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FEATURES

March 10, 2009

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World Language Week cultures students News Editor Have you ever wanted to travel to Spain, Germany, France and China all in one week? Then one look down the world language hall would prove that this dream is very realistic. During the week of February 23 to the 27, students celebrated World Language Week. The celebration of World Language Week has been a tradition at Northview for the past six years, according to Mrs. Chris Monday. “World Language Week is a great way to unify all the languages,” said Mrs. Lindsey Jurski. “This week is a great way to show students how important it is to understand the importance of being global.” To start off the week, the students in all language classes were divided into families. These families included students from Spanish, German, French and Chinese to allow students to mingle with peers from different languages. On Monday, the different families participated in a game of Jeopardy to test their knowledge about other countries. What does abrazo mean and who is the current chancellor of Germany, were only a few of the questions asked during the game. Tuesday was craft day. The students could choose to make a German Jester Hat, a French puppet (marionette), a Latin American carnival mask or Mayan shrinky dinks. After working all class period on the craft, students had to turn their hard work back into the teacher, so that it could be placed in the market. Many students’ favorite days of World Language Week were Wednesday and Thursday. During these two days students had the opportunity to visit many different stations revolving around the languages. At the market station, students could buy back their crafts. However, there was a twist: the students had to buy their crafts speaking the language that the craft represented. If someone wanted to purchase a Spanish carnival mask they had to ask for it in Spanish. The teachers and students volunteering at the different market stations would overprice the item, in order to get the student to try and lower

Katie Koffman SOPHOMORE YIANNI PAPADIMOS teaches World Language students a traditional Greek war dance called the “Bulgarian.” It is done to send soldiers off to battle in hopes that they will come home safely. Many cities and villages in Greece have traditional dances which they perform at local celebrations, according to Papadimos. the price. “It was difficult to try and bargain down the prices of certain items,” said junior Leah Smith. “But it was a great way to practice speaking in a different language.” Presented at the dance station were two different cultural dances. One was a typical German dance taught by the German teacher Ms. Christina Forster. The second dance taught to the students was a Greek dance. NV sophomores Nick Irmen and Yianni Papadimos taught students this traditional Greek dance, the Bulgarian. Abajo, arriba, al centro, pa’ dentro! In English that translates to down, up, to the center, and pull in. These words were sung by the students at the singing station. Vamos a Bailar (let’s dance) is a popular song performed by the Cumbia Kings. The students also had to do the movements that corresponded to each of the words. “It was really interesting singing in a different language,” said sophomore Brittany Von Stein. “It was a challenge trying to do the actions that corresponded with the words we were singing.”

Along with this Spanish song, the students also had to sing in French. The most highly-anticipated station was the international food buffet. Every year, students look forward to trying all the different cultural foods offered at this diverse station. This year French, German, Spanish and Chinese foods were all presented. There were many dishes that exemplified the Hispanic culture including, Cuban chile, paella and tortilla Española. To give students a taste of France many traditional French foods were brought in. Those different foods were, Chocolate Mousse, apple pie, an assortment of cheeses and couscous. Potato salads and apple streusel were among some of the many German foods present. Some Chinese foods represented were chicken and an assortment of noodle dishes. The international food buffet made students order Spanish, German, Chinese and French foods in the native language. To add a new flare, the World Language Department invited native speakers to help serve the food. The guests encouraged the students to order

their food in the target language. On the final day, students watched clips from four interesting foreign films. Students viewed clips from the French film The Chorus: Les Choristes, the Chinese film Liu San Jie, the popular Spanish film Pan’s Labyrinth and the German film Run Lola Run: Lola Rennt. Each clip was presented to the students with English subtitles so they could understand what was happening. The students also had to fill out a previewing, during viewing and post viewing worksheet. “My favorite video clip was from the Spanish movie Pan’s Labyrinth,” said freshman Ryan Keesecker. “It was definitely off the hook.” All in all, World Language Week was a success. Although it was a lot of work, the students and teachers had a great time being able to share the very different cultures of Germany, France and Spain, according to Mrs. Monday. “World Language Week was a lot of work, but it was definitely worth it,” said Mrs. Monday. “The volunteers had a huge impact on the success of the week.”

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