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the soundings the official nwacuho newsletter

northwest association of college and university housing officers

Highlighted in this edition: President’s Annual Report for 2013 New Professionals and Financial Wellness Photos from the Edmonton Conference (cover photo)


board of directors President Erik T. Elordi Assistant Director of University Housing Southern Oregon University 1250 Siskiyou Blvd. Ashland, OR 97520 541.552.6229 elordie@sou.edu President Elect Kathryn Magura Assistant Director, Operations Oregon State University University Housing & Dining Services 102 Buxton Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-1317 541.707.3678 kathryn.magura@oregonstate. edu Past President Kelly Ammendolia Assistant Director for Residential Life The Evergreen State College Residential & Dining Services 2700 Evergreen Pkwy Olympia, WA 98505 360.867.6191 ammendok@evergreen.edu

Treasurer David Akana Assistant Director for Residential Education Oregon State University University Housing & Dining Services 102 Buxton Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-1317 541.737.9965 david.akana@oregonstate.edu Secretary Jenni Chadick Assistant Director of Residence Life University of Puget Sound 1500 N. Warner St. #1003 Tacoma, WA 98416-1003 253.879.3317 jchadick@pugetsound.edu Newsletter Editor Rachel Rasmussen Residence Director Gonzaga University 502 East Boone, MSC 2515 Spokane, Washington 99258 509.313.4648 rasmussenr2@gonzaga.edu

Technology Director Brian Kerrick Housing Operations Manager University of Washington, Bothell Box 358525 18115 Campus Way NE Bothell, WA 98011-8246 425.352.5215 bkerrick@uwb.edu Products and Services Coordinator Esther Gaines Area Coordinator Gonzaga University 502 East Boone, MSC 2515 Spokane, Washington 99258 509.313.4155 gaines@gonzaga.edu Alberta Representative Craig Whitton Residence Coordinator University of Alberta 1-044 Lister Centre Edmonton, AB Canada T6G 2H6 780.492.9495 craig.whitton@ualberta.ca

British Columbia Representative Lawrence Lam Coordinator, Community Development & Student Leadership University of Victoria. PO Box 1700 STN CSC Victoria BC V8W 2Y2 250.853.3136 laml@uvic.ca Washington State Representative Michelle Primley Benton Administrator for North Campus/Diversity Initiatives University of Washington Housing & Food Services 206.543.4862 mprimley@hfs.washington.edu

Oregon Representative Dawn Snyder Assistant Director, Operations Oregon State University University Housing & Dining Services 102 Buxton Hall Corvallis, OR 97331-1317 .541.737.3231 dawn.snyder@oregonstate.edu Alaska-Yukon Representative Leslie Byrd Residence Life Coordinator Kenai Peninsula College 949 E. Poppy Lane Soldotna, AK 99669 907.262.0253 lbyrd4@kpc.alaska.edu


the soundings the official nwacuho newsletter

northwest association of college and university housing officers

Confessions from a Former Res Lifer

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Show Me the Money! New Professionals and Financial Wellness

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Annual President’s Report 2013

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A Look Back at Edmonton

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Also in this edition of the Soundings: First Impressions on Move In Day (p. 6), Women in Housing Network (p.9), Welcome to Our New Board Members (p. 16)

the soundings the official NWACUHO newsletters editorial and submission policies Deadlines for publications are based on distribution needs, and therefore it is important that members honor the established deadlines. Material not received on time, or not used due to space limitations will be considered for use in the next issue. Because soundings is the official publication of an educational association and reflects the professional standards of its members, necessary revisions will be made to ensure publication quality. soundings also reserves the right to edit submissions for space requirements. Authors bear full responsibility for references, quotations, and data accuracy of publications submissions. Authors also hold NWACUHO harmless from any liability resulting from publications of articles submitted for printing.   Be sure to clearly indicate the author(s) and institution(s) on all submissions. Permission is granted to reproduce portions of soundings’ contents with proper attribution and credit to soundings.   Advertisements in the soundings should not be considered an endorsement. For information on exhibitor advertising rates please contact: Esther Gaines, Product & Services Coordinator at gaines@gonzaga.edu or 509-313-4155. Please send all submissions (articles, letters to the association, updates from around the region, and announcements) to: Rachel Rasmussen, soundings editor at newsletter@nwacuho.org. **Please attach articles using MS word document or type the submission into an email.


NWACUHO Soundings

Built for residence life.

164 Needham Street

Lindsay, ON, Canada

K9V 5R7

www.holsag.com

1-888-745-0721

Contract Seating 4

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Walsh Construction Co.

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Building Smart • Building Green • Building Community www.walshconstructionco.com Located in Washington & Oregon Walsh Construction Co. is a general contractor specializing in student housing, academic facilities, affordable mixed-use and multi-unit housing. Renovation, historic preservation and high-end resorts round out the Walsh portfolio. University of Washington Nordheim Court

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First Impressions on Move-In Day Ron van der Veen, NAC Architecture

Last month I said goodbye to my first son going off to college. On top of the tears, the memories, the fright that he doesn’t really know how to live on his own, I finally got to experience student housing from a “buyers” standpoint. I have an intimate history with student housing. I spent 5 years in the dormitories at the University of Oregon before becoming an architect that has specialized in student housing for the last 2 decades. I’ve worked on campuses around the country and just about every type of student housing design one can imagine. But there is something different about finally getting to be the client. Sure, my son is the one actually living in his new environment but I am paying for most of it and was active in his housing choices. (I actually designed a project on his campus that he didn’t make his first choice!). Until the time we arrived on campus it never really occurred to me how important first impressions were to give students and parents a sense of welcoming and safe-keeping. We actually entered from the “back” of our son’s new housing complex and met up with numerous families lost and confused about what to do next. All of the official campus guides and move in helpers were at the front of the building. In the confusion we unpacked the car and then packed it back up twice. At the same time my son started walking around the building trying to find out how to start the check in process. Still no campus help. He finally saw a long line and decided to get in it and this eventually led to key distribution. In the mean time, my wife and I started driving around until we found a student housing representative. That is when our experience began to improve. We were put on a call list and given direction as to where to drop off our son’s boxes. There we were met by an army of cheerful student movers more than eager to get his stuff up to his 6th floor dorm room. This was all done very efficiently without the use of the elevators. I can’t imagine how tired they must have been by the end of the day. Even with this experience I was hoping for a bit more hospitality from the dorm complex: maybe a cup of coffee and refreshments from the haul, a place to grab a school tee shirt or car sticker, a meet and greet from the RA’s, something to say we appreciate the big check you just wrote us. After getting my son’s belongings his roommate soon arrived and the unpacking began. The biggest hurdle to getting the room in order was constructing the loft beds. This was made tougher by the lack of tools available at the front desk. Our wait was at least an hour. It would have been easy to have gone to the nearest hardware store and bought 20 more wrenches for less than $50. In one last gesture of benevolence to my son we took several of his friends out to lunch nearby the campus. Wouldn’t it have been great if we were all offered a lunch in the cafeteria before heading home so we could get an idea of the food choices he could expect. Now I consider myself the anti “helicopter” parent, but again, I was hoping for some point of contact with a student housing representative to assure me my son would survive without his mom and dad. Well, despite the awkward start to his college life experience he seems to being doing quite well, as evidenced by the lack of communication to his parents this last month. He hasn’t even asked for money!

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When I was first unloading my boxes freshman year at the University of Oregon in 1976 the student housing experience was no frills. It was more like “take it or leave it”. We all know how different the experience is today. The high cost of my son’s education has made me much more keenly aware of the value of his living experience. I want to get my money’s worth. And those first impressions on move in day say a lot to me about what I am paying for. Ron van der Veen is a principal with NAC|Architecture and leads their higher education work in the Seattle office. He has a long time passion for student housing, having completed projects around the country for the last 20 years. NAC|Architecture is a design firm that focuses on education and has offices in Seattle, Spokane, Los Angeles and Denver.

Confessions of a Former Res Lifer Lauren Boyd Adams

“Why’d you move to facilities?” is a question I’m commonly asked. A question most commonly asked by a Residence Life professional. There’s no sarcasm or judgment attached to the question. A sincere, earnest professional poses this question to me out of intrigue…and maybe slight suspicion. As a former Res Lifer my standard answer is, “Because you can fix things, but you can’t fix people.” The majority of Residence Life professionals understand immediately as flashes of judicial meetings, roommate conflict mediations gone wrong or conversations with difficult staff members come to mind. They laugh or smile and the conversation topic changes. I’ve realized that I need to be more thoughtful in my response to that question – Why’d you move to facilities? – Because why I transitioned from Residential Life to Facilities Services has very little to do with a desire to fix things. Housing and Facilities Services is so much more than fixing things. As I learned more about facilities professionals and the jobs they perform I found them, both the people and the things those people do, in line with what I value: creating and supporting living and working spaces for students and staff that are functional, clean, welcoming, and, well, pretty; customer service that includes follow-through and follow-up; advocating for the needs of students and staff; fostering relationships with constituents beyond the boundaries of one department; greater understanding of the “big picture” of my department; and constant learning of best practices (mostly from colleagues) to do my job better. As I’ve started to settle into my Facilities position over the past few months, I’ve learned that you can take the girl out of Res Life, but you can’t take Res Life out of the girl. The passion I had for building a student staff team and ensuring that we were all on the same page to build community now manifests itself in how I communicate with multiple vendors and support shops to get us all on the same page to complete building punchlists. That useful skill of understanding the importance of different learning and communication types serves me well as I interact daily with multi-generational, multi-lingual colleagues, staff and students. And, I can still use all of those love-tohate catch phrases like “challenge and support” and “meet them where they’re at” over in facilities, too. The transition from Residence Life to Facilities Services has been easier than I expected. The gap, the divide, whatever you’d like to call it between being a Residence Life professional and a Facilities professional isn’t as wide as one would think. Helping others is at the heart of what both professional groups do daily. As a professional who has worked on both sides I’m reminded of what the father in My Big Fat Greek Wedding said to his family and new in-laws, “…so, OK, you have apples and oranges…they may both be different, but they still all fruit.” 77

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Show Me the Money! New Professionals & Financial Wellness NWACUHO New Professional Task Force

As housing professionals, we know living on campus can be both a blessing and a curse. The financial benefits can be truly great – but how many new professionals take full advantage? When we first start out, sometimes we lose sight of the opportunities we have to prepare for our future. We deserve to treat ourselves once in a while – especially after living on a student budget – but the key is to be realistic. Whether housing is a taxable benefit or you make a small “rent” payment each month, living-in can mean that your expenses are either significantly decreased or non-existent. This presents us with a unique opportunity that our peers in other industries don’t have. Not having traditional rent payments is an obvious perk, but don’t forget about some of the other benefits that will help you stay financially well, especially when you decide to move on and move out! We came up with a few thoughts to get the finance wheels turning… - Include your meal plan (if you have one) as part of your monthly food budget. Use it wisely as eating off campus can be a significant portion of some people’s budgets. - If your vehicle is not necessary, save money and sell your car.. Why spend money on parking, insurance, car payments and gas if your commute involves a short walk across campus or even within the same building? - If you are paying into a pension fund or another retirement option with your institution, learn more about what it really means and what happens to those contributions if you move on. Consider putting money into RRSPs, 403Bs, 401ks, or the retirement option your institution offers while you have fewer expenses. Putting money away as early as possible is helpful in starting the accruement of interest in your favor. - Create a repayment plan for your student loans (if you have them) – there are people on campus who deal with loans every day – leverage their experience if you can! Some institutions offer money management as part of their employee benefit/wellness plans, use it! It is likely free or at very little cost to you. As stated above, the key is to get interest to work for you instead of against you. By paying off your student loans early, you will be paying less money overall on your student loans. Once you pay off a loan early, you’ll be rid of that pesky monthly payment! So what do the seasoned pros say about taking advantage of living in? We posed the question “When I lived on campus I wish I had...” to some of our senior level colleagues and these are their responses: “I wish I had started a “furnish my own apartment” fund and made small but regular contributions, so that when I moved out - remember opportunity can present at unexpected, unplanned, and inconvenient times -, I would have had funds to begin to furnish my apartment. It takes more money than one thinks when you’re starting from scratch to furnish your own place. “- Janice Robinson - Director Residence Life and Administration, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver “.....I wish I had saved the money that normally would have gone to “rent” to put toward a down payment on a real house for when I moved off campus!” - Clint Galloway – Manager Residence Services, MacEwan University 8

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“…I wish I had traveled more. While you should save wisely during this time, there will never be another time when you have fewer expenses, and you should take advantage of that flexibility. Don’t waste you money on small things, spend it doing something you might never have a chance to do again! Spend it on memories, not things.” - Erik Elordi – Assistant Director University Housing, Southern Oregon University

“...I wish I had made two house savings accounts: one for a mortgage down payment and a second for all other costs. Lots of things crop up when you buy a home, both planned and unplanned, and it’s good to have money set aside outside your down payment savings so you’re prepared for things like lawyer fees, home inspection costs, a moving truck, furniture, lawn mower, appliances, home repairs, etc. “ - Brett Zawadiuk – Area Coordinator, East & South Campus, University of Alberta “...I wish I had started earlier in terms of managing my money. I initially thought that I didn’t have enough savings to look to outside help in money management but this wasn’t the case. I was able to start up an investment portfolio (with professional advice) while keeping some funds closer at hand in case of unplanned for expenses.” - Mark Keller – Manager Residence Life, Mount Royal University Hopefully these words of wisdom will help kick start your journey to financial wellness. There is no better time to set yourself, and your bank account, up for success! This article was brought to you by the New Professional Task Force. Check them out at http://nwacuho.org/task-forces/new-professional-taskforce/

Women in Housing Network The Women in Housing network currently reaches over 1,000 followers on Twitter and Facebook, and are looking for more! The Women in Housing professional networking group is dedicated to the education of the ACUHOI group on issues and needs of women staff as it relates to on campus student housing. Women who work in housing systems on college and university campuses are met with specific issues and challenges and this network dedicates itself to the highlighting these issues and educating the general population. On a daily basis one will find inspirational messages and quotes, motivational posts, networking questions, blog articles, advice, job postings, and much more on several social media platforms directed at the thousands of women who are involved in the network. The members of the Women in Housing network are a committed group of members who strive to lift other women up in their daily professional lives. The network is also committed to the education on issues pertaining to women within housing systems, and is currently working to develop knowledge-based opportunities for women to share their expertise on certain hot topics in college and university housing systems. The Women in Housing network also provides wide opportunities for members to connect and expand their professional network within ACUHO-I. Currently the network is planning several networking opportunities at the Annual Conference and Exposition, held in Washington DC this coming June. The network is looking forward to providing an opportunity for ACUHO-I members too meet, connect, and develop their knowledge on current issues for women in housing. Interested in learning more? Connect with the Women in Housing network through Twitter at @wihsng and #wihsng and on Facebook by searching the Women in Housing group. Ideas are future networking and educational opportunities are also being solicited and can be submitted via Twitter, Facebook, or email at purvisr@purdue. edu. Finally, new members can join the Women in Housing network via the ACUHO-I Network at http://network. acuho-i.org/. 99

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www.ankrommoisan.com

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Cadence Student Housing / Tucson, Arizona Capstone Development Partners

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Annual President’s Report 2013 2013 BOARD OF DIRECTORS The new Board of Directors began its term at the closing of the 2013 annual conference, comprised of the following: President Products and Services Coordinator Kelly Ammendolia Esther Gaines The Evergreen State College Gonzaga University Past President Alaska-Yukon Representative Elaine Ames Tammie Willis Central Washington University Kenai Peninsula College President-Elect Alberta Representative Erik Elordi Craig Whitton Southern Oregon University University of Alberta Secretary British Columbia Representative Jenni Chadick Lawrence Lam University of Puget Sound University of Victoria Treasurer Oregon Representative David Akana Dawn Snyder Oregon State University Oregon State University Newsletter Editor Rachel Rasmussen Gonzaga University

Washington Representative Michelle Primley Benton University of Washington – Seattle

Technology Director Brian Kerrick University of Washington – Bothell ANNUAL CONFERENCE The 2013 annual conference was held February 3-5, 2013 in Tacoma, Washington with local arrangements coordinated by staff in Residence Life at the University of Puget Sound. The conference theme was “Fusing Passion with Purpose”. Keynote speakers were Laura van Dernoot Lipsky, founder and director of the Trauma Stewardship Institute, and Mike Segawa, vice president for student affairs at the University of Puget Sound. There were 207 total attendees and 28 exhibitor and corporate member booths. In addition to booths, there were also promotional tables featuring ACUHO-I/the ACUHO-I Foundation, NWACUHO taskforces, and the 2014 conference in Edmonton, Alberta. Special guest representatives included: Michael Griffel from ACUHO-I, Julie Franklin from AIMHO, Ann Marie Klotz from the ACUHO-I Foundation, and Richard Arquette from PACURH. 42 program interest sessions were offered in four program tracks: Operations, Facilities and Housing Services; Supervision and Advising; Organizational Development; and Core Purposes. Eight of the programs were sponsored by NWACUHO taskforces. Two NWACUHO Master Plan Update sessions were also offered.

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SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS In 2013 we recognized members with the following scholarships and awards:

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New Professional Scholarship Vennie Gore Scholarship Drew Satter Lea Griess Graduate Student Scholarship n/a

2013 Conference Scholarship Karla Carreras

Best of the Northwest Program Pam Schreiber and Cheryl Ewaldsen

Case Study Competition Laura Huxley, Marcia Louis, Kate Mitchell, Emma O’Rouke-Powell

David B. Stephen Award Josh Gana

Roger Frichette Excellence in Service Award Brian Stroup

Kay Rich Lifetime Achievement Award Operations Award Mike Segawa Bob McDonnell ACUHO-I Conference New Professional Scholarship David Protheroe

STARS Conference Scholarship Brenda Dao, Holly Dysserinck, Meghan Reiser, Rossetti Celis

NHTI Scholarship Mike Bowers, AJ Duxbury, Paul Evans

MONTHLY AND QUARTERLY EXECUTIVE BOARD MEETINGS The board of directors continues to conduct business through a monthly conference call. In addition, per the association’s bylaws, the board meets in person three times per year, in the late spring, fall and prior to the annual conference. The spring board meeting was held May 19-21, 2013 at Saint Martin’s University in Lacey, Washington. The fall site visit and board meeting took place October 16-17, 2013 at the Fantasyland Hotel in Edmonton, Alberta. The pre-conference meeting took place February 7-8, 2014 again at the Fantasyland. By having the spring meeting hosted on a member institution’s campus, the cost for lodging, room rentals, and technology is kept to a minimum. The pre-conference site visit in the fall is essential to the success of the annual conference. MASTER PLAN Progress on the Master Plan continued this year. An update on the status of the Master Plan will be shared during two different interest sessions at the 2014 conference. Below are highlights of projects addressed in 2013. • Core Purposes – Established decision making guidelines for the STARS and NHTI scholarships consistent with decision guidelines created for other awards and scholarships provided by the association. • Financial Stewardship – Developed expense procedures with appropriate levels of internal and external financial controls for a non-profit association, to be codified in 2014. • Financial Stewardship – Developed guidelines for association revenue practices, an auditing procedure based on non-profit industry best practices, and a reserve policy. • Governance – continued to assess whether the current Board structure meets the association’s vision and mission. Recommended positional structure and bylaws changes to membership, which was voted on and approved. Changes include sun-setting the Secretary and Newsletter Editor positions as of February 2015, and combining those positions into a new Communications Director that would begin a three-year term in February 2015. • Member Engagement – convened a Program Committee of members to select, place, and recognize programs for the annual conference. • Partnerships – Identified possible future revisions to the PACURH/NWACUHO affiliation agreement around when/how the PACURH director should attend our annual conference and the funding support available. 13 13

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NWACUHO Soundings ACUHO-I CONFERENCE The ACUHO-I Annual Conference and Exposition (ACE) took place in Minneapolis, Minnesota June 15-18, 2013. There are two primary association responsibilities for NWACUHO at ACE: attending the annual regional presidents’ meeting and coordinating a regional reception. President-Elect Erik Elordi represented NWACUHO at the regional presidents’ meeting on the Saturday before the conference. Erik represented us well, including being asked to share details about our Master Plan and the strategic process we have employed to address its objectives. Other regions were very interested in learning from our example. The regional reception was a successful joint-venture with counterparts AIMHO and WACUHO. We offered a variety of appetizers and enjoyed the informal opportunity to connect with colleagues across our great regions. At the conference, Pam Schreiber of the University of Washington presented “Your Last 30 Days: Transitioning with Passion and Poise” as the Best of the Northwest Program. David Protheroe of University of Victoria received the ACUHO-I Conference New Professional Scholarship to attend the conference. NWACUHO signed the annual affiliation agreement with ACUHO-I in June. This document clearly defines the responsibilities of the two organizations to one another. AIMHO CONFERENCE NWACUHO and AIMHO have a strong working relationship and recognize this commitment through a formal affiliation agreement. The terms of this memorandum include the current president from each region attending the other region’s annual conference. AIMHO President Julie Franklin attended the 2013 conference in Tacoma, WA. I attended the AIMHO conference at the Riviera Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada November 10-12, 2013. The AIMHO executive board members (and all conference delegates) were extremely gracious and welcoming. I participated in sessions and learned much about how AIMHO conducts its annual business, which is useful information as we continue to refine our own model. One example of a takeaway that we are incorporating into our 2014 conference was a program titled, AIMHO Connections. This is an extension of a mentorship program, providing a guided but informal opportunity for attendees across all levels of experience to form connections. The goal is for people to network and identify possible mentors for themselves. We are excited to bring a similar program to Sunday’s schedule in Edmonton! AIMHO’s 2014 conference will be held November 9-11 in beautiful Logan, Utah hosted by staff at Utah State University. Pictured on the left: Tricia Seifert, one of the keynote speakers at the NWACUHO conference.

Pictured on the right: NWACUHO colleagues at the first ever NWACUHO Connections event, giving new professionals the change to engage in a small group setting with senior Housing and Residence life professionals. 14

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A Look Back at Edmonton...

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Pictures, clockwise from top left: Red Piano in West Edmonton Mall, Presenters at the Case Study Competition, NWACUHO Connections Event, British Columbia Meet and Greet, Kelly Ammendolia turning the conference rain stick

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Welcome to our new board members! This year, at the annual conference, we inducted two new executive board members, Leslie Byrd and Kathryn Magura. Learn more about them below!

Leslie Byrd, Kenai Peninsula College Alaska-Yukon Representative Hello NWACUHO! My name is Leslie and I am the incoming representative for Alaska/Yukon. I am actually new to the region, but was very active in my previous region, SWACUHO and I have had the opportunity to attend ACUHO-I LLC several times. I am the Residence Life Coordinator for the brand new Reslife program at Kenai Peninsula College, a regional branch of University of Alaska Anchorage. The bulk of my professional experience comes from my five years as a Hall Manager/Area Coordinator at Northeastern State University in Oklahoma. As an undergrad, I stumbled upon this field and immediately fell in love with its youthful and empowering nature. I changed my degree and never looked back. I plan to share that passion with the region in hopes to increase membership and continue the strong tradition that lives in the ACUHO family. Kenai Peninsula College, a community college branch of UAA serving the Kenai Peninsula for 50yrs now, opened its first reshall Aug 2013. There are 92 beds divided into six communities with LLC options. The hall has seven community lounges, a multipurpose room that can be used for classes or programing, a fireplace, a catering kitchen, vending, and free laundry. Each fully furnished suite has four private rooms, two bathrooms and a full kitchen with in floor heating. Other amenities include keyed access, a state of art security system, wired and Wi-Fi internet, cable, a gym, a rec room, a basketball court and a Frisbee golf course.

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To see a short video on the many benefits of Change Point and learn more, visit www.macgray.com/changepoint.

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Welcome to NWACUHO! I am thrilled to begin my tenure on the board serving you as President-Elect of our beautiful NWACUHO region. I have been a member of NWACUHO for my entire professional career, and know first hand how caring and giving this association is. From my experience, the more you are willing to contribute to our region: present at and attend conferences, write for the newsletter, attend webinars and drive-in conferences, task force membership, etc, the more you will gain from the experiences. Please do not hesitate to contact me if I can be of any assistance to you on this journey. I am an Oregon native, and have worked my entire career at Oregon State University. My current role is Assistant Director, Operations, and I continually seek out new ways support the students who attend my institution. I have been active with ACUHO-I for the last few years, chairing the Assignments Committee, and look forward to utilizing the skills I have learned on the NWACUHO Board. Be sure to connect with me on Twitter: @kmagura.

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Connect with us for laundry advice, contests and prize giveaways!

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Kathryn Magura Oregon State University President-Elect

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Interested in becoming involved in NWACUHO? Contact a board member for more information on how you can contribute (contact info is inside the cover page).

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Ways to Get Involved with NWACUHO: Join the Listserv:

NWACUHO is proud to present our new listserv, courtesy of the Communications Task Force! We hope that this will become a forum for members of NWACUHO to ask questions and share best practices with other colleagues outside of the yearly conference. If you are interested in signing up for the listserv or would like more information, you may do so at http://nwacuho.org/listserv/.

Join a NWACUHO Taskforce!

NWACUHO Taskforces are in full swing! NWACUHO is proud to have four taskforces: Communications; New Professionals; Drive-In Conference and Professional Development. For more information about the outcomes of each taskforce, please visit http://nwacuho.org/task-forces/ Our taskforces are always encouraging new membership. If you are interested in getting involved with any of our taskforces, please email British Columbia Provincial Representative Lawrence Lam at laml@uvic.ca to sign up for a particular taskforce. We look forward to working with you and learning from your knowledge and experience!

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Announcing a New Student Affairs Graduate Program

This M.A. program at Lewis and Clark College for current and aspiring student affairs professionals has a special emphasis on issues of diversity, equity, and social justice. Graduates of the program will be prepared to take on responsive leadership roles that challenge the status quo in higher education institutions and support all students in full access to the college experience. Program features Students progress through coursework together with a small, diverse group of peers organized into cohorts. This structure leads to lifetime friendships and extensive professional networks. Throughout the program, theory is integrated with practice through rigorous coursework and two comprehensive, supervised practica at Lewis & Clark and other area colleges that give you hands-on experience in college environments. Our program is concerned with creating intentional, inclusive, democratic communities on college campuses where diverse student voices are heard and barriers to success are removed—especially for underserved groups. Our graduates foster understanding and respect for diversity and become advocates for the full and equal participation of all students in higher education. Through rigorous coursework, two practica, and a capstone project, student learn about student development and leadership, organizational management, legal issues, professional ethics, assessment, advising, and equity, among other topics. Faculty Our faculty possess extensive and diverse field experience as student affairs professionals, skill in areas of research and assessment, and deep theoretical grounding in the history and foundations of higher education. Key faculty: • Anna Gonzalez, Ph.D., Dean of Students • Mark Figeroa, Ph.D., Associate Provost for Institutional Research and Planning Details Total credit hours: 39 semester hours Program start date: September Program length: Two years (part time 3-year option available). Classes are scheduled in evenings and weekends to accommodate working professionals. Applying The program will launch in fall 2014. The priority application deadline for any students interested in Graduate Assistantships is May 1 (other applications will be considered through August 1 on a space-available basis). In future years, the deadline for all applicants will be February 1. No tests are required for admission. Graduate Assistantships Available Students are encouraged to apply for one-year, renewable graduate assistantships, which cover tuition, on-campus housing, and a meal plan. Students work 20 hours a week in one of the following areas: Career Development Center, Inclusion and Multicultural Engagement, Student Activities, and Housing/Campus Living (requires living on campus). More at: go.lclark.edu/graduate/student/affairs Apply now: go.lclark.edu/graduate/admissions

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NWACUHO Facebook Page

NWACUHO on Twitter

NWACUHO Blog

NWACUHO on Linkedin

Search for “NWACUHO” under Groups and ask to join. You can share photos, engage in discussions, or connect with friends from the region.

We have a blog where you can post your thoughts and comments on various topics from the Soundings to next year’s annual conference.

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the soundings

Follow the latest trends and institutional updates on Twitter with other professionals from the region. Go to twitter.com/ NWACUHO to get started.

It’s Facebook, but for professionals. Check out all the professional connections you can find by linking into the NWACUHO profile. http://lnkd.in/htviZB

Spring 2014


the soundings c/o rachel rasmussen gonzaga university 502 e. boone ave spokane, wa 99258

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the soundings

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Spring 2014 Soundings  
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