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▶FREE THE NORTHWEST’S OLDEST AND LARGEST PUBLICATION FOR OLDER ADULTS

MARION POLK - METRO | MAY 2020

Get better sleep now Page 4

Keep calm in troubled times Page 12

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VOLUME 23 | NUMBER 5

OREGON’S OLDEST & LARGEST 50+ PUBLICATION 3 Editions serving adults aged 50 and older Portland-Metro-Vancouver, Marion-Polk-Coast, South Valley: Linn-Benton Lane P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 4923 Indian School Rd. NE, Salem, OR 97305 503-304-1323 | 1-877-357-2430 | FAX 503-304-5394 info@northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus.com Subscriptions $26/year | $49/2 years

MICHELLE TE General Manager & Managing Editor mte@northwest50plus.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggi White, Mary Owen, Vanessa Salvia and Grace Peterson EMILY TOWNSEND Design etownsend@eaglemedialab.com DOREEN HARROLD Office Manager/Sales Assistant dharrold@northwest50plus.com DEB JONES Advertising 509-680-4002

...where it feels like home With beautiful grounds, paths to enjoy, three fantastic home cooked meals a day prepared by our seasoned chef. Just blocks from the Elsie Stuhr Senior Center, Beaverton Library, & Beaverton Farmers Market. Creekside Village is where you’ll want to call home.

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5450 SW Erickson Avenue | Beaverton, OR 97005 Northwest 50 Plus is published monthly and locally owned and operated by Eagle Newspapers, Inc. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Northwest 50 Plus. Any use of all or any part of this publication is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.

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MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  3


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YOUR HEALTH

can’t sleep? By M AG G I W H I T E

American College of Physicians. What makes this treatment so innovaLEEP PROBLEMS ARE AN tive is that it requires equal opportunity torture. no medications, sleep That’s how educator and studies or machines. clinical psychologist Amelia J. Instead, Wilcox Wilcox describes insomnia or other types says it teaches you Amelia J. of issues that deprive us of a good night’s to recognize and Wilcox sleep. change beliefs that You lay there, tossing and turning. affect your ability to sleep. It helps you Thoughts race through your mind, with develop good sleep habits and avoid the most anxiety-producing thought behaviors that keep you from sleeping likely to be, “Why am I awake?” well. It’s a problem many men and women It usually takes four to six sessions to — both older and younger — know rewrite habits; good outcomes require all too well. Even after busy or even self-discipline and motivation. exhausting days, sleep can still be elu“You’re going to hate me if you can’t sive. Either we can’t fall asleep, or we tolerate some discomfort for a month or awake in the night and can’t go back to so while you develop new habits,” Wilcox sleep. And with the current pandemic on says. “But the payoff is an improved our minds, it’s no wonder we’re having quality of life.” trouble feeling rested. CBT-1 is not recommended for sleep If counting sheep hasn’t been workapnea, restless legs and some psychiatric ing for you, consider one of the newest disorders. This process of “sleep hygiene” treatments for insomnia called cognitive is not the current signature treatment for behavioral therapy, or CBT-1. It is the first these issues. line of treatment and endorsed by the For those suffering from run-of-the-

TRY A LITTLE CBT-1 FOR WHAT AILS YOU

S

4  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020

mill insomnia, Wilcox starts at the pineal gland in the brain, which produces and secretes melatonin, a hormone that helps regulate biological rhythms such as sleep and awake cycles. Melatonin is inhibited by light and triggered by darkness. Stress also upsets the rhythm and can cause sleep troubles. “It is important to keep in mind that even good events can set off an episode of insomnia,” she says. “It could include an injury, moving to a new house, a job change, winning the lottery — the list goes on and on.” When we encounter stressful times in our lives, our brains invent different ways of coping. “It might include loading up on coffee all day, drinking to excess at night, taking naps, avoiding the gym, lolling around in bed in the morning,” she says. “These types of behavior may make sense in the moment, but they perpetuate the insomnia episode.” CBT-1 is designed to help you develop better coping strategies, Wilcox says, so you can return to a healthier sleep cycle. For example, we head to bed, but then get anxious, worrying about our sleep,


what someone said to us at work that day, strange noises in the house, etc. “This cognitive arousal is also part of what CBT-1 is designed to treat,” she says. If you normally get up at 6 a.m. five days a week, continue that habit into the weekends. Get up and out, and get some exercise. “Don’t give in to it — that desire to go back to sleep,” Wilcox says. Conversely, if at night you can’t get back to sleep after 20 minutes, it is best to get out of bed and read or do something quiet until you again feel sleepy.” Cognitive therapy helps identify your best sleep time and environment. Wilcox recommends sleeping in cooler temperatures and using “optimized” bedding, such as the use of weighted blankets, which are often clinically recommended to ease issues related to anxiety, autism and insomnia. Using a weighted blanket is better than “stacking” blankets, she says. They can be found online or at stores that sell bedding. Cost usually ranges between $80 and $150. Other ways to help relax the mind and body include meditation, yoga and tai chi. “They are wonderful helps,” Wilcox says. She definitely opposes bringing your smart phone to bed with you because the blue light emanating from the devices is received as daylight by your eyes and upsets your hormonal balance. “Never bring screens close to your head,” she says. “And no naps.” And the benefits of practicing better sleep habits? A good night’s sleep allows the mind to consolidate and clear debris from its memory banks, giving us a “clean slate for the next day,” Wilcox says. “It is protective of mood. Otherwise, you are cognitively fuzzy. I am always impressed by how people feel when they get a good handle on sleep,” she says. ☸ Amelia Wilcox is an assistant professor of psychology at Lewis and Clark College, in addition to her private practice.

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MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  5


SEATED SPINAL ROTATION: With the help of your steering wheel or seat, rotate fully. Repeat on the other side.

CHEST OPENER STRETCH: Hold on to the door at chest height, step away until arm is straight and turn your body away. Try turning your palm forward or up to change the stretch. Repeat on the other side.

HIP FLEXOR STRETCH: Hold on to the door for balance, step back with one foot, lift your heel, rock hips forward (tuck your tail) and bend both knees. Repeat on the other side.

Travel comfortably By K I M B E R LY Z . M I L L E R

THESE STRETCHING TIPS REALLY CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE ON LONG TRIPS

Extended periods of sitting can cause muscles in your body, especially those in the front of the body such as hip flexors, “Live with no excuses and travel with no regrets” quadriceps, chest, upper back and neck, - Oscar Wilde to tighten up. When tightness occurs in one part of the body, it will often lead to an HEN THE CALL OF THE ROAD COMPELS imbalance with the opposing muscle group. you to pack up the car and head out for When your hip flexors (front of your adventure, you’ll want to make sure you hip) tighten up, for example, it can pull are feeling in tip-top shape when you get Kim Miller to your destination. The journey may be half the fun, your hips forward (anterior tilt), which but not if sitting in the same position for long periinhibits your glutes and core muscles from being able to staods of time leaves your body stiff and your muscles bilize. Sitting can also exacerbate any low back issues or pain complaining. you might regularly have. Sitting puts 40 to 90 percent more

W

Come see if this Caring Place feels like home... (503) 387-5013 www.CaringPlaces.com 6  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020


UPPER BACK STRETCH: Holding on to the door for resistance, gently pull away as you drop your head between elbow and round upper back.

NECK ROTATIONAL STRETCH: Look over your shoulder and use two fingers on the outside NECK STRETCH: Lower ear to shoulder, press opposite of your jaw to assist the twist. Bonus: This hand out and away and apply gentle pressure on top of stretch can help you check your blind spots head. Repeat on the other side. while driving. Repeat on the other side.

pressure on your lower back compared to standing, according to Cornell University. It will be worth your time to break up long stretches of driving with plenty of rest stops. Stopping and getting out of your vehicle every hour to walk for a few minutes, move and stretch, and use a restroom is ideal. Besides your muscles, don’t forget to keep those brain cells firing. Driving games are a great way to stay engaged,

help pass the time and entertain everyone in the vehicle. ▶ Try this one the next time you go for a drive: Take the letters in the license plate of a passing car and make a sentence out of them as if it were an acronym. Example: a plate that has the letters DWE could stand for Dancing With Elephants or Don’t Wash Elbows or even Drink Water Everywhere. You can play by yourself or compare your answer

with those in the car with you. Have fun with this game and safe travels. ☸ Kimberly Z. Miller, director of Health and Wellness and Healthy Living for the Eugene Family YMCA, is a 16-year veteran of fitness programming with an expertise in personal training and group exercise. She can be reached at kimberly@ eugeneymca.org.

At Mobility Access Options, we provide essential services to support our customers with disabilities that cannot be simply put on hold until this pandemic has subsided. We have closed our showroom doors to the public, but we continue to operate by phone and email with limited staff. Repair and installation appointments are available for urgent situations only. Many of our products are available online. We encourage you to check out our website. We are continuing to ship out products that are ordered. Give us a call today at 971-304-7464 Shop online at www.MAO-NW.com/shop MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  7


PETS | FURRY FRIENDS

what is your Pet plan? By D I A N E ST E V E N S

F

IF YOU HAVE AN EMERGENCY, YOUR PETS STILL NEED CARE

URRY FRIENDS IS FOCUSED ON PROtecting the health and well-being of the animals in our care, our volunteers, and the community we serve. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we navigate this situation together with the communities we serve.

Who will care for your pet?

While it’s not fun to imagine, now is an important time to create a plan for your pet in case you get sick. We strongly encourage you to gather any members of your household and walk them through the following steps to ensure your animals will be well cared for in the event of an emergency. KNOW THE FACTS: According to the CDC, there is no evidence that people can get COVID-19 from pets. The best place for your animal is inside the home they know and love. If you aren’t feeling well but are still able to

1.

provide care for your pet, please keep them at home with you where they’re most comfortable. NOT HOME? If you do become too ill to physically care for your pet or you need to be hospitalized, who can take over for you? Is there anyone else in your home who could help? Maybe a neighbor, friend, coworker or family member who could take them in? Even a groomer, daycare or boarding facility may be able to help in your time of need with advance notice. But the most important thing you can do today is come up with two potential pet plans and talk directly with others, so they’re prepared in case they’re called to action. PREPARE A PET SUPPLY KIT. It may not seem necessary today, but we promise it will be hugely helpful if you find yourself in an emergency without the ability to track down the proper supplies. Your kit should include the following, as best as you’re able: ▶ Name and contact information for the person who can care for your pets.

2.

3.

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All In One Mobility Sales - Installations - Service

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May 5 is #GivingTuesday, and will help kitties like Ravenpaw, who had two broken legs.

▶ Name and contact information for your back-up in case your go-to is no longer able to help. ▶ Food, treats, a leash, a couple of toys, and any other supplies necessary to care for your pet for at least two weeks. ▶ A crate or carrier to transport your pet. ▶ Vaccination records. ▶ Collars with ID tags (and don’t forget to make sure your pet’s microchip information is up to date). ▶ Medications and prescriptions, along with a list of instructions. ▶ Daily care instructions. ▶ Contact information for your veterinary clinic. With your whole family on board and a plan in place, you’ll feel a bit better about your pet’s safety knowing they’re in good hands no matter what challenges may arise.

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On May 5, Furry Friends hopes to raise at least $7,500 for the medical expenses incurred by the many kittens and cats in their care. Please visit the COVID-19 Response page at furryfriendswa.org/ covid19. Because Furry Friends is a no-kill cat rescue, its medical costs are extraordinarily high. In 2019, the organization spent more than $126,000 caring for approximately 200 cats. Those interested in contributing to Furry Friends #GivingTuesday initiative can visit furryfriendswa.org/donate/. Donations will also be taken through the Facebook page. ☸

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YOUR HEALTH

Hospice VS. Palliative care UNDERSTANDING THE DIFFERENCE CAN HELP YOU MAKE IMPORTANT DECISIONS ABOUT CARE FOR SERIOUS ILLNESSES

B

OTH PALLIATIVE CARE AND HOSPICE CARE provide comfort to a person dealing with a serious illness, but the services available and when a person can receive each service is quite different.

Many kinds of palliative care programs exist across the nation, and it can be confusing to understand exactly what palliative care is and how it differs from hospice. Palliative care can begin as early as when a person is diagnosed with a serious illness and is appropriate while they are receiving treatment to attempt to cure an illness or extend life expectancy. Hospice care begins when treatment of a disease is stopped and when it looks like the person is not going to survive the illness. Hospice care is available when a person’s prognosis is about six months or less, if their health continues to progress the way it has recently. Hospice care includes more services than palliative care and includes needed medical equipment and medications; and various therapies, such as music therapy, pet therapy and massage therapy.

By M E L I SSA L I N D L EY

A range of services helps families experience life’s final months according to their wishes, with comfort and dignity. Along the way, the hospice team educates the person and their family on what to expect at each stage and provides physical, emotional and spiritual support — all while managing pain and other symptoms of an illness. Hospice is a benefit covered by Medicare, Melissa Medicaid, the Veterans Administration and Lindley most private insurance plans. Hospice care should be available to all people; through the generous support of donors, Willamette Valley Hospice & Palliative Care makes sure hospice patients and their families receive the support they need, regardless of their ability to pay.

What is palliative care?

Palliative care helps people with serious illnesses feel better. It prevents or treats bothersome symptoms and side effects of disease and treatment. Palliative care also offers support for the emotional, social and practical problems that illnesses can bring up. When a person feels better in these areas, they have a better quality of life. Palliative care can be offered at the same time as treatments intended to cure or treat a disease and a person remains under What is hospice care? the care of their own primary care provider. Palliative care Hospice care is specialized care and support for people with programs are offered in hospitals, at doctor’s clinics, or in a any illness and a life expectancy of six months or less. Hospice person’s home. Willamette Valley Hospice & Palliative Care care is a choice to live the last phase of life, maximizing quality offers a home palliative care program that is paid for by most of life as the primary goal. insurance companies. ☸ A team of hospice experts, which includes a registered nurse, social worker, hospice aide, volunteers, therapists, and spiritual Melissa Lindley is the community outreach coordinator at counselors (if desired), guide a person and their family through Willamette Valley Hospice & Palliative Care. She has been every step of the journey. The team provides patient care and offering education on end of life issues in the mid-valley family support through frequent visits to the person’s home, for over 11 years. More resources on advance care planning, wherever the person calls home. Help is available by phone 24 hospice, and palliative care can be found at wvh.org or by hours a day for questions and necessary nursing visits. calling 503-588-3600. 10  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020


Comparing hospice & palliative care Hospice

Home-Based Palliative Care

Eligibility

Prognosis of 6 months or less to live, if the illness follows the course it has been recently

A serious illness that is causing bothersome symptoms

Professional Services Available (as desired & needed)

Interdisciplinary team members: ▶ Physician ▶ Registered Nurse ▶ Social Worker ▶ Spiritual Counselor ▶ Certified Nursing Assistant ▶ Music Therapist ▶ Massage Therapist ▶ Volunteers ▶ Grief Counselors

Interdisciplinary team members: ▶ Physician ▶ Registered Nurse ▶ Social Worker

Other Services Available

Medical equipment Medications related to the lifelimiting illness Grief support

None

Insurance coverage

Covered 100% by Medicare, Medicaid, and most private insurance carriers

Covered by Medicaid & some commercial insurance carriers

You have a

Choice for Hospice

Choose your only local, non-profit hospice, serving our neighbors for over 40 years.

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MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  11 12/5/18 1:58 PM


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YARD & GARDEN

Look to the

Garden By KY M P O KO R N Y

IT’S A PERFECT PLACE TO KEEP YOU BUSY AND QUIET YOUR MIND

G

ARDENING GRANTS US solace — research bears that out. Digging in the soil is good for our mental health and we need that more than ever as we have followed Gov. Kate Brown’s order to “stay home, save lives.” Even weeding helps keep anxiety at bay, says Brooke Edmunds, Oregon State University Extension Service horticulturist. A bonus: This time of year, the moist soil makes weeds easy to pull. It’s an activity that kids can participate in.

Use the opportunity to turn weeding into a lesson by explaining what a weed is and why they can be bad for the environment by taking over native habitats. BIRDWATCHING: Grab some binoculars and a field guide, which are readily available online, and get outside. The National Audubon Society Field Guide to Birds for the Western Region is a good book, but there are many more. Birdwatching is another way to get kids involved in an outdoor activity. Get them engaged by having them draw and color the birds they see. FIND AN APP: Gail Langellotto, horticulture professor and state Master Gardener coordinator, suggests the app “Seek” by iNaturalist. “Seek will help gardeners and nature

12  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020

lovers to learn more about the flora and fauna in their garden, neighborhood, or nearby natural area,” she says. “It can be used by parents looking for homeschool type activities with their kids. This app is a beautiful combination of technology married with the natural world, and can help open up doors to kids and families who have always wondered ‘what is that plant?’ or ‘what is that insect?’ Discovery can happen anywhere.” GROW VEGETABLES: Consider starting a vegetable garden. During World War II, people were encouraged to plant Victory Gardens so they could eat fresh produce while food was being rationed. Approximately 20 million people stepped up, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture estimates.


There are many reasons to grow your own food — you know where your food came from and what types of fertilizers and pesticides, organic or synthetic, have been used; it tastes better than store-bought produce; it relieves stress, saves money and keeps you active. Many seeds and starts can be planted now, including radishes, carrots, beets, chard, kale, brussels sprouts, peas, broccoli, leeks and salad greens. Hold off on warm-weather crops like tomatoes, peppers, melons, corn, summer squash and eggplant until soil temperatures reach at least 65 degrees; 70-75 degrees is better. An inexpensive soil thermometer is all you need. Scott Thiemann, OSU Extension Master Gardener coordinator in Curry County, says to sow seeds of the same vegetable so kids can compare their growth. If you’re inclined, use the opportunity to teach them how plants grow. “Ensure that only one ‘variable’ at a time is changed,” he says. “For instance, the amount of water applied is an easy way to teach kids about plant needs and how to do a science experiment. Transplanting seedlings into larger pots and into the garden will also teach kids about the process and is a way to compare results and be scientists.” REFERENCES: Three worthy references are Extension’s publications: “Growing Your Own,” the “Master Gardener Series: Vegetable Gardening” (free for a limited time), and the “Educators Guide to Vegetables.” If you don’t have your vegetable seeds, starts or supplies yet, many garden centers are open. Some offer curbside pickup and some have catalogs. Oregon Association of Nurseries is keeping a list of nurseries that are open and what they provide. ☸

Home Remains the Safest Place for You or Your Loved One!

Helping Hands Home Care provides essential in-home care services for homebound people who need help with activities of daily living.

Helping Hands can assist with:

Meal preparation, shopping or transportation Bathing and Dressing

Mobility Assistance and Transfers Medications and more

We realize this is an extremely challenging time and we are committed to helping our community stay safe. Our compassionate, well-trained caregivers have been trained to use universal precautions, minimize exposure to COVID-19 while caring for others and are equipped with Personal Protection Equipment.

If you or a loved one needs help at home, please contact us for a complimentary assessment.

(503) 990-6380 | www.HelpingHandsHomeCare.com 2744 12th Street SE | Salem, OR 97302

Outdoor tips to help pass the time Learn how to attract hummingbirds to your garden.

Study native mason bees and plan to have some in your garden next spring.

If you’ve got some wood on Now’s a great time to divide hand, build a bird house. or move plants. Plan a garden bed meant to attract pollinators and find appropriate plants.

Find out how to attract beneficial insects to your garden.

Have kids make mosaics out of seeds or dry beans: Have fun looking over Draw a design or image on beautiful plant catalogs and cardboard and then trace garden books. Have kids cut the design with glue and add out photos and design their seeds or dry beans to create own garden. a mosaic piece of art. If you have plans to plant Just enjoy it. Breathe in the a tree or shrub and know spring air, turn your face which one you want, order to the sun (when it’s here) it from a nursery and pick it and appreciate what you’ve up curbside. created. MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  13


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PLEASE Stay Home, Stay Safe, Stay Healthy ***************************************************

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  FITNESS

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Although many bike-related events have been canceled or postponed for May, you can still get started with biking safely through some online resources. In Eugene, for example, the city occasionally offers a class AY IS NATIONAL BIKE MONTH AND A PERcalled “Confident Cyclist,” as well as another called “Smart fect opportunity to get some fresh air and Cyclist,” says Shane Rhodes, transportation options coordipractice social distancing — even when and nator. Eugene’s version of the online course is 90 minutes, a if quarantines have been lifted. condensed version of the original eight-hour course based on Biking has many benefits — it’s a low-impact exercise, and curriculum by the League of American Bicyclists. Find your something you can do on your own or with friends. It’s safe and local bicycle club at bikeleague.org to see what classes are fun, particularly when you take the time to learn how to be a offered in your area. confident cyclist. “We cover the basics, rules of the road and defensive biking

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techniques,” Rhodes says. “And then we encourage people to come to a social ride that we host, usually the week after the class, when we do a community ride.” Some of the tips include positioning within a lane before making a turn, biking alongside traffic and using the right gears for safety — helpful even if you’re not new to biking. “The classroom portion has really great information for people who aren’t feeling very confident about cycling,” Rhodes says. “Maybe they haven’t biked in a while and they want to get back out on the bike or just want to feel more comfortable with their biking skills. There are a lot of safety measures that we like to focus on.” Bicyclists have the same rights and responsibilities to follow the rules of the road that car drivers do — one-way streets are one-way streets for bikes as well as cars. Cyclists do have the right to be in the road if they need to claim the full lane for safety reasons. This might be to stay out of the “door zone,” to avoid other hazards in the road, or simply because the lane is not wide enough for a car and bike to share the space. The class covers safety and gear, including proper helmet fitting techniques, and avoidance maneuvers in case they do come close to having a crash. “We encourage people to be courteous and when it’s clear and safe to do so, to move over to the side of the road a little bit to let someone pass, and then move back into the middle of the lane,” she says. “But it’s legal for bikes to be in the middle of the lane when it’s the safest and best place for them to be so we remind people of that.” If you are a cyclist in the bike lane, car drivers are legally required to yield before they turn in front of you. One of the most common crashes is the “right hook,” where vehicles pass you and turn in front of you. A smart cyclist is always extra cautious around streets and driveways when people might turn right in front, Rhodes says. It’s also important to note that cyclists can ride side by side, unless they are blocking the normal flow of traffic, in which case they should move to single file. ☸

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MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  17


YOUR HEALTH  |  IN THE KITCHEN

COOKING FOR ONE By T  HE CLEAN & SIMPLE D I A B E T ES CO O K B O O K

HERE’S WHAT A ONE-WEEK MENU CAN LOOK LIKE “The Clean & Simple Diabetes Cookbook: Fla- grams of carbohydrate vorful, Fuss-Free Recipes for Everyday Meal Planning” by Jackie Newgent. Published by Monday the American Diabetes Association. PurBREAKFAST chase for $22.95 at shopdiabetes.org. ▶ Just Peachy Yogurt and Granola Jar ▶ Egg: I hard-boiled Sunday ▶ 6 whole roasted or smoked almonds BREAKFAST LUNCH ▶ PB&J sandwich: 2 slices whole-grain ▶ Savory Farmer’s Market Oatmeal ▶ 1 cup plain Greek yogurt + ½ cup bread + 2 tablespoons natural, unsweetened almond butter + 2 teaspoons raspberries or sliced strawberries + 2 fruit-sweetened strawberry fruit spread. tablespoons sliced almonds LUNCH ▶ 1 cup broccoli, raw or cooked DINNER ▶ ½ Hass avocado + 1 slice whole-grain ▶ Sheet Pan Eggplant Parmesan with bread, toasted + ½ teaspoon lemon juice Vine Tomatoes: 1 serving + 1 hard-boiled egg, sliced ▶ Spaghetti marinara: 1 ounce dry red ▶ Saucy Caribbean Beans DINNER lentil or other spaghetti + 3 tablespoons ▶ Sheet Pan Eggplant Parmesan with no-sugar-added, unsalted marinara Vine Tomatoes: 1 serving sauce + 2 teaspoons pine nuts SNACK 1: 1 cup grape tomatoes + ½ ▶ Spaghetti marinara: 1 ounce dry red avocado, sliced + 1 teaspoon lemon juice lentil or other spaghetti + 3 tablespoons SNACK 2: Munchies: 1/3 cup trail mix no-sugar-added, unsalted marinara sauce + 2 teaspoons pine nuts Daily total: 1,530 calories and 145 SNACK 1: 1 cup baby carrots + 1 ½ grams or carbohydrates tbsps. natural Caesar or ranch dressing SNACK 2: Fruit and nut butter: 1 extra-small apple + 1 tablespoon natural, Tuesday unsweetened almond or peanut butter BREAKFAST ▶ Just Peachy Yogurt and Granola Jar Daily total: 1,600 calories and 179 ▶ Egg: I hard-boiled 18  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020

▶ Nuts: 6 whole roasted or smoked almonds LUNCH ▶ Overstuffed Veggie and Hummus Sandwich ▶ 6 whole roasted or smoked almonds DINNER ▶ “Love your Leftovers” BBQ Bowl ▶ 1 cup packed fresh baby arugula + 2 teaspoons no-sugar-added vinaigrette SNACK 1: ½ Texas red or pink grapefruit + 2 tablespoons roasted, unsalted sunflower seeds SNACK 2: 1 cup baby carrots + 1 ½ tbsps. natural Caesar or ranch dressing Daily total: 1,380 calories and 149 grams of carbohydrates

Wednesday

BREAKFAST ▶ Savory Farmer’s Market Oatmeal ▶ 1 cut plain Greek yogurt + ½ cup raspberries or sliced strawberries + 2 tablespoons sliced almonds LUNCH ▶ PB&J sandwich: 2 slices whole-grain bread + 2 tablespoons natural, unsweetened almond butter + 2 teaspoons fruit-sweetened strawberry fruit spread. ▶ 1 cup broccoli, raw or cooked


DINNER ▶ Spice-Rubbed Salmon: 1 serving ▶ ½ cup cooked farro or brown rice ▶ 10 spears asparagus + 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil SNACK 1 & 2: BBQ Popcorn Daily Total: 1,630 calories and 170 grams of carbohydrates

Thursday

tomatoes, halved + 1 teaspoon extra-vir▶ 2 tablespoons roasted, unsalted peagin olive oil + 1 teaspoon red wine vinenuts (serve on the salad) gar + 1 piece string cheese, sliced or diced DINNER SNACK 2: Munchies: 1/3 cup trail mix ▶ Spiced cauliflower roast: 1 serving ▶ Saucy Caribbean Beans Daily total: 1,570 calories and 158 SNACK 1: Dressed tomatoes and grams of carbohydrates cheese: 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, halved + 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil Saturday + 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar + 1 piece BREAKFAST string cheese, sliced or diced ▶ Yogurt bowl: 12 ounces plain Greek SNACK 2: Saucy Caribbean Beans yogurt + ½ cup thawed frozen raspberries or sliced strawberries + ½ cup Daily total: 1,550 calories and 146 no-sugar-added granola + 1 ½ teaspoons grams of carbohydrate roasted, unsalted sunflower seeds (To find this book and more from the AmerLUNCH ican Diabetes Association, visit shopdiabe▶ Mason Jar Sesame Chicken Salad tes.org.) ☸ ▶ 1 medium orange

BREAKFAST ▶ Superfood Breakfast Burrito ▶ 1 cup thawed frozen or fresh peach slices + ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese LUNCH ▶ Mason Jar Sesame Chicken Salad ▶ Fruit: 1 medium orange ▶ 2 tablespoons roasted, unsalted peanuts (serve on the salad) DINNER ▶ Pesto pasta with chicken: 1 ½ ounces dry whole-wheat linguine + 3 ounces deli-prepared chicken breast, thinly sliced + 1 ½ tablespoons jarred pesto sauce + 1 lemon wedge ▶ 1 cup cherry or grape tomatoes, halved + 1 teaspoon extra-virgin olive oil + 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar & • Probate •• Guardianship Guardianship •• Conservatorship Conservatorship SNACK 1: 1 extra-small apple + 12 whole Wills & Trusts Trusts WillsWills & Trusts • Probate • Guardianship • Conservatorship Wills & Trusts• •Medical ProbateDirectives • Guardianship • Conservatorship roasted or smoked almonds Asset Protection Veterans Aid & & Attendance Attendance Asset Protection • Veterans Aid AssetAsset Protection • Medical Directives • Veterans Aid Attendance SNACK 2: 1 cup baby carrots + 1 ½ Power of Attorney • Advance Directive • Medicaid Protection • Veterans• Medicaid Aid & & Attendance Power • Medical Directives Directive tbsps. natural Caesar or ranch dressing Power of Attorney • Advance Directive • Medicaid

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  FITNESS

no peak he won’t By M I C H E L L E T E

HE CLIMBED EUGENE’S SPENCER BUTTE 31 DAYS STRAIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF WINTER

S

OMETIMES WE FALL, AND we get right back up again.

Other times, we fall 1,400 feet down a snow bank and feel pretty sure that’s the end of our lives. Unless you’re Joaquin “Jack” Menendez — then you get back up again. Not only has that kind of fall happened to this Eugene resident, but he’s also been knocked unconscious by a bolt of lightning, broken several ribs from falling, and made a “beginner’s mistake” by tripping on a rope, flipping over head first, and spraining his ankle. Yet, these are just blips in a lifetime of climbing some of the toughest peaks on the West Coast, from Cathedral Rock in Arizona and Yosemite’s El Capitan to the volcanoes of central Oregon. “To me, the best part of climbing has

b m i cl

always been moving over the rock,” Menendez says. “You are completely in the moment, doing this one thing. Your attention is completely on, ‘What am I going to do next, how much weight will I put on my foot and where will I put my hand?’ Nothing else is going through your head. Then, you get to a ledge and look at what you did. You look around and it’s always in an incredible spot.” He’s built this legacy from a family of achievers and proudly shares stories of his ancestors who taught him the value of hard work, a love for the outdoors and athletics, and finding your next step in life both on the ground and on the rock wall.

me up a little mountain in Colorado. I was 9 years old and it was so much fun. He would climb up, then I would come up to him. Then, he would climb up again, and I would repeat. That’s how people were climbing then.” Menendez grew up in California. When he was 14, a friend taught him to climb. Then, Menendez taught others. As neighborhood friends, they’d hop on their bicycles, ride to the rocks and start to climb. Their parents bought them lessons, but the boys were largely unsupervised as they learned the sport. “My high school produced a number of world-class rock climbers,” he says. “I loved the idea of going out, being in nature, the camaraderie, being in the An early start mountains.” He started climbing in the midHe also loved soccer, and played on 1960s as a young boy on a hike with his a Division 1 team for the University of grandfather. California-Berkeley, then played semi“He was this John Muir-like character, pro. His younger brother Dan Menendez he loved the outdoors,” Menendez says. played soccer for San Jose State, and now “He traveled with a compass, and he works internationally as an entertainer would take me out on hikes. One day he who specializes in comedy and juggling. had a rope, he put it around me, and took Menendez earned a math degree and MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  21


worked as a software engineer for 35 years in Silicon Valley, before retiring and moving to Central Oregon to work as a farmer. He spent 13 years on a farm directly across the road from Smith Rock State Park. While there, he loved to watch a visiting climber — an 80-year-old man from Austria. “He was my hero,” Menendez says. “He was climbing at a very high level, he was just so fit. He would solo, but he would use a rope. He eventually had to quit when he was 90 just because of arthritis in his hands.” The sport of rock climbing can be hard on the body, and Menendez says now that he’s 66, he understands his own limits. “There are things I just don’t do anymore,” he says. “But a person can start climbing at any age. Especially now, with the rock climbing gyms, it allows for climbing at every level, even without a rope. I’ve been with people who are in their 60s and are doing their first climbs.” Menendez is always ready to climb. In fact, he climbs Spencer Butte in Eugene four times a week, and on one of those days, he climbs it twice. Whenever it’s a sunny day, he spends at least two hours on Skinner Butte to the columns. If it’s raining, he’s at Crux Gym. “That’s my regiment,” he says. “I love it. I can ride my bike to the columns. It just doesn’t get any better than that.” His best time up the difficult trail is 13 minutes. For the average hiker, it takes 23 minutes. “But I’m almost running,” Menendez says. “Then there’s another route that’s not marked. It’s very steep and much longer, much steeper. That takes a long time, but I do it.” This past December, he climbed it 31 days straight. “Weather isn’t a factor for me,” he says. “Rain or shine, I love it. It’s just the best hike ever. It’s a gem.”

A family legacy

On hikes, he thinks about his family who came from the northern part of Spain, and who spoke a “dead” language called Asturian. They thought they were speaking Spanish, until they actually heard Spanish. But it was enough for his

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Joaquin “Jack” Menendez has spent most of his life climbing walls and peaks. Left to right: Near the top of Zebra Crack at Smith Rock State Park; climbing The Needles, Southern Sierra, California; Marsupials Ridge at Smith Rock. Page 23: Menendez at the top of Marsupials Ridge.

father, Julius, who later learned Castilian, and eventually became the Olympic boxing coach in 1960, 1972 and 1976. His most famous athlete in training was Mohammed Ali. “My dad was Mohammed Ali’s boxing coach,” Menendez says. “We grew up around someone who everybody knew, my dad was a very famous guy, a superstar. When he was Ali’s coach, he was the world’s number one expert on boxing. I could go into a store and say my name, and people would always ask me if I was his son.” In fact, Ali learned the art of trash talking during a boxing match from Julius Menendez, who taught Ali how to distract his opponent, causing him to make a mistake.

“My dad was the inventor of trash talking in boxing,” he says. “You’re taking a big roundhouse punch from someone who is fast — you want to talk to the guy, constantly be trash talking him to get him to be angry and make a mistake. That’s when you nail him.” His mother’s story is quite different. Rather than growing up on the tough side of St. Louis, Missouri like Julius, she grew up in the 1920s as the daughter of a missionary in mainland China. Her first language was Mandarin Chinese and she told stories of living in a gated community where it was vital that the residents found themselves within the walls at night. Her father was eventually caught and imprisoned in Nanking by the Japanese,

and his young daughter was brought back to the United States, where she became a naturalized citizen. Because he loves their stories, Menendez wants to write about them and share them with others. But first, he needs to finish his first attempt at writing science fiction in a book he has titled “Scuba.” The characters are fictional, he says, but they are based on people he’s known throughout his life, with a little bit of modern-day politics thrown in. “My mom’s dad was a storyteller,” Menendez says. “He would sit around after dinner and tell stories. He was born in 1879, and that’s what they did back then. They played music, sang and told stories. It’s part of the culture.” ☸

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  ROOTS

what do you

know? By L I N DA M EY E R

W

FINDING THE TRUTH AMONG FAMILY LORE

HAT DO YOU KNOW? THIS IS SOMETHING genealogists ask themselves repeatedly as they research their families. It’s the one beginners are instructed to answer when getting started, usually followed by “How do you know it?”

Genealogists are first encouraged to research “home sources.” These would be documents, letters, diaries, etc., that may be in places like their house, garage, attic or basement. In addition, genealogists contact their relatives regarding

their stories, and the material they may have in their houses, garages, attics, and so forth. Sometimes, stories and memories are the only things you have to work with as you attempt to prove that these stories and memories are true. Here are stories I heard about my family, and which didn’t always turn out the way I expected. My Aunt Gwen told us our family came over on the Mayflower, yet the earliest arrival I have confirmed was an ancestor who arrived in Connecticut in 1634 — with no

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connection to the Mayflower. At least one family arrived at Plymouth but didn’t stay long before moving to Connecticut. My father said that his paternal grandmother was English, and his paternal grandfather was Scottish. I took this to mean that they emigrated from those countries to Canada. My research proved this wrong. They were both born in Canada. The closest English immigrant for my great-grandmother was her great-grandmother who came from Yorkshire, England. My great-grandmother was a British citizen and considered herself English. My great-grandfather, born in Nova Scotia, had a father born in Scotland and a mother born in Nova Scotia. He considered himself Scottish. Interestingly though, Canada didn’t become a country until 1871, and even then, its citizens considered themselves to be British, Scottish or Irish. My father also said we were related to a particular family in Boston, Massachusetts. I could not find a family by that name in Massachusetts, so that story ended up being bogus. I did, however, find many Canadian relatives who moved to Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Maine, principally for jobs. Now, on my mother’s side, the story about her family leaving Germany and coming to the United States centered on deteriorating conditions in Germany. It wasn’t until my grandparents had died and I was researching in Germany that my mother told me the real story. My grandfather was a laborer who worked on the railroad. In his free time, he played, refereed and coached soccer. It was this activity that brought him to the attention of the Nazis. They approached him and asked if he would help establish what would become the Hitler Youth. He turned them down. His wife was afraid for their lives, so they left Germany and sailed from Bremen to New York in January 1926. Family stories can be wonderful things. They can entertain us. They may be completely true, false or somewhere in between. In any case, they can form a direction for our family history research. ☸

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Amenities: Independent Living  Assisted Living/RCF/Foster Care   Housekeeping Transportation   Utilities Included   Planned Activities   Memory Care Knights of Pythias Retirement Center 3409 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98663 360-696-4375 Call Lori Fiorillo to schedule your personal tour with complimentary lunch.

IHTUP Parkview Christian Retirement Community

Our non-profit organization offers very affordable housing. Amenities include meal program, housekeeping, laundry service, beauty shop, fitness center, art room, library, and a secured courtyard, 24-hr. security, secured entrance, emergency pull cords in each apartment. There are planned activities & weekly shopping trips at no cost. Stop by for a tour and lunch any time! No Buy-In, Subsidized Studios & One Bedroom Apts. 166 Units, private pay rates starting at $820.

1825 NE 108th Ave. Portland, OR 97220 503-255-7160 Laura Mathews

Our 6-acre parklike campus is in a quiet neighborhood near medical services, shopping, & banks. Single-level courtyard apartments with beautiful walking paths. Calendar of activities, outings, faith based services, health/ wellness programs, & wonderful sense of community. Entrée choices galore, fresh salad bar & dedicated serve staff. Small pets welcome. 24-hr staff & daily well-being checks. Call for personal tour and complimentary lunch.

IAHTUP

No Buy-In, Not-for-profit, 116 Retirement, 63 Assisted, Rent plus services as low as $1685 per month!

Willamette Lutheran

Retirement Community 7693 Wheatland Road N. Keizer, OR 97303 503-393-1491 FAX: 503-393-7242 www.willamettelutheran.com info@willamettelutheran.com

IaHTUP

A non-profit Christian community on 42 picturesque acres in North Keizer. 3 meals daily with short-order menu, security, van service, housekeeping, beauty/barber shop, exercise room, walking paths, libraries, weekly church services & Bible study, social activity program. 24 hr. staff, active retirement living with RCF II. All units have beautiful view. Pets welcome. No Buy-In, 96 Independent apart., Studios starting at $1768, 1 BR/1 BA (some have 2 baths), 2 BR/2 BA cottages. No charge for second person.

MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  27


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  READERS WRITE

A funny thing happened... By D E B DA R R

WHILE TRYING TO BUY NEW CHICKENS

A

FTER LIVING IN THE country these past 45 years, we are pretty much up for anything, but that didn’t stop me from having another crazy experience.

I was at our local feed store and the store had a Banty hen and her chicks for sale. Our Banty hens were getting pretty old and I wanted to purchase these chickens. So, I went home, got a pet carrier and returned to the feed store to make my purchase. After loading the chickens into the carrier I didn’t notice I had not properly

latched the carrier door and the mother hen flew out of the carrier. After trying to catch the hen without success, and thinking that it would be sad to leave the mother hen behind, I loaded the carrier into the back of my car. Right before I shut the hatch, the hen suddnely flew into my car. The momma was flying all over the

Combined Hearing and Vision Loss?

I am able to keep in touch with the outside world… I am really blessed to have Access Technologies, Inc., and iCanConnect in my life. iCanConnect provides equipment and training to people with significant hearing and vision loss so they can stay connected to friends and family.

Contact us to learn more about this FREE program

503-361-1201 800-677-7512 www.iCanConnect.org/USA

28  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020


back of the car, finally resting on top of the carrier. I had a 15 mile drive back to my home and every time I tried to drive faster than 15 miles per hour, the hen started flapping around in the back of the car. So, I decided to just take a slow pace home. It was then that I noticed the blue-and-red flashing lights of a police car behind me. When the officer approached my car, I only rolled my window down enough to slide my license and car registration through the crack. The officer asked me if I was having car trouble and at that moment the hen started flying toward the front seat of my car. In disbelief, the police officer noticed the hen as I had to explain what had happened when I was loading the chickens. The officer started having a great belly laugh, slid my auto information back to me through the small opening in the car window, and told me to drive straight home. Getting the hen and her chicks settled was easy. All I had to do was take the chick-filled carrier to the chicken coop and the momma hen followed closely at my heels. I opened the door to the chicken coop and unloaded the chicks as the hen entered the coop and joined her hatchlings. ☸

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(Deb Darr lives in Falls City. Northwest50Plus welcomes reader submission on a particular topic or story. No poetry, please.)

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Northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  29


s t P U Z Z L E h g i Knof A s a i h t Py ent G Mother ’s m e r i t e R Active Center

E

Day

FEEL YOU

with Excu N G A G A I N! rs Entertainm ions ◆ Exercise ent And a who ◆ Art Classes le lot of FU N!

Affordable Housing for all incomes subsidized or private pay For more information or to schedule a complimentary tour & lunch CALL LORI TODAY

360-696-4375 3409 Main Street Vancouver, WA 98663

SUNDAY GIFTS INLAW HARDWORKING LISTEN DAUGHTERS SWEET

KISSES HUGS SONS FATHERS FLOWERS LOVE FEEDING

PLAY THIS PUZZLE ONLINE AT: HTTP://THEWORDSEARCH.COM/PUZZLE/398/

PATIENT CARING GIVING ADVICE COOKING WIFE ©THE WORDSEARCH.COM

30  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO

© theword


Classifieds UNITS FOR RENT HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities. Accepting applications at this time. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Glenwood Manor, 1687 NW Division St, Corvallis. 541-753-3408. HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS  for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities. Accepting applications at this time. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Millwood Manor, 2550 14th Ave SE, Albany. 541-928-2545. HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS  for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities is currently accepting applications for our one bedroom waiting list. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Briarwood Manor, 643 Manbrin, Keizer, OR 97303, 541-928-2545.

Attention! Put your dynamic personality and sales skills to work for Northwest50Plus. We are currently looking to fill a part-time print/ digital sales position.

Join our team! You’ll get base + commission, mileage, benefits, and more. Send a cover letter and resume to: Michelle Te, general manager, mte@northwest50plus.com

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this magazine is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

WANTED CASH FOR GOOD CONDITION reloading equipment & supplies. 541-905-5453.

PRE 1980 SPORT & non-sport cards, vintage model kits, .10¢/.12¢ comics;pre 1960’s pulp magazines. Call Gordon 503-313-7538.

VINTAGE MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (not keyboards) and tube type hifi/stereo, sought by local and fair buyer. Call Doug, 503-2245582. DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED.  Paying top dollar! Free local pickup. Call Sharon, 503679-3605.

55+ Community

BASEBALL & SPORTS MEMORABILIA wanted. Buying old cards, pennants, autographs, photographs, tickets, programs, Pacific Coast League, etc. Alan, 503-4810719.

Candalaria Plaza Apartments

Western Village Apartments • 1 Bedroom, 1 bath apartment $695 per mo/with 1 yr. lease • 2 Bedroom, 1 bath apartment $795 per mo/with 1 yr. lease • On-site laundry • Off-street parking • Non-smoking within unit • 55+ community

• 2 bedroom/1 bath apartment $795/mo with 1 yr. lease • 2 bedroom/2 bath apartment $825/mo with 1 yr. lease Private patios • Pet friendly w/restrictions On-site laundry • Close to all shopping Water/sewer/garbage Paid

For preview call:

CALL NOW

503-585-6176 FRIENDSHIP AD ABBREVIATIONS M = Male F = Female S = Single D = Divorced W = White A = Asian B = Black H = Hispanic J = Jewish C = Christian N/S = Non-smoker N/D = Non-drinker ISO = In Search Of

• 1 bedroom/1 bath apartment $695/mo with 1 yr. lease

LTR = Long Term Relationship WW = Widowed White WB = Widowed Black WA = Widowed Asian WH = Widowed Hispanic LGBT= Lesbian/Gay/ Bisexual/Transgender

TO RESPOND TO A FRIENDSHIP AD:

Write the number of the ad you are responding to on the OUTSIDE of the envelope and mail to: Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309.

503-585-6176

CLASSIFIED AD RATES PRIVATE PARTY 

25

$

Up to 20 words. $1.75 per extra word.

COMMERCIAL, REAL ESTATE 

50

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

CEMETERY PLOTS 

60

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

FRIENDSHIP ADS 

40

$

Up to 30 words.

HOW TO SUBMIT AN AD: Mail your verbiage with payment to: Northwest50Plus, P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or email to classifieds@Northwest50Plus.com or call 1-877-357-2430.

*Punctuation not included in word count. Phone numbers count as 1 word. Ad must be in our office by the 6th of the month PRIOR to publication. Ads cover Vancouver, WA to Lane County.

MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  31


Enjoy Retirement 503-646-0635

Residents Manager on site 24/7

CALL today to schedule your tour and join us for a FREE lunch or dinner

32  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK - METRO  |  MAY 2020

12900 SW 9th St. Beaverton, OR 97005 www.BeavertonLodge.com

Profile for Northwest50Plus

Northwest50Plus Marion-Polk May 2020 Edition  

Age is just a number and we're here to help you live you best life -- no matter your age.

Northwest50Plus Marion-Polk May 2020 Edition  

Age is just a number and we're here to help you live you best life -- no matter your age.