure that the Commission’s requirements to mainstream and integrate Equal Opportunities, Information and Communication Technologies, and Sustainable Development into all the Structural funds are being undertaken and achieved.

5.4

The NWDA was recently awarded 2.9 m EUROs from the Innovative Actions programme, which will focus on developing further the information society across the region within excluded communities, SMEs and other sectors. This links in with the wider eEurope agenda, where NW stakeholders are developing linkages through RDTI programmes. NW partners have established NW NODE to conceptualise and deliver projects related to these initiatives. The NW region is a founder member of ERISA.

5.5

In particular, the regions HEIs and other partners have been active in the many EU R&D programmes and are now preparing to participate in Framework 6 programmes and projects. The NWDA has recently increased its capacity in this respect to ensure that SMEs gain access to such opportunities.

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5.6

Other regional European activities now include maximising the opportunities from EU enlargement. The NWDA has recently appointed an Enlargement Co-ordinator to progress links with regions in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. We are developing proactive working relationships with Northwest MEPs and Committee of the Regions members (COR). The Northwest Brussels Office was formally relaunched in 2002 and the Northwest of England House provides a central base for the regional and four sub-regional offices in Brussels.

5.7

The CAP also represents a significant funding stream within the NW. Farmers receive a variety of direct payments and other production-related support under the traditional ‘first pillar’ of the CAP. In 1980, a second pillar was created to fund rural development measures (second pillar). The England Rural Development Programme (ERDP) was introduced for the period 2000-06, covering rural areas outside Objective 1, where such funding is included in the Single Programming Document (SPD).

5.8

A large number of regional, sub-regional and local partners are also directly involved with EU activities, through trans-national projects, twinning and other links. While some mapping has been undertaken on several occasions, this has always only provided a snapshot of this engagement. It is the intention to increasingly include these activities within the delivery of the Regional European Framework to maximise the benefits for NW companies and citizens.

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Section 2: The Framework

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Section 2: The Framework 6 6.1

The Regional European Framework – The Delivery Plan The Regional European Framework brings together these existing regional strands of activity as well as identifying new ones. The Framework thus provides the strategic overlay for a number of increasingly multi-layered activities, which take place within the region. It also demonstrates linkages with overall EU priorities as identified in the Commission work programme and the four priority policy themes (see below).

6.2

Over the next five years, regional and sub-regional partners will encourage the notion that stakeholders from the Northwest, be they regional, sub-regional, locally or sector based, all work within a common framework, aiming to promote the Northwest vision for European activities. Over the last year or so, partners have agreed a number of action plans with specific activities for elements of the strategic priorities. For example, a draft action plan for enlargement activities have been agreed and is now part of the Framework.

6.3

The Framework can only be delivered with the engagement and active co-operation of partner organisations from the public, private, education and voluntary sectors based within the region. Both sub-regional and sectoral activities have a part to play to support the delivery of the strategic priorities outlined below. MEPs and Committee of the Regions members have an important role to play in the implementation of the delivery of the Regional European Framework. The NW already has a strong base within Brussels and this will be further strengthened over the next 5 years to support the implementation of the activities contained in annex C. The RES now also contains the summary Action Plan for Europe under the Regional Opportunities Section.

6.4

Overall, the Regional European Framework: ●

provides a strategic regional framework, which will support a broadening of European activities by NW stakeholders

supports the engagement of a wider community of people and organisations in NW EU-related activities

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promotes the mainstreaming of European issues within and across the NW region

Vision Following the consultation period, the NW stakeholders have adopted a simple, yet forward looking vision for the Regional European Framework. By 2008, the Northwest of England will be recognised as a leading European region, a signficant influencer of EU policies and a region actively engaging its stakeholders in the EU agenda.

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Strategic Aims

8.1

The three Strategic Aims of the Regional European Framework are: ❖

to positively influence and shape EU policies and programmes which impact on the Northwest of England

to maximise opportunities for sustainable economic, social, environmental and cultural activities for the NW region within Europe, and

to promote the Northwest of England as a leading European region

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The Four Strategic Priorities For Delivery 2003-2004

9.1

Four Strategic Priorities have emerged as key for the Northwest region during the next 18 months.

9.2

The strategic priorities for 2003-2004 are:

9.3

Cohesion/the future of the Structural Funds

Competitiveness/eEurope

Governance, and

An outward looking region

The European Strategy Group is agreed that these four Strategic Priorities will best enable the NW region to match its aspirations, building partly on current regional activities, partly on the identified regional and sub-regional priorities within the NW Brussels Offices and on available resources.

9.4

While further prioritisation will take place over the coming months within the four Strategic Priorities, it is likely that the next 18 months will see a concentration on Cohesion policies and Enlargement.

9.5

Strategic Priority 1: Cohesion – the Structural Funds and the future of EU regional/ cohesion policies Rationale: The NW region is the largest recipient of structural funds within the UK between 2000-2006 and will need to show that these funds are spent to maximum impact within the Objectives 1, 2 and 3 programmes in the NW. With enlargement, the shape of these policies will change radically and the region will wish to influence the debate on future EU regional policy after 2006 to ensure that the needs and opportunities within the NW are recognised by both the European Union and the UK Government. Future development of the CAP will be important to rural regeneration within the NW. The current

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England Rural Development Programme (ERDP) is a national programme, administered by DEFRA with some regional targeting. Future CAP reform is likely to increase the amounts of funds under the second pillar (or rural development) and there could well be greater regional discretion over how these funds are used in particular areas. The region will wish to influence the debate on future CAP reform. In addition, closer alignment between the CAP and the structural funds should be pursued. The urban policy dimension within the EU policy-making framework is less well developed and the region is well placed to input into the policy debate, which is currently under way. The region recognises that the urban areas of Manchester and Liverpool in particular have a significant part to play in the economic well-being of the region. Social inclusion and employment initiatives are both linked to the three main strands set out above. Policy Scope Structural Funds; Urban Policy; Rural Policy & Development, CAP; Employment; Social Inclusion. Objectives 1. to optimise take-up and delivery of the current structural funds allocated to the NW of England 2. to influence the debate of the shape of structural funds post 2006 3. to promote and showcase the region in Brussels and across the EU and the candidate countries 4. to gather information and intelligence on EU policies and programmes which impact on and/or are of interest to the region 9.6

Strategic Priority 2: Competitiveness/eEurope Rationale: Competitiveness is one of the major themes within the new Regional Economic Strategy (RES), focusing on delivering added value within our companies and creating more and better jobs for our people. The Regional Economic Strategy will be delivered through 5 priorities for action supported by a range of regional and sub-regional partners. One of these priorities is business development. Competitiveness is also at the heart of the European Agenda with the adoption of the Lisbon Agenda in 2000. Here the focus is on creating the most competitive economy in the world, while at the same time creating more and better jobs and an inclusive economy, utilising the talents of all EU citizens. The NW region is exploiting the eEurope agenda to support the development of business competitiveness. A focus on skills and life long learning is a shared objective both within the NW and within the EU. A whole range of European initiatives and policies focus on competitiveness and the development of an eEurope. These include the delivery of the 6th Framework Programme for Research,

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Development, Technology and Innovation (RDTI), and in particular support for collaboration between SMEs and Higher Education Institutions to engage and foster rapid dissemination of the newest technologies, processes and products. The RES has a focus on cluster development, many of which mirror the EU RDTI agenda. The eEurope agenda is also being promoted and is part of all EU funded programmes. The EU is creating an European Research Area. A number of EU programmes support sustainable development; indeed, this is a recognised priority within all EU programmes. A major element of these is the development of trans-European networks, covering EU networks of ports, roads, rail and airports. Of particular interest is also the operation of the EU state aids policies, which are due for a review in 2003. Other issues regarding EU business related legislation may also be an area where NW stakeholders would wish to influence through relevant networks. Policy Scope: Enterprise, Trade, Business Support; Clusters/Sectors as per the RES; Skills and Life Long Learning; RDT, Innovation, 6th Framework Programme; ICT, Information Society, eEurope; Sustainable Development, including Transport; Competition Policy & state aids. Objectives: 1. to encourage NW businesses to develop export opportunities, partnerships, networks and contacts to increase the competitiveness of the region 2. to link the NW with the eEurope agenda to exploit emerging opportunities in the private, public and voluntary sectors 3. to promote and showcase the region in Brussels and across the EU and the candidate countries 4. to influence EU policies towards SMEs and the business community for the benefit of the NW region 5. to gather relevant information and intelligence on EU policies and programmes which relate to the region’s businesses and business intermediaries 9.7

Strategic Priority 3: Governance/the Future of Europe Convention Rationale: The enlargement of the European Union has stimulated the setting up of the Convention on the Future of Europe. With 25 member states, it is clear that structures and the way in which Europe is governed must be changed. The NWRA has submitted a response to the Convention. The debate on governance is also mirrored within the UK with the recent devolution in Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales, as well as the establishment of the Greater London Authority. More immediate, the links to the region’s 10 MEPs and 4 members of the Committee of the Regions will need to be further strengthened and developed. One suggestion is linking up COR

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members with MEPs on similar committees. Another major strand within the Regional European Framework is the promotion of the benefits of the European Union to the citizens of the NW. Again, the Assembly will play a key role here. Increasingly, the NW region works with other English regions to promote common issues in the areas of economic regeneration, regional governance, transportation and business support to name but a few examples. The tri-partite partners have signed a concordat to support this work. This could include active promotion of the benefits of EU membership. Policy Scope: ‘Future of Europe’ Convention; Develop Links with MEPs; Utilise NW COR members; Promote the benefits of EU membership. Objectives: 1. to develop linkages between MEPs, COR members and NW politicians 2. to promote more positively the benefits of the European Union to NW stakeholders 3. to increase opportunities for cultural, political and civic links between the NW and regions in Europe 4. to promote the mainstreaming of EU policies among NW stakeholders 5. to identify and, where appropriate, sign partnership agreements with other EU regions across the 25 current and potential member states. 9.8

Strategic Priority 4: An Outward Looking Region Rationale: Partners within the NW already engage in partnership with other regions, local authorities, universities, FE colleges, etc. around the European agenda. These partnerships and collaborations provide tremendous opportunities for innovation, learning from good practice elsewhere and showcasing the NW. Regional efforts around the Interreg Programme are bearing fruit and NW partners have been and are likely to be strongly represented in these programmes. Of particular note is the NETA project, which provides a banner for the promotion of trade and economic linkages from Ireland, across the North of England and into Germany, Holland, Denmark and Poland. Regional linkages also increasingly exist within and across the UK. In particular, the NW is working closely with its neighbouring English regions (the North East, the West Midlands and Yorkshire & Humberside) as well as Scotland and Wales. This collaboration covers issues such as transport, NETA, the structural funds and the wider issue of regional self determination for the English regions. Specifically within England, the Regional Assemblies have established the English Regions Network (ERN) and the nine RDAs collaborate via cross RDA networks. The enlargement of the European Union provides a unique opportunity for the region to develop links with regions within the 10 candidate countries. The Regional International Trade Strategy

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identifies Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic as the key three countries and efforts within the Regional European Framework will initially concentrate on these. The focus will very much be on developing trade links via the TPUK sponsored framework, building on good practice that already exists. A further strand within the Strategic Priority is to continue benchmarking the region against similar and more successful regions across the current EU regions and within the candidate countries. Policy Scope: Inter-regional co-operation; EU enlargement and Accession; Inward Investment; Labour mobility; Showcasing the region’s achievements. Objectives: 1. to develop linkages and networks both within the current EU 15 and the ten candidate countries 2. to develop the region’s capacity to attract investment 3. to utilise existing and potential EU funding to support these networks, projects and partnerships 4. to promote and showcase the region in Brussels and across the EU and the candidate countries 5. to identify and where appropriate become active members of EU networks that are of strategic importance to the Northwest 6. to benchmark the NW region against other EU regions 9.9 9.10

Conclusion Annex A lists relevant European policy areas against each Strategic Priority, as well as a number of critical elements for success. Clearly not all the European policy fields will have the same importance to the NW region in the next few years. Indeed, in each of the four Strategic Priorities, the delivery plan assumes that further prioritisation will take place over the coming months to ensure the most effective use of available resource. In some cases, such as the Competitiveness priority, additional capacity building will be required to strengthen current levels of activity as this is a newer departure for the region.

9.11

Over the next 18 months, it is likely that European activities will focus predominantly on Cohesion policies, CAP reform and Enlargement, simply due to the fact that these areas represent a substantial resource and opportunity to the region.

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Section 3: Time Frame and Delivery Mechanism

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Section 3: Time Frame and Delivery Mechanism 10

Time Frame: 2003-2008

10.1

The overall timeframe for the Regional European Framework is 2003 - 2008.

10.2

During this five-year period a number of critical dates for review have been identified at intervals of approximately 18 months. The first review will, therefore, take place in mid 2004 (post EU enlargement based on the best estimates of the current timetable), and at the end of 2006 (to coincide with the new EU Financial Perspective and the end of current eligibility for structural funds programmes). In mid/late 2008, an overall review of the strategy will be carried out to focus European activities on the current policy emphases.

10.3

This timetable allows for a periodic review of both activities and policy themes and will ensure that the Regional European Framework adapts to changing priorities in the Northwest of England and in the European Union.

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Delivery Mechanisms

11.1

Monitoring of the delivery of the Regional European Framework will rest with the European Strategy Group, which brings together the three concordat partners (NWDA, GONW, NWRA) as well as representatives from the Objective 1, 2 and 3 Programme Monitoring Committees.

11.2

It will be delivered through a range of actions and activities carried out by the NW Brussels Office, sub-regional Brussels Offices and, most importantly, stakeholders within the region itself to ensure that the Regional European Framework is continually driven by NW concerns and priorities. In its initial phase, delivery will be focused on bringing together and harnessing existing resources, particularly at the regional level.

11.3

Under each strategic priority, supporting activities include networking, lobbying, research, intelligence gathering, promotion and mainstreaming of EU policies within stakeholder organisations (Annex B).

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Delivering The Region’s European Agenda - In The Northwest The NWDA has established the European Strategy Group (ESG) to better co-ordinate European activity in the region, and especially the performance of the region’s Structural Funds and their alignment with the Regional Economic Strategy. The ESG is a small group of senior representatives drawn from across the region’s European Programmes and the three regional institutions. It is chaired by the Chief Executive of the NWDA. Both the Terms of Reference and membership of this group will require change to ensure that the ESG is able to oversee the Regional European Framework in an effective and efficient manner.

12.2

The Enlargement Task Group emerged from the European Affairs Key Priority Group, but has now migrated across to the ESG due to a shift in emphasis towards the business agenda. Over the

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next 12-18 months, activities for the ETG will focus on developing the business/trade dimension, including the eEurope agenda (50%), an educational dimension (25%) and civic links (25%) with partner regions in the NW’s three priority candidate countries, Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic. These countries are also identified as priority Eastern European markets in the Northwest’s Regional International Trade Strategy, delivered through TPUK. Further links to regions in the remaining candidate countries will be developed over time. 12.3

The NWRA European Affairs Key Priority Group (EA KPG) acts as an advisory body to the key Assembly bodies such as the Board of Directors and the main Assembly on key regional strategic European issues. The EA KPG is made up of 12 Local Authority Councillors and 6 Economic and Social Partners (ESP) and is chaired by Cllr Flo Clucas (Liverpool City Council) who also sits on the ESG. The European Affairs KPG has a broad remit of “ensuring that the citizens of the region benefit from a close and constructive relationship with the European Union” including dealing with such diverse areas as: legislation, policy development, resources (including Structural Funds and others), inter-regional networking, promoting the region in Europe and raising European awareness within the Northwest.

12.4

A NW Interreg Working Group was established in 1997 from within the EA KPG to focus on raising awareness of the then new Community Initiative across the region. Another priority was to support, encourage and develop Northwest links and working relationships with partners across the European Union. The group comprises representatives from all local authorities, GONW, NWDA and NWRA. The Group has been very successful both in progressing bids and in terms of influencing decisions within the relevant programmes. The NW has representatives on the transnational Programme Monitoring and Steering Groups.

12.5

A regional officer-level forum, the European Advisers Group (EAG), brings together officers from the NWDA, NWRA, GONW, local authorities and a number of other bodies in support of the EA KPG and, increasingly, the ESG. The aim over the next 12-18 months is to ensure that this group does indeed support both regional partner bodies.

12.6

The GONW is the managing authority for the main structural funds programmes within the NW, which is covered by a patchwork of Objective 1, 2 and 3 eligibility. The Objective 1 Programme covers the whole of Merseyside, the Objective 2 Programme covers certain parts of Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester and Lancashire, and the Objective 3 Programme is horizontal and covers the whole non-Objective 1 region. In addition, DEFRA administers the England Rural Development Programme for areas outside Merseyside, with regional targeting and integration provided by GONW, which chairs the Regional Programming Group. GONW also enables links direct to Whitehall.

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Delivering The Region’s European Agenda – In Brussels

13.1

The recent creation of Northwest of England House, an office building in Brussels’ Rue du Marteau, jointly funded by Northwest partners is a welcome addition to the promotion of the NW of England as a European region while at the same time, recognising the diversity of the region.

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13.2

The NWRA holds the lease and has sub-contracted office space to all the sub-regional offices. Northwest partners jointly finance the running costs of the premises, which include provision for an office co-ordinator, and a Management Group (chaired by the NWRA) provides an overseeing role. The five NW regional/sub-regional offices operate on a federated basis within the terms of an agreed operating protocol, which was put into place when a NW European Adviser was appointed in 2001.

13.3

The Northwest of England Brussels Office will focus on delivering the regional part of the agreed European agenda, under guidance from the two regional bodies, the NWRA and the NWDA. These two bodies co-fund the office. The main role of the Head of the Office is to provide a conduit for accurate intelligence to/from the region into the heart of Europe, advising on lobbying and influencing decision-making, and acting in a regional capacity.

13.4

With the adoption of the Regional European Framework, the NWBO, the NWDA and the NWRA will pursue the delivery of the EU regional agenda as set out in this document, working closely with the sub-regional Brussels offices and partners in the NW. The overriding aim is to ensure that added value is delivered at all levels and that the current high level of collaborative working continues to develop. Over time, a clearer distinction between the regional and sub-regional priorities is likely to emerge.

13.5

It is with this in mind that partners recognise that the current protocol for collaborative working between and among the Brussels Offices will need to be refreshed. The purpose of this is to reflect the changing Northwest European agenda, and be more specific in relation to the added value that all partners do, and will continue to contribute to within Northwest of England House. This will involve identifying more clearly what the regional and sub-regional Brussels offices will offer towards the delivery of the Regional European Framework.

14

Focus For Next 18 Months

14.1

To deliver the aims and objectives of the Regional European Framework, a detailed action plan has been created identifying indicative activities to be undertaken during the next 18 months (Annex C). This has now been summarised within the RES under the Regional Opportunities Section.

14.2

The annex identifies regional lead organisations, as this will assist in the monitoring of activities. The delivery of many of the activities is clearly predicated on the understanding that these regional lead organisations will engage with sub-regional, local and/or sectoral partners over time as is the case with the RES. The delivery is also predicated on the assumption that all the Brussels based offices play their full part in bringing forward information, intelligence and relevant contacts in support of the Regional European Framework. Should any of the NWBOs/sub-regional/sectoral stakeholders be willing to take over a lead responsibility for a particular activity, this would be welcome.

14.3

Annex C sets out indicative actions to support the delivery of the Regional European Framework. These are in many instances inter-related and will all contribute to the successful implementation of the Framework. The implementation of the Regional European Framework will be monitored by the ESG.

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Policy Scope: ❖

An Outward Looking Region

Competitiveness

Structural Funds and Cohesion Policies

Governance

Delivery:

Supporting Activities:

Developing delivery mechanisms

Develop Partnerships and Projects

in NW and Brussels

Intelligence Gathering

Lobbying/influence

Promotion/Awareness of the NW as a Region in Brussels

15

Conclusions

15.1

The Regional European Framework has established the longer term vision of the Northwest of England in relation to the European Union. A number of activities have been identified and will be pursued over the next 18 months, either by the NW of England Brussels Office, sub-regional offices and key stakeholders in the NW region itself.

15.2

It is envisaged that the range of activities will increase over the period as stakeholders increasingly bring forward activities within the Regional European Framework banner. The annexes themselves bring together a range of activities and/or action plans, which NW regional and sub-regional partners have already agreed. This Framework is the first attempt at integrating these disparate activities.

15.3

The Regional European Framework, its four Strategic Priorities and Policy Scopes will be reviewed in the middle of 2004.

March 2003

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Annex A: Strategic Priorities, Policy Scope and Critical Elements

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Annex A: Strategic Priorities, Policy Scope and Critical Elements

Cohesion

Governance

Policy Scope

Critical Elements

Policy Scope

Critical Elements

Structural Funds

Capacity to maximise all EU funding

Future of Europe Convention

Constitutional status

Partnerships with other regions

Develop links to MEPs

Partnership with other regions

Utilise the NW COR members

Representation in Brussels

Promote the benefits of EU membership

Capacity to engage public interest

Urban Policy/Regeneration Rural Development/CAP Social Inclusion Employment

Representation in Brussels Promotion of the NW region Capacity to influence & develop policies for the region

Competitiveness

An Outward Looking Region

Policy Scope

Critical Elements

Policy Scope

Critical Elements

Enterprise, Trade, Business Support

Capacity to maximise all EU funding

Inter-regional co-operation

Partnership with other regions

Clusters/Sectors as per RES

R&D, Infrastructure & commercial potential

Skills and Lifelong Learning

Capacity to attract investment

R&D/ Innovation/6th Framework Programme

Representation in Brussels

Promotion of the NW region

ICT, Information Society

Capacity to influence & develop policies for the region

Capacity to attract investment

Sustainable Development, including Transport

EU Accession/Enlargement Labour mobility Showcasing the region’s achievements

Capacity to maximise all EU funding Representation in Brussels

Benchmarking against EU regions

Competition/State Aids

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Annex B: Typology of Actions to Support Delivery of the Strategic Priorities

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Annex B: Typology of Actions to Support Delivery of the Strategic Priorities Networking This includes participation in interregional and transnational projects and (new) EU wide networks. The NW region (through regional, sub-regional and sectoral partnerships) already participates in a number of such networks, including Eurada, NETA, EuroChambres, Eurocities, EIRA and Cities for Cohesion. These networks are in the main dominated by the region’s current interest in Structural Funds, Cohesion policies and transport. Regional co-ordination of Interreg projects takes place via the NWRA. Little is currently known about other networks that the region participates in, particularly in relation to business development, sector development, FE/HE and rural development. Lobbying/Influencing The exact extent and scope of lobbying activity to be undertaken by the NW region is unclear as this will depend on policy area, resources, etc. In addition, there will be a need for the NW to respond with an appropriate regional level of policy development. Whilst some may argue this is additional red tape, if the region’s interests are to be represented in the EU, policy statements from the NW should be recognisable in EU terms. The same applies for responding to proposed directives and funding programme proposals. Research & Intelligence A co-ordinated EU research and intelligence function is fundamental to the NW’s activity in the EU to give early warning to NW stakeholders. The Brussels offices are clearly the main antennae for identifying the latest intelligence and proposals from the Commission. At the same time, this has to be informed by activities, concerns and, most importantly, priorities, in the NW. One of the applications for the Regional European Framework is to ensure that the relevant EU issues are brought within the NW’s processes and procedures as a matter of course. Too often, the EU element is an add-on. Lines of communication between the Brussels offices and the NW agencies must be clear. The Framework suggests that the European Advisory Group has to play a more crucial role in this respect. Funding Maximising the potential offered by the whole range of EU funding sources, not just the Structural Funds, is a major objective. At present, there are any number of non-structural Funds, R&D projects under FP6, funding for eEurope activities, etc, but relatively little collective awareness of a) what is on offer and b) what NW players are involved in. The current experience of collaboration around Interreg projects can easily be transferred to other areas of EU policy. Awareness of new funding programmes and the deadlines involved should be quickly disseminated to potential applicants by a co-ordinated EU research and intelligence effort, based upon the five Brussels offices. The Regional European Framework should begin to provide a framework for sharing information and intelligence to reduce duplication.

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Promotion Promotion of the NW as an active EU region and location for inward investment is clearly understood by the region’s agencies. A higher profile for the activities of the Northwest of England House in Brussels would help towards raising awareness of the region – not just with the Commission but also with other EU institutions and major EU regions, both in the current and candidate countries. Promotion of the NW in Europe is also, however, an internal issue. Mainstreaming Many EU policies and legislative measures contribute to the wider regional policy context of the Northwest and need to be complementary to other domestic programmes. Therefore, the Framework will support efforts and initiatives to ensure that the European dimension is integrated into mainstream policy development, thus raising awareness of European issues across sectors and enabling more effective lobbying within the EU.

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Annex C: Indicative Actions for 2003 – 2004

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Annex C: Indicative Actions for 2003 – 2004 Strategic Priority 1: Structural Funds/Cohesion Policies Key Activities

Lead regional partners

Complete by

Outcome and success criteria

Complete ‘added value’ brochure for current Structural Funds Programme

NWDA

Q1 03

Added value brochure completed

Participate in Cohesion Platforms and Fora during 2003

GONW NWDA NWRA

On going

NW participants supportive of agreed regional line

Implement Cohesion Lobbying Action Plan (agreed November 2002) – see annex D

NWDA NWRA MPU

On going

NW input to UK position statement; ESG to lead

Deliver current Structural Fund Programmes with maximum impact

GONW NWDA NWRA

On going

NW input to EU wide debate Avoid decommitment 2003 and annually thereafter Complete MTEs for Objective 1 and 2 Implement recommendations of MTEs Deliver CCTs on a regional basis Links between O1, O2 and O3 and the Joint Pilot

Influence the development of EU urban policies

NWRA NWDA

End 03

Develop statements in 2nd Position Statement

Deliver the current England Rural Development Programme

DEFRA GONW NWDA

On going

Alignment with Rural Renaissance priorities in NW

Influence EU rural Development/CAP

Increase regional decision making on rural development Maximise NW input into CAP priorities post 2006

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Strategic Priority 2: Competitiveness/eEurope Key Activities

Lead regional partners

Complete by

Outcome and success criteria

Participation in eEurope initiatives

NW NODE

End 2003 and on going

Develop partnership and cross EU project(s) Influence EU programmes and policies to the benefit of NW region

Innovation and SME linkages to EU research programmes

NWDA

End 2003 and on going

Delivery of ‘Innovation’ Programmes across NW SMEs accessing EU programmes

Review of State Aids (linked both to this theme and Cohesion)

NWDA

2003

Input into review to support NW interest

NW participation in 6th Framework Programme, RDTI, Life Long Learning and Information Society Programmes

NWDA NW HEIs

End 2003 and on going

Linkages between cluster programme and 6th Framework Assessment of current state of play in relation to involvement of HEIs Development of linkages between EU and NW in these areas

Agreement to key policy focus vis-àvis EU enterprise policy and SMEs

NWDA NWBO

Q2 03

NW linkages to the TENS networks

NWRA NWDA GONW

End 03

NWDA

End 03

Identify Best Practice across EU, including benchmarking of NW against like regions

38

Agreement to scope Links with other regional stakeholders, i.e. BLs, TPUK and Chambers Assessment of current state of play Lobby for inclusion in TENS networks as appropriate Complete benchmarking study if appropriate

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Strategic Priority 3: Governance Key Activities

Lead regional partners

Complete by

Outcome and success criteria

Develop links with regional MEPs

NWBOs/EAG

On going

Regional MEPs increasingly working with NWRA, NWDA and other stakeholders within a NW framework Enhanced linkages between MEPs, KPG and ESG

Agree support structures formally for NW COR members

AGMA

Support NW COR members

NWBOs

End Q1 03

NW COR members selected as rapporteurs

On going

Relevant officer support provided to draft opinions

NWRA

Sub-regions

Enhanced NW COR members’ ability to influence UK delegation Follow and influence debate in Future of Europe Convention

NWRA

Promotion of benefits of EU membership to NW stakeholders

NWRA

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Regional dimension recognised within new EU governance structures On going

Mainstreaming of EU policies

39


Strategic Priority 4: An Outwood Looking Region Key Activities

Lead regional partners

Complete by

Outcome and success criteria

Implement Enlargement Action Plan (agreed January 2003) – Annex E

NWDA

On going

Development of closer business-tobusiness links between the NW and target regions within candidate countries Development of 1-2 formal partnership agreements Development of educational/training strand

Implementation of the NETA Project

NWRA

On going

Successful applications to the Intereg III programme Integration of NETA in wider regional agenda

Development of regional partnerships/projects with other EU regions

NWRA NWDA GONW NWBO

On going

Delivery of the Innovative Actions Programme

NWDA

Mid 05

Applications for inter-regional projects Development of EU benchmarking project

Establishment of delivery vehicle Agreement to NW pilot projects Compliance with EU/NWDA conditions

Participation in relevant strategic networks

NWRA NWDA NWBOs Sub-regions

On going

Assessment of impact of current participation in EU networks Identification of gaps and remediation Use of networks to promote regional agenda

Further enhancement of regional approach to the Interreg III Programme and other CIs

NWRA NWDA GONW

End 03

Examine scope for mainstreaming of CI projects Develop more focussed regional approach to NW engagement in CIs Assess potential resource implications

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Delivery Mechanisms for REFA: Brussels Based Key Activities

Lead regional partners

Complete by

Outcome and success criteria

Review protocol

NWBOs/EAG

End Q1 03

Agreed way of working in support of the REFA Agreement by ESG and KPG

Formalise regional/sub-regional specialisations

NWBOs with EAG

End Q1 03

Formal lines of communication agreed Enhanced added value provided by the NWBOs

Agree work programme for NWBO to deliver regional elements of REFA

NWDA/NWRA

Q1 03

Agreed work programme Monitor achievements Review annually

Information & Intelligence Gathering

NWBOs

On going

Timely information & intelligence shared among NW partners Identification of gaps and remediation

Annual programme to promote ‘England's Northwest’

NWBO NWRA NWDA

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On going

Agreement to programme and timings Delivery of events to time and budget

41


Delivery Mechanisms for REFA: NW Based Key Activities

Lead regional partners

Complete by

Outcome and success criteria

ESG and KPG agree REFA

NWDA/NWRA

Q1 03

Agreement to REFA

Monitoring of delivery of REFA

ESG

On going

Agreed activities delivered on time and to budget

NW Brussels House

NWRA

On going

Agree budget 2003/04 Manage NW House budget within resource limits (quarterly review cycle) All office space rented out/occupied to maximise income Establishment of regular NW House Management Group meetings

Agree themes/work programme for KPG

NWRA

Q2 03

Alignment of KPG priorities with REFA as appropriate

Agree themes/work programme for ESG

NWDA

Q2 03

Alignment of ESG priorities with REFA as appropriate

European Advisory Group supporting both KPG and ESG

NWRA/NWDA

End 03

Development of work programme to show linkages, where appropriate Enhanced co-ordination and collaboration between NWDA, NWRA and GONW European teams in support of agreed REFA activities

March 2003

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Annex D: NW Lobbying Plan: Structural Funds Post 2006 (Agreed October 2002)

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Annex D: NW Lobbying Plan: Structural Funds Post 2006 (Agreed October 2002) NW Lobbying Action Plan: Structural Funds Post 2006 Item

Actions

Lead

Outcome

Timescale

Links with other English regions

English regions via English Regions Network and Cross RDA Group

NWRA NWDA

Promoting NW position

End 2002

Links with EU regions & influential EU organisations

Maintain network with EU regions

ALL

Intelligence gathering to be shared via EAG

Links to existing EU wide networks (LGA, Eurocities, EIRA, Cities for Cohesion, the Rural Exchange, etc)

(as appropriate)

Linking up positions across the UK end 2002 On going

Promote NW case & position Build networks

IRISI/NW Node Links to EuroChambres UK Government – DTI, ODPM, DEFRA, DFES, FCO

Promotion of NW position Involvement in Regional Road shows, events, etc

NWRA NWDA

Promote positive case for the NW via position statement and ‘added value’ document

November 2002 On going

MTEs for Objective 1 and 2 Contact with relevant policy officers

UK Government MPs and Ministers

Promotion of NW case

NWRA NWDA

Sign up MPs to NW case by promotion of added value argument

End 2002

Links with MEPs and COR members

Awareness raising of NW position

NWBOs

Sign up MEPs and COR members to NW case

October 2002

Lobby to include NW position in debate and new regulations

Rapid dissemination from NWBOs to EAG

Regular briefings of MEPs/COR Monitor debates in EP and COR Monitor likely statistical indicators

Monitor GDP (O1) Identify EU-wide/national statistics for allocation on non-objective 1 funds to NW region

a regional european framework for action

MPU/ MBO RIU

Ability to refine lobbying case Ability to influence statistical base for non-Objective 1 regions

Q1 annually for O1

45


NW Lobbying Action Plan: Structural Funds Post 2006 Item

Actions

Lead

Outcome

Timescale

European Commission

Links with relevant desk officers

NWBOs

Rapid dissemination of intelligence from NWBOs to KPG, EAG and ESG

On going

NWDA

Early warning of proposed changes

On going

Attendance at relevant Cohesion Policy Platforms (2002) & Fora (2003)

NWRA & NWDA

Promote NW case

Sept 02 May 03

Identify examples of good practice, added value & activities from all current programmes

NWDA

Ability to influence UK Government

Nov 2002

Links with officials drafting new regulations State Aids Revisions to Eligibility Rules NUTS

Added value from current programmes

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Annex E: Enlargement Action Plan: Activities January – December 2003

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Annex E: Enlargement Action Plan: Activities January – December 2003 DRAFT Enlargement Action Plan: Activities Jan – December 2003 Strand

Actions

Milestones

Lead

Timescale Comment

Business-toBusiness

1. Trade Missions

Identify relevant trade missions (i.e. to the three target countries)

TPUK

End January 03

2. Develop links between NW and regional/local TPUK staff

Build links with TPUK staff (in Warrington, SBS and chamber network)

NWDA secondee

End February 03

This initial development begins when NWDA secondee is in place.

3. Identify and build network with relevant trade missions in target countries

Identify and link with relevant contacts in Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic

NWDA secondee

4. Trans-national SME based projects

Develop 1-2 trans-national projects

End December 2003

Could use PHARE and other funding. Could link to 6th FW. Start date will depend on funding deadlines and match funding.

5. Support for EIC activity

Support EIC led project to promote enlargement to SMEs

Identify HEIs/FE colleges with CC expertise

Identity participating NWUA/ AOC/ FHEIs NWDA secondee

Education and Training

TPUK EIC - Liverpool

Bid submitted to EC and NWDA

Mar 03

Link FHEIs to trade missions to target countries Identify FE and HEI link person(s) Define FHE input

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NWUA/ AOC

This will depend on whether institutions are identified. This will depend on which institutions; could focus on student exchanges (Socrates, Leonardo, etc), staff exchanges; R&D collaborations; training; business development, etc.

49


DRAFT Enlargement Action Plan: Activities Jan – December 2003 Strand

Actions

Civic Links

Overarching strand

1. Build expertise in NW

2. Identify target regions

Lead

Timescale Comment

NWRA Conclude 1-2 regional partnership agreement

June 03

Investigate whether NW should participate in PRAXIS

June 03

NWRA

Should be signed by regional organisations. Formal agreement with Lodz to be concluded.

NWRA Develop Cultural links via conference and/or exchange of best practice event?

Could be linked to NW Brussels Conference as this is now under discussion

Exchange of best practice

NWDA secondee

Arrange for seminar style session with UK reps from Kent, Scotland?

Round Table/ Brussels – sharing expertise with CC regions

NWBO

Agree target regions NWDA secondee within three target countries to focus activities

Sept 03

This could be an opportunity to explore what strands of co-activity we would wish to pursue around sharing of best practice. The lead should come from Brussels working with relevant CC BOs

May 03

This would help to focus activities. May require research efforts (funding required). This should be no more than 1-2 per country.

Mapping existing links with target regions

NWDA Apr 03 secondee/ TPUK

This is required to target and focus our efforts, which at the moment is across all three countries.

Complete ‘NW Offer’ brochure

NWDA secondee

Apr 03

This would pull together a comprehensive guide to what we can offer across all three strands. Glossy required for showcasing (institutions, HE/FE, regional/local links, NW – what is it?, contacts; examples)

4. Co-ordinating Group

NWDA, NWRA, HE, FE, NWBO, TPUK, ?

Feb 03

The focus of this group would be to get activities underway within the action plan. Scope and membership would depend on topic and should not replicate the enlargement task group. Any member would be expected to deliver actions agreed.

5. Office accommodation for CC regions in Brussels

NWRA (Phil Robinson)

3. Complete prospectus

50

Milestones

Some contacts had been made with Krakow.

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List of Abbreviations

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51


52

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Glossary AfS

Action for Sustainability

AGMA

Association of Greater Manchester Authorities

AOC

Association of Colleges

CAP

Common Agricultural Policy

CCT

Cross Cutting Themes

COR

Committee of the Regions

DEFRA

Department for the Environment, Forestry and Rural Affairs

DfES

Department for Education and Skills

DTI

Department for Trade and Industry

EA KPG

European Affairs Key Priority Group

EAG

European Advisers Group

EAGGF

European Agricultural Guidance and Guarantee Fund

EIC

European Information Centre

ERDF

European Regional Development Fund

ERDP

England Rural Development Plan

ESF

European Social Fund

ESG

European Strategy Group

ESP

Economic and Social Partners

ETG

Enlargement Task Group

EU

European Union

F/HEIs

Further/Higher Education Institutions

FCO

Foreign and Commonwealth Office

FE

Further Education

FIFG

Financial Instrument for Fisheries Guidance

GDP

Gross Domestic Product

GONW

Government Office for the Northwest

GVA

Gross Value Added

HEI

Higher Education Institution

MEPs

Members of the European Parliament

MPU

Merseyside Policy Unit

MTE

Mid Term Evaluation

NETA

North European Trade Axis Project

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53


NW NODE

Northwest Networking Organisation for Digital Enablement

NWBO

The Northwest Brussels Office

NWBOs

Sub-regional Brussels Offices (Merseyside, Greater Manchester, Lancashire, Cheshire and Cumbria) located in NW House

NWDA

Northwest Development Agency

NWRA

Northwest Regional Assembly

NWUA

Northwest Universities Association

ODPM

Office of the Deputy Prime Minister

PHARE

Supports infrastructure financing and institution building in the EU candidate countries

RDTI

Research, Development, Technology and Innovation

REFA

Regional European Framework for Action

RIU

Regional Intelligence Unit

RES

Regional Economic Strategy

SME

Small and Medium Sized Enterprise

TENS

Trans European Networks

TPUK

Trade Partners UK

54

a regional european framework for action


For further information please contact: Mark Critchley European Strategy Group Adviser Northwest Development Agency Renaissance House P O Box 37, Centre Park Warrington WA1 1XB Telephone: 01925 400280 Fax: 01925 400401 Email: mark.critchley@nwda.co.uk Margaret Reid European Programmes Manager North West Regional Assembly North West Assembly House Coops Building Dorning Street Wigan WN1 1HJ Telephone: 01942 737913 Fax: 01942 737927 Email: margaret.reid@nwra.gov.uk Abigail Howarth Head of North West Brussels Office North West of England House Rue du Marteau 21 B1000 Brussels Belgium Telephone: 00 32 2 229 5397 Fax: 00 32 2 229 5383 Email: abigail.howarth@northwesthouse-brussels.org

www.nwda.co.uk www.englandsnorthwest.com

KADM 06/03 17423

http://www.nwda.co.uk/pdf/EURFRAMEWORK  

http://www.nwda.co.uk/pdf/EURFRAMEWORK.pdf

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