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This is going to be huge

Logan Hendrickson started off building chairs for dolls. Now his sleek but rugged designer furniture (for actual humans) is creating a big buzz By Maureen Adamo | Photography bill hughes

Roxy and Logan Hendrickson bought half a house — a log cabin, actually, on the outskirts of Henderson. It was a steal, priced at roughly the value of the acre it sat on, because it was a mere shell of a home. There were barely even walls. So the two, married last July, rolled up their sleeves and got to work. They laid up bricks, installed wide-beam wood flooring, designed a kitchen and bathrooms, inch by inch building the house with sweat equity and an aesthetic that might be called raw, homey industrial minimalism. Their work on the house led to them blogging about the process to help instruct other home-improvers (DIY concrete walls, anyone?). And because the house (featured on page 58) was built from nothing, Roxy and Logan decided their furniture would be as well. Soon, friends began asking Logan to make pieces for their own homes. Encouraged by the budding enthusiasm for a craft born of thrift, the couple decided to try to sell a few of the things they were making on Etsy.com. Onefortythree (onefortythree.com), named for their home address, was born, and the couple moved their online storefront from Etsy onto designer startup mecca Big Cartel. T h i n k small At least, that’s one way of telling the story of Onefortythree. The big secret to their success is literally a small one: The HendrickSeat of power: Logan son’s furniture business really kicked into high Hendrickson designs and gear with dollhouse furniture. builds modern furniture. Here, he welds a chair “I got a lot of calls in from the dollhouse frame in his workshop. scene,” Logan Hendrickson says. (The most surprising part of his admission is that there is, in fact, a “dollhouse scene.”) Having been invited to participate in a blog-sponsored dollhouse design competition, Logan did what pretty much, well, no one else would have. He built a geodesic dome dollhouse, complete with a working electric chandelier and uber-mod, real (and tiny) molded plywood and steel furniture. The dollhouse was rich with textile detail. Logan “installed” wood laminate and built a platform bed fitted with cotton sheets. The work won him a feature in American Miniaturist magazine; building awe-

46 | Desert

Companion | April 2013

some dollhouse furniture is that big a deal. When the competition was over, people who had been following called to buy bits of the minuscule modernism he had constructed. It was then Logan decided to scale up. If he could make molded, Eames-inspired plywood chairs for dolls, he thought, he could make chairs for people, too. “It was tricky, because there’s not a lot of information on how to do

Desert Companion - April 2013  

Desert Companion celebrates the passions and aspirations of Southern Nevadans. We inform, entertain, engage people and define the spirit of...

Desert Companion - April 2013  

Desert Companion celebrates the passions and aspirations of Southern Nevadans. We inform, entertain, engage people and define the spirit of...