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The limitations of the sampling method applied in the study as well as low number of responses in most of the countries has implications both for the interpretation of results nationally and in comparisons across countries.

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outlines of practice implications Adult guidance in the Nordic countries will with no doubt continue to grow in the years to come, but there are indicators in this research that it is rather single-tracked, i.e. it is mostly face-to-face, in one to three sessions and emphasises educational and personal issues, less vocational ones. Moreover, guidance is too seldom evaluated, apparently more for the sake of it than anything else. Teachers will no doubt continue to be involved in guidance, as well as professional guidance workers and from these results we can deduce

that guidance will not be particularly proactive; unless policy makers decide to use these results as a turning point. The outlines of practice seen in these results can be compared to definitions of guidance in OECD and EU documents that are as follows: In the context of lifelong learning, “guidance refers to a range of activities that enables citizens of any age and at any point in their lives to identify their capacities, competences and interests, to make educational, training and occupational decisions and to manage their individual life paths in learning, work and other settings in which these capacities and competences are learned and/or used”. (OECD, 2004a, p. 67). The 2008 EU resolution says: “Guidance plays a decisive role in the major decisions that individuals have to take throughout their lives. In this respect, it can contribute to empowering individuals to man-

age their own career paths in a more secure way in the context of today’s labour market and to achieve a better balance between their personal and professional lives”. This research tells us that adult guidance services in the Nordic countries are certainly addressing some of the issues of lifelong guidance, such as personal and educational aspects. We know however that the guidance approach is rather traditional, and that vocational issues could be addressed more. We also know that quality assurance issues, such as evaluation and feedback are too scarce and that users are as a rule not involved in forums of debate or policy making. The experience of users is not being used, which is why they are often not asked to give feedback and they are not involved in decision making at policy levels. These results can have implications for further research, practice, training and policy making.

Profile for NVL Nordvux

Voice of users  

This present evaluative research, titled Voice of users – promoting quality of guidance for adults in the Nordic countries, examines both th...

Voice of users  

This present evaluative research, titled Voice of users – promoting quality of guidance for adults in the Nordic countries, examines both th...

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