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WHAT’S INSIDE? ...BOB MARLEY 101 ...PRIMETIME PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT ...A LOOK BACK AT SALEM

PHOTO COURTESY OF JARED PAYTON


Board of Directors President Kathryn Magura Assistant Director, Operations Oregon State University president@nwacuho.org President-Elect Craig Whitton Residence Area Coordinator University of Alberta pres-elect@nwacuho.org Past-President Erik T. Elordi Director of Residential Facilities Cornish College of the Arts past-pres@nwacuho.org Treasurer Drew Satter Area Coordinator Gonzaga University treasurer@nwacuho.org Communications Director Kate Gannon Coordinator for Leadership, Academic & Diversity Initiatives Washington State University communications@nwacuho.org Technology Director Brian Kerrick Housing Operations Manager University of Washington-Bothell web@nwacuho.org

Product & Services Coordinator Esther Gaines Associate Director of Residence Life Gonzaga University psco@nwacuho.org Alaska-Yukon Representative Leslie M. Byrd Residence Life Coordinator Kenai Peninsula College alaska@nwacuho.org Alberta Representative Bob Lambert Residence Life Coordinator Mount Royal University alberta@nwacuho.org British Columbia Representative Lawrence Lam Coordinator, Community Development & Student Leadership University of Victoria britishcolumbia@nwacuho.org Oregon Representative Paul Wheeler On-Campus Housing Coordinator Central Oregon Community College pres-elect@nwacuho.org Washington Representative Michelle Primley Benton Administrator for North Campus & Diversity Initiatives University of Washington washington@nwacuho.org

Editorial and Submission Policies Deadlines for publications are based on distribution needs, and therefore it is important that members honor the established deadlines. Material not received on time, or not used due to space limitations will be considered for use in the next issue. Because soundings is the official publication of an educational association and reflects the professional standards of its members, necessary revisions will be made to ensure publication quality. Soundings also reserves the right to edit submissions for space requirements. Authors bear full responsibility for references, quotations, and data accuracy of publication submissions. Authors also hold NWACUHO harmless from any liability resulting from publications of articles submitted for printing. Advertisements in the Soundings should not be considered an endorsement. For information on exhibitor advertising, please contact: Esther Gaines, Product & Services Coordinator at gaines@gonzaga.edu or (509) 313-4155 Please send all submissions and announcements to Kate Gannon, Communications Director at communications@nwacuho.org

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE... Board of Directors

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Letter from the President

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Looking Forward

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Reflecting on the Past

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Primetime Professional Development

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Bob Marley 101

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Top 5 Ways to Save Money in Anchorage 2016

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A New Model for Guiding Residential Communication Based on Informational Speech Development

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A Look Back on Salem…

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And the Award Goes To…

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Welcome our New Board Members!

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PHOTO COURTESY OF JARED PAYTON

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A Letter from the President It is my pleasure to represent NWACUHO as President this year. I have been involved with the region on some level for over a decade, so when it came time to serve this great organization in a leadership capacity, I was truly honored. For those of you who were able to attend our 2015 conference in Salem, Oregon, you heard me talk about how NWACUHO is my professional home. No matter where I have sought to get involved on a professional level, I have always come back to NWACUHO as my home base. It is my hope over this next year that you will choose to get involved within our region and make NWACUHO your home too. Regardless of your professional level, there are opportunities to get involved within our region. You can join a committee, attend or plan a drive-in conference, present a First Friday Webinar, and of course, attend our annual conference. It is my hope that you will gain skills and expertise from the fantastic colleagues we have throughout our region by getting involved and connected. I am also excited to be working with a great local arrangements team to put together our 2016 annual conference in Anchorage, Alaska. We will be staying at the Hotel Captain Cook: http://www.captaincook.com right in the heart of downtown Anchorage, and will be doing what we can to provide a true Alaskan experience for all our attendees. Look for more information and travel tips coming from the Board of Directors in the next few months.

“Regardless of your professional level, there are opportunities to get involved within our region.”

There are also a lot of changes happening at the national level with our parent organization, ACUHO-I, and I will do everything I can this next year to make sure our regional members have a voice in shaping the organization and our field. We have a lot of fantastic professionals in our region who are leading the way in reshaping our profession. It is time for that hard work to be recognized on a national level.

During my Presidential year, I hope to connect with many of you to truly gain an understanding of who you are, what you need from a professional organization, as well as the issues you see facing our field today. I would welcome the opportunity to set up a phone conversation, to get to know the members of our great region. Also, if you plan to attend the ACUHO-I Annual Conference and Exposition in Orlando, Florida this summer, I would love to catch up in person. Maybe I’ll even buy you a cup of coffee. We all have traveled a different path to get where we are today as professionals. My fellow NWACUHO Board of Directors and I are here to support you on that journey however we can. Kathryn Magura NWACUHO President @Kmagura 4

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Looking Forward Hello NWACUHO! My name is Craig Whitton and I am very happy to serve as your President Elect! Erik and Kathryn are both going to leave big shoes to fill, but I promise to do my best for you and our region. I’ve worked with NWACUHO since 2013 where I joined the board as Alberta Representative. This region – through the First Friday Webinars, Annual Conference, and of course the Soundings newsletter, have all helped me in my career in a massive way. I’ve learned an incredible amount from my fellow professionals in the region and those lessons have made me better at doing what we are all here to do: serve our students. I’m incredible excited to be seeing as many of you as possible in Alaska next year. As far away as Alaska may seem, it’s a real treat to be able to engage with professionals in a region as diverse as ours. And even though 2016’s annual conference feels like a long way off, the Board is hard at work on 2017’s conference as well. We are extremely pleased to be hosting the 2017 Annual Conference in Eastern Washington, and we’re going to do our best to make sure it’s a fantastic experience for all of you. In my opinion, our region is pretty special – we really do put the “I” in ACUHO-I. Our regional activities regularly rotate not just through states, but through nations – no other region gets to have this experience, and I think it’s pretty great. As an avid traveler, I always look forward to February when I can take some time to explore the North West, visit old friends and meet new ones. One of my most favorite things I’ve seen on my travels through the region was when I attended the Tacoma, Washington conference a few years back. Due to some travel hiccups, I ended up flying into Vancouver BC and taking the train to Tacoma. As I passed through Surrey, BC and entered into Blaine, WA, the train was stopped so customs officials could check passports and such. From the window I got to see the Peace Arch, which is a monument erected in 1921 commemorating the end of the war of 1812. One of the inscriptions on the arch, above the iron gates, reads “May these gates never be closed”. The monument is symbolic of the relationship between Canada and the USA, and I think it’s fitting that it’s in our region. When it comes to student housing, Edmonton has a lot more in common with Anchorage than it does Toronto; Vancouver can relate more closely to Seattle than Halifax. The challenges our regional members face do not stop at the border, and neither does our professional learning and development. I’m always open to hear how our Association can serve our members better, so if you have an idea, a question, or a criticism, please don’t hesitate to reach out to me by whatever method works for you. Our association is nothing without the fantastic people who call the Northwest home, and I’m excited to work with and serve you for the next few years. Kind Regards, Craig Whitton NWACUHO President-Elect @CraigWhitton 6

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Reflecting on the Past

Greetings NWACUHO!

What an amazing year I had serving as your president. There are so many accomplishments to be proud of from the last year, the Association truly worked for all of you. The largest responsibility of the NWACUHO President is shepherding the annual conference along. Your presidency starts with the closing of one annual conference, and comes to a punctuated end with the closing of another. I would like to highlight a few of the accomplishments from the 2015 annual conference in Salem: • We set records! 206 conference attendees PLUS 34 exhibitors! • We had an amazing slate of interest sessions! 67 interest sessions were submitted and 38 chosen to be part of the conference schedule. • We live-streamed three interest sessions during the conference, along with featured speaker Larry Roper and our annual business meeting. This made the conference more accessible to our members not able to attend in person. • For the first time in our history, we surpassed over $100,000 in conference revenue! After all the bills were paid, we ended with a conference surplus of about $25,000. This was largely possible thanks to the generosity of our Corporate Members and exhibitors. This money will be invested in our 2016 conference in Anchorage, AK to reduce costs, making it a more accessible to the membership. • We had three amazing member institutions, Oregon State University, Reed College, and Willamette University, for the local arrangements team. I would especially like to recognize David Craig from OSU, Amy Schuckman from Reed, and Liz Trayner from Willamette for their work and the teams they brought along to assist. These are only a few items of note from the conference and its success. All of these accomplishments are a direct result of countless hours of hard work by the board of directors, committee participants, and our membership. Serving as your president has been one of the most fulfilling experiences of my career. The people I have met, the places I’ve traveled on your behalf, and the lessons I’ve learned along the way were truly transformative. I cannot thank the board of directors and our members enough for allowing me to have this opportunity. Transitioning to the past-president role is bittersweet. After a year of long days, countless meetings, and lots of travel, it’s nice to be able to turn over the responsibilities to someone else. However, it also means I’ve started the last year of my service on the board of directors, and the end of this amazing experience is quickly coming. I look forward to the next year as past-president on the board and I’m excited to find new ways to be involved with the association once this time is done. Thank you to everyone that has support and encouraged me over the last year. Take Care,

Erik Elordi NWACUHO Past-President @erikelordi 7

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Have You Met Tom? Tom Ellett is the President for the ACUHO-I Executive Board. Part of his mission is to connect with every ACUHO-I member institution to learn more about their operations. If your institution hasn’t had the chance to connect with Tom yet, please do. It’s a quick 10 minute chat, answering about 6 questions, and ANY professional staff member can take the call! Tom will be sharing the aggregate findings in a full report at the end of his presidency. If you’re unsure of whether or not someone from your school has talked with Tom, we have a list of schools he would still love to connect with. Email communications@nwacuho.org to see if you’re on that list, and we can connect you with Tom. The preferred way to set up one of these chats is via email: tom.ellett@nyu.edu

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Primetime Professional Development By Kate Gannon

I often speak with our residential education director staff about creating their professional development plan (PDP) through the year. I pester them with questions like: What are you interested in? Where are your weaknesses and how can you reshape them into strengths? How do you learn best? And while many have good intentions to create a plan and follow through on it, this drive gets lost in doing the day-to-day tasks of running a hall staff and community. This is why the summer is primetime for professional development! During the summer months, for most of us, our weeks ease up with student meetings, and we have more space in our schedules. My charge to you is to seek to fill that space with development. Maybe start with a quick blog reading, or even listening to a podcast. Then graduate to a full, scholarly article, maybe even write a blog post for your regional orPHOTO COURTESY OF GOOGLE ganization [sorry, shameless Communications Director plug]. There are a number of conferences and webinars that happen during the summer months as well. You can interview or have lunch with a Chief Housing Officer in your department, or an SSAO at your university even. Find out what skills they rely on to do their job and then you have created a wish list for yourself. There are numerous developmental opportunities that exist all year, but in the summer months we truly have the clarity to step back and reflect on the year. What did I enjoy this year? What really challenged me? It is within these questions that our opportunities for growth lie. A wise mentor of mine once told me that the forethought for my academic year starts in the summer. If you aren’t able to travel to attend a conference in the summer, look ahead for the year. Make a plan that suits your style, budget, and future path now. Sign up for some listservs so that you automatically have something coming to your inbox each week to keep you honest throughout the year. Develop a webinar on something you’re great at, so you can share it when your time permits with the region. Grab a book and relax on a beach somewhere just soaking in the student development theory. I know that the summer can fly by, and we all like to have a breather from the hectic schedule of housing and residence life, but don’t squander the opportunity to strengthen your professional identity through development opportunities. Whether you seek them out elsewhere, or create them yourself, there is always value in learning. Here are some of my favorite spots for professional development:  The Student Affairs Collective - You can have it emailed to you weekly and they have different formats of information from blogs, to videos, to articles--there’s something for everyone  Regional Associations - Your NWACUHO is switching to a blog format! Write your thoughts down and submit it online to be posted to the region. All levels and ideas are welcome! Submit an idea for a webinar on a topic you’d like to see, or want to present.  acuho-i.org - There are online learning resources and more formal certification courses too. Sell the benefit to your department to gain support from your supervisor(s). Check out the Core Competencies to get a skills list started for yourself. Kate Gannon is the Coordinator for Leadership, Academic, & Diversity Initiatives in Residence Life at Washington State University. She also serves as the NWACUHO Communications Director.

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Bob Marley 101 By Ron van der Veen

This is my 3rd article for The Soundings chronicling my son’s first year in college and what it’s like to go from student housing designer to student housing parent. Overall, it’s been a great experience for him and us as a family, and I have learned a lot about the value of residential life in the college experience from a dad’s perspective. I went to his dorm last week to take him home for summer break. To my surprise, he had actually packed, cleaned his room and was ready to go (is this the same son who slept on his piles of clothes during high school???). During the nearly three hour trip home we engaged in non-stop conversation on a wide variety of topics from girls, to drinking, to religion (is this the same son who barely used monosyllabic words to address me in high school???). While chit-chatting he even admitted that he really missed me (is this the same son who asked me to walk 10 feet in front of him during middle school???)!!! I was ready to turn the van around and head back to the college to give away my 401K plan to his school’s endowment. As wonderful as it was to see how my son’s new-gained maturity, was benefiting ME, there was one small issue that got my goat. He told me that during last quarter he took a class on Bob Marley. This is how our conversation went:

Dad (D): So tell me about this Bob Marley class, son. John (J): Oh, it was great! It was super fun and really easy. No homework! D: Hum, well, what did you do in class every week? J: We met twice a week. On Mondays we’d sing Bob Marley songs and on Wednesdays we would watch Bob Marley documentaries … until the professor ran out of them. D: Then what did you do on Wednesdays? J: Sing more Bob Marley songs. D: Did you have ANY assignments during the term? J: Only one. D: Well, what was that? J: Each student had to teach one Bob Marley song to the class…

PHOTO COURTESY OF GOOGLE

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BOB MARLEY 101...

Now don’t get me wrong, I have a “Buffalo Soldier” station on Pandora. Who doesn’t love reggae? And learning about the Wailers sounds fascinating. On top of that, I had a few of my own no-brainer classes in college I used to bump up my GPA. But as we talked I was secretly calculating what this sing-a-long session had cost me and it came out to be close to $800 by pro-rating my son’s tuition. A little later, while I was pumping gas, I secretly went online and checked the cost of a Bob Marley music book: $19.95 + $3.95 for shipping-NEW! Then I looked for biographies on Bob. I realized I could have given my son a PhD equivalent education on Bob Marley via Amazon.com and still saved about $739… AND he would have gotten a large Rastaman Vibration poster with it! So why does this really matter, and how does this relate to student housing? When I was in college this class would have cost me about $15, and there weren’t 150 online alternatives to learn about Bob Marley. With the over inflated price of today’s higher education experience, as a paying dad, I want every cent to have tangible value. This includes his campus living experience. What are the student housing options that will give him the most value for our money? I don’t mind paying a bit more, but I need to know I am getting A LOT more. I want the assurance that his living options will have a concrete impact on his academic performance (and that doesn’t mean he’ll sing better during Bob Marley class!). As my son weighs his options for next year’s living, we are looking at this more like a costly family investment than a place for him to crash. My son is only home for a few days before he heads up to Alaska to work in a cannery for the summer. This is something he decided to do to challenge himself (is this the same son that usually sleeps in till dinner???). I am really going to miss him for the next 6 weeks. We haven’t even had the chance to talk about his best housing options for next year, or our favorite Bob Marley songs! Ron van der Veen is a principal for NAC|Architecture and lead’s their Seattle Higher Education Practice. He has been designing student housing projects since before his son was born!

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By Lawrence Lam

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FLY SMART! Use our flight discount code & set up a Google Flights or Kayak price alert to find the cheapest day to purchase your tickets. Consider flying from a different airport too. SEATAC generally offers the cheapest flights, & if you apply for their Alaska credit card, it will give you enough miles to get to Alaska & back!

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APPLY FOR SCHOLARSHIPS! NWACUHO has 4 conference scholarships to attend the Annual Conference. Check out nwacuho.org/scholarships. Have a colleague proofread your application before you submit it.

FIND A ROOMMATE! Cut down on costs & share a room with a colleague, or make a new friend.

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REGISTER EARLY. There is a late fee for registration beyond the early bird rate. Be sure to know & plan around the registration timeline & meet the deadlines.

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PACK SMARTLY. Traveling with only a carry on will save on luggage checking fees.


A NEW MODEL FOR GUIDING RESIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION BASED ON INFORMATIONAL SPEECH DEVELOPMENT By Timothy “TJ” Martin

In today’s society we see the role of a resident advisor or resident assistant as a common one within residential life programs. Regardless of what a program chooses to call the staff that advise and assist residents, the position is one that requires a certain skill base. There are some common skills that are desired for those who work in these positions, including communication competency. Inherent in this is an importance for staff to be effective in their personal and interpersonal communication skills. For many there may be apprehension or anxiety when approaching these communicative interactions. Communication anxiety is certainly understandable as it is a common approach when faced with certain communication situations, especially verbal communication. However, for some this anxiety may come with any communicative interaction. Regardless of the form of communication someone is entering into there is a basic model that can be followed when approaching communicative interaction. To assist with this communication apprehension or anxiety this article provides a model programs could use to help train their staff in the thought process and communication preparation required to have conversations with residents. This model is based on an informative speech outline used in training college students in how to prepare informative speeches for audiences. This approach views communicative interactions with residents as an informative speech. Previous research shows us that for pubic speakers, preparation and practice reduce anxiety. Thus that same process of preparation and practice is advocated in the model here. Before introducing the model it is important to understand the different types of speech delivery that are applicable to this communication process. TYPES OF SPEAKING DELIVERY There are three main types of speaking delivery. The first is impromptu. With this type of delivery the message and words are thought of and chosen on the spot at the moment of delivery. The disadvantage to impromptu speaking is that it is possible to leave out important information or overlook an important point the speaker wanted to make. Second is the memorized delivery method. Here the message and words are prepared ahead of time, and committed to memory. However, the delivery is dependent on accurate memory retention where information is susceptible to being forgotten, especially if the speaker is nervous or apprehensive. The third and most preferred method of delivery is what is referred to as extemporaneous. This type of delivery is when the message is prepared and practiced ahead of time but your words are chosen at the moment of delivery. This comes across as a more natural conversation, and requires advanced preparation and practice for effective delivery. Before speaking it is important to think ahead of time about what you would like to say. There are times in our daily life where we must speak with others impromptu; however, we know that interactions with peers, colleagues, students and residents will be a part of our role so we can make the case that it is possible to begin preparing for the conversations we will be having. Therefore staff can go ahead and plan out what will be said using this framework. FRAMEWORK EXPLAINED The framework for this model is founded on a basic informational speech outline used when teaching college students how to prepare and give an informational speech. Each element of this framework will be explained in detail. 14

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A NEW MODEL FOR GUIDING RESIDENTIAL COMMUNICATION... Subject – think about what the overall conversation will be about. What will you be asking about and sharing? Examples could be: major or career interests, why they and you chose this educational institution, involvement on campus, or what each of you are looking forward to them most about the week, month, or semester. The subject will be a redundant touchstone that you repeat throughout your conversation. Redundant Touchstone – we remember best when we have something repeated to us several times, it also helps us stay on track with our message. A redundant touchstone is a word or phrase that you will be repeating throughout your message. General Purpose – think about why you are having this conversation. Examples of a purpose are to inform, to educate, and to persuade. Specific Conversation-centered Purpose: This is where you combine your subject and purpose making sure to include your redundant touchstone. An example of how to phrase this is to say “After this conversation, the person I’m speaking to should be able to be informed about how to be involved on campus. Introduction – when you begin your conversation with a resident try to include four steps: attention step, rapport step, credibility step, and the preview step. Attention Step – this could be as simple as saying “hey” or knocking on their door or as complex as telling a joke or funny story to get their attention. Rapport Step – this is where you connect by referencing something in common, shared experience, or shared interest that helps the resident understand that you are a resource and know where they are coming from. Credibility Step – your credibility may sometimes already be established due to your position as an RA; however, mention something that shows you are a credible resource relevant to the topic of the conversation. Preview Step – repeat your redundant touchstone to ensure clarity in your communication and that you both are on the same page about what you are talking about. Body – think about and plan out they main points you want to convey during your conversation. Conclusion – there are three parts to concluding a conversation: the cue, review, and closing statement. Cue – it helps to provide a cue that you are ready to wrap up the conversation. Examples could include saying “so in conclusion,” “to wrap up what we’ve talked about,” or “so before I go.” Review – this is where you repeat your redundant touchstone and briefly review you’re the main points of your conversation. Closing – don’t forget to close by saying “bye” or “have a great day” or “I’ll see you later” CONCLUSION Integral for university staff, specifically housing and residence life staff, is personal and interpersonal communication skill and competency. Many times staff may be unsure how to begin the process of having conversations with peers, colleagues, or residents. With communication apprehension or anxiety as a very real and common concern it is important to provide training that helps staff enhance their communication skill and ability. Preparation and practice will assist in reducing apprehension and anxiety. This model, based on an outline for developing an informational speech, provides a useful framework for guiding staff through both the thinking and speaking process required before having an effective conversation hopefully providing improved communicative interaction between staff and students. TJ Martin is a Residential Education Director at Washington State University. If you would like to be sent an example of this model please email TJ at tj.martin@wsu.edu

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A Look Back at Salem... PHOTOS COURTESY OF JARED PAYTON

Top: Ribbon selection at check-in table Left: Checking in with our Alaska-Yukon Rep Leslie Byrd Bottom: Learn more about our 2016 Conference in Anchorage, Alaska

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Top: A Capella group from Willamette University performing Sunday night Middle: Current Past-President Erik T. Elordi with our photographer, Jared Payton from Gonzaga University Bottom: Small group discussions during Jamie Washington’s Keynote Speech on Monday

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A LOOK BACK AT SALEM...


And the Award Goes To... PHOTOS COURTESY OF JARED PAYTON

Top Left: Vennie Gore Scholarship Recipient Amber Marti; Top Right: Graduate Student Scholarship Recipient Pamela Seitz; Middle Left: New Professional Scholarship Recipients Sam Bardal & Courtney Northrup; Middle Right: Best of the Northwest Program Winner Lauren Adams; Bottom: NWACUHO 2015 Conference Vendors

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Left: Kay Rich Lifetime Achievement Award Winner Tom Scheuermann

Below: Case Study Competition Award Winners (L to R) Bob Lambert, Shannon Bradley, Erin Dellino, Melanie Medina, & Sarah O’Steen

Not pictured: Roger Frichette Excellence in Service Award winner Karla Carreras

Below: Roger Frichette Excellence in Service Award Winner Kate Flowers

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Below: Housing Operations Award Winner Melanie Potts

AND THE AWARD GOES TO...


Welcome Our New Board Members! Alberta Representative - Bob Lambert Hello NWACUHO! My name is Bob (Bobby) Lambert and I am super excited to be the new Alberta Provincial Representative! I moved to Alberta in June 2014 and I am a Residence Life Coordinator at Mount Royal University in Calgary, Alberta. I completed my undergrad at Wilfrid Laurier University in Waterloo, Ontario. This is where I immediately bought into the residence experience. I attended multiple conferences within OACUHO and saw how the collaborative nature within the Association can increase overall efficiencies for members. Although new to the region, I have enjoyed meeting many new professionals with the Residence Life Professionals Association and NWACUHO. I presented at the most recent NWACUHO in Salem, Oregon and was fortunate enough to be a member of the winning team for the Annual Conference Case Study Competition. I look forward to meeting many more members within the Association and contribute to the continued effectiveness as much as I can! Have a great summer and I hope to see you in Anchorage, Alaska!

Oregon Representative Paul Wheeler

Treasurer Drew Satter

Communications Director - Kate Gannon Hey Folks! I am so excited to start engaging our membership through our upcoming blog format for NWACUHO! I am from Chicago, Illinois originally and have worked in a few different regions during my SA career. I am eager to bring my different experiences in those regions to help strengthen NWACUHO and its communication. Looking forward to meeting more of you, whether online, through the Twittersphere, or at annual conferences! 20

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WELCOME OUR NEW BOARD MEMBERS...

President-Elect - Craig Whitton Hi NWACUHO! My name is Craig and I'm extremely excited to be serving as your President Elect! I hail from Edmonton, where I work for the University of Alberta. I love dogs, motorcycles, and being outside -- for me, there's no such thing as camping "season" -- January or June, I'll be in the mountains! I'm thrilled to be heading to Alaska in 2016 for our Annual Conference, as I know Anchorage has a lot to offer, and I hope to see you all there!

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Soundings 2015 vol 1 spring edition  

Check out our final NWACUHO newsletter before we move to a Soundings Blog this summer. Take a look back at Salem, Oregon and forward to Anch...

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