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the soundings the official nwacuho newsletter

northwest association of college and university housing officers

-NEW: Soundings Spotlight -Flooding in Alberta -ACUHO-I Conference Reflections -CUBO Study Tour 2013 (pictured above)


executive board President Kelly Ammendolia Assistant Director for Residential Life The Evergreen State College Residential & Dining Services 2700 Evergreen Pkwy Olympia, WA 98505 360.867.6191 ammendok@evergreen.edu President Elect Erik T. Elordi Assistant Director of Family Housing & Conference Services Southern Oregon University 1250 Siskiyou Blvd. Ashland, OR 97520 541.552.6229 elordie@sou.edu Past President Elaine Ames Operations and Marketing Manager, UHNSP Central Washington University 400 E. University Way, MS 7513 Ellensburg, Washington 98926 509.963.1838 amese@cwu.edu

Treasurer David Akana Assistant Director for Residential Education Oregon State University University Housing & Dining Services 102 Buxton Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-1317 541.737.9965 david.akana@oregonstate. edu Secretary Jenni Chadick Assistant Director of Residence Life University of Puget Sound 1500 N. Warner St. #1003 Tacoma, WA 98416-1003 253.879.3317 jchadick@pugetsound.edu Newsletter Editor Rachel Rasmussen Residence Director Gonzaga University 502 East Boone, MSC 2515 Spokane, Washington 99258 509.313.4648 rasmussenr2@gonzaga.edu

Website Administrator Brian Kerrick HFS Coordinator University of Washington, Bothell Box 358524 18115 Campus Way NE Bothell, WA 98011-8246 425.352.5215 bkerrick@uwb.edu Products and Services Coordinator Esther Gaines Area Coordinator Gonzaga University 502 East Boone, MSC 2515 Spokane, Washington 99258 509.313.4155 gaines@gonzaga.edu

Alberta Representative Craig Whitton Residence Coordinator University of Alberta 1-044 Lister Centre Edmonton, AB Canada T6G 2H6 780.492.9495 craig.whitton@ualberta.ca British Columbia Representative Lawrence Lam Coordinator, Community Development & Student Leadership University of Victoria. PO Box 1700 STN CSC Victoria BC V8W 2Y2 250.853.3136 laml@uvic.ca Washington State Representative Michelle Primley Benton Administrator for North Campus/Diversity Initiatives University of Washington Housing & Food Services 206.543.4862 mprimley@hfs.washington. edu

Oregon Representative Dawn Snyder Operations Manager Oregon State University University Housing & Dining Services 102 Buxton Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-1317 .541.737.3231 dawn.snyder@oregonstate. edu Alaska-Yukon Representative Tammie Willis Associate Director of Residence Life Kenai Peninsula College 156 College Road Soldotna Alaska 99669 907-252-7603 tdwillis@kpc.alaska.edu


the soundings the official nwacuho newsletter

northwest association of college and university housing officers

Letter From the President

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Flooding in Alberta

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Soundings Spotlight: To Live and to Learn

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Reflections on ACUHO-I and ACE

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Institutional Updates

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Also in this edition of the Soundings: CUBO Study Tour 2013 (pg 13.); Information on upcoming NWACUHO Executive Board elections (pg. 18); BaseCamp at the University of Alberta (pg. 22); Getting Beyond Metal Keys (pg. 22); Living the Learning: It Starts with TLC (pg. 24); A Look at New Residence Hall Construction (pg. 26)

the soundings the official NWACUHO newsletters editorial and submission policies Deadlines for publications are based on distribution needs, and therefore it is important that members honor the established deadlines. Material not received on time, or not used due to space limitations will be considered for use in the next issue. Because soundings is the official publication of an educational association and reflects the professional standards of its members, necessary revisions will be made to ensure publication quality. soundings also reserves the right to edit submissions for space requirements. Authors bear full responsibility for references, quotations, and data accuracy of publications submissions. Authors also hold NWACUHO harmless from any liability resulting from publications of articles submitted for printing.   Be sure to clearly indicate the author(s) and institution(s) on all submissions. Permission is granted to reproduce portions of soundings’ contents with proper attribution and credit to soundings.   Advertisements in the soundings should not be considered an endorsement. For information on exhibitor advertising rates please contact: Esther Gaines, Product & Services Coordinator at gaines@gonzaga.edu or 509-313-4155. Please send all submissions (articles, letters to the association, updates from around the region, and announcements) to: Rachel Rasmussen, soundings editor at rasmussenr2@gonzaga.edu **Please attach articles using MS word document or type the submission into an email.


NWACUHO Soundings

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the soundings

Summer 2013


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Letter from the President

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Greetings NWACUHO Colleagues, It is hard to believe August is upon us! That means it has already been six months since our conference in Tacoma, and only six more months to go until we meet in Edmonton! While the fleeting summer may seem like it should be downtime, we know in reality it presents us with plenty of projects and much change. Staff departures and arrivals, the closing and opening of fiscal years and moving forward with a new budget, planning, reorganizing, restructuring, renovating, and the list goes on. My hope is that amidst your productivity, you have carved out some intentional time for relaxation and self-care. The past few months have engendered both adversity and prosperity in our region and respective countries. Our Albertan colleagues in and near Calgary experienced devastating flooding, a controversial verdict was delivered in the George Zimmerman trial, the U.S. Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act, just to name a few. No matter your location, political leans or level of activism, these issues have no doubt touched you and your loved ones in some way. In terms of our work, we become increasingly aware of social, financial and other justice-related circumstances that many of our students are living and unpacking with us on campus. What a profound responsibility we have to educate, provide a safe and inclusive home away from home, and create open access to the right support resources. NWACUHO and ACUHO-I continue to offer robust development opportunities in an effort to better our profession and services. If you have not already attended a webinar or conference, read or wrote for the Soundings or Talking Stick, joined a taskforce, or plugged yourself into these networks in some other way, I urge you to do so. As the idiom goes, it takes a village! Within NWACUHO, we have a number of wonderful prospects for you on the horizon. Our next First Friday Webinar will be held on August 2 at 10:00 a.m. exploring how to make the most of your NWACUHO experience. This fall, you could choose to submit a program proposal for the annual conference, volunteer on our new conference program committee, or run for a board position in the elections process. So many opportunities to choose from and we can’t wait to connect with you! As always, please feel free to contact any board or taskforces member with questions or suggestions. I hope that you enjoy the rest of your summer! Warm regards, Kelly I. Ammendolia NWACUHO President

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NWACUHO Soundings

Flooding in Alberta

Craig Whitton, University of Alberta My name is Craig Whitton, and I am the Alberta Representative for NWACUHO. Alberta is “Wild Rose Country” in Canada The motto accurately describes both the geography and the people- wonderful and inviting, but resilient and tough when needed! In late June of this year, that toughness was tested. The province I call home was subject to severe flooding- the worst in a generation. Dozens of communities, and tens of thousands of people were impacted by these floods. While Edmonton (my city) largely escaped the impact of the floods, our neighboring institutions in Southern Alberta were not as fortunate. While they were not directly damaged by the flooding, they had (and continue to have) an instrumental role in responding to this crisis by housing and feeding evacuees from hard hit areas. As housing professionals in Post Secondary Institutions, when disaster strikes, we are in a unique position. Provided our facilities are intact, our residence halls are the go-to evacuation centers to feed and shelter potentially thousands. You may not even know it, but your local National Guard or Army Reserve may have detailed plans to utilize your facility in the event of an emergency (for example, I’m told that Lister Hall at the University of Alberta was to be the Canadian military’s Edmonton command post in the event that the Y2K bug proved to be an issue). I am writing this article for Soundings offering my perspective and to share some of my experiences during the recent events in Alberta; while I do not work for any of the majorly impacted Universities (University of Calgary, Mount Royal University, Southern Alberta Institute of Technology, Olds College, and Medicine Hat College), I was part of a task force sent from the University of Alberta in Edmonton to assist the University of Calgary in any way we could. I’m sure employees of the aforementioned institution can give far greater depth and perspective and no doubt many would love to contribute to “Soundings” for this very reason, but as 6

with many disasters, just because the waters have receded in most places does not mean the work has stopped. I have personally witnessed the University of Calgary’s student housing team putting in countless hours in the service of those in need during this crisis, the logistics of which makes our usual cycle of student check in look like a trip to the grocery store. I have no doubt the same is true of our other southern Alberta institutions. Anytime a post secondary institution is needed in an emergency to address the needs of the populace, there are many things that need to be accounted for and accomplished. There needs to be an efficient check in and check out procedure which is almost guaranteed to be at a bad time of year. There needs to be food. There needs to be basic supplies- clothing, toiletries, etc.- since many people may have lost everything. This can be a very difficult to organize at short notice. On top of the basic logistical considerations, the University or College is often required to work with local emergency response agencies. Each agency will have different needs, perspectives, and ways of working - but the main commonality is that they will need to place people in your residence halls, and your institution will have to make it work. To say it is challenging is an understatement.

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With a disaster like a flood, there is always a human reaction, and that can either be very positive or very negative. We have seen instances of disasters wherein the response was very negative -- the looting and other harmful incidents following Hurricane Katrina, for instance. Alternatively there are many examples of extremely positive post-disaster responses, such as New York or most recently, southern Alberta. I have spent the past week at the University of Calgary and I have been genuinely moved by the response of Calgarians. I’ll tell you a very short story about Reynaldo, an evacuee. I met Reynaldo as I was leaving the dining hall; while he looked young, he also looked quite at home on a University campus so I thought he might be going to school. As it happens he was just 13 years old. He was just tying his dog up outside the dining hall, and so I went to say hello as I miss my dog something terrible also (almost as much as my wife!). After complimenting him on his dog, we started chatting. “What’s your name?” I asked him. “Reynaldo. Are you a student here?” he said. “No - I’m here helping out with some of the housing. How about you?” “I’m an evacuee.” “Sorry to hear that, Reynaldo. I hope you are comfortable here - is there anything you need?” “No.” He waited for a few moments. His eyes welled up as he held back tears. “We lost everything.” He then bent over and started giving his dog a good scratch behind the ears. He smiled - “Well...Not everything.” Later the same day, I saw Reynaldo again. He was assisting an elderly lady, also an evacuee, who was bound to a wheelchair (I believe she was a stranger to him until a few moments before). Reynaldo was pushing her wheel chair through the dining hall service center. She couldn’t quite see what food was on offer due to the higher counter, so he’d describe it to her, and if she wanted some, he’d scoop it out for her. He took her to every station and carried her food and then went back for his own. He then sat with her and ate and kept her company. Pretty amazing kid, I think you’d agree. But with all the things I’ve seen here, I don’t believe that’s the whole story. Reynaldo’s actions are amazing, to be sure - but it isn’t unique. There are people doing kind things for each other all over Alberta to help others in need. Calgary - and other impacted parts of Alberta - have really banded together in so many ways to help each other out. It is inspiring, and I think our institutions - which in many cases are focal points of larger communities - have something to do with that. We all know that students come to our residence halls for far more than a roof over their heads and 3 meals a day. The role of a Post Secondary Institution is far greater then to simply provide housing for students, and I’ve come to learn the exact same is true in times of crisis. The same skills we use every day with our students - support, guidance, counseling, and leadership -- are exactly what is needed in an emergency like this one. Our field is full of helpful people, and “helpfulness” is contagious. I can say with certainty that from what I’ve seen, the University of Calgary’s team have done an exemplary job of truly leading by example. I have no doubt with people like this responding to the aftermath of the flood, Calgary -- and all of Southern Alberta -- will be Wild Rose Strong once again. 7

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NWACUHO Soundings

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Cadence Student Housing / Tucson, Arizona Capstone Development Partners

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The Soundings Spotlight will be an ongoing opportunity in each issue of the Soundings to highlight some of the new or unique projects being implemented in institutions across our region, beyond your Institutional Updates. We are looking for content spanning all functional areas of Housing Management and would love to hear more about the exciting things your institution is up to! If you would like to be part of the Soundings Spotlight, please email Karla Carreras (karlac@uvic.ca) for more information.

To Serve and To Learn

By Robin Copestake, The University of Victoria With Service Learning, Community-Based Learning being included on the George Kuh List of High Impact Educational Practices, institutions across North America have been working to include this in the services offered to their students (Kuh, 2008). The University of Victoria’s Residence Life and Education Department is no exception and launched their Community Service Learning Program in spring 2013 with Project Serve Day UVic. On March 16, UVic Residence Life and Education partnered with Volunteer Victoria for Project Serve Day, where 70 resident participants performed varied acts of service at six locations in the Greater Victoria Area. Acts of service were framed by pre- and post-reflection activities where groups discussed the impact of service, community, and values. The reflection activities were led by 7 facilitators who underwent over 6 hours of training in CSL, coordination of the day, and leading critical reflection. UVic’s model was based on the day of service programs offered by the University of Guelph and McMaster University. Learning objectives reflected the CAS standards for Service-Learning Programs and included (2012): • Critical and reflective thinking about their act(s) of service • Interpersonal reflection on the service and community both for this day and at large • Consideration of cultural and human differences; social responsibility; global perspective and sense of civic responsibility The program assessment was overwhelmingly positive with all respondents indicating that they would “recommend Project Serve Day UVic to a friend” and ninety-two percent of respondents agreeing that “the pre- and post-reflections helped [them] to think about the impact [their] actions can have on the community”. UVic Residence Life & Education was extremely lucky to partner with Volunteer Victoria, a local not for profit that coordinates volunteer opportunities for the entire Greater Victoria Area. In order to connect students to the community organizations and volunteer opportunities earlier in the academic year, UVic’s next Project Serve Day is planned for September 28th, 2013. Some of the exciting service opportunities this event includes are: program design and evaluation with Need2 Suicide Prevention, doing actives with residents at the Broadmead Care Center and assisting with the Fairfield Gonzales Community Association’s Fall Festival. The department’s expanded CSL efforts for the 2013-2014 academic year will also include an alternative reading break during both the November and February breaks. The University of Victoria’s Residence Life and Education is thrilled to be developing a Community Service Learning component to their program with the goal of building stronger communities by serving the community together. See “Soundings Spotlight” on page 20 for references and photos from this event. 9

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Reflections on ACUHO-I and ACE

An ACUHO-I Summer

Melissa Boles, University of Idaho It’s on my longest, most exhausting day that I collapse in a chair and think, “thank goodness I’m here.” It’s a weird thought to have, but it’s the one that comes to me. The conferences program here could have done just as well with an intern that wasn’t me, but would I have learned what I’m learning had I ended up at a different school? I knew I wanted to be at a campus like this one when I started the application process earlier this year. I wanted a state school in a bigger town than the one I was living in, with a job that would challenge me and help me grow. I’ll be honest; returning to the Pacific Northwest wasn’t exactly at the top of my list. Originally from Washington, I’ve spent the last year at a graduate program in North Carolina, and was intending on spending my summer in California or New England. When the University of Idaho offered me an interview, though, it seemed right, and when they offered me the position, I knew it was. I was supposed to be back in the Pacific Northwest and in the Palouse. I’ve met amazing people here, and been given opportunities I never thought I’d see. There have been challenges and hard moments, but thank goodness I ended up here. Would I be able to walk into my 2nd year of graduate school (and eventually my job application period) with the confidence I know I will had I not been here? I’ve been wanting to do an ACUHO-I internship since I graduated from undergrad in 2011. I have never been more excited than the day the internship applications opened, because I knew I was finally going to get an experience I’d been aching for. If you’re a graduate student, or you’re about to be, let me tell you this: apply for an ACUHO-I internship. I don’t know where you’ll end up, or what you’ll learn, but I do know that you’ll learn something. And I have a feeling you’ll end up exactly where you’re supposed to be. Melissa Boles is a graduate student in College Student Personnel at Western Carolina University. She is spending her summer as the Summer Conferences ACUHO-I intern at the University of Idaho. 10

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From the Northwest to the Midwest! NWACUHO Goes to ACUHO-I

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Erik Elordi, NWACUHO President-Elect

In June, the ACUHO-I Annual Conference & Exhibition (ACE) was hosted in Minneapolis, MN. Of the over 1,100 people in attendance, over 40 attendees came from NWACUHO affiliated institutions. While we were a small contingent, we made a significant impact on the conference. I was fortunate to represent NWACUHO at ACE; attending the Regional Presidents Meeting before the start of ACE, co-hosting our regional reception with AIMHO & WACUHO, and attending many sessions and networking opportunities for the region. The Regional Presidents Meeting comprises the presidents and presidents-elect from all the regions that makeup ACUHO-I nationally and internationally. It was an amazing opportunity to share the great work being done by NWACUHO and learn what other regions are currently working on. It was encouraging to see that many of the issues and concerns other regions are struggling with are either the same as NWACUHO, or ones that we’ve figured out over the last several years. Many regions are moving to use WordPress for their website, something we’ve been doing for years. The utilization of technology was a major theme of our discussion. Another major theme of our meeting and discussion was strategic and master planning. NWACUHO was asked to present on its master plan, how it was developed, how we’ve engaged membership in the process, and how we’re systematically moving through its implementation. The work being done by NWACUHO for our master plan has established us as a leader in this area and many other regions will be using our plan as a blueprint as they begin their own process. We had several great professionals representing NWACUHO during ACE in a variety of ways. Pam Schreiber from the University of Washington presented her and Cheryl Ewaldsen’s Best of the Northwest presentation, “Your Last 30 Days: Transitioning with Passion and Poise”. David Protheroe from University of Victoria was our NWACUHO New Professional Scholarship recipient. We had two participants from STARS College that were able to stay for the conference, Meghan Reiser from the University of Victoria and Holly Dysserinck from the University of British Columbia. The ACUHO-I Foundation sponsored a piggy bank war between all the regions during the conference. NWACUHO was teamed-up with WACUHO because we both had a smaller number of attendees from our regions. During our joint reception with WACUHO, we were able to raise $468 to add to the total we collected throughout the conference. A big thank you to Josh Gana at the University of Washington, Craig Whitton at the University of Alberta, Rich DeShields at Central Washington University, and Torry Bruce at University of the Pacific for providing matching donations during the regional social. Through a great team effort, we won the piggy bank war and the Foundation will be helping fund one of our future socials! There is a lot to be proud of in NWACUHO. We might be a small region, but we continually have shown we’re a national leader in the level of work we’re producing as an association and in the quality of professionals that call NWACUHO home. As always, if there is anything NWACUHO can do to support you and the work you’re doing, please let us know.

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NWACUHO Soundings

A New Professional at ACUHO-I

David Protheroe, University of Victoria ACUHO-I Conference New Professional Scholarship Winner Attending ACUHO-I for the first time as a new professional was an incredible experience for me. While I had been before, as an undergraduate at STARS college, this was a whole different ballgame. I wasn’t just attending sessions because I was curious, I was attending them because I was looking for specific knowledge to help me as a professional, and for new ideas to bring back to my institution. It was a change in perspective to be sure. As I looked at the various sessions offered, I quickly noticed that many of the ones I wanted to attend were all during the same time blocks. Distraught, I picked my favourites and resigned myself to missing out on the others. Imagine my delight when one presenter mentioned in passing that his presentation (and all the others) would be put online, on the ACUHO-I Online Library. A few weeks after the conference, I checked the library and was able to find several of the presentations that I had wanted to see. With more being constantly added, I look forward to being able to hop back and review these presentations anytime I want! For those of you were dying to go to the conference and had bemoaned the fact that you wouldn’t get to attend this session or that, I highly recommend that you check out some of the presentations that have been uploaded too. Of course, no conference is simply about workshops and powerpoints, and ACUHO-I’s speakers were fantastic this year. Our keynote speaker, Dr. John Medina, put me through a rollercoaster of emotion, speaking of revolutionizing the workplace by implementing mandatory naptime in offices (PREACH!) with one breath, and then installing treadmill-workstations (Come again?) in the next. Despite his mixed messaging, this molecular biologist shared a fantastic perspective on our brains operate. While I don’t have time to summarize more of his talk, his website www.brainrules.net does, and is definitely worth perusing. For anyone looking for a new personal development tool to use with students and staff alike, I watched Dr. R Kelly Crace introduce his Life Values Inventory at ACUHO-I. By identifying core values, and helping individuals find concrete methods of developing and living out these values, Crace’s LVI seeks to create resilient, fulfilled and confident people, young and old alike. I am planning on using this ongoing, interactive, tool with my staff members starting this fall, and I look forward to seeing the results. I would like to thank NWACUHO for providing me with the chance to attend this incredible conference, and also for encouraging me to share my experience with all of you. This association works incredibly hard to provide all of us with opportunities to learn from those around and continue to develop as professionals. The ACUHO-I conference is obviously much more than what I have described in the preceding paragraphs, with opportunities for networking, round table discussions which don’t have powerpoint presentations, and exhibits showcasing some of the incredible resources available to us as Housing Professionals. No one article could hope to cover the entire conference, so I have aimed to highlight some of the pieces that may be valuable to those who were not able to attend the conference. I hope that you follow at least one of the links I have included above, and that you enjoy some of what you may find, I certainly did. Enjoy the rest of this issue, as we gear up for staff training in the fall! 12

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CUBO Study Tour 2013

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Natasha Rogers Residence Life Coordinator, Mount Royal University I was recently privileged to attend the College and University Business Officers (CUBO) Study Tour from June 26 to July 3, 2013 in the United Kingdom. After reviewing the list of delegates I felt a small bit of apprehension as most of the individuals listed were far higher on the org chart than me. That said I was proven wrong almost immediately upon starting this incredible journey. I would whole heartedly recommend the study tour experience to any of my colleagues, no matter what stage of their career they are at. We can all learn from each other – from seasoned veteran to the new kid on the block. Excited, nervous and eager to learn as much as I could I headed to the United Kingdom ready to get started. During the tour our group of 14 international delegates travelled south across the UK, hosted along the way by the exceptional staff from 8 institutions. This was not only my first study tour but the first of its kind to be hosted by CUBO. The tour was the brain child of Director of Accommodation and Commercial Services at the University of Sheffield, Pat McGrath, who had previously attended similar tours in the United States, China and Australia. I believe I speak for everyone on the tour when I say our hosts, the team from the University of Sheffield (including Pat McGrath, Lisa Weatherall, David Mcknown, and Ian Jones), hit it out of the park! Our group of delegates, hailing from Canada, the United States, Germany and Australia, were welcomed first to the University of Edinburgh where our tour began. Staying in student accommodation, touring facilities and hearing from members of the various institutions gave us the opportunity to learn about the varied systems first hand. We were wined and dined with the best local fare that each institution had to offer, giving us a glimpse into the food offerings available to students. We were also able to hear about the developing systems related to student welfare, which varied from the use of Wardens to the creation of Residential Life Programs. Private funding partnerships and working within parameters set for heritage buildings provided fascinating challenges and opportunities that delegates enjoyed learning more about. We also heard about commercial services operations and took in the sights and sounds of unique retail, dining and other spaces on each campus. One highlight of the tour was a talk by Professor David Russell of the Russell partnership entitled “Feed the World.” Professor Russell gave a glimpse into the intricate plan created to deliver top notch food service leading up to and during the London 2012 Olympic Games. Forman’s Fish Island in London could not have been a better venue as we had a beautiful view of the Olympic Stadium. We also heard from Peter Russell who gave us in-depth information on the Russell Partnership’s STEMS e-induction system. The interest of many delegates was peaked not only for student arrivals but student staff training programs as well. (Continued on page 20- CUBO Study Tour) 13

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NWACUHO Soundings

Ways to Get Involved with NWACUHO: Be a Guest Blogger:

If you love reading the member-submitted articles in Soundings as much as we all do, then you will be excited for this next initiative. Starting in May, NWACUHO will be featuring a monthly Guest Blogger on our website, www. nwacuho.org. We are looking for guest bloggers right now, so if you are interested in contributing one or two blog posts for a month on a wide variety of topics in 2013 to share knowledge with your fellow members, contact: Brian Kerrick at bkerrick@uwb.edu.

Join a NWACUHO Taskforce!

NWACUHO Taskforces are in full swing! Coming out of the 2013 annual conference, members were enthusiastic and eager to being work on our four taskforces. This year, NWACUHO is proud to have four taskforces: Communications; New Professionals; Drive-In Conference and new this year, Professional Development. For more information about the outcomes of each taskforce, please visit http://nwacuho.org/task-forces/ Our taskforces are always encouraging new membership. If you are interested in getting involved with any of our taskforces, please email British Columbia Provincial Representative Lawrence Lam at laml@uvic.ca to sign up for a particular taskforce. We look forward to working with you and learning from your knowledge and experience! 14

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Walsh Construction Co. Building Smart • Building Green • Building Community www.walshconstructionco.com Located in Washington & Oregon Walsh Construction Co. is a general contractor specializing in student housing, academic facilities, affordable mixed-use and multi-unit housing. Renovation, historic preservation and high-end resorts round out the Walsh portfolio. University of Washington Nordheim Court

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Institutional Updates Washington Gonzaga University Gonzaga is in full swing this summer enjoying some time to do some planning and improvement in the department. With all staff on 12-month contracts and no turn-over, we have been able to do some great training in StrengthsQuest, teambuilding, and other departmental and divisional trainings. We have also been working hard to implement our new Community Development Model with all of its intricacies. We are looking forward to having RAs do 1-1s with their residents, turning in monthly reflective reports, getting residents involved in the greater community, and so much more. We are also in full swing planning our RA Training with a Candyland theme. RA Training: It’s a sweet adventure! We are looking forward to the creativity that will be brought to the training sessions, and perhaps a sugar headache on the side. Lastly, we are excited to invite 2 new Graduate RDs on the 1st of August. Maria Rivera and Drew Felton will be joining our Pro Staff team for their Graduate Studies! University of Puget Sound After 6 years of service, Kelly Ammendolia our NWACUHO President, is transitioning to a new role at the Evergreen State College. She will be missed, but we are excited to have her (and Jackson) so close by! After two years with us, RD Nolan Yaws has transitioned to a new role at Seattle University. We wish him well, and are excited to have SU alum James Spaan join our team as our new RD starting in July! Puget Sound is opening a new hall in August! We are excited to have this new addition to our housing as our 2-year live on requirement goes into full swing with all 2nd year students living on this fall. Commencement Hall is designed for juniors and seniors and is comprised of 10-12 person “houses,” five of which are academically based programs. We are looking forward to a great year ahead! Our Division of Student Affairs is working on a creating a process for measuring our division wide student learning outcomes to streamline the work of various departments. If you are interested in learning more, or have suggestions, please contact Jenni Chadick at jchadick@pugetsound.edu! Eastern Washington University Our Computer Engineering Sciences LLC, won a NASPA Gold award this Spring. Student Affairs has been awarded the Gold NASPA Excellence Award for Housing/Res Life. The award recognizes EWU’s success in developing a vibrant Computing and Engineering Sciences Living/Learning Community. We are also excited to announce the opening of a new 354- bed residence hall on our campus (see photo below). The building will open this fall and is the first new residence hall on our campus in some time.

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Pacific Lutheran University PLU’s Residential Life has many new developments for 2013-14. We are welcoming four new staff members: • Melissa Williams – Resident Director for Harstad Hall • Dan Hammerquist – Resident Director for Tingelstad Hall • Ginny Cooper – Senior Office Assistant • Jes Takla – Director of Residential Programs This year, we have two new learning communities on-campus, including the Kreidler Community (for upper division non-traditional, veteran, and commuter students) and Gender Neutral Housing. We are continuing into our second year with the new First Year First Generation community after a successful pilot year in 2012-13. We also have several projects underway to improve sustainability and update our facilities. As of summer 2013, all residence halls will have “military shower stops” and improved water aerators. Several halls are receiving upgraded lighting to increase electrical savings. Stuen Hall will be upgraded this year, including seismic renovations.

Oregon Willamette University After several years of a fair amount of turnover, we are excited to have a fully returning staff for 20132014! We will be training our Community Mentors in Bystander Intervention using the Green Dot philosophy. We will also be enhancing our alcohol intervention training. Additionally, we will be enhancing our use of social media during training. Last year, we utilized Twitter during training and will be introducing the use of blogging as well as other tools. Residence Life has been offering a number of training opportunities for the campus at large this summer. Jason Kilmer trained over 20 members of the Willamette community on Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention of College Students (B.A.S.I.C.S.) in May. Willamette is partnering with Western Oregon University to introduce bystander intervention to campus. 40 staff members from WU & WOU will be trained as Instructors after a 4-day intensive training on Willamette’s campus. Finally, Willamette will be hosting a 2-day Title IX Investigator Training put on by the Association of Title IX Administrators (ATIXA). A number of NWACUHO institutions will be participating in the training. Pacific University This year Residence Life decided once again to bring in a summer intern, and we were lucky enough to get funding for two! Katelyn DePasquale (myself) and Tyler Ivory are the summer ACUHO-I interns, both entering their second years in higher education programs. Tyler attends Valdosta State University in Valdosta, GA, and I am attending Canisius College in Buffalo, NY. Since neither one of us has worked in residence life before, this is proving to be a valuable experience and stepping stone in both of our young careers. Tyler and I have been tasked with learning and developing protocol to assist with the move from paper processing to digital format, developing online RA training and assessment tools, researching for new initiatives, and much more. Pacific University is proud to announce the approval of construction for a new residence hall, which should be open by Fall 2014! With enrollment on the climb, we are preparing our campus for a major increase in residential students, and this new two-structure residence hall will hold upwards of 400 students. Upon completion of this project, we will be saying goodbye to one of our older buildings, Clark Hall, which has served as a freshman/ sophomore hall. In the meantime, we are in the process of remodeling Walter Hall, which includes removing built in furniture and putting in new flooring. More updates to come!

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Institutional Updates University of Oregon The University of Oregon welcomes several new staff members: New Facilities Services Director- Gus Lim; New Facilities Services Manager- Gordon Burke; New Facilities Services Manager- Mike Aguilera; New Marketing Manager- Lauren Miller; New Assistant Director of Residence Life- Heather Kropf; New Assistant Director of Residence Life- Silvina Sousa-Ransford; New Food Service Manager-Benjamin Wilkinson Our Food Service department received honorable mention for the NACUFS Loyal Horton Award competition in the area of Retail Sales and Multiple Concepts/Marketplace for large schools. We had a tunnel fire on winter term opening day which caused several buildings on campus temporarily close and left many residence halls without power. Housing had to provide lighting assistance and additional campus safety officer presence that night for approximately 3,000 students impacted by this outage. Southern Oregon University For the second year in a row, we are having no staffing changes! We’re happy all of our full-time staff will be returning to SOU. However, with the opening of two new residence halls and a dining center, we are in the process of shifting some responsibilities around among the current staff. We’re close to completing construction on the project we’ve been calling the North Campus Village. In the next few weeks, we will be rolling out the official names of the buildings! The project which encompasses two buildings with 700 beds and a dining center is over 223,000 sq ft and will be turned over to the University on Sept 2 with new student move-in scheduled for Sept 26. In addition to new construction, we’re currently in the middle of renovating the lobby of one of our older buildings, Greensprings. The lobby remodel will allow for a new housing front desk, mail room, and administrative offices for staff.

British Columbia University of Victoria We are excited to welcome Colleen Lewis to UVic for a 1 year assignment as Manager, Residence Life & Education covering Chelsey Evans’ maternity leave. Colleen started with us at the beginning of July. After the retirement of Claire Riddell (Manager, Accommodation & Administration), Dalia Gonzalez and Daphne Andrews’ portfolios have shifted to ‘Business Operations’ and ‘Conference & Customer Service’ respectively. Our student staff August Training program has now incorporated a half day of Community Service Learning. We are proud to be partnering with the municipality of Saanich for our service work. Our Residence Life & Education Leadership Team is currently completing Insights workshop to deepen our understanding of each other and selves. Very interesting and worthwhile so far! We are also developing a brand new Community Living Guide for all residents. It will be an orientation and resource guide to students living in our community. Construction and renovations to our new Programming Resource Centre, Health & Wellness Centre, and Academic Resource Centre are well under way! Collectively the centres will be known as “The Hub” and will be in the lower level of our Lansdowne complex. In line with our sustainability commitments, we are near completion to transitioning out our garbage chutes and implementing eco-friendly sorting stations. University of the Fraser Valley Coordinator of Housing and Residence Life Tracey Mason-Innes will be on an educational leave until midSeptember 2013. Upon her return she will be filling in for the Manager of Student Life who leaves for her own educational leave until mid-January 2013. Tracey will then return to Residence Services at this time. Filling the role of Acting Coordinator of Housing and Residence Life is Kathryn Garcia. Kathryn (Kathryn.Garcia@ufv.ca) is no stranger to Residence Services having worked as a Housing Assistant in the department over three years ago. 18

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Alberta Grant MacEwan University Grant MacEwan University will be undergoing a rebranding to “MacEwan University”. The new logo and marketing materials will be unveiled on August 26th. Clint Galloway, Manager of Residence Services at Grant MacEwan, was the recipient of the Service Award by Grant MacEwan University, in recognition of his ongoing contributions to student life. Lakeland College Lakeland College is redoing their bedrooms to a card access system at their Llyodminster campus. They are also celebrating their centennial this year. To recognize this event, they are having a virtual “mattress dominoes”. This will start at their Vermillion campus, and when the last domino falls there, they start in Lloydminster. They are hoping for about 600 dominoes and will record the event to share with the membership. Judy Eiben is the incoming president for the Residence Life Professionals Association. Medicine Hat College Due to the flooding of the South Saskatchewan River (fed by the Bow and Elbow which impacted Calgary and surrounding areas), Medicine Hat College is one of our association’s institutions that are helping house evacuees for longer term stays. On the night of the evacuation they made arrangements for 88 but have 8 families staying on until August. Mount Royal University Mount Royal is another of our Southern Alberta institutions whose tireless work has helped significantly since the flooding began. Initially they had about 300 people staying in residence on and off and as a result they had to rapidly shift their operation to accommodate things, like moving to a 24 hour desk. Their team worked around the clock, with volunteers and evacuees coming and going. There are still a number of people remaining. Additionaly, Mount Royal was the site of a provincial operation to assist those people applying for emergency funding. Olds College Alison Guthrie retired, and Christina Kelley is the new housing officer. They have a new housing operation in the works but nothing totally finalized just yet (but hopefully will be soon). Old College is also housing a number of evacuees from Calgary. with the Red Cross is assisting. There are more evacuees potentially coming in. Like Lakeland College, OIds College is celebrating their Centennial this year with a number of fun events. Red Deer College Typical Summer Upgrades and operations; Initially they were on standby to house evacuees but that proved to be unnecessary. Tim Siemens was the recipient of the Association of Canadian Community Colleges Silver Award in Staff Excellence. This prestigious national Award honours an individual staff member who has made an exceptional contribution within the institution and within the community. University of Alberta The University of Alberta welcomes Michael Frasier to their team. He will be the Residence Coordinator of two new buildings, Pinecrest and Tamarack, slated to open in August with 240 beds total, as well as the University’s East Campus Village. The University has doubled the number of RAs for their traditional communities and has added an additional layer of Senior RAs to help with the administration of a much larger team. Restorative Justice continues to be implemented and used throughout the residence system. 19

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Soundings Spotlight (ctd. from page 9):

70 participants from the University of Victoria came to help on Project Serve Day. References used in this article are below.

Council for the Advancement of Standards in Higher Education (2012). CAS professional standards for higher education (8th ed.). Washington, DC: Author. Kuh, G. (2008). High-impact educational practices: What they are, who has access to them, and why they matter. Washington, DC: Association of American Colleges and Universities.

CUBO Study Tour (ctd from page 13):

Learning happened throughout our time in the UK, not only while visiting the various institutions but during social time and countless conversations on our coach journey from Edinburgh to London. The study tour provided a unique opportunity for us to network with colleagues from around the globe. A key part of the program was the opportunity to participate in a number of social events including a visit to the iconic Cavern Club in Liverpool, Chatsworth – the home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, and the beautifully historic city of Durham. There were also free afternoons in Edinburgh and London where delegates took the opportunity to do everything from shopping to visiting historic sites and taking in a show. Institutions visited included the University of Edinburgh, Queen Margaret University, University of York, University of Sheffield, University of Liverpool, St Edmund Hall College (Oxford), University of Greenwich and Imperial College London. I can’t thank our hosts enough for their hospitality and willingness to answer our seemingly limitless questions! Upon conclusion of the tour some delegates were also able to attend the CUBO Summer Conference and continue networking with colleagues from around the UK. The study tour was truly an exceptional experience and one that I hope to take advantage of again in the future. I could go on for pages about all of the wonderful aspects of the tour but I think it is best if I finish my story here. If you would like to hear more about the CUBO 2013 Study Tour feel free to contact me at nrogers@mtroyal.ca. 20

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NWACUHO Executive Board Elections Are you looking for your next professional development opportunity? Do you want to become more involved with NWACUHO? I would like to encourage and invite members to consider running for office in the upcoming annual election this fall. The positions that will be available are president-elect, secretary, products and services coordinator, and Washington and British Columbia representatives. In addition to positional responsibilities, board members meet monthly, including a monthly conference call and in-person meetings in February, May, and October. Brief job descriptions are available on NWACUHO’s web site at www. nwacuho.org/ about-nwacuho/executive-board. If there is someone that you think may be a great candidate, please let me know and I would be happy to contact him/her. Look for more information on our website, via email, and in the Soundings in the months to come! Feel free to contact any current board members with questions. - Elaine Ames, NWACUHO Past President DO you Don’t

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NWACUHO Soundings

BaseCamp- University of Alberta University of Alberta Residence Services is implementing a new orientation program called BaseCamp for first year students living in Residence Saint-Jean and Lister residences beginning in August 2013. BaseCamp provides students with a week-long orientation to familiarize themselves with their new community. The approximate 1300 participants will have additional opportunities to develop connections with their peers and be involved in the greater Edmonton community. The academic components will provide first year students with an introduction to higher education, to the resources offered at the University of Alberta, and to enhanced academic success strategies. The BaseCamp program aims to ensure student success by allowing the opportunity for residents to establish a peer support network and familiarize themselves with campus resources prior to the beginning of classes. Program Outline: 1. August 25 - 27: Residence Orientation to introduce students to their new community, and establish relationships with peers. 2. August 28 - 29: University Orientation to provide students with enhanced academic success strategies and an understanding of campus resources and how these resources can contribute to their university experience. 3. August 30: Day of Service to encourage positive relationships with the Edmonton community and work with their peers to accomplish a common goal. We will be partnering with Edmonton Community Leagues, Capital City CleanUp and the University’s Facilities and Operations. o The Day of Service will be capped by a BBQ to thank participants for their involvement and have guest speakers welcoming students to the university and the city of Edmonton For questions or more information please contact Caitlin McLeod at caitlin.mcleod@ualberta.ca tel:780-492-9800 or visit our webpage at bit.ly/UAlbertaBaseCamp

Getting Beyond Metal Keys -the “Budget-Friendly� Way Mark Allen, Kaba Access and Data Systems Most experienced housing managers understand the frustration, risks and liability associated with managing metal keys, as well as the benefits of an electronic keycard system. However, many are still using mechanical keys and cylinders because they believe migrating to an electronic solution is cost-prohibitive. While there are keycard systems that cost a few thousand dollars per door, there are also solutions that can be implemented that rival the cost of mechanical key systems over time. These lower priced electronic systems also provide a variety of benefits to management that surpass mechanical keys. Liability of Mechanical keys Although mechanical keys may appear to be a low cost solution, they actually generate a variety of risks, liability and ongoing costs. Additionally, keys are inconvenient and frustrating to manage compared to electronic alternatives. The risks include everything that can happen if a key is lost, stole, or copied (theft, assault, vandalism, etc.). The potential liability if someone is injured or killed is not calculable, especially if proper key management protocols were not followed. This is why the hotel industry moved away from metal keys many years ago. The hidden costs are all those expenditures beyond the initial material expense of the keys and cylinders. This includes the labor allocation for rekeying, exchanging, hunting, organizing, tracking, and managing keys. For example, a lost master key creates a significant expense to remedy. 22

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While an electronic keycard can also be lost, it can be easily cancelled without having to do any maintenance at the door. It’s no big deal if the card is not found. Electronic keycards are easily programmed and re-programmed, as opposed to cutting and exchanging new keys/cylinders. Rekeying after a security breach, or exposed risk is significantly more expensive than when using an electronic keycard system. It is also more time consuming and frustrating for property management. As parents become more educated about security, some may refuse to allow their children to stay in a dormitory without electronic access control. Likewise, it is imperative that housing communities don’t take shortcuts when rekeying is required. This is a huge liability risk. Nobody wants to be audited after a crisis event, and have to explain not doing the right thing. Cost-Effective Alternatives The most practical alternative to mechanical keys is a card access system. However, the important thing to recognize is that it does not have to be an expensive system to serve you effectively. The more expensive systems may integrate vending, meal plans, laundry, etc. all on the same card. However, campuses that are still using metal keys can take a big step to mitigate risk and liability, while also gaining other conveniences, without going to the higher price systems. In many instances, housing managers appreciate keeping their system separate from the rest of the campus. Electronic KeyCard Benefits An electronic keycard system provides a variety of conveniences for students and management. Access privileges can be modified without leaving the desk. Management has much more flexibility to control access for staff and students as desired, as there is no mechanical hierarchy that has to be followed like in a mechanical key system. Lost cards can be cancelled without having to incur additional expense, or issue new credentials to anyone else. Changes and modifications are accomplished in seconds at basically no costs, rather than hours or days. While mechanical locks do not record when the lock has been accessed, electronic systems keep a record of whose credential was used to open a door and when. This can be helpful to resolve theft claims, manage maintenance personnel, etc. RFID Card Access There are different types of card access systems including magnetic stripe cards, proximity cards, and smart cards. Magnetic stripe cards are typically the least expensive. The newest card access systems use RFID (radio frequency identification) smart cards. These cards have a higher level of security, and programming privileges are written to the card at a centralized location. The cards are more durable than magnetic stripe cards, as there is nothing to get demagnetized or scratched. In addition, the readers are more durable, as due to RFID technology, nothing has to be inserted so the reader is sealed from the elements or vandals. Funding Justification When all costs of managing metal keys are considered, as well as the risks and liability, the transition to a card access system makes good financial sense. While the fully integrated systems may be out of reach, there are reasonably priced alternatives. When all expenses for mechanical keys are captured over a 5-10 year period, an electronic keycard system becomes easily justifiable. And, life gets easier for housing managers. Many charge students a lost card fee of $25-$100. This encourages responsibility while also helping to fund the more secure system. About the Author: Mark Allen has worked for Kaba Access and Data Systems for over 10 years. He specializes in designing cost-effective keycard solutions for campus applications. He can be reached at 336-725-1331 x 1350 or 23

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NWACUHO Soundings

Living the Learning: It Starts with TLC Jessica Takla, Pacific Lutheran University

The number of Themed Learning Communities (TLCs) has increased on U.S. college and university campuses, especially in the past twenty years. This growth is supported by numerous studies in the field of higher education indicating the positive effects these communities (both formal Living Learning Communities [LLCs] and TLCs) have on college outcomes . Zhao and Kuh (2004) found strong empirical evidence of the direct impact that learning communities have on student outcomes by integrating “diverse academic and social activities into a meaningful whole … to convert the experiences into authentic learning” (pp. 116-7). Similarly, in a study comparing learning community participants to students in a traditional residence hall (TRH), Inkelas, Vogt, Longerbeam, Owen, and Johnson (2006) found, LLC “students were statistically more likely than TRH students to feel competent in their critical thinking skills, application of knowledge abilities, growth in liberal learning, and academic self-confidence” (p. 64). Results of numerous studies have indicated that learning community students are more likely than students living in traditional residence halls to have closer faculty/peer relationships, be more involved, and experience greater academic achievement across institutional types. In a study examining three different institutions, Tinto (2000) found that learning communities had a positive academic and social impact regardless of institutional type. Stassen (2003) inferred that, particularly at large institutions where learning is highly individualistic and residential communities may be large and potentially alienating, learning communities can serve an important function in creating an integrated academic community. While many campuses have established robust Living Learning Community (LLC) structures, other institutions are in the earlier stages of development and may just be introducing new Themed Learning Communities (TLCs) as residential living options. TLCs are a great way to lay the foundation towards more formal learning communities while continuing the learning outside of the classroom. Mac Kinnon (2006) found, “students in the TLCs performed significantly better academically (as measured by fall-semester cumulative GPAs) than nonparticipants” (p. 4). Pacific Lutheran University (PLU) has a variety of LLCs and TLCs on-campus in various stages of development. Given the success of its inaugural LLC, Hong International Hall [HIH] established in 2004, PLU has sought to expand the LLC and TLC opportunities on campus. PLU’s Residential Life department has grown seven new communities since 2007, including Social Action & Leadership (SAL), First Year Wings, Hinderlie Community for Creative Expression (HCCE), Harstad Women’s Empowerment Community, First Year First Generation Community, and new this year, the Kreidler Community (for upper division non-traditional, veteran, and commuter students) and Gender Neutral Housing. These communities all began as TLCs (themed wings or buildings) which emerged and grew from student interest and in response to various needs identified on campus.

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Identifying Themed Learning Communities Developing successful TLCs begins by building stakeholder buy-in through collaboration. An integral initial step is assessing the needs of one’s campus community, which can be done in a variety of ways including reviewing admission and persistence trends, conducting focus groups and/or surveys with current students, and collaborating with campus partners to identify emerging themes. Sometimes student affairs professionals may be the individuals recognizing the trend and need for a community (e.g., for PLU’s First Year First Generation community, Resident Director Joe Kowalczyk worked with campus partners to identify PLU trends and research student affairs best practices to support this growing population). Other times, the drive for the community may come directly from the students (e.g., PLU’s new Gender Neutral Housing opening Fall 2013 grew out of a collaborative petition from the Associated Students of PLU [ASPLU] and Residence Hall Association [RHA], supported by Residential Life). Partnering Across Campus to Gain Institutional Support Once a TLC is identified, building institutional support through reaching out to and collaborating with institutional partners is key in creating a foundation for success. For example, PLU’s Social Action and Leadership (SAL) community was grown in partnership with the Diversity Center in 2007. Since that time, the Resident Directors and Resident Assistants have reached out to faculty from a diverse array of fields, as well as staff from PLU Sustainability and the Center for Community Engagement and Service, to identify partnerships to strengthen the community. Similarly, the emerging Kreidler Community for 2013-14 is a joint endeavor with Student Involvement and Leadership to strengthen programming and resources for non-traditional, transfer, veteran, and commuter students. Harstad Women’s Empowerment Community also has forged partnerships with PLU’s Women’s Center and the Women’s and Gender Studies Program. Identifying key collaborators from other student affairs and academic departments through intentional outreach, often times beginning with programming, can help grow TLCs and move toward development of a shared co-curricular plan. Develop Learning Outcomes, Assess, Document, Repeat The first step in co-curricular planning is developing Learning Outcomes (LOs) that guide programmatic structure, initiatives, and activities. Formal assessment questions should mirror these LOs to guide TLC growth and improvement. Whether conducting a pre- and post-test of community participants, focus groups during the year, or quick snapshot assessments through paper surveys at programs, understanding the impact of programming and other co-curricular endeavors is important to the ongoing development of the community. Intentional documentation of the TLC (i.e., photography, video, and/or artifacts from events, programs, etc.) is integral to complement data reports to share successes as well as provide content for future marketing of the community to prospective, incoming, and continuing students. In conclusion, Themed Learning Communities (and their further development into formal LLCs) have been shown to augment the educational experience and provide significant learning opportunities outside of the classroom. Developing TLCs on your campus could be the foundation toward building (or enhancing) a robust cocurricular structure to support students living their learning beyond the classroom. Please contact Jessica Takla at jes.takla@plu.edu for article References. 25

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A Change is Gonna Come... A Look at New Residence Hall Construction Ponderosa Commons – opening September 1, 2013 The University of British Columbia is excited to be opening its first “hub”, Ponderosa Commons. This new residence building reflects UBC’s vision to create vibrant centres where the campus community can meet, study, work, eat and students can live and learn. The first phase will be home to approximately 600 students as well as house a restaurant, collegium for commuter students, an end of trip facility, an athletic space, classrooms and faculty Pictured above: Ponderosa Commons, phase 1: The architect’s rendering offices. of Ponderosa Commons, phase 1, including Maple and Arbutus Houses. Ponderosa Commons will open its doors to residents on September 1st. Two of the three houses will be ready at that time to welcome 200 residents to Maple House and 250 students to its towering neighbor, Arbutus. Already known affectionately as “The Pond”, this residence consists of 50% studio apartments, 25% two-bedroom apartments and 25% four-bedroom apartments. All units come fully furnished and include features such as a microwave, dishwasher and full size fridge. Every floor has an informal learning space where residents can Pictured above: Ponderosa kitchen: David Kiloh, Director Facilities study with their neighbours. and Building Services demonstrates the features in a studio apartment As a year-round student residence, kitchen. similar in style to Marine Drive residence, Ponderosa Commons is well suited to upper-year and graduate students. We have hired 4 Residence Advisors and 1 Senior Advisor for this first phase of the residence. 26

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Ponderosa Commons, ctd. Ponderosa Commons has been built with various green features. A panel cladding system of concrete exterior layer, foam insulation layer and concrete interior layer (a “sweater”) envelopes the entire building providing continuous insulation. The windows have been fit with position sensors, to help residents conserve heat. When a window is open, the heat cannot be turned on, reducing wasted energy escaping from the room. All water fixtures, in kitchen and bathroom faucets, toilets and showers are low flow to help residents lower their water consumption. Lastly, each unit is supplied with a green and recyclable waste bin. Solid waste sorting rooms will be available in the building. Here, residents can sort solid waste into green waste, recyclables and electronic waste to improve waste diversion from landfill.

North Campus VillageOpening Fall 2013 Southern Oregon University is close to completing construction on the project we’ve been calling the North Campus Village. In the next few weeks, we will be rolling out the official names of the buildings! The project which encompasses two buildings with 700 beds and a dining center is over 223,000 sq ft and will be turned over to the University on Sept 2 with new student move-in scheduled for Sept 26.

Pictured above: North Campus Village Courtyard at SOU In addition to new construction, we’re currently in the middle of renovating the lobby of one of our older buildings, Greensprings. The lobby remodel will allow for a new housing front desk, mail room, and administrative offices for staff. Pictured left: North Campus VIllage Dining Commons at SOU

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Done reading the Soundings? Pass it on! Please share the Soundings with the rest of your colleagues on campus. A digital copy can be found at www.nwacuho.org

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Summer 2013 Soundings  

The Summer 2013 Edition of the NWACUHO Soundings.

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