Page 1

LOCAL news for boomers and seniors

THE NORTHWEST’S OLDEST AND LARGEST PUBLICATION FOR OLDER ADULTS

SOUTH VALLEY | NOVEMBER 2019

Circadian lighting How it affects your moods | Page 6

The dangers of dating Yes, even at your age | Page 11

Here’s something to do! Check out our calendar of local events | Page 18

VISIT US ONLINE: NORTHWEST50PLUS.COM  FIND US ON SOCIAL MEDIA


Northwest

50 Plus

Creating envionments

Creating envionments where moments of joy,

where moments of joy,

independence, andand independence,

wellness are focus the focus wellness are the each and every day. each and every day. Creating envionments

where moments of joy,

VOLUME 22 | NUMBER 11

OREGON’S OLDEST & LARGEST 50+ PUBLICATION 3 Editions serving adults aged 50 and older Portland-Metro-Vancouver, Marion-Polk-Coast, South Valley: Linn-Benton Lane

independence, and

wellness are the focus each and every day.

P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 4923 Indian School Rd. NE, Salem, OR 97305 503-304-1323 | 1-877-357-2430 | FAX 503-304-5394 info@northwest50plus.com Northwest50Plus.com Subscriptions $26/year | $49/2 years

Contact us for more information or to schedule a private tour today!

MICHELLE TE General Manager & Managing Editor mte@northwest50plus.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Maggi White, Mary Owen, Vanessa Salvia, Barry Finnemore, Pat Snider, Grace Peterson, and B. Lee Coyne

Contact us for more information or to schedule a private tour today! Contact us for more information

EAGLE MEDIA LAB Design production@eaglemedialab.com DOREEN HARROLD Office Manager/Sales Assistant dharrold@northwest50plus.com JOAN RILEY Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro joan4freedom@comcast.net LARRY SURRATT Advertising Sales, Portland-Metro-Vancouver lsurratt@northwest50plus.com ROBYN SMITH Advertising Sales, Marion-PolkLinn-Benton-Lane counties rsmith@northwest50plus.com Printed by Eagle Web Press, Salem, OR Northwest 50 Plus is published monthly and locally owned and operated by Eagle Newspapers, Inc. The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by Northwest 50 Plus. Any use of all or any part of this publication is prohibited without written consent of the publisher.

or to schedule a private tour today!

6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, OR 97321

www.linnbenton.edu/foundation COLLEGE FOUNDATION LINN-BENTON COMMUNITY

What will be541-917-4209 your legacy?

We can help you make the most plan aidhave your, protect community. out assets of whatcan you family Learn how using your retirement and loved ones, and continue to help

Contact us today others after your lifetime.

Contact today others afterus your lifetime. Learn how using your retirement and loved ones, and continue to help plan assets can aid your community. out of what you have, protect family

We can help you make the most 541-917-4209

What will be your legacy? LINN-BENTON COMMUNITY COLLEGE FOUNDATION www.linnbenton.edu/foundation

6500 Pacific Blvd. SW, Albany, OR 97321

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  3


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RETIREMENT LIVING

new light

seeing things in a By VA N ESSA SA LV I A

L

CIRCADIAN LIGHTING REALLY CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE

EAVE IT TO THE OWNER OF A LIGHTING company to have an actual “lightbulb” moment, but this “sudden realization” happened to Suzanne Cavanagh.

A few years ago, Cavanagh felt she had lost some of her passion for her business, Century Lighting, in Springfield. But she realized she just needed to see things in a new way. Now, she works to share her new knowledge about the difference natural light can make in a person’s life, including for those living in a local memory care community. Cavanagh and her husband Joe bought their business more than 10 years ago. They sell and install lighting in commercial buildings. One year, Cavanagh worked with a business coach on goals for the upcoming year. The coach asked what it would take to have a spectacular year. “My response was that I wanted to figure out what my passion was,” she says, “not thinking it would have anything to do with lighting. Turns out light was my passion, and now I’m all about finding ways that people’s lives can be improved through light.” While attending a lighting conference, Cavanagh learned 4  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019

about the impact of light in a hospital’s neonatal unit. That got her thinking about some of her experiences and how lighting could help others to lead happier, healthier lives. “I had been a hospice volunteer and I thought, if light could make a difference in the NICU, could it have made a difference for the patients on hospice I had visited? Could it have made a difference for my grandmother and father-in-law?” Cavanagh says of their Alzheimer’s disease. “So, I started studying light. I became a member of the Human Centric Lighting Society and I started seeing all this research being done on how light impacts us. I knew that’s what I was supposed to be doing — helping people understand light and how to live well with light.” She’s now a certified as both a lighting specialist 1 (LS-1) through the National Association of Independent Lighting Distributors (NAILD), and as an executive home modification specialist (commonly known as aging-in-place) through USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology. These credentials allow her to develop lighting programs in both residential and commercial properties that help improve the health, productivity, happiness and safety of the people who work or live there.

Lighting changes

Until about 125 years ago, humans have lived with natural light. Sunlight determined when we woke up, went to bed, P H OTO CO U RT ESY O F T H E M A N U FACT U R E R L S G


Cool

Warm

The Shedd Institute www.theshedd.org - 541.434.7000

Shedd Classical 2019-20

Suzanne Cavanagh (above) shows the difference between cool light, the type of light you want during the day; and warm light, the type you want in the evening because it doesn’t have the blue light of the sun.

and even how energetic we were during the day. Now, artificial light from lightbulbs, televisions, phones and computers bombards our eyes and brains all day. Many workplaces have no windows at all. Sunlight has the full spectrum of colors, which consists of cool, high-energy blue light of mid-day; and the calming, warmer colors of sunset and sunrise. Blue light is necessary during the day for alertness, but undesirable at night when it can suppress melatonin and disrupt sleep. Sunlight naturally waxes and wanes in intensity throughout the day. However, traditional electric light doesn’t change; it is static, keeping the same color and intensity whenever it’s on. “Melatonin makes us want to sleep,” Cavanagh says. “To suppress melatonin you need blue light, which is why on bright, blue, sunny days you just feel energized.” Circadian lighting is a lighting system that utilizes the full spectrum of color and intensity, designed to mimic sunlight. It uses a very small GPS tracker and an automatic adjuster to provide a light that gradually increases or decreases in color and intensity every six seconds — a way to replicate the

natural patterns of daylight. The shifts are so gradual they are not noticeable. Research on circadian lighting is abundantly clear: It improves productivity, can help improve caloric intake, aid aging eye issues, and more. Workers who experience circadian lighting throughout the day report better sleep at night. Students with circadian lighting in their classrooms scored better on tests that required higher visual acuity, such as math and reading. Some sports teams are experimenting with installing circadian lighting in their facilities to improve performance and lessen the effects of jet lag while traveling.

Memory care

Now, the lighting is being tested on older adults. Last fall, Cavanagh partnered with Liz von Wellsheim, gerontological nurse practitioner and owner of ElderHealth and Living in Springfield, to install circadian lighting in Birch Home, one of its memory village homes. “As soon as we put it in the staff (told us) the residents said they felt like they were outside,” von Wellsheim says. “They spent more time in the room with the (new) lighting fixtures and they said it made them feel good. I think it’s

P H OTOS CO U RT ESY O F S U Z A N N E CAVA N AG H X

Now Hear This 2019-20 Shedd Theatricals 2019

December 6-22 Coming up next at The Shedd… 11.5 11.7 11.10 11.13 11.16 11.19 11.22 11.24

Richard Thompson The Del McCoury Band microphilharmonic: Beethoven Rodney Crowell Mr. Tom’s Magical Moombah! Taj Mahal 11.20 Jesse Cook A Night For Sight 2019 MTTA: The Vaudeville Hour

The Shedd Community Music School

The Shedd Choral Society Sundays at 6:30

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  5


The circadian fixtures currently installed in ElderHealth & Living’s Birch Home provide a natural lighting environment.

great. I think people are happier in that house than the others.” Von Wellsheim is interested in anything that might improve the health and mood of her residents. She knows that older eyes need more light to see,

and that better lighting should decrease falls and other vision problems related to low light. Previously, ElderHealth and Living used the standard fluorescent fixtures. Now, they’re embarking on other improvements, including adding more skylights. “I think seniors are stuck indoors more and don’t get that melatonin and serotonin from being outdoors and in natural light,” von Wellsheim says. “They can be constantly in artificial lighting, which affects their mood as well as their sleep. With our folks, when people’s moods are affected, they’re cranky and they may act out and become aggressive. Anything I can do to improve that, I want to do.” Soon, Cavanagh will place circadian lighting in four other homes at ElderHealth and upgrade the Birch Home with an improved system. With these upgrades, von Wellsheim plans to gather data about the new lighting. “Theoretically I think it should work

LC QP MC Eugene_Northwest 50 MC Quote Ad.indd 1 6  85708 NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019

for adjusting people’s biorhythms to help them sleep better at night and be more alert during the day, which is always challenging with older folks,” von Wellsheim says. “I haven’t been able to prove that yet, but I think it’s going to work. And I really like the light.” Hearing that the residents at ElderHealth and Living not only liked the improved lighting, but that it made them feel better, was an emotional moment for Cavanagh. “It’s doing what it’s supposed to do,” she says. “For offices, this will be key. For schools and medical facilities, this technology is a gamechanger. I believe within 10 years this is going to be what lighting is because everyone is going to understand the health benefits of it so much more than they do now.”☸

OF NOTE

Century Lighting, 550 Shelley St., Suite G, Springfield. Call 541-726-5994 or visit centurylightingoregon.com.

3/29/19 8:46 AM


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  YARD & GARDEN

plant some minor bulbs By G RAC E P E T E R S O N

NOW IS THE TIME TO GET THESE BULBS IN THE GROUND SO THEY CAN WINTER OVER PROPERLY

A

LTHOUGH IT WAS MANY YEARS AGO, I REmember it well. It was a Saturday in June and I was with my gardening friends meandering through the gorgeous gardens of Dancing Oaks Nursery outside of Monmouth. At the west edge of the garden, a large grassy field stretched gently upward toward the home of owners Fred Weisensee and Leonard Foltz. Sprinkled randomly throughout this field were hundreds of small, purple-lavender spheres waving gently in the breeze. I must not have had my camera with me because my search for a photo to accompany this article was fruitless. A few more years passed before I got serious about researching this sweet plant; however, a gentle reminder tugged at me the following year when I found a clump blooming in one of their raised beds, amid the rock roses, cowslips and evening primroses. A subsequent June and I spied the little lavender spheres for sale with a tag that read Dichelostemma congesta, or field cluster lily. “A charming native with tall, narrow, waving stems topped with rounded clusters of purple-blue flowers. Mid-summer blooming, it is found in open grassy fields. You might also know it as ‘Ookow.’ This is the only species in the genus pollinated by birds.” There you go; mystery solved and

plants purchased. Field cluster lily might be my favorite plant. But I’m not sure. I have a thousand favorite plants. Last June about 10 little clusters rose up from beneath a clump of Japanese Forest grass planted in almost full day sun — my attempt at having my own little meadow in my relatively small suburban backyard. Daffodil, tulip, hyacinth and crocus are the familiar fall planted bulbs and now is the time to purchase and get them in the ground so they’ll receive the winter chill they need to perform well next spring. While these more common beauties serve to cheer us with their dashing color and easy demeanor, there are a lot of other bulbs to consider for the task. The aforementioned lily is one example but there are many more. If you search “minor bulbs” you’ll discover a plethora of unsung heroes of the bulb clan. Goodies like snowdrops, winter aconites, glory of the snow, Grecian windflower, Muscari and Fritillaria to name a few. But there are still more minor bulbs that deserve our devotion. For instance, there are two more Dichelostemma species worth growing, however they look nothing like the cluster lily. Dichelostemma ida-maia sports a cluster of tubes in either red or pink with a green tip that opens to white. My biggest fear with having bulbs in my garden is that I’ll mistakenly spear the buried and forgotten bulbs with my shovel. I’ve done this more times than I care to admit. Happy bulb planting. ☸

NORTHWEST LIVING  |  HEALTHY LIVING

For all your big plans, we have a plan.

Enroll now mytrueplans.com/advantage or call 1-866-713-2186 (TTY: 711)

Find Medicare Advantage plans for your True Health

8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Pacific Time), seven days a week

Providence Medicare Advantage Plans is an HMO, HMO-POS and HMO SNP with Medicare and Oregon Health Plan contracts. Enrollment in Providence Medicare Advantage Plans depends on contract renewal.

PHP_AEP_NWBoomer_7.5x1.75_Generic-Enroll_Dancer_102819.indd 1

H9047_2020PHA34_M

10/7/19 2:26 PM

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  7 FILE NAME:

PHP_AEP_NWBoomer_7.5x1.75_Generic-En-

TITLE


YOUR HEALTH  |  CHRONIC CONDITIONS

The future of Alzheimer’s By M I C H E L L E T E

G

NOV. 16 IS NATIONAL MEMORY SCREENING DAY ETTING SCREENED EARLY FOR MEMORY loss won’t prevent it from happening, but it can mean the difference in how it’s treated and your quality of life.

“It’s where early diagnosis makes sense,” says Scott Lusk, PhD, a clinical and neuropsychologist who has been studying Alzheimer’s through clinical trials for more than 30 years. Nov. 16 is designated as National Memory Screening Day, and it’s a good reminder that if you have concerns about memory loss, there is no obligation to participate in a screening and review the test results. “If a person does have some concerns, or a family member does, reach out and get checked,” Losk says. “Visit your primary care physician. If there’s no issue, you’ll be reassured, but if there is an issue knowing about it as early as possible

gives you the longest likelihood to do something about it.” A memory screening involves a series of cognitive tests evaluating memory, attention, concentration, language skills and visual-spatial skills. “We are identifying the kinds of deficits we would see in early progressive memory loss disorders,” he says. “It’s about thinking and cognition.” A typical patient in his Portland office might be a 65-yearold person whose mother and grandmother had some form of dementia, and this person is concerned that family history might have continued on. They take the evaluation, get the feedback and meet with the clinicians about whether more evaluation is needed. “Typically, it’s someone who has a family history, or has had some concerns about their own memory,” Losk says. “But it could also be someone who has had several concussions, suffered a mild stroke, or dealt with severe depression for many years, particularly if it’s been untreated. We can help them identify whether they need to be concerned. Sometimes,

Devoted Caring Professional Staff Funerals • Burials • Cremations Monuments • Keepsakes • Video Tributes Personalized Memorial Packages

61 ince 19 s d e n ow Family

Newly updated facilities with a warm and comfortable environment, on-site n-site reception room, room conveniently located with a reputation of excellence. Pre-planning available — Medicaid approved plans Handicap Accessible Reliable 24/7 Service • Se Habla Español

541-746-9667

112 N. A St | Springfield, OR 97477

www.MajorFamilyFuneralHome.com 8  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019


a person just has an overabundance of anxiety.”

Measuring the impact

The impact of Alzheimer’s on Americans continues to grow as we live longer. It’s estimated that 5.5 million Americans have Alzheimer’s, he says, and the economic impact among medical expenses, care facilities and opportunity costs for caregivers is about $250 billion. Even more, about 40 to 50 percent of adults ages 85 and older have some form of dementia. “It’s a big problem in terms of economic impact, and a big problem in terms of what it does to families,” Losk says. “After a certain level of memory loss, awareness starts to go away, and that affects the families even more so than the actual person. It’s a high edicare burden.” Advantage 4 Health Insurance He sees many patients who once were high functioning in their professional and personal lives whose minds now have been lost to Alzheimer’s. Their spouses, used to this high-functioning partner, now must deal with the changes. “It rocks the relationship and the family,” Losk says. “It’s a huge, huge thing. The disease becomes a disease that also affects the family, it’s a disease of the family. Some diseases like this rob your life away but don’t kill you right away.” It’s part of the reason Losk became involved in research in the mid-1980s. At the time, he says, there was absolutely nothing available for treating the symptoms of Alzheimer’s and related dementias. “But we’ve been getting better and better about addressing Alzheimer’s and normal aging symptoms,” he says. He trained in southern California, followed by post-doctoral work at OHSU. He joined Memory Health Center at Summit Research Center and took on his first Alzheimer’s study in 1990. “This will be my 30th year, and in the time I’ve been doing it, the good news is that we now have four medications

to treat Alzheimer’s symptoms,” Losk says. “They help memory a little bit, but don’t address the causes, what’s going on in the brain. We are working on medications that go after the plaque in the brain. We’ve yet to hit our mark, but we’ve hit on a compound that’s going to be really beneficial.” Although several of the studies with trial medications haven’t worked, that’s actually encouraging news for researchers because it allows them to eliminate specific paths that prove unproductive. “It’s taught us a lot about where not to go,” Losk says. “Now we have a bunch of new arenas, and in the next five to

10 years, we should have some positive results.” ☸

Of note

To schedule a screening at Memory Health Center in Portland, call 503-228CARE, send an email to oregon@summitnetwork.com, or visit memoryhealthcenter. com. For more information about the National Memory Screening program, visit alzfdn. org/memory-screening/what-is-memory-screening To find nationwide sites for memory screening, visit alzfdn.org/memory-screening/find-a-site.

Jason Stubbs Principal Agent

Turn to us for answers to your Medicare and Health Insurance questions

Medicare Supplements

Medicare Advantage

Health Insurance

Plan to attend one of these free seminars:

11/5 • 4 p.m. Health Net Medicare Plans 11/7 • 3 p.m. Lane County Medicare Questions • 5:30 p.m. Medicare 101 -The ABCDE’s of Medicare and how they work 11/12 • 11 a.m. Lane County Medicare Questions • 4 p.m. Regence Blue Cross Medicare Plans 11/14 • 6 p.m. What are my Health Insurance Options when I retire and how it affects me 11/20 • 2 p.m. Health Net Medicare Plans 11/22 • 12 p.m. Lane County Medicare

Questions 11/26 • 12 p.m. Lane County Medicare Questions 12/3 • 11 a.m. Health Net Medicare Plans 12/3 • 5:30 p.m. Medicare 101 - The ABCDE’s of Medicare and how they work 12/4 • 11 a.m. Regence Blue Cross Medicare Plans 12/17 • 6 p.m. What are my Health Insurance Options when I retire and how it affects me

All seminars take place at 1126 Gateway Loop, Suite 136, Springfield

There are monumental changes in Medicare Plans this year. Call today to reserve your spot. Seats fill quickly, don’t delay.

Call or go online to schedule an appointment

541-538-2700

www.OregonInsuranceCompany.net • info@OregonInsuranceCompany.net SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  9


YOUR HEALTH  |  SAMARITAN HEALTH

prostate discomfort HIS SEARCH FOR ANSWERS LED TO A PROCEDURE THAT HELPED HIM REGAIN INDEPENDENCE

W

HEN CYCLING ADVENTURES AND THE travels associated with retirement were being impacted by symptoms of an enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia or BPH), Conrad Willett, 77, of Newport decided to explore treatment options.

“I had been taking medication for nearly four years,” he says. “It somewhat helped with my symptoms, like the strong urge to urinate, difficulty when trying or the many ups and downs throughout the night. But, there’d be times when riding in the car for any great length of time was difficult and I’d become almost incontinent.” About two years ago during a seminar on prostate health by urologist Robert Laciak, MD, Willett learned about UroLift. “UroLift is a minimally invasive approach that helps treat the symptoms of an enlarged prostate,” says Dr. Laciak with Samaritan Urology. “The straightforward procedure uses tiny implants to lift and hold the enlarged prostate tissue out of the way, so it no longer blocks the urethra. There is no cutting, heating or removing of tissue.” Laciak says Willet was doing all the right things medically. But like many men in their 60s and older, he was suffering Conrad Willett now gets to enjoy cycling after having a procedure to fix an enlarged prostate. 10  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019

from the symptoms of an enlarged prostate. After doing a little research and passing the necessary medical evaluation in October 2017, Willett had Dr. Laciak perform the UroLift procedure. Since having the procedure, Willett no longer needs medication, his sleep has improved and his strong urge to urinate and difficulty when trying have subsided. He is back to traveling with his wife, Gail, and cycling nearly 500 miles a month. “My advice to others who may share a similar experience, consider looking into this minimally invasive procedure,” Willett says. “It was life changing. I’m back to enjoying retirement, and without interruption.” Nearly 500 million men worldwide suffer from symptoms of an enlarged prostate, such as difficulty urinating, increased frequency of urination, day or night, weak or slow urinary stream or at times, pain while urinating. Learn more about Conrad Willett and how he regained independence, and score your own prostate health, at samhealth.org/ConradW. ☸

Of note

UroLift works by placing tiny implants that physically hold the prostate away from the urethra. This is a mechanical opening of the area as opposed to traditional cutting of excess tissue. Side effects and recovery are therefore minimized. This is an outpatient surgical procedure. Patients can go home the same day and there is usually no need for a catheter, which is typical with traditional prostate surgery.


Romancescams NORTHWEST LIVING  |  SECURITY

DON’T FALL VICTIM TO SCAM SITUATIONS

S

CAMMERS PREY ON EMOtions, and loneliness is one of the primary reasons this scam is effective. Victims are typically recently widowed or vulnerable. Another emotion is the fear of not having sufficient funds to last for a lifetime. The person they have met portrays him or herself as financially sound and makes claims of love and support.

Common scenarios

The romantic partner will give many possible reasons for being out of the country and needing money, such as: ▶▶On an oil rig and needs money to replace a broken part or to pay workers. ▶▶Trying to collect an inheritance and needs money for taxes, fees or other charges. ▶▶Family member needs help with

medical expenses.

Red flags

Beware if the friend: ▶▶Asks that money be sent to unknown person, saying they are a friend and will get them the money. ▶▶Asks that money be sent via Western Union, MoneyGram, prepaid cards like Visa, Mastercard or GreenDot, or gift cards like iTunes or Amazon. ▶▶Asks that money be sent to a country other than where the friend is located, saying that the money is going to a “holding” or “correspondent” bank for no valid reason. ▶▶Gives an account name (either a company or an individual) that does not match his or her name, or is a name that is not easily verified. • Cannot provide verifiable information (address, Social Security number, etc.). ▶▶States that you are the last resource. ▶▶Provides outrageous reasons for

needing the money. ▶▶Says he or she has been involved in some sort of accident. ▶▶Cannot receive emergency treatment until a medical facility is paid. ▶▶Says he or she is on the verge of receiving a large inheritance. ▶▶Needs money to pay taxes upfront or attorney’s fees. ▶▶Mentions government payoffs. ▶▶Promises to share his or her wealth with you or reimburse you as soon as the friend returns to the United States — but only if you can send money immediately.

Learn more

▶▶Visit northwest50plus.com to learn more about how to protect yourself or a friend. ☸ (This article was provided by Edward Jones/Madison K. Stewart, a financial advisor in Eugene.)

Discover Your Medicare Options Open Enrollment October 15th through December 7th Medicare Advantage Plans • Supplement Plans • Prescription Plans

Alison Garner Owner /Broker

Ask Me!

Schedule your free plan review

Call or go online today!

541-505-6864 www.garnersinsurance.com alison@garnersinsurance.com

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  11


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  MOBILITY

Round Round, I get around By M AG G I W H I T E

SLOWING DOWN? NOT DOING AS MUCH? NEW PRODUCTS IMPROVE QUALITY OF LIFE

O

NE OF THE BIGGEST safety risks in our homes as we age is falling down. We can trip over items, lose balance and the ability to be mobile. A serious fall can mean temporary and even permanent loss of mobility. Jody Schwalk-Burke of Mobility Access Options NW recommends removing items such as papers, books, clothes and shoes from stairs and places you walk. “Remove small rugs or secure them to the floor,” she says. Schwallk-Burke also recommends using a cane or walker in the home to get around, as well as keeping door thresh holds level. “Even an inch in height on a doorway is a significant trip hazard for anyone,” she says, “from your front door, to inside your home, to the back porch, it’s unlikely that every part of your home is on the same level.” To reduce the risk of tripping and making it easier to move through doorways and entry ramps, place a mat or plate at the thresh hold to provide a smoother transition. Additionally, fix any loose steps and stairway handles, or put in new ones. “Make sure the rails are on both sides

of the stairs, and are as long as the stairs,” Schwalk-Burke says. There are also modern mobility solutions that help you enjoy the lifestyle you had before physical limitations made it hard to get around. Even more, mobility devices provide more safety and protection in the home, because individuals don’t need to rely on brute strength to help. Mobility equipment helps everybody so the spouse or family can travel the way they used to and the person with difficulty can keep up with them — or even move faster. Paul Robin, vice president of All in One Mobility, Inc., is in the business of helping the vulnerable among us get through the day with more ease. “If husband or wife cannot move quickly or can only walk small distances before becoming fatigued, it limits the other spouse’s life,” he says. “If a family member cannot move you from the bed to the bath to the living room, both of you share the problem.” Mobility equipment helps everybody and today’s (equipment) is much easier to use, he says. “A 200pound wife cannot handle a 400-pound family member and this applies to professional caregivers as well.” Robin’s large showroom features the latest of everything, from

12  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019

elevators and ceiling lifts, to step-in baths, lifting chairs that even lay flat, wheelchair lifts, stair lifts and walkers. His company sells devices to protect you from falls that can hasten your decline. “There is a lot of resistance to using mobility devices,” he says. “People find it hard to accept for many emotional reasons.” But think of a scooter as a golf cart, Robin says. With them, you can move around, get outside, visit museums and other attractions you couldn’t do before. “It opens up your life in many ways,” he says. “Advances in all of them offer more


options, like electric buttons and many conveniences that weren’t available even five years ago. They are always being improved and are more user-friendly than ever before.” Even new walkers have better options because they can handle up to 450 pounds. Much of the equipment is easy to fold and unfold, as well as put back together. If you’re planning a trip, feel confident that airlines know how to check them, including the scooters. When it comes to baths and showers, adaptive equipment is built low so there are no barriers to entry. “The problem with bathtubs is not getting in, it’s getting out,” Robin says. Schwalk-Burke says one of the best products for maintaining independence is a stairlift — a device that takes you comfortably and conveniently up a flight of stairs. “A stairlift can mean the difference between staying safe and giving up your home completely,” she says. Medicare can be confusing The lift has two components: a track, and a chair with a motor at its base that propels itself up and down the stairway by moving along the track surface. “Most stairlifts include a basic set of features to help ensure the user’s safety,” Schwalk-Burke says. Publicly-funded resource All stairlifts have seat belts and some feature easy-to-use Free and objective information belts for those with medical issues such as arthritis. and assistance “Most stairlift models also detect objects on the stairs and will stop the chair,” she says. Help you compare Medicare She also recommends a security pole-and-curve grab bar, health and drug plans which is a transfer pole with a pivoting curve grab bar that locks every 45 degrees. It can be installed anywhere in the Offers local classes year-round home without additional tools and works as a bathroom grab October bar, chair standing aid or bedside support.15 through December 7 is the time to sign up or change Medicare Because we are living longer, companies are paying more Advantage and prescription drug plans. attention to the needs of older adults. However, Medicare e can help you home. compare plans only pays for devices when you can’t get around in your and make enrollment Robin says it is getting much harder to access Medicare bene- changes. Use our online Locator Tool to fits, but financing is available. Call 800-722-4134 (toll-free) find local help “Life is limited when you cannot walk up stairs and you visit near you become less able to go anywhere,” heor says. “WeShiba.oregon.gov also help people with spinal injuries or with cerebral palsy,FREE, so we dealcounseling SHIBA provides unbiased on Medicare and related issues year-round. with all ages.” We also help you fight fraud, waste We also educate consumers about how to protect, detect and report and abuse. Ask us how! Don’t let budget, specific concerns or mobility issues hold Medicare fraud, waste and abuse. Ask us how! Paid for in whole or in part through a grant from the ACL. you back from investigating ways to improve your mobility. ☸

SHIBA is here to help

We are here to help...

W

Call: 800-722-4134 Visit: shiba.oregon.gov

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  13


NORTHWEST LIVING  |COMMUNITY ACTION

called to By BA R RY F I N N E M O R E

A CHANCE SIGHTING LED CYNDI ROMINE TO HELP THOSE WHO CAN’T HELP THEMSELVES

Rescue

C

YNDI AND GREG ROMINE WERE ON A CAnoe trip in the late 1980s near a picturesque waterfall in the Philippines, where they had been working as missionaries. Near the waterfall, Cyndi saw a man talking to a young couple with a child, but did a double-take when she saw the man hand some money to the couple and then walk away with their child. In that fleeting moment, the child was gone. Cyndi Romine says the exchange was “surreal,” and she became sick to her stomach when she realized she had just witnessed a child being sold into sex trafficking. She didn’t rescue the child in peril that day, but Romine says the incident led her to establish Called to Rescue, a nonprofit organization that rescues missing, abused or trafficked children. “She, without knowing it, has led to the rescue of so many others,” Romine says of the little Filipino girl. Called to Rescue works internationally, raising awareness and conducting prevention programs; reporting abuse to proper authorities; partnering with law enforcement and other government and nongovernmental agencies; and Cyndi Romine has been helping children both in the United States and overseas to escape the clutches of sex trafficking and abuse. 14  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019

training caregivers and those who want to serve on task forces to help law enforcement find missing, abused or trafficked children. Romine established the faith-neutral Called to Rescue in 1992. In the past three years, she says, they have rescued about 1,450 children in the United States, the Philippines and other countries. Children rescued range in age, but the youngest one was 4 years old. She describes herself as part advocate, part investigator, and says there’s not one typical way children are found or rescued. Domestically searches can begin with a phone call from a family to Called to Rescue’s east Vancouver, Wash., office. Romine learns the ins and outs of the situation and then volunteers begin trying to track a child, hitting the streets and searching locations such as public parks and bus depots. In one instance, Romine tracked down a girl in the Portland area and witnessed her getting into a car, which they followed to a suburban neighborhood. Romine called 911, gave


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  RETIREMENT LISTINGS

Amenities: Independent Living  Assisted Living/RCF/Foster Care   Housekeeping Transportation   Utilities Included   Planned Activities   Memory Care Commons offers an active community Bayberry Commons Bayberry with experienced and friendly staff. We feel this Assisted Living & Memory Care Community 2211 Laura Street Springfield, OR 97477 541-744-7000 Patty Neuman, Administrator Pneuman@bayberrycommonsalf.com www.bayberrycommonsalf.com

aHTUPM Quail Park Memory Care 2630 Lone Oak Way Eugene, OR 97404 541-780-0162 www.QuailParkEugene.com/NW50

HTUPM Terpening Terrace

Resort Style Retirement 50 Ruby Avenue Eugene, OR 97404 541-689-0619 800-818-7518 Donna www.terpeningterrace.com

iHTUP Timberhill Place 989 N.W. Spruce Street Corvallis, OR 97330 541-753-1488 Robin Bemrose

aHTUP Waverly Place Assisted Living & Memory Care 2853 Salem Ave. SE Albany, OR 97321 541-990-4580 Chantelle Hernandez

aHTUPm

is your home and your privacy is paramount while under our care. We provide a unique resident based service helping to ensure your independence. We are an Assisted Living and Memory Care Community. No Buy-In. 48 Assisted Living units - Studio: $3,995, 1 BR: $4,595, 2 BR: $4,995. Second person: $800. 14 Memory Care units - Private BA: $5,495, Shared BA: $5,195. Units are available!

There are good reasons our residents and their families have chosen Quail Park Memory Care Residences of Eugene to call “home.” Our caring and personalized support for the health and well-being of our residents guides us each day. Located in beautiful Eugene, Oregon, our inviting Memory Care offers an enriching and peaceful retreat. Every detail has been thoughtfully planned as “The Only Place to Be” for Memory Care in Eugene, Oregon. Enjoy an independent lifestyle & unparalleled service; ALL-DAY dining, on demand transportation, activity & social programs, weekly housekeeping & linen service, private dining room, libraries, community kitchens, TV theater, fitness center, computer room, game rooms, beauty shop, rec. room, interior courtyard w/ walking paths, underground parking, & 24-hr. staffing. Call for a complimentary lunch & tour. No buy-in or long term lease, 94 Units , Luxury Studio, 1&2 Bedroom, Apartment Homes. Assisted living community located within short distance of local shopping center. We offer 3 delicious meals daily, weekly housekeeping & linen services, social/recreational programs, scheduled transportation in our van and a full range of personal services available should you need them. No Buy-In, 60 Units We offer 9 styles of apartments including 2 BR/2 BA apartments. Waverly Place is an elegant new state-of-the-art, 71-unit assisted living and 21-unit secured memory care facility which also houses our sister company, Wellness at Home, an in-home care agency. They provide services to residents and offsite. They can be reached at 541-990-0339.

No Buy-In, 92 Units Studio: $3200, 1 BR/1 BA: $3600 SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  15


authorities the girl’s name and location, and the police responded. In a developing nation such as the Philippines, it’s a different strategy. Trafficked children, a situation often driven by poverty, are rescued through orchestrated undercover operations involving local law enforcement and social services. Called to Rescue partners with groups there and in other countries that run safe houses for the the rescued children. Romine says she is incredibly passionate about her work, but acknowledges little headway is being made to stop child trafficking or to make a major dent in the number of missing children. In the United States alone, 2018 statistics from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children show 424,066 entries in the FBI’s National Crime Information Center for missing children, compared with 464,324 in 2017. One in seven of the more than 23,500 runaways reported to the center in 2018 were likely victims of child sex trafficking, the organization reports. Romine says public awareness of abused and trafficked children is greater today than ever, but the ugliness and complexity that surrounds it — including the prevalence of guns and drugs — makes its large scope difficult for many people to grasp. She calls it a multibillion-dollar problem. Romine was raised on a farm in Nebraska as the oldest of three children. “If you’re a kid on a farm you work hard,” she says. “It’s part of who you are, and you don’t even think about it.” She and her husband attended Northwest Christian University in Eugene, then went into the ministry, leading various churches and serving as missionaries. Farm life — its accompanying work ethic and need for adaptability — was great training for missionary work, she says. “We are used to adapting.” Romine describes herself as made for advocacy. She is as comfortable speaking to groups about child trafficking and

abuse as she is pounding the pavement to prevent it, and says her disarming presence and appearance allows her to interact well with those on the streets. She has been held at gunpoint, and chased down a street by a pimp, an incident that prompted her to learn krav maga, a martial art form originating in Israel. They partner with various organizations domestically and abroad, including Hope Ranch Ministries in Eugene. ☸

APPLY NOW! St. Vincent de Paul is now accepting wait list applications for HUD Senior Housing.

Aster Apartments Senior Housing in Springfield

For persons 62 years or older Low income (rent is 30% of adjusted income) 1 bedroom/ 1 bath units • 3-Story high-rise with elevator Close to shopping & bus • Onsite laundry & community room Water/sewer/garbage & electricity included in rent There is currently a wait list for this property

APPLY AT: 2890 Chad Drive • Eugene, OR 97408 866-739-0867, contact Waitlist Dept @ 541-743-7164 • TTY/TDD 711 St. Vincent de Paul does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability status, familial status, national origin or marital status in the admission or access to, or treatment or employment in, its federally assisted programs and activities.

Timberhill Place

Where Help is Always Available Should You Need It

Enjoy your own private apartment surrounded by your favoritie things. Meet new friends and get all the help you need from our qualified staff, 24-hours each day. Timberhill Place provides three delicious meals each day, weekly housekeeping and linen services, scheduled transportation, all utilities and a full range of personal services. All this in a beautiful building, with a monthly rent you’ll find surprisingly affordable.

Come discover Assisted Living at Timberhill Place! Call for more information and a personal tour.

16  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019


NORTHWEST LIVING  |  SHOP LOCAL NOW HIRING

541-461-2101 Cold weather tune up reg. $149 With your SENIOR DISCOUNT only $119 Tune up includes identifying existing or potential problems that can cause an unexpected breakdown

Providing Quality In-Home Care Services Include: Personal Care Medication Management Dressing/Bathing Housekeeping

No Risk Guarantee 24 Hour Emergency Service Call Today!

Transportation Meal Prep Pet Care And More!

Corvallis/Albany

541-757-0214

CCB# 47396

www.HelpingHandsHomeCare.com

Call today for a FREE in-home care assessment!

“Helping You Adapt Your Home to Your Current Needs”

R ick HaRRis c &H ontRactoR

andyman

Serving Lane County Are your stairs difficult to climb?

A STAIRLIFT CAN HELP! CALL US TODAY TO SCHEDULE YOUR FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION

Your Community Nonprofit Hospice

Mobility Access Options NW

971-304-7464 www.MAO-NW.com

CCB# 187428

Your Community Nonprofit Hospice

“Being a recipient of the love that Lumina gives, has Moving people since 1989 Tamara Scoville helped me understand that “No Job too Small” is aabout lot of ‘giving dignityup.’ to It was, ‘How h Lumina itthere wasn’t dying with peace, and dying we make your life better? How can we improve Piano & Safe without pain.” Specialist quality of your life?’ And it was amazing." Call today to see how Serving all of canLumina help you.can help you. l today toLumina see how Scott Hahn

8 Window & Gutter Cleaning 8 Pressure Washing 8 Debris Hauling 8 Deck Building 8 Wheelchair Ramp Building 8 General Home Maintenance ~ FREE ESTIMATES ~

541-729-3460 CCB#150537

NW Financial Insurance

Donna R. Green

Licensed Insurance Agent

541-286-6443 donna@nw-financial.com

Lane, Linn & Benton Counties

541-285-5392 Luminahospice.org luminahospice.org| 541.757.9616 | 541.757.9616

or

541-461-0632

310 NW 7th St., Corvallis SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  17


November 2019 THINGS TO EXPERIENCE THIS FALL

OCT. 30 — MISINFORMATION AND FAKE NEWS WORKSHOP, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m., Main Meeting Room, Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, 645 NW Monroe Ave. 541-7666965.

1 — WALK WITH EASE, a six-week program through Newport Senior Activity Center. 541-265-9617. CHAMBER MUSIC CORVALLIS, Ensemble Lucidarium, 7:30 p.m., First Presbyterian Church, 114 SW 8th St., Corvallis. $26.

MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mill Casino, 3201 Tremont St., North Bend. Millcasino.com. (ALSO NOV. 20) CORK’S CREW, 6 p.m., The Embers, 1811 Hwy. 99N., Eugene. HOW TO COPE WITH GRIEF OVER THE HOLIDAYS, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. 541-917-7760.

AAUW: GEORGIA APPLEGATE AND TRISH GARNER, “AAUW’s Latest Initiatives,” 9:30 a.m., Westminster Presbyterian Church, 777 Coburg Road, Eugene. 541-556-8149.

CLUB, 9 a.m., Willamalane, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Carpool to Albany. Mossbacks.org.

3 — CORVALLIS-OSU PIANO INTERNATIONAL: CONRAD TAO, 4 p.m., LaSells Stewart Center. $25/$28. Corvallispiano.org.

5 — MOSSBACKS VOLKSSPORT CLUB, 9:45 a.m., Hallmark Resort, 744 SW Elizabeth St., Newport. Walk along Nye Beach. Mossbacks.org. UN-INVITE ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION FROM YOUR HOLIDAY CELEBRATIONS, 2 p.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. Free. 541-682-5318 or getrec.org.

6 — HOLIDAY PIE AND WHIP CREAM, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $30/$36. 541736-4444.

(ALSO NOV. 15) PRESTON AND GWEN, 6:30 p.m., Eugene Elks. 541345-8416. CLUB, 9 a.m., Willamalane, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Carpool to new trails in Lebanon. Mossbacks.org.

2 — MOSSBACKS VOLKSSPORT

D SQUARED CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., Tsunami Books, 2585 Willamette St., Eugene. 541-345-8986.

JAKE JOLIFF BAND, 7:30 p.m., Tsunami Books, 2585 Willamette St., Eugene. 541-345-8986.

9 — MOSSBACKS VOLKSSPORT

(THROUGH NOV. 17) “NEXT TO NORMAL,” 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Majestic Theatre, 115 SW 2nd St., Corvallis. $16-$16.

FUN WATERCOLORS FOR BEGINNERS 1, 9:30 a.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $30/$36. 541-736-4444.

“THE UNARMED CHILD,” a response to gun violence with Eugene Vocal Arts and Eugene Concert Choir, 7:30 p.m., Beall Concert Hall, 961 E. 18th Ave., Eugene. $26-$30. 541-687-6865.

12

(ALSO NOV. 16) VICTORIAN FINISHING SCHOOL ADULT CAMP, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturdays, SMJ House, 303 Willamette, Eugene. $60. See Facebook for details.

THE OWYHEE RIVER JOURNALS

FRIENDS OF THE EUGENE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., 100 W. 10th, Eugene.

TUESDAY

6 p.m., Fern Ridge Library, 88026 Territorial Hwy., Veneta. Free.

7 — TRAVEL JOURNAL: EXPLORE EXOTIC MOROCCO: 2:30 P.M., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Free. 541-7364444. NUALA KENNEDY AND EAMON O’LEARY HOUSE CONCERT, 7:30 p.m., 755 River Road. CORVALLIS FOLKLORE SOCIETY: HANNEKE CASSEL FIDDLE TRIO, 7 p.m., Whiteside Theatre, 361 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. $18-$22. 541752-0437.

8 — HILLTOP BIG BAND, featuring Sherri Bird on piano and vocals, 7:30 p.m., The Old World Deli, Corvallis.

18  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019

HOLIDAY BAZAAR AT CAMPBELL CENTER, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., 155 High St., Eugene. Free admission. 541-6825318. 17TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY FESTIVAL, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monroe Grade School, 600 Dragon Dr., Monroe. CORVALLIS FOLKLORE SOCIETY: TOM PAXTON, 7 p.m., Whiteside Theatre, 361 SW Madison Ave., Corvallis. $25-$35. 541-752-0437.

13 — RETIREMENT STRATEGIES FOR WOMEN, 5:30 p.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $3/$4. 541-736-4444. WINTER SAFETY TIPS AND TRICKS, 12:30 p.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. 541-9177760.


14 — COSY SHERIDAN, 7:30 p.m., Tsunami Books, 2585 Willamette St., Eugene. 541-345-8986. SHIBA MEDICARE SEMINAR, 1 p.m., LBCC Albany Campus Fireside Room CC-211. Free. 541-812-0849.

15 — 40TH ANNIVERSARY SOIREE, 6 p.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $40. 541-7364444.

16 — MOSSBACKS VOLKSSPORT CLUB, 9 a.m., Willamalane, 215 West C St., Springfield. Carpool to south Salem. Mossbacks.org. OREGON TRAIL LACEMAKERS, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Willamette Oaks Retirement Living, 455 Alexander Loop, Eugene. 541-484-1180. SHIBA MEDICARE SEMINAR, 10 a.m., GSH Cancer Center, 501 NW Elks Dr., Corvallis. Free. 541-812-0849.

18 — HOLIDAY ONLINE SHOPPING, 6 p.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $11. 541-682-5318 or getrec. org. 19 — SKIP THE HOLIDAY BLUES: MANAGING EXPECTATIONS DURING THE HOLIDAY SEASON, 9 a.m., Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. 541-917-7760.

20 — TECH HELP LAB, 3 to 4 p.m., Main Meeting Room, Corvallis-Benton County Public Library, 645 NW Monroe Ave. 541-766-6965. LEGAL ADVICE: ADVANCE DIRECTIVES, 3 p.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Free. 541-736-4444.

21 — COMMUNITY BREAKFAST, 7:45 to 8:45 a.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. $3.50/$4.20. 541-736-4444. EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR YOUR PETS’ CARE, 2:30 p.m., Willamalane Adult Activity Center, 215 W. C St., Springfield. Free. 541-736-4444. RETIRED SENIOR PROVIDERS OF LANE COUNTY, “Eugene Mission” with Sheryl Balthrop, 2 p.m., Sheldon Oaks Retirement, 2525 Cal Young Road. 541-342-1983. THANKSGIVING LUNCHEON, noon, Albany Senior Center, 489 Water Ave. NW. $14. 541-917-7760.

23 — CORVALLIS-OSU SYMPHONY, 3 p.m., LaSells Stewart Center, OSU. $22+. Cosusymphony.org. 25 — NATIONAL ACTIVE AND RETIRED FEDERAL EMPLOYEES, noon, Sizzler Restaurant, 1010 Postal Way, Springfield. Topic: Alzheimer’s research. URBAN HOMESTEADING: AROMATHERAPY AND ESSENTIAL OILS, 6:45 p.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $20. 541-682-5318 or getrec.org.

27 — THANKSGIVING LUNCHEON, 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Campbell Center, 155 High St., Eugene. $6. 541-6825318 or getrec.org. ☸

Calendar deadline: Nov. 5 for December events. Submit info to mte@northwest50plus.com.

Eugene Coin & Jewelry We buy sell coins, & estate jewelry Do& YOU havevintage hidden treasures?

in any hidden condition. DoGOLD YOU have treasures? Do YOU have hidde We buy any type of gold: new, used or broken,

DIAMONDS

Do YOU YOU have have hidde hidde Do

We buy all sizes & shapes. Price depends on quality, cut and size of diamonds.

GOLD

We buybuy any type gold: of We anyoftype of gold: gold: ne n

We buy any type of gold: n

new, used or925 broken, in any We buy stamped sterling silver and condition. silver serving dishes and flatware.

in any any condition. condition. SILVER in We buy andWe sell collectible American and buybuy all sizes & shapes. COINS Do We sizes & international coins inhidden singleall pieces or collections. YOUPrice have treasures? &cutshapes. shapes. P quality,& buy allonsizes shapes. P DIAMONDS Wedepends

DIAMONDS quality, cut andorsize of size of diamonds. size of diam diam We buyStreet, anyand type of gold: new,97401 used broken, 1416 Willamette Eugene, OR quality, cut and size of diam GOLD in any condition.

541-683-8445 • eugenecoin@aol.com • eugenecoin.com

We buy stamped sterling We buy stamped sterling 92 925 silver andstamped silverdepends serving We buy stamped sterling 9 We buy all sizes & shapes. Price on We buy sterling 92 dishes and flatware. quality, cut and size ofserving diamonds. dishes silver silver serving dishes and and fla fl

SILVER SILVER SILVER COINS COINS COINS

EUGENE’S LARGEST FULL SERVICE COIN DEALER - A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1924

DIAMONDS

silver serving dishes and fla

We buy and sell We buy stamped sterling 925 collectible silver and We buy and sell American and international silver serving dishes and flatware. We buy and sell collectible collectible A A We buy and sell collectible A coins in single pieces or international coins in single international coins in single single We buy andcollections. sell collectible American and in international coins international coins in single pieces or collections.

1416 Willamette Street, Eugene, O

1416 Willamette Street, Eugene, O O Willamette Street, 14161416 Willamette Street, Eugene, OR 97401Eugene, 541-683-8445 541-683-8445 • eugenecoin@aol.com • eugenecoin.com •• eu 541-683-8445 •• eugenecoin@aol.com eugenecoin@aol.com eu

541-683-8445 • eugenecoin@aol.com • eu EUGENE’S LARGEST FULL SERVICE COIN DEALER - A FAMILY TRADITION SINCE 1924

EUGENE’S LARGEST LARGEST FULL SERVICE COIN DEALER -- A Eugene’s largestFULL full SERVICE serviceCOIN coinDEALER dealer! EUGENE’S SERVICE COIN DEALER A FAMILY FAMILYTR TR EUGENE’S LARGEST FULL -A FAMILY TR A family tradition since 1924 SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  19


The Jewelry Girl, llc Lisa Russell 541-556-9598 Free Appraisals ... I’ll come to you

BUY & SELL Gold • Silver Costume Jewelry Men’s Jewelry Scrap Gold & Silver Pieces & Parts Even Junk

PUZZ L E A G E Most Common Pets

25 years+ experience

2001 Franklin, #3 • Eugene

Donate your Vehicle Locally!

• All procceds stay in the local community • We accept cars, trucks, RVs, running or not.

Cars for a Cause

888-227-8223 20  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY 

CAT BIRD CHICKEN IGUANA FISH

GUINEA PIG RAT DOG FERRET HAMSTER

LIZARD SNAKE GERBIL TURTLE MOUSE

© thewordsearch.com PLAY THIS PUZZLE ONLINE AT: HTTP://THEWORDSEARCH.COM/PUZZLE/8/


PETS | CAT RESCUE AND ADOPTION NETWORK

T

adopt Zoe

HE CAT RESCUE & ADOPtion Network presents Zoe, a cute and petite black-andwhite tuxedo female kitty about 14 years old. She was brought into a local vet and surrendered as a frightened and upset kitty — she may have been abused in her past. With loving care in her foster home, she is now very outgoing and affectionate. She adores being petted and loves all the attention she can get. She is quite scared of dogs and does not get along with other cats, so she needs to be the only pet. Zoe is on a prescription diet, but otherwise she has no medical issues. This sweet girl just needs a quiet home and a kind-hearted adopter who will give her the chance at a new life — and be rewarded with a devoted and loving companion.

Benton Health Center 530 NW 27th Street Corvallis, OR 97330 541-766-6835 East Linn Health Center 100 Mullins Drive, A-1 Lebanon, OR 97355 541-451-6920 Monroe Health Center 610 Dragon Drive Monroe, OR 97456 541-847-5143 Alsea Rural Health Center 435 E. Alder Street Alsea, OR 97324 541-487-7116 Lincoln Health Center 121 SE Viewmont Avenue Corvallis, OR 97333 541-766-3546 Sweet Home Health Center 799 Long Street Sweet Home, OR 97386 541-367-3888

She is spayed, up to date on vaccinations, microchipped, has been defleaed and dewormed, and is negative for Felv and FIV. Her adoption fee is $60, which allows us to provide care for other cats in need. To meet Zoe, please call 541-225-4955 option 1 or send an email to adoptinfo@CatRescues. org. ☸

Accepting New Medicare Patients www.bentonlinnhealthcenters.org Hours vary by location please call for an appointment.

Stage to yours!

From our

THEATER

HT SPOTLImG around the world YOUR GUIDE

Eugene Ballet’s 40th Season

an important rock musical about a family’s struggles with mental health

november 1-17

tickets: $16-18 | $10 opening night & thursdays

TO STAGE

ENT IN ENTERTAINM

E VALLEY

THE WILLAMETT

Inspiration fro

commupeople from your nal soloists and by highlighting professio on Nov. 2 with works nity. begins the seasonBrahms and Mendelssohn. t, Eugene Vocal Arts masters: Schuber & Orchestra the great German demand, on Dec. 16 the ECC ” version of Back by popular s with a fully staged “musicalmelodies will will delight audiences Carol. On Feb. 24, gorgeous ey’s McCartn Paul Christma from A ion Dickens’ to Music. Requiem, Celebrat soar with Fauré’sand Vaughan Williams’ Serenade celebration of a for Stone 12 April Standing Vocal Arts on Join the Eugene Peace of Wild Things. with a bang, The Earth Day with concludes the concert season Hollens and American Style Brabham, Evynne celebrities Vicki featuring local Smith. ◊ at 541-682-5000. Calvin Orlando call the Hult Center For season tickets, season with its 44th concert Big Band and Choir presents to Eugene Concert from sacred masterworks the at Retallack music a collection of With Artistic Director Diane Eugene Vocal a and Oscar Wilde’s Broadway tunes. Choir & Orchestrfrom around the world, Concert on Eugene helm, s with inspirati Arts present program

An IdeAl HusbAnd September 28 Tickets: $14-16

s our Eugene Ballet celebrate at the Hult 40th anniversary season Center with a fabulous with theater, of dance infusedincluding two passion and joy inspired by full-length ballets Shakespeare’s plays. present a very In October, we as well contemporary Hamlet Bowie as a tribute to David Complexions with Star Dust by Ballet. Contemporary er would Of course Decemb without our not be complete classic, The timeless holiday . er Nutcrack Pimble’s In February, Toni & Juliet Romeo classical ballet s to romance, treats audience intrigue and drama. returns Finally, The Firebirdon choin an all new producti Suzanne Haag. reographed by of the Her futuristic retelling a world in captures tale classic from the need of being reborn allet.org. ◊ ashes. See eugeneb

SEASON

6 ORDER BYTOOCT HAMLET

Theater Spotlight, call

BONUS! 2 TIX

503-304-1323 Don’t delay!

Y

-19

pm Friday, April 12 7:30 O U of Beall Concert Hall,

To advertise in the

F OF 20%SUBSCR IPTIONS

AND SAVE! 44TH Season COMFORT SUBLIME AND GLORIOUS

MAJESTICALLY GRAND

The Haugland Family Foundation

NOV. 4

WWW.MAJESTIC.OR

2018 ORIGINAL MUSICAL NOW TO OUR FULLY-STAGED, CREATIVE SUBSCRIBE K CHORAL MASTERWOR

pm Friday, Nov. 2 7:30 U of O Beall Concert Hall,

DECEMBER ISSUE

STIC THEATRE

THE MAJE Corvallis, OR 97333 115 SW 2nd St.,G | BOX OFFICE: 541.738.7469

Orchestra CONDUCTOR ChoirK, &ARTISTIC DIRECTOR AND Eugene Concert DIANE RETALLAC

EXPRESSIONS CONTEMPORARY NATURAL WORLD OF OUR PRECIOUS

Advertising deadlines

October 7

back his past... enough to buy No man is rich

16 2:30 pm Sunday, December Concert Hall Hult Center Silva FROM BIG BANDS

TO BROADWAY

24 2:30 pm Sunday, February Concert Hall Hult Center Silva

2-5000 Hult Center 541-68 rg EugeneConcertChoir.o

40TH ANNIVERSAR 2018/19 SEASON HAMLET ROMEO & JULIET THE FIREBIRD SPECIAL EVENTS STAR DUST THE NUTCRACKER INTERPLAY

AT GET TICKETSt.org

Combo & with Vicki Brabham Orlando Smith Guest Artist Calvin 7:30 pm Hult Center Saturday, April 27

eugeneballe

THEATER SPOTLIGHT NORTHWEST BOOMER

| September 2018

1

& SENIOR NEWS

ws.com nwboomerandseniorne

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  21


Classifieds UNITS FOR RENT HUD SUBSIDIZED UNITS for people over 62 and/or persons with disabilities is currently accepting applications for our one bedroom waiting list. We are committed to providing equal housing opportunities. All utilities paid. Briarwood Manor, 643 Manbrin, Keizer, OR 97303, 541928-2545..

SERVICES LAWN MAINTENANCE specializing in large properties. Weed-eating, field mowing, blackberries, cleanups, bark. 35 years experience. Eugene area. Call Mark 541556-4433.

MISCELLANEOUS NEED A WILL? CALL Sal Catalano, “The Lawyer That Makes House Calls,” for an appointment in your home. 541-525-2884. Powers of Attorney-Advance DirectivesTrusts. www.CatalanoLawPC.com.

CEMETERY PLOTS BELCREST MEMORIAL PARK, SALEM. Cemetery lots for sale. 1 lot 3,995. 2 or more discounted. We pay the transfer fee. 951-203-5109.

WANTED

CLASSIFIED AD RATES

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED. Paying top dollar! Free local pickup. Call Sharon, 503-679-3605. WANTED: MOTORHOME OR TRAILER.  Must be 1995 or newer. I have CASH. If needs work, that’s ok. 503-269-2947. BASEBALL & SPORTS MEMORABILIA  wanted. Buying old cards, pennants, autographs, photographs, tickets, programs, Pacific Coast League, etc. Alan, 503-481-0719. CASH FOR PRE 1980  sport & non-sport cards, model kits, comic books, pre 1960’s magazines. Private collector. 503-3137538.

PRIVATE PARTY 

25

$

Up to 20 words. $1.75 per extra word.

COMMERCIAL, REAL ESTATE 

50

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

CEMETERY PLOTS 

60

$

Up to 20 words. $2.50 per extra word.

FRIENDSHIP ADS 

HOW TO SUBMIT AN AD: Mail your verbiage with payment to: Northwest50Plus, P.O. Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309 or email to classifieds@Northwest50Plus.com or call 1-877-357-2430.

*Punctuation not included in word count. Phone numbers count as 1 word. Ad must be in our office by the 6th of the month PRIOR to publication. Ads cover Vancouver, WA to Lane County.

CASH FOR GOOD CONDITION reloading equipment & supplies. 541-905-5453.

FRIENDSHIP ADS OLDER, ACTIVE, HEALTHY, FINANCIALLY secure widow is seeking a gentleman to become her friend and accompany her to various entertainment and fun activities. Let’s enjoy life together! #5740

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertising in this magazine is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This magazine will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this magazine are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. Toll-free for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

FRIENDSHIP AD ABBREVIATIONS M = Male F = Female S = Single D = Divorced W = White A = Asian

40

$

Up to 30 words.

B = Black H = Hispanic J = Jewish C = Christian N/S = Non-smoker

N/D = Non-drinker ISO = In Search Of LTR = Long Term Relationship

WW = Widowed White WB = Widowed Black WA = Widowed Asian

TO RESPOND TO A FRIENDSHIP AD:

WH = Widowed Hispanic LGBT= Lesbian/Gay/ Bisexual/Transgender

Write the number of the ad you are responding to on the OUTSIDE of the envelope and mail to: Northwest50Plus, PO Box 12008, Salem, OR 97309. 22  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019


Call Now & Save 1-844-651-9023

TM

up to

90% SAVINGS

Abilify 5mg Actigall 300mg Advair 250/50mcg Alphagan P 0.1% Anoro Ellipta Asacol 800mg Azilect 1mg Azopt 1% Benicar 40mg Boniva 150mg Breo Ellipta 100/25mcg Brilinta 90mg Bystolic 5mg Combigan 0.2%/0.5% Combivent 20/100mcg Colchicine 0.6mg Dexilant 60mg Domperidone 10mg Eliquis 5mg Entocort 3mg Evista 60mg Farxiga 10mg Finacea Gel 15% Flovent 110mcg Invokana 100mg Janumet 50/1000mg Januvia 100mg Jardiance 25mg Jublia 10% Lumigan 0.01% Multaq 400mg Myrbetriq 50mg Namenda 10mg Nexium 40mg Onglyza 5mg Pentasa 500mg Pradaxa 150mg

84 tabs 300 tabs 180 doses 15ml 90 doses 300 tabs 100 tabs 15ml 84 tabs 3 tabs 90 doses 168 tabs 84 tabs 15ml 600 doses 100 tabs 90 caps 300 tabs 180 tabs 100 caps 84 tabs 84 tabs 90g 360 doses 90 tabs 168 tabs 84 tabs 90 tabs 24ml 9ml 180 tabs 90 tabs 84 tabs 84 tabs 84 tabs 400 tabs 180 caps

$135 $201 $180 $105 $300 $245 $295 $85 $132 $175 $375 $450 $110 $125 $135 $105 $330 $125 $585 $128 $78 $300 $130 $150 $365 $315 $250 $405 $485 $75 $555 $285 $45 $84 $285 $285 $450

compared to your local pharmacy

Men’s Health

90 tabs 20 tabs 30 tabs 90 tabs 16 tabs 16 tabs 16 tabs

$145 $120 $125 $60 $250 $40 $45

Estring 7.5mcg/24hr 1 ring Premarin 0.625mg 84 tabs Premarin Vag Cream 42g Vagifem 10mcg 24 tabs 100 tabs Pristiq 50mg 400 doses QVAR 80mcg 200 tabs Ranexa ER 1000mg Restasis 0.05% 90 vials 50 grams Retin-A Cream 0.05% 90 caps Spiriva 18mcg Symbicort 160/4.5mcg 360 doses 90 tabs Synthroid 100mcg Tradjenta 5mg 90 tabs Tricor 145mg 90 tabs 90 tabs Uloric 40mg 600 doses Ventolin HFA 90mcg 100 tabs Vesicare 5mg 300 grams Volaren Emulgel 1% Vytorin 10/40mg 90 tabs 84 tabs Xarelto 20mg Xifaxan 550mg 100 tabs

$100 $85 $95 $110

Cialis 5mg Cialis 20mg Levitra 20mg Propecia 1mg Stendra 200mg Viagra 50mg Viagra 100mg

Women’s Health

r

$145 $125 $175 $220 $85 $120 $195 $50 $325 $120 $150 $75 $150 $84 $150 $450 $155

FFREE SHIPPING!

Prices shown may be for generic equivalents if available. Prices are in USD and are subject to change without notices

• Prescriptions Required • Pharmacy Checker Approved • Credit Cards Accepted

1-844-651-9023

Hours: M-F: 6:30 am - 6:30 pm Sat: 8 am - 2:30 pm PST, Closed Sun

Suite 338 7360 137 St Surrey, BC, V3W 1A3 Canada

SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019  NORTHWEST 50 PLUS  23


CALL NOW for your FREE Estimate!

Clog-Free Design with a No-Clog Guarantee!1

541.705.4044 Receive a

$200 VISA Gift Card

Protective Overhang/Trim ScratchGuard® Paint Finish

with your LeafGuard purchase!4

NOVEMBER SPECIAL

75% OFF LABOR 2

Receive a

$25 Lowe’s Gift Card

with FREE in-home estimate!3 1 Guaranteed not to clog for as long as you own your home, or we will clean your gutters for free. 2 Does not include cost of material. Expires 11/30/19 3All participants who attend an estimated 60-90 minute inhome product consultation will receive a $25 gift card. Retail value is $25. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. If married or involved with a life partner, both cohabitating persons must attend and complete presentation together. Participants must have a photo ID, be able to understand English, and be legally able to enter into a contract. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 21 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction with any other promotion or discount of any kind. Offer not sponsored or promoted by Lowe’s and is subject to change without notice prior to reservation. Expires 11/30/19. ⁴ All participants who attend an estimated 60-90-minute in-home product consultation and choose to make a purchase will receive a $200 Visa gift card. Retail value is $200.00. Offer sponsored by LeafGuard Holdings Inc. Limit one per household. Company procures, sells, and installs seamless gutter protection. This offer is valid for homeowners over 18 years of age. The following persons are not eligible for this offer: employees of Company or affiliated companies or entities, their immediate family members, previous participants in a Company in-home consultation within the past 12 months and all current and former Company customers. Gift may not be extended, transferred, or substituted except that Company may substitute a gift of equal or greater value if it deems it necessary. Gift card will be mailed to the participant via first class United States Mail within 10 days of receipt of the promotion form. Not valid in conjunction NORTHWEST PLUS of any SOUTH VALLEY  |  NOVEMBER 2019notice prior to reservation. Expires 11/30/19. LeafGuard operates as LeafGuard of Oregon in Oregon under OR LIC # 223377 with24  any other promotion or50 discount kind. Off er is subject to change without

Profile for Northwest50Plus

Northwest 50 Plus South Valley Lane County Edition November 2019  

Northwest 50 Plus South Valley Lane County Edition November 2019