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LOCAL news for boomers and seniors

THE NORTHWEST’S OLDEST AND LARGEST PUBLICATION FOR OLDER ADULTS

MARION POLK | DECEMBER 2019

Happy Holidays! inside: housing options | preserving memories

VISIT US ONLINE: NORTHWEST50PLUS.COM  FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA


editor’s note

Northwest

50 Plus

VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 11

OREGON’S OLDEST & LARGEST 50+ PUBLICATION 3 Editions serving adults aged 50 and older Portland-Metro-Vancouver, Marion-Polk-Coast, South Valley: Linn-Benton Lane P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 4923 Indian School Rd. NE, Salem, OR 97305 503-304-1323 | 1-877-357-2430 | FAX 503-304-5394 info@northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus.com Subscriptions $26/year | $49/2 years

MICHELLE TE General Manager & Managing Editor mte@northwest50plus.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggi White, Mary Owen, Vanessa Salvia, Barry Finnemore, Pat Snider, Grace Peterson, and B. Lee Coyne EAGLE MEDIA LAB Design production@eaglemedialab.com

I

N SEPTEMBER, OUR YOUNGEST DAUGHTER’S world completely changed — the last of her three older siblings left to college and she is now the only child left at home.

She knew the day was coming, and she even felt a little bit excited. Finally, she’d have her own bedroom and no competition for the bathroom, among other things. But the change has been a little harder than she imagined. She’s felt a little lonely, a little lost. And why wouldn’t she? She’s never known a day in her life without them there. Thanks to modern technology, she communicates with them on an almost daily basis, and it helps to fill that void. But it’s not the same. Here at Northwest50Plus, we’ve experienced our own changes, and although they’ve been hard, we definitely feel it’s for the better. Not only did we change our format from a newspaper to a magazine, but we changed our name as well. That has taken some getting used to — for us and for you. To stay fresh and relevant, we jumped out of our comfort zone. We did away with some labels. We upgraded our look and feel, and we’re happy with the results. To be a successful print publication in today’s digital environment is a challenge. The competition for your time, money and effort is fierce. Fortunately, we’re up for the challenge. Every month, we seek to find new ways to inform, educate and entertain you. We’ve added a puzzle page and a comic strip. We beefed up our Medicare Guide. Our editorial designs are crisp and easy to follow. We seek out advertisers that reflect your needs. Every month is a new start, an opportunity to bring you closer to the goods, services and people in this great part of our state. But we can do better, and we need your help. Would you take a few minutes to complete the survey right next to my comments? Your input and feedback is so valuable. If you’d prefer, visit our website and take the survey there. Then, share the magazine with your friends. Respond to the articles and the advertising. Let’s keep a good thing going. ☸ MICHELLE TE General Manager/Editor

DOREEN HARROLD Office Manager/Sales Assistant dharrold@northwest50plus.com

Escorted Tours

Enjoy the friendly, family atmosphere of group travel... Explore famous cities and sights... Our tours are designed with a "love of discovery"... Experience truly hassle-free vacations…

JOAN RILEY Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro joan4freedom@comcast.net LARRY SURRATT Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro-Vancouver lsurratt@northwest50plus.com ROBYN SMITH Advertising Sales, Marion-PolkLinn-Benton-Lane counties rsmith@northwest50plus.com Printed by Eagle Web Press, Salem, OR Northwest 50 Plus is published monthly and locally owned and operated by Eagle Newspapers, Inc. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Northwest 50 Plus. Any use of all or any part of this publication is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.

* Tucson AZ – Feb 25-29 * Absolutely Ashland – March 2-4 * San Antonio – March 11-16 * Music & More in Tennessee – April 6-11 * California Coastal Splendor – April 19-24 * The Portland Spirit to Astoria – May 13-15 * Fly Away Mystery Tour - May 19-25 * Canadian Rockies – June 19-25 * Hurricane Ridge & the San Juan’s - July 18-23

Call for Details

2  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019

(503) 585-3979  (800) 333-0774 www.orwest.com


Please take this survey Help us provide content that really meets your needs

▶ Your county: ☐ Benton ☐ Multnomah ☐ Polk

☐ Clackamas ☐ Clark ☐ Lane ☐ Lincoln ☐ Linn ☐ Marion ☐ Tillamook ☐ Washington ▶ What age are you: ____________________ ▶ Are you retired: ☐ Yes ☐ No ▶ Type of housing: ☐ Own ☐ Rent ☐ Retirement community ☐ Assisted Living ▶ Number of people in your household: ☐ 1 person ☐ 2-3 people ☐ 4 or more ▶ Do you own a vehicle (check all that apply): ☐ Car ☐ Motorcycle ☐ Boat ☐ RV/Trailer ☐ None ▶ How many hours per week do you spend: Working at least one job ________Volunteering ________Traveling ________ Spending time with grandchildren ________ ▶ Do you use (check all that apply): ☐ Bank

☐ Credit Union ▶ I own a (check all that apply): ☐ Desktop computer ☐ Tablet ☐ Smart phone ▶ How many hours per week are you online: ____________________ ▶ How many times per week do you eat out (any meal): ☐ 0-2

☐ 3-5 ☐ 6 or more ▶ Where do you pick up Northwest 50 Plus: ☐ Grocery store ☐ Senior Center ☐ Library ☐ Hospital ☐ Restaurant ☐ Retirement Community ☐ Doctor’s Office ☐ Bank ☐ Other _______________________ ▶ Please check the types of articles that interest you (check all that apply): ☐ Health ☐ Fitness ☐ Travel ☐ Local personalities ☐ History ☐ Products/services ☐ Entertainment ☐ Hobbies ☐ Other ___________________________________________ ▶ What type of advertising is most relevant to you (check all that apply): ☐ Retirement communities ☐ Products ☐ Services ☐ Travel ☐ Entertainment ☐ Sporting Events ☐ Casinos ☐ Medical ☐ Prescription Drugs ☐ Restaurants ☐ Other_____________________________ ▶ Do you use coupons: ☐ Yes ☐ No ▶ Do you often use senior discounts: ☐ Yes ☐ No ▶ Favorite way to travel: ☐ Car ☐ Bus tours ☐ Camping ☐ Cruises ☐ Adventure Travel ☐ RVs ☐ Package Tours ☐ Destination Resorts ▶ Are you a full or part time caregiver: ☐ Full ☐ Part ☐ I receive caregiving services ▶ How often do you visit a senior center: ☐ Daily ☐ 1-3 times a week ☐ Occasionally ☐ Never ▶ What hobbies do you regularly engage in? (check all that apply): ☐ Books ☐ TV ☐ Collecting ☐ Restoring ☐ Arts/Crafts ☐ Investing ☐ Sports ☐ Travel ☐ Eating Out ☐ Movies ☐ Clubs/organizations ☐ Church ☐ Gardening ☐ Other ________________________________________ ▶ What’s on your bucket list (check all that apply): ☐ Destination Travel ☐ Adventure Travel ☐ Big purchase ☐ Sporting Event ☐ Entertainment ☐ Other _____________________________________ ▶ Do you have a financial advisor: ☐ Yes Name of company ____________________________________ ☐ No ▶ Are you living with a chronic condition: ☐ Yes, Please indicate _______________________________ ☐ No ▶ How likely are you to visit a retirement community in the next 6 months, either for yourself or someone else:

☐ Definitely ☐ Likely ☐ Not likely ☐ I live in a retirement community ▶ I plan to make a car purchase: ☐ Next 6 months ☐ Next 2 years ☐ Next 5 years ☐ Never

Please return this survey as soon as possible to Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or take a picture and email it to mte@northwest50plus.com

MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  3


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  SILVERTON

hello,Dodie

By M A RY OW E N

SILVERTON SENIOR CENTER DIRECTOR IS FINDING THE SPICE IN HER LIFE

D

ODIE BROCKAMP WANTS TO MAKE THE Silverton Senior Center the hub for older adults, so that people can make better and more informed choices for pro-active aging,” she says.

As the executive director with a passion for program development, “I see happy seniors every day who attend a variety of programs, classes and events, and that brings joy to my life,” she says. “It’s been very rewarding and challenging, working with a diverse population and board of directors that changes as their terms expire and new folks are elected. I have seen it grow from 200 to almost 800 members.” Brockamp brings to her position a liberal arts degree, with an emphasis on graphic design and lettering, from Oregon State University. “I am an accomplished calligrapher and have won a few competitions and sold quite a bit over the years,” says Brockamp, who also taught calligraphy and drawing in a variety of locations.

She has a long history in the Silverton area, and hopes her granddaughter Ayva will continue the family tradition of graduating from Silverton High School. After college, Brockamp began working in a local nursing home as a housekeeper, thinking it would be an easy job that could support her dream of an art studio. She was quickly promoted to activity and social services director, and returned to Chemeketa to fulfill a state requirement that she be certified as an activity director. “Little did I know that the administrator at the time had a vision for me, and I have been working with the senior population since 1985,” she says. After working in several other places, Brockamp now finds herself back in Silverton, where she’s been for almost eight years. She’s a member and officer with Legacy Silverton Health Auxiliary, a member of Silverton Kiwanis, and recently joined the Gordon House Conservatory Board of Directors. “Over the years, I have also been involved with the Silverton Art Association, and served on their board as well as a volunteer gallery sitter,” she says. “I try to volunteer at least once a month at the Wednesday night community dinner as my way

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of giving back and saying thanks to the Silverton community.” At SSC, she has worked to expand the resource and referral base with a personal goal to help others make better and more informed choices for pro-active aging. “I emphasize holistic wellness that focuses on the seven dimensions of wellness, which includes the mind, body and spirit,” Brockamp says. She’s brought many programs to SSC, including yoga, bingo, pinochle, ukulele song circle, hula dancing lessons, trivia night, needlecraft, mah jong, tai chi, game nights, and an open art studio. Also available are support groups, computer and smartphone classes, Medicare insurance options, exercise classes, free legal advice, and such services as massages by Bill Clubb Massage and foot care by Silver Angels Foot Care. “The program development never ends,” she says. “The one event I’m most proud of is the singles dine-out club, which gets seniors 50-plus together once a month to go out to dinner in a non-threatening social situation for fun and companionship,” Brockamp says. “This was one of the first groups I started seven years ago, and it’s still going strong with 15-25 seniors every month enjoying dinner out locally.” In her spare time, Brockamp enjoys entering — and winning — the annual Wooden Nickel Salsa Contest. “Spice adds flavor to life,” she says. “That’s my philosophy.” Visit silvertonseniorcenter.org. ☸

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MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  5


3

Tips

sugar. This is the same amount of sugar in a 16-ounce soft drink. Most of us don’t drink enough water in the winter months which can lead to dehydration. So instead of ordering a sweet treat opt for a glass of water or tea. Schedule your workouts With our busy schedules between work, shopping, decorating, and holiday festivities our workouts are often skipped this time of year. Regularly engaging in a complete workout, including cardio and strength training can help avoid the extra pounds by burning those calories. Muscle is the most metabolically active tissue in the body, so be sure to schedule your workouts. This is an appointment so be sure to treat it like a doctor’s appointment or meeting with your boss. Carve out some “me” time It is easy to get lost in the holiday rush. Each year there seems to be a million things to do and not enough time to do them all. This can leave you feeling stressed and overwhelmed. Our body’s natural response to stress is to release a hormone called cortisol, which helps the body store fat. People also tend to reach for comfort foods when their stress levels rise. Great ways to reduce stress (without food) are taking a bubble bath, taking your dog for a walk, and reading a book. ☸

For avoiding that 2. dreaded holiday weight gain

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  HOUSING

Advocates for change By M I C H E L L E T E

STATEWIDE ORGANIZATION HELPS OWNERS IN MARINAS, MOBILE HOME PARKS

W

HEN RESIDENTS IN NANCY INGLEHART’S Gresham neighborhood learned their rent would be increasing by $40 a month, they had decisions to make. Would they pay their electric bill, cut down back on medications or skip meals? It was a difficult choice for these homeowners in a mobile park adjusting to the price increase. “I bought my home in 1999, and I’ve been here 20 years,” Inglehart says. “The elderly gentleman who owned the park turned it over to his daughter and son-in-law who lived out of state. They came at us with a heavy hammer, scaring us and making demands.” Inglehart says she understands the interests of a for-profit mobile park, and that the owners want to see income from their investment, “but he didn’t go about it the right way,” she says. “So, I pushed back a little.” Eventually, she found herself in mediation with the park owners, a remedy that didn’t have the outcome she expected. However, it led Inglehart to find a new mission as an advocate. Because of that experience, she’s now on the board of directors for Manufactured Housing-Oregon State Tenants Association (MH-OSTA), as well as a mediator for the city of Gresham. Residents of manufactured homes long have battled their own interests with that of property owners, and often felt they had little recourse. Oregon legislation in the past 10 years has given these homeowners an increased presence, a stronger voice and more rights as homeowners. “We’re an advocacy group for homeowners who live in manufactured home parks,” says Inglehart, OSTA treasurer and board member. “We are protected under ORS Chapter 90 and afforded certain laws that now protect our rights. We provide education, visit parks in Oregon, and talk about the rights and responsibilities of owners and residents.” Individuals who own manufactured homes in parks are considered tenants because they rent the space their home

sits on. This is also true for floating homes in marinas, which will be covered by ORS Chapter 90 beginning Jan. 1 due to the passage of SB 586. There are currently 1,900 manufactured home parks in Oregon, consisting of more than 62,000 homes. Although many of these homes are built to be moved, Inglehart says that many are too old and cannot survive being moved, especially those with aluminum wiring. This presents a concern when a park owner decides to sell the property, effectively leaving homeowners in the park without recourse because they can’t move their home to another park, and it can’t be sold because the park is closing. Even more, there have been no new manufactured home parks built in Oregon for many years. SB 586 calls for mandatory mediation between park residents and the park owner. “These homeowners have invested all this money into their homes, the homes can’t be moved, and they have no place to move it to if they could move it,” Inglehart says. “We need to preserve these parks; it’s an affordable lifestyle for seniors, those on fixed incomes, and those with disabilities.” ☸

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YULETIDE JOY!

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Start the holiday season with “Holiday Swing” and Byron Stripling, a powerhouse trumpeter gifted with a soulful voice and a charismatic onstage swagger. As soloist with the Boston Pops Orchestra, Stripling has performed frequently under the baton of Keith Lockhart; he has also been the featured soloist on the PBS television special Evening at Pops with conductors John Williams and Mr. Lockhart. Currently, Stripling serves as artistic director and conductor of the highly acclaimed Columbus Jazz Orchestra. Since his Carnegie Hall debut with the New York Pops, Stripling has emerged as one of the country’s most popular symphony pops guest artists, having performed with over 100 orchestras around the world. He has been a featured soloist at the Hollywood Bowl and performs at jazz festivals throughout the world. An accomplished actor and singer, Stripling was chosen, following a worldwide search, to star in the lead role of the Broadway bound musical “Satchmo.” ◊

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A DV E R T I S E M E N T

Portland

EYE DOCTOR HELPS

Legally Blind to See A patient came to see Dr. Cusic; she wanted to keep her drivers license and was prescribed bioptic telescopic glasses to read signs and see traffic lights farther away. Dr. Cusic also prescribed microscope glasses for reading newspapers and menus in restaurants. As the patient puts it, “my regular glasses didn’t help too much- it was like looking through a fog. These new telescopic glasses not only allow me to read signs from a farther distance, but makes driving much easier. I’ve also used them to watch television so I don’t have to sit so close. I don’t know why I waited three years to do this; I should have come sooner.” “Bioptic telescopes can cost over $2,000,” says Dr. Cusic, “especially if we build them with an automatic sunglass.” “The major benefit of the bioptic telescope is seeing faces better and possibly regaining driving privileges as they are legal for passing the driving test for Oregon and Washington”.

A scene as it is viewed by a person without age-related macular degeneration

A scene as it might be viewed by a person with age-related macular degeneration

For many patients with macular degeneration and other vision-related conditions, the loss of central visual detail also signals the end to one of the last bastions of independence - driving. A Wilmington optometrist, Dr. Ross Cusic is using miniaturized telescopes which are mounted in glasses to help people who have lost vision from macular degeneration and other eye conditions. “Some of my patients consider me the last stop for people who have vision loss” said Dr. Cusic, one of only a few doctors in the world who specializes in fitting bioptic telescopes to help those who have lost vision due to macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, and other debilitating eye diseases. Imagine a pair of glasses that can improve your vision enough to change your life. If you’re a low vision patient, you’ve probably not only imagined them, but have been searching for them. Bioptic telescopes may be the breakthrough in optical technology that will give you the independence you’ve been looking for. Patients with vision in the 20/200 range can many times be improved to 20/50. Macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness and vision loss in people over 50. Despite this, most adults are not familiar with the condition. As many as 25% of those over the age of 50 have some degree of macular

degeneration. The macula is only one small part of the retina, however it is the most sensitive and gives us sharp central vision. When it degenerates, macular degeneration leaves a blind spot right in the center of vision making it difficult or impossible to recognize faces, read a book, or pass the driver’s vision test. Nine out of 10 people who have macular degeneration have the dry form. New research suggests vitamins can help. The British medical journal BMC Ophthalmology recently reported that 56% of patients treated To learn more about bioptic with a high-dose combination of telescopes or to schedule a consultation vitamins experienced improved with Dr. Cusic, give us a call at vision after six months. TOZAL 1-877-823-2020. Comprehensive Eye Health Formula is You can also visit our website at: now available by prescription from eye www.SeattleLowVision.com doctors. For more information and a FREE While age is the most significant telephone consultation, call us today: risk factor for developing the disease, heredity, smoking, cardiovascular Offices located in Vancouver, WA disease, and high blood pressure have & Kirkland, WA also been identified as risk factors. Macular degeneration accounts for Ross Cusic, O.D. 90% of new legal blindness in the US. While there is currently no cure, Low Vision Optometrist promising research is being done on IALVS Member many fronts. “My job is to figure out everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning” says Dr. Cusic. Even if it’s driving.

A DV E R T I S E M E N T


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  PRESERVING MEMORIES They learned their mother had a brief interlude with a traveling photographer and quickly condemned her. She likely knew her journal would be read, so why do you think she spoke her truth? Perhaps it was to share the reality of her life and the sacrifice she made to keep the family together by staying married to a man who needed her? Do memories of the past whisper to you? Does your narrative inspire a memoir? Our lives don’t have to be as dramatic as the story told in “Bridges of Madison County” to be of value to our legacy.

Reasons why

Susan Kirschner is retired as a senior lecturer in the humanities department at Lewis and Clark College, where she taught creative nonfiction, including memoirs. She says we record memoirs for a variety of reasons, including to help us overcome and heal events of the past. It gives us perspective when we look back. “Memories can be unreliable,” she says. “Some people check and re-check their recall and talk to people involved, others look up documents that may trigger memories.” Kirschner says it’s helpful to understand how memories work. Implicit memory works in the subconscious, taking in texture, sound, touch of clothes and smells. Explicit memory is in the conscious — it records what you do and feel. “The brain is enormously efficient taking in all stimuli and places that we can retrieve,” Kirschner says. “All we need is a stimulus that triggers a memory, such as the smell of a roast in the oven, things closest to the center in the brain. All senses control memory and if you want you can recover them.” Write a memoir to chronicle the amazing life you’ve led,

Writing a memoir By M AG G I W H I T E

E

VERY ONE OF US HAS A STORY. EVEN MORE, our stories need to be recorded and shared.

Do you remember the scene in “The Bridge of Madison County” when the children of Meryl Streep’s character discover a chronicle of her life after she had died?

Retired professor Susan Kirschner says we all have stories inside that need to be written down and shared.

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she says. Write to keep family history alive, to feel heard or to explain certain conflicts from your perspective. It could give your own life more meaning because you share facts of your life that aren’t discussed in the present, for whatever reason. Perhaps you suffer from misunderstandings or regrets and you want to explore your intentions at the time, and you want your memoir to be discovered when you are gone. Writing a memoir gives you an opportunity to imagine your life from another’s point of view. You may wish to control your own narrative and be the primary source of that story, Kirschner says.

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How do you get started? “Start writing,” she says. “As you write you could remember more and more. Ask a sibling or other family member their memories and in time a narrative will unfold. He or she could have a totally different perspective.” Perhaps a friend could describe a room, or what was going on at a particular time. “Writing has the power to be intimate but distant,” Kirschner says. “When you know who you are, you are not lonely.” Keep notes, tickets to events and places you’ve been. Keep a journal about thoughts and feelings that have meaning in your life. “There is no one way to write a memoir or to stimulate memory,” Kirschner says. ☸

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NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RETIREMENT LIVING

Housing options By M AG G I W H I T E

WHEN YOU DON’T KNOW WHERE TO MOVE, REFERRAL AGENTS CAN BE YOUR BEST FRIEND

W

ITH SO MANY RETIREment housing options, knowing where to begin can be a challenge, especially when searching for adult care homes. There are many resources to help you find what you need. Most of these are trustworthy, some are not. The Oregon Senior Referral Agency Association provides information, education and resources for consumers, senior referral agencies, and companies serving the senior population that do

not provide referral services. Consumers may access the site to find accredited referral agencies. Agencies can become members of OSRAA to gain access to more education through networking, workshops and conferences. Additionally, the website offers insight into current laws regarding adult care, opportunities to post vacancies in adult home care, assisted living, residential care and memory care. OSRAA members work diligently to establish industry standards that protect vulnerable older adults. They have helped pass regulations for longterm care referral agents and ethical standards. For example, they pushed for legislation requiring all referral agencies to register with the Department of Human Services to oversee complaints, give the public a source for complaints and report abuse. “We lobbied from grass roots to state legislature for oversight to protect vulnerable seniors because some communities do not do their jobs,” says Liz Fischer, a certified senior advisor and OSRAA president and founding member. The organization hosts conferences twice yearly. Visit osraa.com for more information.

Referral services

Fischer owns Right Fit Senior Living Solutions, a senior referral agency, and knows first-hand what is Liz Fischer

needed to assist in the process of moving from your home to residential care. Referral agents provide a multitude of services, she says, including giving tours of residential care homes and communities, and offering other referrals and resources related to the transition. They are insured and must provide disclosure statements to their clients. Agents do not endorse or recommend any specific community and do not charge clients for their services. Instead, they are paid by the home or community when a family makes the choice that best fits the needs of their loved ones. Fischer talks of concerned families who independently toured 20 places to find something that fit their needs, “and we could have found them help by visiting one to three.” They also help you locate organizers who assist with downsizing and packing the home before the move; affordable lawyers to create estate plans, advance directives and other necessary documents; and leading you to an accredited claims agent who helps veterans and their families pay for long-term care. Agents can refer clients to nursing and care managers who are advocates for the aging, and can even go with a person to doctor and hospital appointments to ensure they receive the care they need. “We take a lot of stress away by helping families through trying times because we know where to get help for them,” Fischer says. Visit ltcr.oregon.gov/agents to determine whether the agent you are


working with is accredited. Agents help find solutions for people in financial need and have a lot of experience in dealing with stressful situations. Fischer shares the example of a man in his 80s who was left with no place to live because he and his wife sold their home to pay for her care. “Most people don’t plan ahead because they don’t want to deal with death,” Fischer says. “They wait until a crisis and have no time to look at the many options and resources. They don’t know what to ask, what to look for in choosing a community. It is hard to think when the situation hits you in the face without warning.” Referral agents also have access to a database that informs them of complaints regarding abuse, mismanagement and more. “Our code of ethics requires that we visit all facilities and are aware of state surveys,” Fischer says. “On tour we ask the questions most families do not know to ask and point out things that are important.” If you choose to tour communities on your own, Fischer advises looking for cleanliness, smell, whether residents look happy, state records, and whether it just “feels right.” For more assistance, contact Fischer at RightFitSenior.com. ☸

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EAVE IT TO THE OWNER of a lighting company to have an actual “lightbulb” moment, but this “sudden realization” happened to Suzanne Cavanagh. A few years ago, Cavanagh felt she had lost some of her passion for her business, Century Lighting, in Springfield. But she realized she just needed to see things in a new way. Now, she works to share her new knowledge about the difference natural light can make in a person’s life, including for those living in a local memory care community. While attending a lighting conference, Cavanagh learned about the impact of light in a hospital’s neonatal unit. That got her thinking about some of her experiences and how lighting could help others to lead happier, healthier lives. “I had been a hospice volunteer and I thought, if light could make a difference in the NICU, could it have

14  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019

made a difference for the patients on hospice I had visited? Could it have made a difference for my grandmother and father-in-law?” Cavanagh says of their Alzheimer’s disease. “So, I started studying light. I became a member of the Human Centric Lighting Society and I started seeing all this research being done on how light impacts us.” She’s now a certified as a lighting specialist 1 (LS-1) through the National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors.

Lighting changes

Until about 125 years ago, humans lived with only natural light. Sunlight determined when we woke up, went to bed, and even how energetic we were during the day. Now, artificial light from lightbulbs, televisions, phones and computers bombards our eyes and brains all day. Sunlight has the full spectrum of colors, which consists of cool, high-energy blue light of mid-day; and the calming, warmer colors of sunset and sunrise. Blue light is necessary during the day for alertness, but undesirable at night when it can suppress melatonin and disrupt sleep.

P H OTO CO U RT ESY O F T H E M A N U FACT U R E R L S G


Sunlight naturally waxes and wanes in intensity throughout the day. However, traditional electric light doesn’t change; it is static, keeping the same color and intensity. “Melatonin makes us want to sleep,” Cavanagh says. “To suppress melatonin you need blue light, which is why on bright, blue, sunny days you just feel energized.” Circadian lighting is a lighting system that utilizes the full spectrum of color and intensity, designed to mimic sunlight. It uses a very small GPS tracker and an automatic adjuster to provide a light that gradually increases or decreases in color and intensity every six seconds — a way to replicate the natural patterns of daylight. The shifts are so gradual they are not noticeable. Research on circadian lighting is abundantly clear: It improves productivity, can help improve caloric intake, aid aging eye issues, and more. Workers who experience circadian lighting throughout the day report better sleep at night. Students with circadian lighting in their classrooms scored better on tests that required higher visual acuity, such as math and reading.

Memory care

Now, the lighting is being tested on older adults. Last fall, Cavanagh partnered with Liz von Wellsheim, gerontological nurse practitioner and owner of ElderHealth and Living in Springfield, to install circadian lighting in Birch Home, one of its memory village homes. “As soon as we put it in the staff (told us) the residents said they felt like they were outside,” von Wellsheim says. “They spent more time in the room with the (new) lighting fixtures and they said it made them feel good. I think it’s great. I think people are happier in that house than the others.” Von Wellsheim is interested in anything that might improve the health and mood of her residents. She knows that older eyes need more light to see, and that better lighting should

Cool

Warm

Suzanne Cavanagh (above) shows the difference between cool light, the type of light you want during the day; and warm light, the type you want in the evening because it doesn’t have the blue light of the sun.

decrease falls and other vision problems related to low light. “I think seniors are stuck indoors more and don’t get that melatonin and serotonin from being outdoors and in natural light,” von Wellsheim says. “They can be constantly in artificial lighting, which affects their mood as well as their sleep. With our folks, when people’s moods are affected, they’re cranky and they may act out and become aggressive. Anything I can do to improve that, I want to do.” Soon, Cavanagh will place circadian lighting in four other homes at ElderHealth and upgrade the Birch Home with an improved system. With these upgrades, von Wellsheim plans to gather data about the new lighting. “Theoretically I think it should work for adjusting people’s biorhythms to help them sleep better at night and be more alert during the day, which is always challenging with older folks,” von Wellsheim says. “I haven’t been able to prove that yet, but I think it’s going to work. And I really like the light.”☸

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December 2019 THINGS TO EXPERIENCE BEFORE THE NEW YEAR

NOV 29 —

Willamette University, Salem. $10/$8. Willamette.edu/go/musicstore.

CHRISTMAS IN THE GARDEN, 5 to 9 p.m., through Jan. 6, The Oregon Garden, 895 W. Main St., Silverton.

6 — CHRISTMAS BAZAAR, featuring soup lunch/drink ($3), 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Dec. 7, Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St.

“’TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE CHRISTMAS,” 7:30 p.m., through Dec. 22, Salem’s Historic Grand Theatre, 187 High St. NE, Salem. Enlightenedtheatrics.org.

NOV 30 — HOLIDAY SWING WITH BYRON STRIPLING, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Dec. 1, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland. $24+. Orsymphony.org. HOLIDAY SHOWCASE, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., through Dec. 24, Bush Barn Art Center, 600 Mission St. SE, Salem. “DASHING THROUGH THE SNOW,” 7:30 p.m., through Dec. 17, Pentacle Theatre, 324 52nd Ave. NW, Salem. $27.50+. pentacletheatre.org.

4

WEDNESDAY

POINSETTIA SALE Santiam Hospital Auxiliary’s annual holiday fundraiser, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. through Dec. 6, Santiam Hospital foyer, Stayton. Plants come in a variety of colors, $15 each. 503-932-0977 for large orders.

1 — (ALSO DEC. 8) HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE, 1 to 4 p.m., Deepwood Museum and Gardens, 1116 Mission St. SE, Salem.

3 — GARDEN CLUB CHRISTMAS POTLUCK AND GREENERY WORKSHOP, 6:30 p.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St.

MICHAEL ALLEN HARRISON CHRISTMAS CONCERT, 4 p.m., The Oregon Garden, 879 W. Main St., Silverton. Christmasinthegarden.com.

KENNY G, “Celebrating 25 Years of Miracles: The Holiday Album,” 7:30 p.m., Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland. $35+. Orsymphony.org.

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED 1 TO 4 P.M. SUNDAYS, through Dec. 31, at the Circulation Desk, Keizer Community Library, 980 Chemawa Road. 503390-2370.

QUILTS AT KEIZER, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., through Jan. 28, Keizer Community Center, 930 Chemawa Road NE. Free. midvalleyquiltguild.com.

2 — SILVERTON SENIOR CENTER TRIP, Festival of Lights at the Grotto, 1:30 p.m. $20/$22. 503-873-3093. ABIGAIL SCOTT DUNIWAY CHAPTER, Daughters of the American Revolution, 10 a.m., Stayton Fire District, 1988 W. Ida St. Speaker: Local Literacy and Education Programs. Bring canned food donations. 503-769-5951. “SCROOGED,” 2 and 7 p.m., Elsinore Theatre, 170 High St. SE, Salem. $6. Etix.com.

SILVERTON SENIOR CENTER TRIP, Pittock Mansion and lunch at Oregon Culinary Institute, 8:30 a.m. $35/$37. 503-873-3093.

4 — HOLIDAYS AT THE CAPITOL, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. through Dec. 21, 900 Court St. NE, Salem. Free. STAYTON RED HAT STRUTTERS CHRISTMAS LUNCHEON BUFFET AND BINGO, Santiam Golf Club. $12 payable to Ruth Case. 503-900-0025. Bring pre-wrapped gift of $15 or less.

5 — CHRISTMAS IN HUDSON HALL, 7:30 p.m. through Dec. 6,

18  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019

CHRISTMAS AT CORBAN, 7:30 p.m., and 3 p.m. Dec. 7, Psalm Performing Arts, 5000 Deer Park Dr., Salem. Free, but donations taken. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 7, Jason Lee Manor, 1551-1625 Center St. NE, Salem. Something for everyone. MAKING SPIRITS BRIGHT, 6 p.m., Main Street Park, Monmouth. Monmouthbright.com.

7 — HOLIDAY MARKET, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. through Dec. 8, Deepwood Museum and Gardens, 1116 Mission St. SE, Salem. SONS OF NORWAY BAKE SALE, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Salem Masonic Lodge, 1625 Brush College Road NW, Salem. Lefse: $10. 503-362-8388. TOYS FOR JOY SANTA CRUISE IN AND FIREFIGHTERS BREAKFAST, 8 to 11 a.m., Stayton Fire Department. Staytonfire.org. REMEMBER CHRISTMAS, 1940s Style, 5:30 to 9:30 p.m., Fraternal Order of Eagle, 2771 Pence Loop SE, Salem. Dress the part. B17Alliance. com. IDA’S PARADE OF LIGHTS, 5:30 p.m., downtown Independence. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST, 8 to 10 a.m., Keizer/ Salem Area Seniors, 930 Plymouth Dr. NE, Keizer. $4.50. SATURDAY NIGHT DANCE AND POTLUCK, 7 p.m. Saturdays, Keizer/ Salem Area Seniors. $5.

13 — 21ST ANNUAL GOSPEL CHRISTMAS, with the Oregon Symphony, 7:30 p.m. Friday and


Saturday, 4 p.m. Dec. 15, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland. $35+. Orsymphony.org.

Willamette Lutheran Retirement Community presents a

14 — WILLAMETTE VALLEY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY ANNUAL POTLUCK PARTY, auction and book sale, noon to 1 p.m., VFW Building, 630 Hood St. NE, Salem. 503-363-0880.

Thursday December 19, 2019 6:00 p.m.

MAKE AND TAKE CHRISTMAS CRAFT: COCOA MIX AND MUG, 10 a.m., Silverton Senior Center, 115 Westfield St. $5. 503-873-3073.

Doors open at 5:45 p.m.

CHRISTMAS PARTY, for volunteers and members of Silverton Senior Center, 2 to 4 p.m., 115 Westfield St.

In celebrating a tradition of Christmases from around the world, we cordially invite you to join us for our special holiday open house.

STAYTON HOLIDAY KICKOFF, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m., Historic Downtown Stayton. Free.

18 — OREGON SYMPHONY, Comfort and Joy: A Classical Christmas, 7:30 p.m., Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, Portland. $25+. Orsymphony.org.

This year will be a New Orleans Style Christmas featuring the trio of ‘Jass Two Plus One’.

“A CHRISTMAS STORY: THE MUSICAL,” 7:30 p.m. through Dec. 28, Elsinore Theatre, 170 High St. SE, Salem. $29+. 503-375-3574.

• Refreshments served • Door Prizes

24 — SALEM TUBA HOLIDAY, noon, Elsinore Theatre, 170 High St. SE, Salem. $10. 503-375-3574.

31 — NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY, 1

to 3 p.m., Silverton Senior Center. ☸

Deadline for January submissions: Dec. 6 to mte@northwest50plus.com.

Willamette Lutheran Retirement Community

For more information about this and other upcoming events, contact Kay Hayes.

Please RSVP, limited seating.

503-393-1491

7693 Wheatland Rd. N • Keizer, OR 97303 Follow us on Facebook

MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  19


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YARD & GARDEN

Holiday arrangements

By G RAC E P E T E R S O N

BRING OUT THE RED AND GREEN IN YOUR HOLIDAY DECORATING

A

NOTHER GARDENING year is behind us. Isn’t it true that the older we get, the faster time flies? But the news is not all negative. There is an upside to this whole speed of time deal, especially when it comes to gardening. Before we know it, winter will be over and we’ll be seeing spring flowers and

going to plant sales again. inconspicuous cuts on my conifers and I confess that I’m a winter weather wuss. broadleaf evergreens such as boxwood I don’t get a lot done in the garden when or camellia and whatever else strikes it’s too cold or rainy to be comfortable. my fancy. I’ll also snip some berries Fortunately, this month, I will turn my to add to my arrangements. Once thoughts indoors and to decorating for the I’ve gathered everything, I’ll bring it holidays. indoors for arranging. I like to arrange a green and red The only caveat to making holiday centerpiece for my dining room table arrangements is that some of the plants and maybe one or two more for gifts or we choose could be toxic and harmful for other spots in the house. Clipping or deadly if ingested by children or greens from my garden saves me pets. Although I don’t have dogs, I have money and guarantees freshness. four indoor cats that — fortunately — As much as possible, I will make don’tshould seem interested in snacking on A memorial service be about memories,

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**Immediate burial (without any rites or ceremonies at the funeral home, graveside or elsewhere) includes basic services of the funeral director and staff, refrigeration, transfer cemetery property or services. Prices may vary based on selections. of remains to the funeral establishment, transportation of remains to the cemetery, and service vehicle. Price quoted does not include any merchandise, such as casket, or cemetery property or services. Prices may vary based on selections.

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20  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019

**Immediate burial (without any rites or ceremonies at the funeral home, graveside or elsewhere) includes basic services of the funeral director and staff, refrigeration, transfer of remains to the funeral establishment, transportation of remains to the cemetery, and service vehicle. Price quoted does not include any merchandise, such as casket, or cemetery property or services. Prices may vary based on selections.


my arrangements. One of my favorite shrubs to grow for berries is a small China rose called “Angel Wings.” (Rosa chinensis ‘Angel Wings’). I first laid eyes on it many summers ago while touring a florist’s garden. It had hundreds of the cutest pink, dime-sized flowers blooming in terminal clusters above disease resistant foliage. The florist told me that despite its summer allure, she was growing angel wing rose for the bee-sized, deep red hips it produces in fall. And then she surprised me by telling me that she grew her rose bush from seed. Sure enough, I bought seed and it germinated within weeks and grew quickly. The hips start out green, morph to orange and finally to deep red. Perfectly winter hardy here in the Pacific Northwest, the plant stays small, only topping out at approximately two feet tall and two feet wide. I have mine in a large container, but it works just as well as an in-ground planting, close to the front of the border. And maybe the best news is that the rosehips are not toxic to animals so we can bring it indoors without risk of poisoning our furbabies. There are many websites that provide good information on plants toxic to dogs and cats. I recommend thesprucepets.com. Do your research. ☸

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MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  21


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BUY & SELL Gold • Silver Costume Jewelry Men’s Jewelry Scrap Gold & Silver Pieces & Parts Even Junk 25 years+ experience

JACK FROST ANGEL CHRISTMAS SNOWFLAKE GIFTS PRESENTS

FAMILY SCROOGE MERRY MANGER CRACKERS GRINCH

JOLLY FRIENDS TREE CANDY CANES

© thewordsearch.com 22  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK

PLAY THIS PUZZLE ONLINE AT: HTTP://THEWORDSEARCH.COM/PUZZLE/124/


Classifieds UNITS FOR RENT HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities is currently accepting applications for our one bedroom waiting list. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Briarwood Manor, 643 Manbrin, Keizer, OR 97303, 541928-2545.

MISCELLANEOUS NEED A WILL? CALL Sal Catalano, “The Lawyer That Makes House Calls,” for an appointment in your home. 541-525-2884. Powers of Attorney-Advance DirectivesTrusts. www.CatalanoLawPC.com.

CASH FOR PRE 1980 sport & non-sport cards, model kits, comic books, pre 1960’s magazines. Private collector. 503-3137538. DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED.  Paying top dollar! Free local pickup. Call Sharon, 503-679-3605.

FRIENDSHIP ADS CUTE, SPOILED, PETITE LADY, age 71, would like to meet a kind and congenial true gentleman. W, C, N/S and N/D. Salem area please. #5741 WWM, 84, SEEKING A WF  for a companion friendship relationship. I am a Christian and belong to The Salvation Army Church. Would like a N/D and N/S. #5742

CASH FOR GOOD CONDITION reloading equipment & supplies. 541-905-5453. WANTED: MOTORHOME OR TRAILER.  Must be 1995 or newer. I have CASH. If needs work, that’s ok. 503-269-2947.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this magazine is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

M = Male F = Female S = Single D = Divorced W = White A = Asian B = Black H = Hispanic J = Jewish C = Christian N/S = Non-smoker N/D = Non-drinker ISO = In Search Of

LTR = Long Term Relationship WW = Widowed White WB = Widowed Black WA = Widowed Asian WH = Widowed Hispanic LGBT= Lesbian/Gay/ Bisexual/Transgender

TO RESPOND TO A FRIENDSHIP AD: Write the number of the ad you are responding to on the OUTSIDE of the envelope and mail to: Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309.

55+ Community

Candalaria Plaza Apartments

• 1 bedroom/1 bath apartment $695/mo with 1 yr. lease

WANTED BASEBALL & SPORTS MEMORABILIA wanted. Buying old cards, pennants, autographs, photographs, tickets, programs, Pacific Coast League, etc. Alan, 503-481-0719.

FRIENDSHIP AD ABBREVIATIONS

Western Village Apartments • 1 Bedroom, 1 bath apartment $695 per mo/with 1 yr. lease • 2 Bedroom, 1 bath apartment $795 per mo/with 1 yr. lease • On-site laundry • Off-street parking • Non-smoking within unit • 55+ community CALL NOW

• 2 bedroom/1 bath apartment $795/mo with 1 yr. lease • 2 bedroom/2 bath apartment $825/mo with 1 yr. lease Private patios • Pet friendly w/restrictions On-site laundry • Close to all shopping Water/sewer/garbage Paid

For preview call:

503-585-6176

503-585-6176

MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  23


24  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  MARION POLK  |  DECEMBER 2019

Profile for Northwest50Plus

Northwest50Plus Marion Polk December 2019 Edition  

Northwest50Plus Marion Polk December 2019 Edition  

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