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Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE) Cumbria Sub-regional Implementation Plan September 2007.

1. Introduction 1.1. Partners in Cumbria have worked together over the last year to develop a set of proposals for the delivery of the RDPE in Cumbria. This is an integrated approach in many ways; it has involved staff from a number of organisations, it has taken an integrated approach to Axes 1 and 3, and it has involved close working with Natural England and the Forestry Commission to ensure the greatest possible level of complementarity with Axis 2. 1.2. Cumbrian partners have made clear from the outset that they are taking an ambitious and innovative step in proposing to deliver the whole of Axis 1 and 3 using the LEADER method. There are 2 principal reasons for this: 1.3. It is felt by many partners in Cumbria that the LEADER method is a particularly effective and appropriate means of delivering rural development in an area such as Cumbria. Its reliance on Local Action Groups, its requirement for broad participation and bottom-up initiative, all show the true innovation that is at the heart of the LEADER method. 1.4. Cumbria has a very strong track record in delivering LEADER programmes. It has two LEADER+ programmes (Fells and Dales and a part of the North Pennines programme), and has experience of LEADER since 1996 1.5. The proposals contained below have been developed by a writing group, which has comprised representatives of the following organisations: Cumbria County Council Cumbria Vision District Councils (represented by Eden District Council) Cumbria Rural Enterprise Agency International Centre of the Uplands - Cumbria Fells and Dales LEADER+ programme North Pennines LEADER+ programme Natural England Forestry Commission

1.6. The proposals for governance, management and delivery have been tested with key organisations in Cumbria (Cumbria County Council, Cumbria Strategic Partnership and Cumbria Vision). Furthermore, the detail in this document builds on three wide-ranging stakeholder events that have been held; in Threlkeld, in April 2006, in Penrith in September 2006, and at the Rheged centre in May 2007. Each event attracted 40-50 attendees from a broad range of organisations. 1.7. The development process is also the subject of action-research by the International Centre for the Uplands-Cumbria whose results are being fed back into the writing group and into development of the proposed LAGs.


2. Background

2.1 In June 2005, the European Agricultural Fund for Rural Development (EAFRD) was approved to replace the European Agricultural Guidance and Guarantee Fund (EAGGF) as funds for rural development under the second pillar of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for the period 2007 – 2013. The available measures for funding have been divided between three main headings (or axes). There will also be a fourth, cross cutting (or implementation) axis under which the LEADER approach to bottom up locally led projects will be used to implement the measures under some of the other axes. 2.2 To unlock this funding from the European Commission, DEFRA submitted a Rural Development Programme for England (RDPE) to the European Commission in April 2007.

2.3 DEFRA have confirmed that Axis 2 (Improving the environment and countryside) will be managed by Natural England and the Forestry Commission and will receive 80% of the funding allocation. Most of the present agri-environment schemes – Woodland Grant, Farm Woodland Premium, Organic Farming, Countryside Stewardship, Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) payments, Entry Level Scheme and Higher Level Stewardship - will be bundled up and repackaged within a new Environmental Land Management Fund (ELMF). It is understood that Natural England and the Forestry Commission will not adopt the LEADER method to implement Axis 2.

2.4 Axis 1 (Improving the competitiveness of the farming and forestry sectors) and Axis 3 (Rural quality of life and diversification of the rural economy), however, will be managed by the Regional Development Agencies and will each receive 10% of the funding allocation. The Northwest Regional Development Agency (NWDA) has responsibility for that management in the North West Region. They, along with the Government Office for the North West, the Forestry Commission and Natural England, are required to produce a Regional Implementation Plan, informed at least in part by sub-regional needs and aspirations. This document forms the Cumbria sub-regional contribution to that plan 3. Need and disadvantage in rural Cumbria 3.1 The following economic assessment of rural Cumbria is based on research undertaken by BMG Research Ltd in 2004, which gave a detailed baseline position of the rural economy, refreshed, for the purposes of this document, with the latest statistical information. Key points are:


3.2

The dominance of three sectors– public services with around 43,000 jobs, distribution (which includes hotels and restaurants) with around 63,000 jobs and manufacturing with around 37,000 jobs.

A strong agricultural sector (the sector directly employs 13,000 people, yet its indirect contribution is substantially higher). Furthermore agriculture has shaped Cumbria’s landscape and its role in maintaining that landscape, which then benefits the tourism sector, is obvious. Agriculture’s vulnerability to changing market pressures and changing subsidy regimes means that it is likely that farm incomes will remain depressed for the foreseeable future.

Cumbria’s economy is made up of a large number of small companies – 82.7% of firms employ less than 10 people and a very small proportion (less than 0.5% of the total) of large companies employing more than 200 people. This is because small firms tend to have limited capital and management skills, restricted markets, limited growth ambitions, low investment in training and limited promotional opportunities for staff. Small firms are rarely able to kick start the local economy by themselves. This “small firm economy”, potentially brings with it competitive weakness, although there are strengths in having a flexible and diverse business base.

Cumbria has relatively few jobs in the business and financial services sector – 11.4% of jobs are in this sector compared to 20.6% nationally. These sectors, including those businesses involved in ICT development and support, have been the major engine for economic growth in the UK over the past twenty years, and may well be a factor in slow economic growth in Cumbria. Cumbria is characterised by low levels of Gross Value Added (GVA)…

Despite the more positive analysis contained in parts of the assessment the statistical position of the Cumbrian economy continues to worsen. Towards the end of 2006, the Office for National Statistics published the sub regional accounts for the UK. This information included details of the economic performance down to county level and below, provided in the form of Gross Added Value (GVA). This showed that since 1995 Cumbria had slipped behind the national average although the economy of the county has recovered somewhat since 2000 to the extent that Cumbria was the fastest growing sub-region in the northwest between 2003 and 2004 (see Table 2.1). As a result GVA per head of population in Cumbria had declined from 92% of the national average in 1995 to 76% of the national average in 2004. Only Durham, Merseyside and Cornwall had a lower GVA per head. Table 2.1

GVA comparisons 1995 – 2004

GVA per head of population

1995

2003

2004

Change 95-04

Change 03-04

(£)

(£)

(£)

%

%

West Cumbria

9,507

11,157

11,655

+22.6%

+4.5%

East Cumbria

10,448

13,435

14,262

+36.5%

+6.2%

Cumbria

9,988

12,344

13,017

+30.3%

+5.5%

North West

9,729

14,230

14,994

+52.5%

+5.4%

United Kingdom

11,037

16,549

17,451

+58.1%

+5.5%

Source: Office for National Statistics sub regional accounts 2006


The Gross Added Value statistics indicate that Cumbria’s economy is stabilising at a new base level well below the national and regional average. It is known that neither unemployment, (which has exhibited a downward trend in Cumbria over the past few years), nor the total number of jobs in the county or the size of the working population, (both of which have remained steady over the past few years) lie behind the long-term reduction in the GVA per head of population. The cause of the relative decline is far more likely to be as a result of the reduction, relative to other areas, in the number of jobs in high value added sectors such as manufacturing and a commensurate growth in low value added sectors such as retailing and tourism. There has also been an increase in the proportion of part time jobs in the county. 3.3

Employment, however, is at a healthy level…..

There are, however some success stories. As the assessment noted between 2001 and 2004 the total number of jobs increased by 17.1%, and unemployment in much of rural Cumbria remains low. Across Cumbria as a whole, official unemployment in June 2007 stood at 4,777, a rate of 1.6% of the workforce, significantly lower than the national average. There are, however, sharp contrasts between the east of the county, where rates of unemployment are extremely low, and the west of the county where they are higher - Eden (0.5%) and South Lakeland (0.6%) have some of the lowest unemployment rates in the UK. Carlisle (1.7%) is also below the national average. This has meant that in some parts of east Cumbria such as Carlisle, Penrith and Kendal the lack of labour supply has meant that companies have started to import labour to fill job vacancies – there are 3,130 registrations on the Worker’s Registration Scheme located in Cumbria (data to March 2007). These registrations log the number of jobs filled by migrant workers from the 8 Eastern European countries that joined the EU in 2004. 3.4

Earnings in rural Cumbria are variable, and very low in places…..

Considerable discussion often surrounds the issue of incomes in Cumbria, much of the debate concerning the extent to which it is justified to regard parts of the county as a “low wage” or “high wage” economy. The government’s official data is based on the Annual Survey of Hours and Earnings, and the most recent information is for 2006. Cumbria has average gross weekly earnings of £422, which is almost identical to the North West average of £421 but lower than the England average of £453. However there are marked variations across the County. Gross Weekly Earnings are lowest in Carlisle (£377) followed by South Lakeland (£391). The low figure for South Lakeland implies that full time jobs in the most rural areas of the county are relatively low paid – although household incomes may be much higher due to the influx of more wealthy retirees on pensions, and people taking on multiple jobs. By contrast GWE’s are highest in Copeland (£577) which is clearly related to the high rates of pay in the manufacturing sector particularly the nuclear sector. However, although rural Cumbria is a relatively low wealth generator in economic terms, this is ameliorated by • A reasonable level of employment. Wages may be lower on average but there is not a high level of unemployment or of inactivity. Indeed labour shortages in some parts of East and South Cumbria are causing firms to import labour • Income earned by people working outside Cumbria. It is noticeable that in South Lakeland and Eden, Cumbria’s wealthier districts – not only have higher levels of employment than elsewhere and more people employed in managerial and professional jobs, but are able to commute via the M6 to jobs in Lancashire etc.


• The pension and investment income of older retired people who move into Cumbria for lifestyle reasons – particularly South Lakeland and Eden. 3.5

Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing are important, but declining…..

Agriculture (including forestry and fishing) directly employs around 13,000 people, yet its indirect contribution to other sectors is undoubtedly much higher (e.g. agricultural engineering, construction, transport, food processing etc). Furthermore, agriculture has shaped Cumbria’s landscape and its role in maintaining that landscape is fundamentally important to tourism. Agriculture’s vulnerability to several pressures (animal health, supermarket pressure on prices and consequent low margins, and changing subsidy regimes that seem likely to depress farm incomes further) is obvious. Agriculture and fishing in total generated £184m of Gross Value Added for Cumbria in 2003, equivalent to 2.9% of the County’s GVA, by far the highest share of any part of the Northwest region. However, Cumbrian agricultural output is declining not only in relative, but also in absolute terms. Over the five years 1995 - 2004 total output in Cumbria has increased by £1,578m (over 32%). However, within this overall figure, an increase of £1,454m from services has been offset by a fall of £24m in agriculture, hunting and forestry (whose difficulties were evident even before foot and mouth disease). Manufacturing output has increased by £149m 1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

Agriculture, hunting & forestry

208

207

176

169

169

156

149

158

172

184

Industry, inc. energy & construct.

2 129

2 150

2 169

2 149

2 119

2 072

2 093

2 101

2 174

2 278

Service activities

2 525

2 683

2 813

2 932

2 976

3 042

3 187

3 416

3 700

3 979

Cumbria

4 862

5 040

5 158

5 250

5 264

5 270

5 429

5 675

6 046

6 441

Table 2.2 Cumbria’s headline GVA at current basic prices 1995-2004, by broad sector (£million) Source: Office for National Statistics Regional Accounts Unit

Self-employed incomes in agriculture are very low. Using data from the Inland Revenue the median self-employed income in Cumbria for 2004-05 was just £7,820, compared to £10,300 in the UK. To emphasise the seriousness of low farming incomes, the average annual income from agriculture, hunting & forestry in 2003-2004 was equivalent to an hourly rate of £4.24 (assuming 39 hours a week for 48 weeks a year), less than the contemporary National Minimum Wage. In reality, self-employed farmers often work much longer hours than these assumptions (and bear significant responsibilities and financial risks). As many as 24.1% of all VAT registered businesses in Cumbria are in agriculture and fishing (4,275 businesses). A detailed analysis of changes in Cumbria by sector of VAT registered businesses reveals that agriculture has lost 430 businesses since 1994. 4. Challenges and opportunities 4.1 In summary, rural Cumbria faces some significant challenges over the coming years of the programme period. These include:


• Ongoing problems of low pay and low GVA, which are to some extent exacerbated by job growth in lower-GVA sectors, with less growth in higherGVA sectors. • The shift to a new method of farm payments, with a resulting shift in the focus of agri-environment activity in the county • Reducing farm incomes, and a reduction in the number of working farm holdings • The ongoing legacy of Foot and Mouth Disease, which significantly weakened the sector in Cumbria. • Rising house prices, and the pressure on traditional jobs in rural areas • Increasing national and international competition in key sectors such as tourism 4.2 Nonetheless, there are opportunities on which the programme can build. In recent years in Cumbria, there has been a strong focus on rural development, which has created a basis on which to build for this programme. This will include: • Growing national and international interest in traditional and local foods, and, coupled with that, an increasing demand for quality visitor experiences • A growing cultural sector, which complements the demand for quality tourism. • The unrivalled cumbrian landscape, with strong environmental sustainability supported by previous and current agri-environment programmes • Previous focus on rural development, such as the Rural Regeneration Cumbria programme, which established some significant projects and improved the capacity of public bodies in Cumbria to promote rural development. • The development of market town partnerships, leading to an understanding of, and focus on, the role of key service centres • The increased focus and capacity that comes from the establishment of Cumbria Vision, and its strong partnership with other key players, such as local authorities. • Growth in community-level capacity to drive rural development, supported by a wide range of projects including the Rural Women’s network, Rural Futures, Rural Greens and others. It is against these challenges and opportunities that his programme has been developed. 5. A vision for rural Cumbria; objectives for 2013 Partners involved in the development of the RDPE in Cumbria have set a series of highlevel objectives for the programme. These are that, by 2013, rural Cumbria will demonstrate: • More sustainable farming and forestry sectors, with a focus on promoting diversification and restructuring and increasing value.

• Greater levels of localised production in the food sector and elsewhere, with a focus on quality and adding value.


• More sustainable local rural communities, with improved and locally controlled services • Increased levels of energy efficiency, and greater self-reliance on renewable energy • More diverse and innovative rural enterprises, again with a focus on increasing value in the rural economy, and demonstrating clear links between high quality businesses and exceptional landscape character. • Reduction in rural inequality • Inspired and skilled people in the rural area who are empowered to take local action The overall aim of these objectives is to support a diversified, higher-value rural economy. 6. RDPE Measure-level interventions 6.1 Partners have examined in detail the potential for targeteing each of the measures in a Cumbrian context. 6 priority themes are emerging, which encompass a range of project activities, and which will collectively contribute to the objectives above. These are: • The promotion of energy efficiency, sustainable use of energy, and increasing capacity for renewable energy • The diversification of the forestry and woodland sector, and increasing added value in woodland products • Increasing the competitiveness and sustainability of the farming and food sector. • Promoting sustainable local tourism which connects people and places • Increasing the growth of micro enterprises and social enterprises • Supporting sustainable local communities and services This has resulted in a provisional schedule of activities, summarised in the table below, and described in more detail in the measure-level tables attached. 6.2 If the RDPE in Cumbria is delivered through the LEADER method, as hoped, these activities will be shaped and modified by the LAGs themselves. In some cases, LAGs will be involved in the development of project specifications and priorities (e.g for strategic scheme-type projects). In some cases, the projects will emerge from the LAGs themselves (e.g. in the case of local tourism projects). In either case, the decision-making sovereignty rests with the L:AGs.


Table 1: Axis 1 interventions Axis

Axis 1 114

115

121

122

123

124

125

Title

Vocational  training and  information  actions 

Use of advisory  services

Setting up of  management,  relief and  advisory  services 

Modernisation of  agricultural  holdings

Improvement of  the economic  value of forests 

Adding value to  agricultural and  forestry  products

Cooperation for  development of  new products,  processes and  technologies

Infrastructure  related to  development &  adaptation of  agric & forestry

Allocation: % of axis

30%

10%

10%

10%

10%

20%

5%

5%

Grant scheme for individual enterprises/ producers, concentrating on annex 1 products

Collaborative ventures between producers, processors and/or other enterprises. May build on added value activity in M 123

Measure

111

Thematic priority Farm scale energy production (renewables, energy efficiency)

Energy

Forest futures

Agricultural competitiveness

Programmes of vocational training appropriate to local need, supporting the 6 key themes of the RDPE in Cumbria

Core advice service for forest futures type programme

1. Development of farmer-controlled businesses and support for cooperation networks etc e.g. organics. 2.Co-operation of forest holders for added value

Forest futures: indepth support and advice on added value 1. Nutrient management & balancing support. 2. crop storage (inc. energy crops) and animal health and welfare

Limited number of infrastructure projects to support economic impact of other axis 1 measures 1. Beyond catchment sensitive farming; water resource efficiency. 2. Limited no. of infrastructure projects to support economic impact of other axis 1 measures


Table 2: Axis 3 interventions Axis Measure

311

312

313

Axis 3 321

323

331

341

Title

Diversification  into non­ agricultural  activities

Business  creation and  development 

Encouragement  of tourism  activities

Basic services  for the economy  and rural  population 

Conservation  and upgrading  of the rural  heritage

Training and  information 

Skills  acquisition,  animation and  implementation  of local  development  strategies

Allocation: % of axis

20%

25%

20%

15%

10%

5%

5%

Training & information needs analysis of LAG areas to be followed by packages of training from community-based providers in line with axis 3 activities

Support and development to concentrate on sub-LAG scale partnerships (e.g at village, valley or market town scale) to support development of local plans and strategies. Particularly in support of M313, 321, 323

Thematic priority Energy

Forest futures

Agricultural competitiveness

Eco and local tourism Micro-business and social enterprise

‘New enterprise on farms' scheme to provide support and grants for farming households

‘Rural business support programme' to provide support and grants for business creation and growth. Needs link to LAG priorities

Ecomuseum/ living landscape/ sense of place projects in line with LAG priorities

SME and public services, based on key service centres, in line

Locally-driven heritage projects in line with LAG priorities. Projects to demonstrate small-scale socioeconomic and environmental


Communities and Services

with LAG priorities

benefits, largely linked to M313


7. Co-operation Partners in Cumbria are keen to make co-operation a feature of this programme, building on the very positive experiences of the previous LEADER+ programmes, and on other experiences of cooperation within and beyond the UK. Co-operation is possible on many levels:

7.1 Within the programme, co-operation and networking will be facilitated between projects, and between providers to ensure the maximum added value from the range of providers across Cumbria. In particular, if the LEADER proposals for Cumbria are accepted, co-operation between LAGs will be encouraged, to share experience and good practice.

7.2 Across regional boundaries. Cumbria has a boundary with other English region (the North East), and with another UK nation (Scotland). Co-operation and collaboration across these boundaries will vary, but will be promoted and encouraged within the programme. In particular, co-operation with the North East will be encouraged for communities and projects in the North Pennines area, building on the established links and initiatives developed during the earlier successful North Pennines LEADER+ programme. Joint projects are envisaged across this border, capitalising on the geographic sense of place that exists in that area. In the case of joint projects, it is envisaged that project costs will be apportioned between the two regional budgets. New LAGs will be encouraged to consider formal cooperation arrangements with other LAGs outside the North West Region to encourage such cross-regional projects.

7.3 With other regions in the UK, making use of existing LEADER networks to encourage the sharing of experience and best practice with other regions that are committed to the bottom-up style of delivery.

7.4 With other EU regions . Again a feature of LEADER, EU co-operation provides a new dimension to rural development, offering a new perspective, new ways of working, and an opportunity to share experience for practitioners and people living and working in rural areas. Contacts already exist with a number of other EU regions with similar rural landscapes, and these will form the basis for wider collaboration across the EU. 8. Procurement Procurement methodology is also dependent upon the success of LEADER proposals for Cumbria. If Cumbria is indeed able to deliver the whole of Axis 1 and 3 through the LEADER method, there will 3 principal means of procuring project providers: Type 1 Strategic Commissioning (applies to measures where strategic Cumbria-wide or LAG-wide intervention is necessary, e.g. measures 114, 115, 311, 312) In this case, the accountable body, in conjunction with the LAGs, will commission project providers on the basis of an open tendering system. A brief will be agreed by the programme team, with the LAGs, and circulated to likely providers within the LAG area. Applications to run the scheme/project will be invited by a set deadline, and a clear, rigorous and transparent scoring system will be used to assess the quality of proposals. Tender action required will depend on the value of the contract and will comply with EU regulations and the County Council’s existing procedures for EU funds: eg a project of £15,001 to £50,000 will normally require three competitive tenders to be invited.


This procurement route must be complementary to, and not conflict with, regionally commissioned activity Type 2 Local Initiatives (applies to measures where bottom-up LAG-driven initiatives are paramount, e.g. measures 313, 321, 323) The availability of funds will be promoted widely within the LAG areas, and in this case, local needs and projects will be identified by the LAGs. Projects will be supported in their development, and project applications will be received and appraised according to strict appraisal criteria, in line with national and EU guidance. In most cases, these funds will be administered and promoted through specific collective funds on issues such as green tourism, environmental enterprise, and other Axis 3 activities. In these cases the over-arching scheme would be promoted by one of the partners on the LAG with the experience and competence to manage grant schemes. For both types of projects appraisal will be carried out by the County Council’s Regeneration Support Team as described in the Capacity section below. Type 3 Individual applications by businesses (applies to measures where businesses have the opportunity to make proposals directly to the LAGs, e.g. 121, 124, 125) In some cases, there will be scope for businesses to apply directly to the programme against substantive measures: eg farm business applying for farm shop support. However, the majority of applications will come through delegated fund schemes as described in type 2 above, and only in exceptional circumstances will direct applications be made. Selection of projects is the responsibility of LAGs with sub committees being appointed which has proved to be particularly effective in the current Fells and Dales programme. Systems for feedback and appeal for unsuccessful applicants are already in place in the current Fells and Dales programme and these systems will be modified for the new programme. 9. Capacity 9.1

Management

Cumbria County Council has acted as accountable body for the previous Fells & Dales LEADER+ programme in the county, and its cabinet has formally agreed to act as the accountable body for the funds in Cumbria for the 2007-13 programme. In previous Leader+ programmes, the LAG staff team have played an important role as ‘animateurs’, stimulating and encouraging innovative and high-quality local projects. It is intended that this will be a continued role of LAG staff. The County Council has also indicated that it would be keen to be the employer of the staff team charged with the administration and management of the programme. The composition of the staff team has been designed to offer the maximum level of support for the LAGs, with staff who are dedicated to particular LAGs. Efficiency savings could be made, not by sharing staff between LAGs (as it is felt that LAGs need to develop close working relationships with


the staff team over a period of time), but by sharing common administrative requirements, for example: • Both LAG teams could be co-located in the same office premises. This would not obviate the need for hot-desk facilities elsewhere in Cumbria to ensure local accessibility of the programme for LAGs, but would make considerable savings on ICT and communications, office rental &c. • A single administrator for both LAGs could perform common functions, e.g working on promotional and publicity materials, maintaining a common database &c. • Both LAGs would make use of the services of the County Council’s Regeneration Support Team for appraisal, monitoring and compliance functions Most importantly, this team would not be a new stand-alone organisation, but would be integrated into existing delivery vehicles in the county. Although the final staffing structure has not yet been agreed, it may look something like this:

Solway, Border, Eden Programme manager

Fells & Dales Programme manager

Administrator 1 FTE or 2 X 0.5 FTE

Solway, Border, Eden LAG development officer

Solway, Border, Eden LAG support officer 0.6 FTE

Fells & Dales LAG development officer

Fells & Dales LAG support officer 0.6 FTE

It is estimated that some 16% of programme funds will be necessary to ensure the level of quality and support that is necessary to successfully deliver the programme in the locally-focused way that is desirable in Cumbria.


Estimated annual costs Item

Cost

Salaries

£180,000

Employment on-costs (NIC, Pension, Redundancy)

£36,000

Office costs

£30,000

Travel

£8,000

LAG support costs (total for 2 LAGs)

£10,000

Accountable Body management and administration (RST)

£45,000

Development costs (Network membership & training)

£5,000

Website, communications, programme promotion

£8,000

Sub-total

£322,000

Set-up costs (first year only) • Recruitment •

£10,000

Furniture and equipment

9.2

Roles and Responsibilities

Cumbria LEADER Programme Managers (2 of; one for each LAG) •

Overall management of the programme, including responsibility and reporting to NWDA, DEFRA (if required), Cumbria County Council, partners on the Cumbria Rural Development Partnership

Integration with other rural development activities in Cumbria

Line management of staff in the team

Regional and sub-regional representation

Programme evaluation

Administrator (1 of; or 2 part-time, for 2 LAGs) •

Office management

Human resource issues

Budget monitoring

Governance for north and south LAGs

Ensuring systems compliance in liaison with Development Assistants

Recording State Aid (if applicable)

LAG Development Officers •

Support to and development of LAGs

Project development

Liaison with project promoters

Programme promotion


Working with Axis 2 partners

Eligibility and programme fit checks for project appraisal

LAG Support Officers •

Support to the Development and Management Officers

Ongoing support for project implementation

Systems compliance

Support to LAGs

These roles will be complemented by the Regeneration Support Team who will be responsible for technical appraisal of projects, monitoring the progress of individual projects, ensuring audit compliance, inspection of verification of projects, processing of financial claims and progress reports, and general compliance issues including robustness against audit. It is important to bear in mind that there are existing staff working on current LEADER programmes in Cumbria. Legally, of course, they may or may not have TUPE rights of transfer to the new programme, if approved. More importantly, they represent a significant body of knowledge and experience about the principles and delivery of LEADER, and could be an important contributing factor to the success of the programme. Advice should be sought on TUPE requirements and processes once the staff structure has been determined. 9.3

Appraisal, monitoring and inspection

Consideration must be given to ensuring clear separation of duties between project development, project appraisal and project delivery. Delivery organisations in Cumbria will make project applications to run projects financed by EAFRD funds, either commissioned (as in type 1 above) or by direct application (type 2, or rarely by type 3, above). Those project applications would be fully appraised by the Council’s Regeneration Support Team (RST). This procedure is in line with the current process for appraising projects for other EU and NWDA funding programmes, and includes an assessment of risk to the accountable body. Following appraisal, if a project is recommended for approval by the LAG, the County Council will issue an offer letter to the applicant organisation, as is the current practice with other programmes. This offer letter will include information about the justifications for any claw-back of money in the case of misuse of funds. The RST has established systems for monitoring and inspection that fulfils both NWDA and EU requirements, including current LEADER+ projects and NWDA single pot projects. These systems would be applied to the new RDPE programme. 9.4

Financial claims and progress reports

The programme staff in Cumbria would work closely with the RST in the submission of claims and progress reports. It is expected that the claims and reports would be compiled by the programme manager and her/his team, and verified and submitted by the RST staff. 9.5

Recording state aid


It is not anticipated that there will be substantial need to record state aids, as the programme as a whole has block state aid clearance. However, procedures exist within the RST appraisal system to identify potential state aid issues, to raise them at appraisal stage, to notify project applicants and to ensure that state aid notification, or de minimus recording, takes place 9.6

Evaluation

Evaluation will take three forms, there will be evaluation of individual projects which will be the responsibility of the project promoters, but it will be a requirement that the results of evaluation will be shared with the programme as a whole. The second form of evaluation will be ongoing evaluation of programme progress. Thirdly there will be a formal mid-term evaluation to provide the opportunity to adjust the programme strategy. 10. Governance 10.1

Cumbria partners do not wish to see the creation of a two-tier structure where there is a “main programme” and a subsidiary programme run using the LEADER approach; nor do they wish to see Axis 1 being delivered by one body and Axis 3 being delivered through Local Action Groups using the LEADER approach. In Cumbria we have substantial experience of using the LEADER approach, not least in connection with the Axis 1 agenda and in relation to wider rural economic diversification. Furthermore, Axis 2 is already being delivered by Natural England and the Forestry Commission– and that we would seek to secure their involvement in the governance structure from the outset.

10.2

In order to define the LAG areas, Cumbria partners undertook a rigorous analysis of options, for which 4 guiding principles were agreed: LAGs should be defined using wards as the building blocks – this will, inter alia, assist the collation of data and information. There is an intention to target, as fully as possible, the whole rural population of Cumbria. The urban centres of Carlisle, Kendal, Barrow, Whitehaven and Workington will be excluded. This gives an urban population of around 216,000 and a rural population of around 271,000 According to the Implementing Regulations; “the population of each area as a general rule must be between 5,000 and 150,000. Properly justified exceptions may be accepted”. There is a desire to reflect ‘natural communities’ as much as possible. It is felt that the Natural England work on ‘joint character areas’ could assist this process

After a detailed analysis of all options, taking into account the integrity of the areas, connection with local identity and links to existing initiatives, the proposed option is to develop 2 LAG areas, named for working purposes: Solway, Border and Eden (population 141,662) and Fells and Dales (population 129,740); although it is acknowledged that the LAGs themselves may wish to change the names to better reflect local identity. LAGs may also wish to discuss the setting up of sub-LAGs to ease communication across what are acknowledged to be large geographical areas. For instance, an 'uplands' or 'Severely Disadvantaged Area' sub-LAG for Solway Border and Eden could help facilitate cooperation on specific issues with the Fells and Dales LAG or other LAGs in the North East region or in Scotland. A map is at Annex 1 and a full list of wards is at Annex 2. These 2 LAG areas, and the partnerships therein, would be the subject of full submissions to NWDA for LEADER designation during August 2007. If approved, LAGs become the sovereign bodies for the governance and management of the RDPE in Cumbria.


10.3

However, a gap has been recognised in terms of aligning the Axis 1 and 3 activity of RDPE with other parts of the RDPE, and with other rural interventions in Cumbria. Therefore, partners propose the creation of a Cumbria-wide rural strategic body which will be charged with the strategic oversight of the programme, and in particular to ensure synergy with the delivery of Axis 2 activities and with region-wide initiatives. There is also a need to align any developments with the emerging Cumbria Vision structure, and it is understood that this group could have a reporting line direct to Cumbria Vision’s board. There is currently no existing body which such responsibility in Cumbria. It will, therefore, be necessary to create a new body, which will be called the Cumbria Rural Development Group (CRDG). It will have 2 principal functions: a) to ensure that actions delivered within each LAG area complement each other, and complement other initiatives and programmes in the county b) to ensure that actions under Axes 1 and 3 complement actions under Axis 2, and encourage ways in which Axis 2 actions can be influenced by actions in the other axes The membership of such a strategic group would reflect the LEADER principles and would be a true partnership across the public, private and voluntary sectors and would cover the full range of sectoral and rural issues generally. It would have three electoral “colleges”, from the public and non-public sectors and the two LAGs themselves. It is expected that the group would be chaired by a member of Cumbria Vision. The suggested membership is:

Public sector (8) Cumbria CC 2 District Councils (one per LAG area) Lake District NPA Natural England Forestry Commission CALC Cumbria Strategic Partnership

Non-public sector (8)

Other (4)

Cumbria Vision 2 representatives from each LAG area (should also be Cumbria Tourism non-public sector Voluntary Sector representatives) Development Agency (e.g VAC) Enterprise Agency (via CLEAN network) CPRE (Friends of Lake District) Country Land & Business Association NFU National Trust Total of 20 members: 8 public sector, 12 private and voluntary sectors

That group will also ensure appropriate links to Cumbria Strategic Partnership and their delivery of the wider Cumbria Sub-regional strategy. The main linkage, however, will be with Cumbria Vision. Importantly, as stated above, the LAGs themselves will have the key role in governance. They will identify and support the development of projects, approve project proposals for funding, and be important representatives on the new CRDG. According to LEADER principles, they will have a majority representation from non-public agencies, and will have appropriate representation from young people, from women and from rural businesses. The governance architecture is summarised in the diagram below:


Cumbria  Vision

NWD A

Solway,  Border,  Eden 

Fells and  Dales Local  Action  Group

Local  Action  Group

Cumbria County  Council : Accountable body  and programme  secretariat

PROJECTS KEY Flow of funding Strategic  planning Other links

Cumbria  Rural  Developme nt Group


11. Systems and procedures The systems and procedures to ensure accountability for public funds will be built on existing systems and procedures in use by the Regeneration Support Team for current NWDA and EU funding. These systems are tried and tested for very large public programmes, and have been developed in conjunction with North West Development Agency as part of their Systems and Processes Improvement Programme (SAPIP) 11.1

Accounting

Accounting will undertaken primarily by accounting staff within the RST, and supported by the finance accountants within the County Council’s Economy, Community and Environment Directorate. Accounting procedures and systems will be based on those currently used for EU and NWDA programmes. 11.2

Audit, fraud and irregularity reporting

Under current procedures for LEADER, all irregularities over ÂŁ1 must be recorded, all irregularities over ÂŁ10 must be reported (to GONW under the current system). The RST has in place systems to identify irregularities, and the necessary paperwork to record irregularities. These systems are sufficiently robust for the new programme. 11.3

Monitoring

Monitoring of projects will be carried out by RST staff using a monitoring procedure developed over several years of NWDA and EU funding. The procedure will be modified the ensure compliance with current RDPE regulations, in agreement with the NWDA 11.4

Publicity

Programme publicity will follow EU guidelines for publicity where EU funds are involved. There is considerable experience of appropriate publicity and dissemination within the existing LEADER+ programmes in Cumbria. 11.5

Equality and Sustainable development

The programme staff will be trained in addressing the key cross-cutting themes of equality and sustainability. Existing partners in Cumbria have considerable experience of implementing these themes, as they have formed a key part of EU programmes since 2000. There is a wealth of good practice and guidance available within the NW region in delivering cross-cutting themes, and this guidance will be used with programme staff. Both themes are also embedded in the delivery of the RDPE, particularly in the LEADER method. There is a requirement that LAGs include appropriate representation from women and young people, and it is recognised that many LEADER projects address sustainable development in innovative and effective ways. 11.6

Managing underperformance


The RST will support the programme manager to compile quarterly reports of commitment and spend. This will allow the programme team to identify particular measures where the programme is underperforming, which can be addressed in the following ways: Where commitment is low (i.e. insufficient projects have come forward of been approved), programme staff can either work with LAGs to identify potential projects, or can work with project sponsors to improve the quality of applications Where spend is low, this will be identified during monitoring visits, which can be supplemented by individual contacts with projects that are identified as under-performing on spend. Project sponsors will develop remedial strategies to ensure that spend is brought back on track. The individual offer letters between CCC (as accountable body) and the project sponsor will detail the circumstances under which grant may be withdrawn or reduced, and the potential exists to reallocate grant to other projects is under-performance persists. In the case of under-performance of outputs, again the programme team and RST will work with project sponsors to identify remedial strategies or, if necessary, reduce the level of grant. 11.7

Detection of irregularities

It is most likely that irregularities will be recognised either during monitoring visits or during the claims process. The staff will work with the project sponsors to correct the irregularities, which may take the form of adjusting financial claims to bring the accounts back on track or removing ineligible expenditure, adjusting the reporting of outputs, or improving reporting systems. 11.8

Avoidance of ‘double-counting’ of beneficiaries

One of the advantages of running the RDPE Axes 1 and 3 as a single LEADER programme in Cumbria is the ability to maintain a single, co-ordinated information system. This will allow programme staff to keep an up-to-date database of project applicants and beneficiaries. It is the responsibility of project sponsors to ensure that records of individual beneficiaries (for example, attending training courses) are kept.


Annex 1 Map of proposed LAG areas


Annex 2 List of wards in proposed LAG areas Solway, Border & Eden Irthing Lyne Aspatria Ellen Holme Marsh Silloth Solway Wampool Waver Wharrels Wigton Burgh Dalston Longtown & Rockcliffe Stanwix Rural Wetheral All Saints Broughton St Bridget's Christchurch Clifton Dalton Ellenborough Ewanrigg Flimby Netherhall Seaton Arlecdon Beckermet Cleator Moor North Cleator Moor South Distington Egremont North Egremont South Frizington Moresby St Bees Brampton Great Corby and Geltsdale Hayton Eamont Hartside Hesket Kirkby Thore Kirkoswald Langwathby Lazonby Penrith North Skelton Alston Moor Long Marton Warcop Appleby (Appleby) Appleby (Bongate) Brough Penrith Carleton Penrith East Penrith Pategill Penrith South Penrith West

Fells & Dales Bootle Ennerdale Gosforth Millom Without Seascale Broughton Lakes Ambleside Lakes Grasmere Staveley-in-Westmorland Windermere Applethwaite Windermere Bowness North Windermere Bowness South Windermere Town Crummock Derwent Valley Keswick Haverigg Holborn Hill Newtown Askham Greystoke Shap Ullswater Morland Kirkby Stephen Crosby Ravensworth Orton with Tebay Ravenstonedale Cartmel Low Furness & Swarthmoor Ulverston Central Ulverston East Ulverston North Ulverston South Ulverston Town Ulverston West Burneside Coniston Crake Valley Crooklands Hawkshead Kirkby Lonsdale Staveley-in-Cartmel Whinfell Dalton North Dalton South Arnside & Beetham Burton & Holme Holker Levens Milnthorpe Grange Lyth Valley Natland Sedbergh Boltons Warnell Dacre


MEASURE TEMPLATE FOR PROPOSED RDPE INTERVENTIONS IN CUMBRIA RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention

Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

Sustainable Development Indicators and Targets Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support

Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%)

111 – Vocational trainin

The skills base for the Agriculture and Forestry sector remains relatively low. There is and managers to enable efficient and modern working practices to be adopted and bec training seminar and open day events are required to disseminate new ideas and to as forestry and the consumer. Understanding the environmental values and social issues significant part of the modernising agenda and will be tackled through this measure To up-skill workers. To introduce new skills and techniques to workers. To reintroduce traditional skills to workers where they have declined. To increase the uptake of IT systems in the industry To train new entrants to the industry. To improve quality in business by improving learning opportunities for managers. To provide opportunities for the public to appreciate land management roles and to re-e forestry production. To enable businesses to collaborate on learning through group activity / learning sets. To raise awareness further about environmental and social considerations in farming a To provide learning support for understanding certification programmes (organic, leaf, f To raise awareness of opportunities to run rural enterprise with social objectives (Socia other innovative models. To ensure training links with activity and investment taking place on farm and or forestr 30% of axis 1

All projects must be accessible to women, ethnic minorities and disabled people, and a life. It will be a requirement of project leaders that they take into account the needs of r programmes. Project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to people from a needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other special needs. It will be part of all projects to deliver economic, environmental and social outcomes an Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g. in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou and e-learning where appropriate.) 6,000 participants 17,000 training days ACTIVITY ONE Formal and informal occupational skills for agricultural and forestry workers and for Far Disseminating new knowledge, technologies and techniques. Enabling new entrants and diversifying businesses to acquire the necessary skills. Identify new training needs not currently addressed. Subsidise attendance on courses the identified groups. Set up and help run land manager groups, which will disseminate learning to wider aud (business clubs, seminars, workshops, support and mentoring, advisory activities, know

Individuals in agriculture and forestry operations Individual members of the public Providers of agricultural and forestry vocational training £150,000grant £64,285.71 locally generated match per annum. 70% for programmes leading directly to an economic outcome for the participant – espe supported in Axis 1 Up to 100% for programmes leading to non commercial outcomes from interventions


Coverage Delivery Area Demarcation

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Delivery Area Demarcation

Support is subject to limits imposed by the state aid training block exemption rules Residents of the entire rural area of Cumbria, targeting new entrants and programmes Whole of rural Cumbria The projects will not replicate the provision of Colleges, training providers or other instit through other ESF, LSC funding streams.

ACTIVITY TWO New Directions: Providing New knowledge and know how, sustainability awareness, su awareness, encouraging co-operative actions and innovation dissemination. Revenue support and individual subsidised attendance support for formal and informal days, learning sets, and similar open learning methods Individuals in agriculture and forestry operations Individual members of the public Providers of agricultural and forestry vocational training £90,000grant aid per annum Up to 100% for all participants – for non commercial outcomes from interventions, subje training block exemption rules Residents of the entire rural area of Cumbria Whole of rural Cumbria, The projects will not replicate the provision of Colleges, training providers or other instit through other ESF, LSC funding streams.

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%)

114 – Use of a

There has been a body of existing work with woodland owners in Cumbria that has con woodlands and maximising the value from those woodlands, set against a background opportunities for woodland-related businesses. However, experience shows that there need for a new advisory service which can provide support and assistance to forest and private sector, to identify the potential of their woodland and to add value to their produ case of unmanaged or under-used woods, of which there are a large number in Cumbr will complement actions under measures 122 and 123, which will both provide in-depth access. To establish a new advisory service for forest holders to improve the sustainable mana 10%

Equal Opportunities

It is anticipated that this provision be available across the sub-region and that it is acce holders irrespective of age, gender or ethnic origin.

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (eg in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resour e-learning where appropriate.)

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support

ACTIVITY ONE The provision of advice to farmers and forest holders to improve the sustainable manag neglected woodlands with potential for supply of wood fuel or those providing high soci landscapes and protected sites. Revenue-based programme to establish the need for and set up a new advisory service successful ‘forest futures’ programme. This new service will target forest holders not h forms of intervention. Technical advice and support, consultancy assistance, business


Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

awarded to an organisation or consortium of organisations via competitive tender. Farmers with forest holdings; other forest holders £100,000 p.a. Rate of support 50-80% of the costs of the advice, depending on local need and deman holding. All of Cumbria; targeted at private forest holdings 400 forest holders

Sub-regionally; contracted at LAG level Activity is complementary to interventions under Axis 2 of the programme, but there is n

MEASURE TEMPLATE FOR PROPOSED RDPE INTERVENTIONS IN CUMBRIA RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention

Allocation (%)

115 – Setting up of managem

Farmers and forest holders need help in adapting to changing circumstances in the ma environment and regulation. They particularly need to improve their management skills farmers continue to run their businesses in isolation from other farm businesses (ie as s recognised that collaborative ventures involving collective purchasing and the sharing o important way forward for more efficient operation.

Given that the majority of woodland is farm-based and in small areas there is a significa situation whereby the nature of the woodland resource is matched to the needs of the o The objective of intervention in this Measure is to help farmers and forest holders adap expected that the provision here for farming would be devoted to the development of fa ventures between farmers in collaborative groups.

It is expected that two schemes be developed; one for the farm sector and one for the w 10%

Equal Opportunities

It is anticipated that this provision be available across the sub-region and that it is acce holders irrespective of age, gender or ethnic origin.

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (eg in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resour e-learning where appropriate.)

Description of Proposed Activity

Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%)

ACTIVITY ONE This service will support farmers who are seeking to establish or expand collaborative v or other forms of farmer-controlled businesses or groups. It will also support the develo the agricultural sector and encourage innovative collaborative projects to trial new tech producers.

Given that aid rates are 50% in the first year, 30% in the second year and 20% in the th support given will be for the costs of establishing these new services providing expert s basis of achieving financial sustainability after a three-year period. The beneficiaries will be farm businesses seeking to work with other farm businesses. It is estimated that the total cost of this activity will be £150,000 per annum, with 50% b Over five years this is £750,000. The regulation states that the aid rate is 50% in the first year, 30% in the second year, after that for any individual group. New groups will be formed in years one, two and thr


Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support

Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

The opportunity for establishing suitable ventures will be available to farmers across the resource is necessarily time-limited due to the tapered funding, which means effectively the first three years of the programme in order to secure their completion by 2013. 40 is the national target for newly set up management, relief or advisory services. 4 gro sub-region. Increase in GVA on supported holdings of 5%. Also similar increase in labour productiv This activity could be delivered either regionally or sub-regionally, but the proposed del delivered at local action group area level. It is anticipated that agriculture and forestry intervention be delivered by EAFRD and th ACTIVITY TWO A woodlands advisory service will be established to provide expert support to the situat complementary to that provided under measure 114. In the future a possible farmer wo bio-fuel and ecosystem services may be necessary. This service will work with farm woodland owners who are seeking to establish or expa of co-operatives or other forms of farmer-controlled businesses. It will also support the rings for the forestry sector. In the future, a wood fuel advisory service may be require

It is anticipated that a project officer will assist with organisational and concept develop groups optimise their use of the available financial support. This individual would not b measure 114, to ensure complementarity between measures The beneficiaries will be farm woodland owners seeking to work with other farm woodla

£25,000 grant per year The regulation states that the aid rate is 50% in the first year, 30% in the second year, after that for any individual group. It is likely that one sub-regional service can be established from this resource, targeting time, further development of wood fuel may necessitate a specialist advisory service Advisory service established No. of businesses receiving advice Increase in turnover of businesses receiving advice The whole of rural Cumbria This programme is for agricultural businesses – other non farm businesses that buy in elsewhere.

121 – Modernisation

Cumbria has a high number of small holdings, often constrained by limitations of land, f planning system. There is a significant need for modernisation of holdings to improve a b) their economic performance Although realising human potential is an important way of increasing performance of fa capital physical investment to improve competitiveness. Such investments need to fost performance of holdings and need to be targeted to interventions which provide a clear the reduction of pollution and the mitigation of climate change. This measure, along w delivering the funds identified through the upland uplift, as it will concentrate in particula farms. Cumbrian farms need investment assistance to be able to improve their performance in and positive environmental impact. 10% All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in delivering programmes


Sustainable Development Description of Proposed Activity

Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

In addition, project leaders must ensure that new capital facilities are accessible to peo appropriate, taking into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. New facilities an sustainability through good practice (e.g. in sustainable use of materials and resources renewable energy and in energy efficiency measures). ACTIVITY ONE Improving Farm Environmental and Economic Performance: Investment in facilities and technologies in the following key areas: 1) Renewable Ener anaerobic digestion, wood fuel heating, hydro and small scale wind turbines. 2) Farm n scale capital investments that will demonstrably improve the animal health and welfare novel or niche breeds, including support for research and development into new techniq Farms receiving investment will be required to engage in dissemination activity as a co Note: we are assuming that miscanthus establishment will be part of a national program Capital grant aid, revenue grant aid. Farm businesses and landowners £100,000 pa over 5 years = £500,000 plus £500,000 match funding from other sources Up to 40% in non LFA ,up to 50% in LFA. Maximum grant aid of £10,000 per holding

Available to all farmers (subject to Planning Permissions, environmental impact assess No. of farm holdings receiving investment support: 25

This Scheme will be available throughout the rural area of Cumbria This intervention is appropriate to EAFRD rather than ESF or ERDF. It will also be dist domestic programmes such as those arising from the sustainable farming and food stra ACTIVITY TWO To provide an “upland uplift” to the sheep and cattle sectors In the Less Favoured Area infrastructure investments which bring animal welfare benefits, improvements in occupa Grant aid Farm businesses £20,000 pa generates £20,000 of match funding, or £22,000 in non-LFA Up to 40% in non LFA ,up to 50% in LFA. Maximum grant aid of £10,000 per holding All farm businesses in the Cumbria LFA (targeted upland uplift measure) No. of operations supported:: 10 over 5 years Less Favoured Area of the sub-region This intervention would not be fundable through ERDF or ESF

122 – Improving the e

The volume of timber harvested is only 31% of the volume increment across England a timber in England's woodlands is rising rapidly. This is not economically or ecologically and consequential shading were identified as the variable most closely correlated with flora abundance and diversity.

Declines in timber prices have seriously reduced net income from forest management, a decline in the area under active management. Average standing prices for softwood real terms. Low timber prices and lack of markets are a prime reason for owners not m


Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

Sustainable Development Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

priority for Government intervention by a consensus of sectoral bodies. Timber harves enhancing the economic value of forests. Improving the economic value of forests by e demand for wood fuel and other value added wood products is in many cases a key to also benefit the environment. To support forest holders who have developed initial management plans for forest man implement the proposals in those management plans, and to develop added-value woo trails. The existence of a management plan, or the intention to produce one, is a prere 10%

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in delivering programmes women in business. In addition, project leaders must ensure that new capital facilities are accessible to peo appropriate, taking into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. New investments good practice (e.g in sustainable use of materials and resources, and in the provision o energy efficiency measures). ACTIVITY ONE Interventions under this measure will be to equip forest workers with the required mach will be delivered with delegated capital grants following the provision of advice and info addition, the measure will support more intense business support and advice which bui measure 114, also assistance to small woodland owners to secure UK WAS certificatio Consultancy and specialist advice to forest holders to develop detailed management an their business. Capital grants to forest holders to support the purchase of equipment w of woodland products. Woodland based enterprises ÂŁ100,000 p.a. Up to 50% of total eligible costs outside Less Favoured Areas (LFA) and Natura 2000 a Natura 2000 areas. All of Cumbria; targeted at private forest holdings with no upper or lower size limit 60 holdings to benefit from advice/support

Sub-regionally; contracted at LAG level Activity is complementary to interventions under Axis 2 of the programme, and develop there is no perceived duplication

123 – Adding value to agric

The agricultural and forestry sectors in Cumbria have great strengths in local product d reputation for high quality. However, local products that offer significant added value a great benefits from this measure, particularly by concentrating on the agricultural and fo materials: milk, meat and wood. This measure complement activity under axis 2 meas To support new and micro business size enterprises adding value to locally sourced pro To support local product awareness raising to the wider public. To encourage the production of quality products that meet specific accreditation standa To offer business support to holdings also receiving support under axis 2 stewardship s 20% of axis 1 All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in delivering programmes


Sustainable Development Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

In addition, project leaders must ensure that support and advice is accessible to people appropriate, taking into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. Initiatives must s through good practice (e.g. in sustainable use of materials and resources, in local purch use in marketing and selling). ACTIVITY ONE Grant scheme for improvement of primary processing facilities and adding value to bus innovative or new products and processes. Building work, services, equipment, specia supported as will distribution infrastructure. Capital grant aid to start up or upgrade premises for the purposes of innovative product and specialist systems Farm businesses, non farm businesses utilising farm produce, forest business adding v product. £150,000 per annum 40% where the process involves annexe products 1 in, and annexe 1 products as a re SME block exemption for other projects The primary target is farm based enterprise, however business purchasing from farms stages of processing are eligible in forestry businesses. Organic or other recognised a Collaborative enterprise will also be eligible as will social enterprise models and Comm 30 Businesses receiving assistance €5m (approx. £3m) of total new investment Whole of Rural Cumbria targeting meat processing in the livestock areas, milk based p merchant produce and native hardwood product is to be specifically encouraged in the Displacement of activity will not be encouraged through the use of grant aid. No other activity ACTIVITY TWO Supporting new Cumbrian added-value produce through supporting events, shows, dis particularly new products derived from support under activity 1 of this measure. Revenue and capital grant aid. Organisation, promotion, equipping and staffing events Direct beneficiaries would be businesses and their associations. The general public wo Businesses will benefit indirectly from increased awareness of local food purchasing £50,000 per annum 100% there is no state aid where there is no direct commercial beneficiary and /or whe European states. Organisations whose brief it is to raise general awareness of quality local product eithe specific service centre area. New (less than 3 years in existence) events will be targete No. Events held No. of people attending events supported No. of information sources created promoting local products Whole of rural Cumbria Some events, shows, displays and information sources already exist and are sustainab threaten to displace these events. Other European aid might be able to support activity products.

124 – Co-operation for the

This measure forms a natural complement to measure 123, in that it supports joint work craftspeople, producers and growers to encourage new and innovative products and fo the prevalence of small farm and woodland holdings and very small businesses in rural encourage co-operation necessary to compete in an increasingly competitive sector.


Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%)

To support joint working between producers and other enterprises to add value to Cum sustainable use of cumbrian products. 5%

Equal Opportunities

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in designing training prog In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.)

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

ACTIVITY ONE Support to the promotion and development of new products and processes by produce between producers and other enterprises. Design, product, process or technology development and tests and other tangible and/o cooperation such as marketing, promotion, business support.in the form of advice, assi are directly related to the development of new or innovative products and processes. Primary producers in agriculture and forestry, the processing industry and other partner £200,000 p.a. Up to 100%, subject to limits imposed by the SME block exemptions under Commission All of Cumbria; commissioned at LAG level 100 initiatives supported

Sub-regional, commissioned at Lag level Activities may be eligible for ERDF support, but are unlikely to be within the scope of pr competitiveness programme. Care will be taken to ensure no double-funding of project

125 – Infrastructure related to agriculture 1)Woodland especially on farms is often unmanaged due to lack of access infrastructur in significant way in infrastructure for timber extraction given the high costs and the lack Woodland to which access has been improved does however present many other econ in situ processing and recreation which will require small scale access improvements.

2) Farms even in high rainfall areas need support to implement sustainable water mana of water capture.

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

3) To provide an “upland uplift” to the livestock sectors; in the hill sheep sector in partic infrastructure investments linked to training which bring animal welfare benefits Access improvements to unmanaged and under managed woodland in order to create Sustainable water management and reduction of water costs on farms; improvement of labour cost reduction in the sheep and suckler cow sectors 5% of the axis. (approx. £50,000 p.a.)

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in delivering programmes In addition, project leaders must ensure that infrastructure investments are accessible t


Sustainable Development

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

appropriate, taking into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. New investments agriculture and forestry holdings through good practice (e.g. in sustainable use of mate of new forms of renewable energy and in energy efficiency measures, the minimisation visual intrusion). ACTIVITY ONE Improvement of access to woodland to facilitate sustainable woodland-based enterprise recreational use of woodlands, and therefore to support diversification of woodlands, as operations such as charcoal burning and in situ small-scale processing. Grant aid. Owners of farm woodland £20,000 pa generates £20,000 of match funding, or £22,000 in non-LFA 50% of total costs in LFA, 40% in non-LFA locations (with beneficiaries supplying the re All owners of farm woodland eligible No. of operations supported: 10 over 5 years

Across the sub-region This intervention would not be fundable through ESF or ERDF ACTIVITY TWO Sustainable water management on farms: including creation of new water storage, prot effective water capture e.g. from roofs of buildings etc and cost reduction measures Grant aid Farm businesses £20,000 pa generates £20,000 of match funding, or £22,000 in non-LFA 50% of total costs in LFA, 40% in non-LFA locations (with beneficiaries supplying the re All farm businesses eligible No. of operations supported:: 10 over 5 years

Across the sub- region This intervention would not be fundable through ESF or ERDF ACTIVITY THREE To support improvements to infrastructure and access to farmland to improve the comp Priority will be given to interventions on upland farms to improve the competitiveness o given to small infrastructure investments which bring animal welfare benefits, improvem cost reduction. Grant aid for capital developments to improve infrastructure and access Farm businesses £20,000 pa generates £20,000 of match funding, or £22,000 in non-LFA 50% of total costs in LFA, 40% in non-LFA locations All farm businesses in the Cumbria LFA (targeted upland uplift measure) No. of operations supported:: 10 over 5 years Less Favoured Area of the sub-region This intervention would not be fundable through ERDF or ESF


RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

Sustainable Development

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

311 – Diversification into

The impact of CAP reform and the move the single farm payment will expose Cumbrian provide new business opportunities. Benefits of farm diversification to farms are clear, w quarter or more of total farm incomes in over half of businesses with diversified enterpr cross many sectors, including added-value agricultural products, retail and tourism. Gr lever in other forms of investment, contributing to the viability of farms through building operation. To develop a ‘New businesses on farms’ service which can support any eligible farming business opportunities. 20% All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account in particular the needs of rural women and young pe In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.)

ACTIVITY ONE ‘New businesses on farms’ scheme, to provide support and capital grants to develop ne households which are outside of the agricultural sector that provide alternative income Business support and advice, expert technical advice, small-scale capital grants for equ buildings directly related to the business. Members of a farm household as defined by the EAFRD regulation £200,000 p.a. Up to 50% of project costs, depending on the extent of commercial return and limits imp Available to all eligible farming households in Cumbria. 25 beneficiaries; households or businesses

Sub-regionally to ensure coverage across all Cumbria, commission at a LAG level This activity is complementary to business support activity financed through ERDF com However, given the ERDF emphasis on growth priority sectors, it is likely that such acti based micro-businesses. Care will be taken to ensure that no project receives funding

312 – Support creation & de

Allocation (%)

Cumbria’s economy is made up of a large number of small companies – 82.7% of firms as 24.1% of all VAT registered businesses in Cumbria are in agriculture and fishing (4,2 changes in Cumbria by sector of VAT registered businesses reveals that agriculture ha and micro-enterprise in rural areas are often in need of grant aid to go ahead with plans sooner. High level of awareness of the availability of grant is essential and a degree of level To encourage micro-enterprise development. To create work opportunities in rural business. To enhance opportunities for young and women entrepreneurs in the rural economy 25% of axis 3

Equal Opportunities

All projects must be accessible to women, ethnic minorities and disabled people, and a

Objectives of the Intervention


Sustainable Development Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for

life. It will be a requirement of project leaders that they take into account the needs of r programmes. Project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to people from a needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other special needs. Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g. in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou and e-learning where appropriate.) ACTIVITY ONE To run a grant scheme for rural micro enterprise. Building work, services, equipment a as will distribution infrastructure Plus market support, feasibility and development work Capital grants and where appropriate non productive revenue support to new business where job creation is significant and demonstrates value for money) All rural micro business not based on farm or on farm/forest produce. It is recognised t for young people (under 30) and women, and the interventions will benefit from integrat in Cumbria. £200,000 per annum grant aid, £300,000 private per annum = £500,000 total per annu Up to 50% under de minimis regulation

Although all areas and all applicants will have access to funds, additional targeting (thro networking) will assist young entrepreneurs (under 30) and women entrepreneurs. Eac specific targeting to ensure complementarity and prevent displacement of existing ente Micro enterprises supported 100 No of jobs created No of new products supported The Whole rural area Displacement of activity will be discouraged through the use of grant aid. Other Europe certain economic sectors, e.g. ERDF, but that programme will focus on certain priority s Strategy. ACTIVITY TWO To assist rural service centres, such as market towns, to support the development and

Revenue support to service centre partnerships (such as market town partnerships) Businesses and general public in each rural service centre from general awareness rai £50,000 grant aid pa; £250k 2008-2013 100%. There is no state aid where there is no direct commercial beneficiary and /or wh between European states. Each service centre will be able to support part-time project staff to promote local busin centre and the area that it serves. No. seminars or other events for businesses held No. of people attending events supported No. of information sources created promoting local businesses Each service centre without current provision will be eligible Some service centres already have chambers of commerce or similar alliances which a this activity or threaten to displace these groups. Other European funds can fund micro sectors

313 – Encourag

Tourism is a major component of the Cumbrian economy, contributing £1,129 million in


Intervention Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

Sustainable Development Description of Proposed Activity

Type of support

Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%)

the rural areas of the county. Nonetheless the sector faces a number of challenges, inc peripheral areas of the county, and modernising the facilities and offer in more popular Cumbria’s economic strategy recognises the need to concentrate on niche and value-a To support a range of locally-generated tourism projects which will make a collective im encourage collaboration and joint marketing between tourism businesses and facilities. 20%

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in designing training prog In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.) ACTIVITY ONE Packages of tourism projects which will make a demonstrable impact on local economy by LAGs, who will be encouraged to take an ‘ecomuseum’ or ‘living landscape’ approac identify packages of projects within a defined geographic area (e.g. within the same val impact on the local economy than support to individual projects alone. Collaboration be encouraged Capital and revenue support to new or developing tourism destinations and facilities, in facilities, installation of interpretation and signposting, purchase of technical and consu information, marketing and promotional material. Also revenue support to assist with s will be targeted to support community-led packages of projects that contribute to a stron ecomusee concept). Projects supported will be expected to make a significant contribu will not provide support to minor accommodation that is not of strategic relevance or int existing tourism enterprises located in, and tourism related organisations operating in, r up new rural tourism enterprises. £200,000 p.a. Up to 100%, depending on the extent of commercial return and limits imposed by the d All of rural Cumbria; local targeting to be determined by LAGs 35 tourism business supported or assisted

Delivered at a sub-regional level, but concentrating on local projects defined by LAGs Tourism is seen as a priority within the ERDF competitiveness programme. However, t projects’. This measure will operate at a more local level. Care will be taken to ensure programmes.

321 – Ba

The main issue is that of the rural population’s ability to access services. Co-ordination community is an essential element of making services fit for purpose and sustainable. T empower local people to have a greater choice and influence over local decision makin delivery. There is a particular need to address the marginalization experienced by disad those less able to travel. To improve or maintain the living conditions and welfare of those living in rural areas an areas through the provision of more co-ordinated and better basic services for the econ 15%


Equal Opportunities

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in designing training prog In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.) ACTIVITY ONE Enabling co-location of services and Innovation in service outreach. Co-ordination of se initiatives to reduce travel or to increase access to services. Collaboration between pub explore new ways to meet the needs of isolated rural residents unable to access the m measure will clearly complement those activities that are the statutory responsibility of l enterprises approaches to service delivery and to the management and use of commun Approximately four pilots based around targeted lower level Key local Service Centres the third sector and private service providers, commissioning support and facilitation wo services to be co-located in close contact with statutory service providers, using guidan Agency Service Outlets. Initially the residents within the catchment areas of four key service centres, but the lea up and a case made for applying similar approaches across all of the lower level Key lo Increased co-ordination of service provision would have the greatest benefit to people w other way to get to services outside their immediate community. Vulnerable people like problems, older people and younger people are most likely to benefit ÂŁ50,000 pa 100%

Description of Proposed Activity

Type of Support

Beneficiaries

Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

The catchment areas of four lower level Key local Service Centres in Cumbria identified 4 Key local Service Centres supported 15 projects supported Sub Region, commissioned at LAG level Does not conflict with other interventions through national or domestic programmes.

323 – Conservation and

Cumbria has a high value of local rural heritage, although much of it is being lost. The r tourism economy and a springboard for local businesses, so the fabric of the environme sectors to build on and benefit from. Cumbrian rural communities have a strong sense local heritage. These attributes do not, however, assist the sustainability of local areas developmental focus, harnessing local pride and distinctiveness in support of other soc community. Rural heritage, in this context, can be very broad, from physical features such as village through to locally distinctive traditions, designs, dialects, etc. To support a range of locally-generated rural heritage projects that will make a collectiv quality of life, and which complement local strategies implemented under measure 313 10%

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in designing training prog In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia


Sustainable Development

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%)

Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.)

ACTIVITY ONE Support to renovation, promotion or development of local culture and heritage assets. significant buildings of cultural value, key sites or landscapes of particular cultural or he to culturally significant events, festivals and activities. Projects will be identified at a loc engagement. Capital and revenue support to cultural and heritage assets , including renovation, repa associated capital costs, the conservation or preservation of culturally significant sites a assist with events, festivals, promotion of local heritage, and links to tourism activities.. Businesses, social enterprises, charities, and other formally constituted groups. ÂŁ100,000 p.a. Up to 100%, depending on the extent of commercial return and limits imposed by the d All of rural Cumbria; local targeting to be determined by LAGs 20 projects supported

Delivered at a sub-regional level, but concentrating on local projects defined by LAGs Tourism is seen as a priority within the ERDF competitiveness programme. However, t projects’. This measure will operate at a more local level. Care will be taken to ensure programmes.

331 – Training

In rural Cumbria, the capacity to develop local, bottom-up projects varies considerably. is a lack of capacity amongst community groups, local businesses and other organisati This measure will support targeted training and development activity that will compleme axis 3 To support training and development of local individuals and organisations, to build the economic , environmental, and social development of rural Cumbria 5%

Equal Opportunities

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in designing training prog In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia

Sustainable Development

Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.)

Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support

ACTIVITY ONE Packages of training and information provision from community-based providers which local need, and which contribute to improved capacity to deliver other axis 3 measures. accessible manner, using locally-based venues which are accessible to all. Training needs analyses, packages of community-based training, revenue support for t small capital costs to assist training delivery (e.g resources and materials)


Beneficiaries

Economic actors engaged in other measures of axis 3, including individuals from busin other formally constituted groups.

Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage

ÂŁ50.000 p.a. Up to 100% of eligible costs, subject to limits imposed by the state aid training block ex

Indicators and Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

RDPE Measure Code Rationale for Intervention

Objectives of the Intervention Allocation (%) Equal Opportunities

Sustainable Development Description of Proposed Activity Type of Support Beneficiaries Total Cost Intervention Rate (%) Coverage Indicators and

All of rural Cumbria. In certain circumstances, training may be provided in venues outs to be the most effective way to serve beneficiaries from the eligible area (e.g in a major Kendal) 800 beneficiaries 2,600 training days Delivered at a LAG level, according to LAG-defined priorities The nature of the training, linked clearly to axis 3 interventions, makes it clearly distinct Social Fund. However, care will be taken to ensure that no project or training programm

341 – Skills acquisition, animation & stra The LEADER approach demands not only clear LAG strategies, but clear understandin Within local communities, there are village and town partnerships and other groups who of local need and the delivery of bottom-up projects. In rural Cumbria, however, the cap considerably. In some sectors and communities, there is a lack of capacity amongst co other organisations essential to local rural development. This measure will support targ local development partnerships at a smaller geographic level than that of the LAGs activity. This activity will complement and support the training of individuals under mea To support training and development of local development partnerships, to build their c social development of rural Cumbria, and to contribute to the delivery of the RDPE in C 5%

All projects must be accessible to women, and address the needs of women in rural life leaders that they take into account the needs of rural women in designing training prog In addition, project leaders must ensure that activities and services are accessible to pe into account needs of people of differing abilities, language skills or having other specia Sustainable development is a cross-cutting theme of the programme. All projects must practice (e.g in the use of accessible venues, in sustainable use of materials and resou e-learning where appropriate.) ACTIVITY ONE Training and development of local partnerships which respond to local need, and which deliver other measures in the RDPE. Training will be provided in an accessible manne accessible to all. Training and animation of local partnerships, production of local development plans and and facilitators, small capital costs to assist training delivery (e.g resources and materia Local development partnerships, whether formally constituted or not. These may be sp town or valley), or may be thematically linked (e.g a group of tourism operators) ÂŁ50.000 p.a. Up to 100% of eligible costs, subject to limits imposed by the state aid training block ex

All of rural Cumbria. In certain circumstances, training may be provided in venues outs to be the most effective way to serve beneficiaries from the eligible area (e.g in a major Kendal) Minimum of 4 partnerships supported. 200 individuals benefiting from training.


Targets Delivery Area Demarcation

Delivered at a LAG level, according to LAG-defined priorities The nature of the training, linked clearly to axis 3 interventions, makes it clearly distinct Social Fund. However, care will be taken to ensure that no project or training programm


http://www.nwda.co.uk/docs/Cumbria_15oct2007