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CAN KEITH COOPER EVER FORGIVE US?

“record.” In 2011, five years after his release from prison, he began his journey to receive a pardon from the governor of Indiana. Many who are minimally aware of this case, like I once was, ignorantly believed that Cooper was just another convict trying to get out of prison. I just happened to read a little further the other day, and now I can’t let the situation rest. When one seeks a “pardon,” the request is literally for the conviction to be “forgiven.” This would be a unique pardon to grant, since the requestor is technically not asking for forgiveness in the classic sense of the word. There is no admission of guilt, remorse or reform, since Cooper is claiming he is innocent and virtually everyone involved with the case now agrees. The victims, the prosecutor and, to some extent, the court system itself attest to his innocence. So in this case, it is actually the State of Indiana that needs forgiveness. All Cooper wants from Indiana is his name cleared and returned to him so that he can move on with his life. So what is the problem? “All Cooper wants from Indiana is First, Gov. Mike Pence, through his staff, decided his name cleared and returned to him that there are still some so that he can move on with his life.” last-ditch and burdensome judicial options to exhaust — MICHAEL LEPPERT before the governor should act. His office does not want to inappropriately intervene in the business of the judiciary prematurely. That last-ditch Then Cooper was offered a deal: He effort is a post-conviction application for could withdraw his petition that sought relief from Elkhart County. exoneration of his conviction and, in Second, the elected prosecutor in exchange, could walk out of jail a free man. Elkhart County is Curtis Hill, the current Otherwise he would have to petition for a Republican nominee for attorney general new trial himself, remaining incarcerated of Indiana. Hill’s office negotiated the deal until its completion. to which Cooper agreed for his 2006 reIn 2006, he accepted the deal. He would lease from prison. Hill has not commented be able to reunite with his three children on the substance of the pardon request. immediately, but the felony on his record I will let you decide the political calculus still stood. of the defiant approach to this no-brainer After nine years in prison, life on the of a request, given these circumstances. outside has had plenty of challenges. One Finally, the Indiana Parole Board subin particular is the felony conviction still mitted a non-binding recommendation follows him everywhere, specifically in for pardon to the governor in March of the job market. Cooper has been work2014. It has been collecting dust for more ing as a forklift operator since his release than two and a half years. It is also imfrom prison, but advancement has been portant to note that Pence appointed the regularly thwarted due to his erroneous parole board members he is now ignoring. eith Cooper is becoming a household name around here these days. It’s ironic because all he wants from the State of Indiana is to have his name given back to him. Cooper is an African-American convicted felon who lives in Chicago. He was released from the Indiana Department of Correction in 2006 after spending nearly 10 years in prison, much of it at Wabash Valley Correctional Facility. He wants Gov. Mike Pence to issue a pardon for his conviction for an uncommon reason: He is innocent. In 1997, Cooper was convicted in Elkhart County of armed robbery and sentenced to 40 years in prison. But by 2005 it had become clear that the evidence used to convict him was no longer credible. The conviction of his alleged accomplice had already been overturned by the Court of Appeals and remanded to Elkhart County for retrial. In the course of pursuing that retrial, the accomplice’s charges were dismissed.

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MICHAEL LEPPERT EDITORS@NUVO.NET Michael Leppert is a public and governmental affairs consultant in Indianapolis and writes about politics, government and anything else that strikes him at IndyContrariana.com.

Democrat gubernatorial nominee John Gregg is on record supporting the pardon. Republican gubernatorial nominee and current lieutenant governor Eric Holcomb is considering the situation but believes it can be resolved quickly. The handling of the matter, or more accurately the timid recoiling of Pence from handling it, defines his leadership abilities. Bluntly, he is simply unable to stray from the script when governing. Correcting this error by the state should be something the governor, any governor, should embrace. If righting this wrong is so undesirable for Pence, why does he claim to want to govern at all? In a week where Pence has spent inordinate time expressing grace and forgiveness for Donald Trump’s lewd and quite possibly criminal behaviors, he is doubling down on Keith Cooper. “To forgive is to set a prisoner free and to discover that prisoner was you,” is an apt quote offered by the late Lewis Smedes, the famous theologian and Christian professor. The irony here is that the prisoner today is no longer Cooper. The prisoner is Mike Pence. I don’t expect Pence to ever issue the pardon, since he has effectively run out his own clock by hiding from it. And it’s an embarrassing mess he is clearly leaving behind. I have faith that in January, our next governor will do the right thing. What I selfishly want for Keith Cooper is that he can find the strength to follow Smedes’ advice and forgive Indiana for what it has done to him. I assure you, Mr. Cooper, this is not who we want to be. Please accept our apologies when you ultimately receive the pardon with our sincere hope that your forgiveness of us, and not ours of you, finally sets you free. n


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WHY YOU MIGHT NOT VOTE

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Things to know about identification before you go to the polls

BY A MBER ST E A R NS ASTEARNS@N U VO . N ET

arly voting is underway for this election cycle and already voters are flocking to the polls to cast their ballot. In the first few days of early voting at the Marion County Clerk’s office, officials are reporting increases in numbers over the last two presidential election. There are a few things that voters need to know when going to the polls. This knowledge could be the difference between your vote and voice truly being heard and a waste of time.

IDENTIFICATION In 2005, Indiana Hoosiers were required to show a government-issued photo identification to cast their ballot. The legislation making the requirement was championed by then-Secretary of State Todd Rokita. The rules for what that identification must show have been misunderstood over the last 11 years. NUVO hopes this will clear the air on what is and isn’t necessary. First of all, your photo identification must have an expiration date and be either current or have expired after the date of the last general election. So, since the last general election in Indiana was last year on November 3, 2015, if your driver’s license, passport or government-issued photo ID has expired anytime between November 4, 2015 and today, you can still use it when you go to the polls. Even if that ID expires on Election Day, November 8 of this year, that identification can still be used to vote using a regular ballot. (The difference between regular and provisional ballots is coming up, so keep reading.) In addition to the expiration date, the other specific points of the ID law include name and photo. The law states that the ID must contain a photograph of the person to whom the ID was issued. The ID must also show the name of the person and that name must conform to the name on the voter registration record. So, if you have legally changed your name but haven’t updated your voter registration, don’t dispose of that old identification just yet. You will need it for Election Day. Those are the only identification requirements for voting according to Indiana state law. Although the voter

Early voting is underway at the City-County Building in Marion County. Election Day is Nov. 8.

registration book contains your address, the address on your ID does not have to match the address on the book. Your legal physical residence must match what is on the voter registration book, but that doesn’t have to be the address on your license. So if a poll worker gives a voter a provisional ballot because your address is “wrong” according to the ID, that poll worker is in the wrong and your vote should be counted. (Passports do not include your address and are considered valid government-issued IDs with names, photos and expiration dates suitable to use for voting.) The Bureau of Motor Vehicles will issue an ID card free of charge if you indicate that it is for the purpose of voting. However, all of the necessary paperwork will still be required in order to obtain that ID. Indiana driver’s licenses and identification cards will be required to be Secure IDs by the year 2020. Indiana law changed to be in compliance with federal regulations. A secure identification system was one of many recommendations that came out of the 9/11 commission that studied the events and processes leading up to the terrorist attacks. States were required to come up with a way to issue secure IDs to citizens. Indiana, like many states, increased the requirements for driver’s

licenses and IDs. Anyone applying for a new driver’s license or non-driving ID will automatically be issued a secure ID with the submission of the appropriate documents. Persons who already have valid driver’s licenses and IDs don’t have to secure that ID until 2020. Beginning in 2020, secure IDs will be required to board commercial aircraft and enter federal buildings and military installations. A Secure ID requires proof of identity, proof of residency and proof of a valid Social Security number. Required documents include birth certificates, social security cards and utility bills from current residences. Any legal name changes that differ from the name on your birth certificate must be documented as well. For women who have been married multiple times, documentation — such as marriage licenses, divorce decrees and other court-related documents — indicating all name changes should be submitted as well.

BALLOTS So now that you have your ID and you know how to use it, there are a variety of ways to cast your ballot.

With a valid ID and no major changes in life, you can cast a regular ballot on Election Day, through early voting at the county clerk’s office or by mail absentee. If you vote early at the clerk’s office you don’t need a reason to do so — just show up and exercise your right. However if you want to vote absentee by mail, you have to request and submit an application indicating the specific reason why you need to vote in this manner. Absentee ballot applications must be in the hands of the clerk’s office by October 31. Postmarked by October 31 is not acceptable and will prevent your vote from being counted. The good news is that if you are a registered voter in some way, shape or form, you cannot be turned away from the polls, early, on Election Day or otherwise. But if you plan to vote on Election Day but failed to update your voter registration information or there are questions regarding the validity of your ID, you may be required to use a provisional ballot instead of a regular one. A provisional ballot allows an individual to fill out their voting intentions, but the ballot is not submitted for counting until the issues and questions are resolved. The ballot is sealed in an envelope with your voter information on it to be counted at a later date. Voters with ID issues have until the end of Election Day to get those issues resolved to have their ballot counted that day. If it can’t be resolved within a few hours, voters have up to 10 days to have the issue resolved and their ballot counted. (Remember, on election night the results are preliminary and subject to a variety of things like recounts and consideration of provisional ballots before the election is officially certified.) Registered voters who have moved without updating their registration can still cast a ballot, regular or provisional, in most instances dependent upon the circumstances, especially if they go back to their old precinct. Even a move out of state cannot prevent you from at the very least casting your vote for president of the United States. For specific information on what your rights are as a voter in Indiana, look for the 2016 Indiana Election Day Handbook online or in your county clerk’s office. Every voter should do what he or she can do to make sure his or her vote counts this November. n

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WHY YOUR WRITE-IN VOTE MIGHT NOT COUNT

There is a method to write-in candidates

required all write-in candidates to file paperwork with the state by July 5. “If you didn’t file to be a write-in in Indiana, people can’t write you in. Those BY R A C H EL H OF F ME Y E R , votes won’t count,” said Valerie Warycha, TH E STA TEH O U SE F IL E communications director for the Secretary EDITORS@NUVO . N ET of State. Fifteen candidates, including the Green oters hoping to write Bernie Sanders Party’s Jill Stein, are eligible to be written or Evan McMullin in on their Indiana in. Libertarian Gary Johnson is listed as a ballot are out of luck. candidate on the ballot, alongside Donald Interest in write-in candidates is surgTrump and Hillary Clinton. ing, according to Google Trends data, According to election law experts, the where online searches for the term have goal of the deadline law is to ensure candihit a record high. Indiana, in particular, dates meet requirements, such as age and is among the top five states searching for residency, and file any necessary financial “write-in” in recent days. disclosures. The deadline also gives voters In fact, by Thursday afternoon searches time to learn who the people are that are by Hoosiers for Sanders grew so much that running for office. Google Trends is classifying it as a “break“We don’t want people manipulating the out,” meaning the search term has grown system when they’re flying under the radar by more than 5,000 percent. Another top as write-in candidates,” said Derek Muller, associate professor of law at Pepperdine University School of Law. A cynical reason may “If you didn’t file to be a write-in in exist as well. Write-in Indiana, people can’t write you in. candidates make getting re-elected more difficult Those votes won’t count.” for major and third party candidates, Lloyd Mayer, —VALERIE WARYCHA, professor of law at the SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE. University of Notre Dame, pointed out. “They can unexpectedly siphon away votes,” he said. search is for McMullin, who is running as Deadlines early in the election cycle, an Independent candidate. Google Trends enacted by legislators who are already in shows a 1,600 percent growth. office, can reduce the number of write-in But despite Hoosiers’ interest in poscandidates and discourage people from sibly voting for Sanders and McMullin, voting for them. it’s too little, too late. Indiana election law On his website, McMullin lists Indi-

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Mike Pence’s hair has been on fire ​ever since ​since Access Hollywood released the “groping” video and the mass exodus of GOP faithful that followed. The divorce between Trump and House Speaker Paul Ryan has got to be a huge stress for Pence, especially considering that his supposed strength in keeping the peace between the two was part of the appeal of having him on the ticket in the first place. Trump has made his unfavorable opinion of Ryan very clear via his favorite rage machine — Twitter. It’s a shame Pence’s tears can’t extinguish his blazing hair.

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TRUMP’S UNFRIENDLY PARTY FIRE

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DESPAIR-O-METER RATING: CATASTROPHIC!

People disillusioned with candidate choices may opt to write in candidates, but that might not be the best way to vote.

ana as a state where despite barriers the campaign “will make every effort to ensure your vote counts,” but Mayer described that as an uphill battle. He cited a Supreme Court ruling that says states do not have to allow write-ins at all as long as candidates have other ways to get on the ballot. The McMullin campaign did not respond to questions regarding what efforts they may be making in Indiana. While Google Trends did not give any insight as to why searches for “write-in” are spiking, Geoffrey Layman, a voting behavior expert at the University of Notre

Dame, argued the country is faced with voting between the two most unpopular candidates in the history of polling. While he expects to see an increase in the number of write-ins this year, Layman said most voters talking about participating in a write-in vote will likely end up voting traditionally. “When push comes to shove, people who identify with a party usually end up voting for that party,” he said. “Especially in a state like Indiana where you can do a straight ticket vote. It’s just easier.” n


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WOOLEN BLANKETS AND WRITING The first TILT mixer was a blast, and there are still two more to go

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BY D A N GROSSMA N ARTS@NUVO . N ET

uring his TILT talk, visual artist, educator and historian Samuel E. Vázquez used some intriguing terminology linked to tagging subway cars with spray paint (such as referring to subway cars as “pages” in a book). But the responses that he gave to audience questions after his talk were even more intriguing. TILT, jointly sponsored by the Arts Council of Indianapolis and Indiana Humanities, places two speakers from two different disciplines side by side to talk briefly about their respective disciplines after a mixer fueled by boozy drinks and hors d’oeuvres. In the Q&A that follows, unexpected linkages just might be found between two seemingly divergent disciplines. On Tues. Oct. 11, Vázquez was paired with Fiona McDonald, a Postdoctoral Researcher at the Indiana University– Purdue University Indianapolis (IUPUI) Arts & Humanities Institute. Her topic was the 400-year-old history of woolen trade blankets. “The woolen blanket was something I knew growing up,” McDonald said. “My parents were immigrants to Canada from Ireland and had woolen blankets from Irish mills.” Such blankets were objects of trade, of practical necessity. “They’re one of the most heavily distributed materials and objects globally from the 17th century,” she said. “They were sent on missions on a lot of ships,

Vazquez and McDonald at the first TILT TALK

MR. COFFEE POT AND THE BLUES/BANJO

(Rebecca Shrum and Gordon Bonham)

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SCI-FI MOVIES AND 16-MM FILM

(Sarah Skwire and Kassim Norris)

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and eventually became a trade item.” On the other hand style writing, as Vázquez made clear in his talk, was something that began without tangible economic benefit. But style writing, believe it or not, had many benefits that might be discussed in terminology widely used in the human resources and self-empowerment spheres. These are terms like time management, and confidence. After all, it takes both confidence to mark a subway car and time management to do it quickly enough to get away before the police catch you. Before getting to the history of New York City style writing, however, Vázquez had to dispose of a certain moniker for style writing that has come into common usage. That is, when an audience member asked if Vázquez might just be referring to the term graffiti, he replied: “That’s one word it’s known by nowadays: graffiti. But that was a term that the media put to the art form to basically label it. The word in Italian is graffito, basically, a ‘rude mark.’ This was something that the media was saying was something that basically had no value. But those in the early days, we called it writing,

because that’s what you did in the early days: you wrote your name on the wall.” This activity was something that was rooted in the need for self-expression in the New York City of the late ’70s and early ’80s where social services and schools had essentially collapsed, according to Vázquez, who was among the style writers of the time. “So if you were a young person and creative, you’re going to find a way to express yourself,” he said. Woolen blankets might not seem like the most obvious candidates for self-expression, but an indigenous arts movement incorporating the woolen blanket began to arise in the early ’80s — employed by indigenous artists — around the same time style writing began to come into notice as a commercially acceptable art form. “The blanket starts to shift from being an object of wealth to being a colonial object of repression,” said McDonald. “And you start to see artists using blankets not as object of representation but as a canvas. They’re manipulating and moving it. They’re transforming it into something that has a different meaning and a different heritage.” n

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NAZIS, TRUMP & VINYL SUBMITTED PHOTO

Lobyn Hamilton’s vinyl artwork dissects alt-right politics

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BY EM I L Y TA Y L OR E T A Y L O R @ N U V O . NET

obyn Hamilton’s vinyl artwork is no longer a hidden gem just in Indy. A few of his big moments: When his work was featured on the TV series Empire; when a friend of Kayne West commissioned Hamilton to make a silhouette of the famous rap artist. Hamilton, who is self-taught, went full-time with his artwork just three years ago. In fact, he will celebrate his threeyear-art-full-time anniversary the week his show at the University of Indianapolis ends. One of the most notable (and possibly controversial) pieces in his UIndy show The Breaks is “Der Donald,” a commentary on the similarities between the fear and temperament created by the Nazi party and the surge of right-wing ideals. “I think if you look all over the world right now, there’s a right-wing movement,” says Hamilton. “These are all just ideals; as soon as some people come who you are afraid of, refugees, then all of the sudden you no longer have those so-called ‘open arms’ because you had it when there was nothing there to test it. It’s fine until a non-Anglo-Saxon climbs to the highest office in the world. Then it’s like, ‘Oh shit.’ It’s fine as long as it’s out there. Once something is tested then you see where people’s true values of societies is. I think that’s interesting when you see that. We have seen it before — the Nazi regime — you see it now. Not just here in America.” The creation of the piece took Hamilton to an area that was known for being a Nazi stronghold in World War II: Ravensburg, Germany. He recalls watch10 VISUAL // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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THE BREAKS: LOBYN HAMILTON

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ing an episode of Happyish and saw a character holding the Organization Book of the National Socialist German Workers Party, which was given to all Nazi members. He began to research the book and found only a few copies of it worldwide, and plenty of hesitation shrouding it. He tracked down two copies in Germany — one fourth edition from 1937, which is on display next to “Der Donald,” and one first edition which is now in his personal collection. He bought them for 1,000 Euros total. “I get there and he says all this stuff about how he doesn’t understand why people don’t talk about that time period,” says Hamilton. “Because, clearly, when I was talking about this book to my friends, and friends’ friends, it got really quiet and it got really weird …” The shop owner told him not to tell anyone that he got the book from him, refused a receipt and instructed him to say he purchased it at a flea market. But Hamilton wasn’t interested in just slapping together images of swastikas and Trump for the piece. “That’s sophomoric, that’s childish,” says Hamilton. “We are professionals. You want to educate somebody without pounding them over the head with it or even invite them to do their research. I am not your babysitter as an artist.”  n


REGGIE MILLER COURTESY OF THE INDIANA PACERS

Many of Miller’s magical moments came against the New York Knicks.

50 SEASONS. 50 GREATS. In honor of the Pacers’ golden anniversary, we ranked their greatest players JO N R. L a F O L L E T T E EDITORS@NUVO . N ET

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aming the team was the easy part. The real dilemma came after. In the beginning of 1967, six local investors (including business people, an attorney and a sports reporter) schemed to bring professional basketball to Indianapolis. It wouldn’t be the first time a pro team resided in the Circle City — the Indianapolis Jets and Olympians had already come and gone. But the newly created American Basketball Association promised to be a worthy alternative to the still-fledgling NBA, and Hoosier powerbrokers looked to make the latest iteration of pro ball stick. The team was quickly christened the Pacers, a name that honored harness racing while invoking the Indy 500. The

tougher task came in deciding who the team would represent. Would they be the Indianapolis Pacers, or the Indiana Pacers? You already know how that one worked out, and, in retrospect, it was the obvious decision. Basketball is Indiana’s game, played by Hoosiers from South Bend to Evansville, from Terre Haute to Richmond. The Pacers have resonated with fans in a way seldom experienced by other franchises. When the team faced economic ruin in 1977 shortly after joining the NBA, then-coach Bobby “Slick” Leonard and wife/general manager Nancy initiated a telethon wherein fans raised the $2 million needed to keep the team afloat and remain in Indy. You think Miami Heat fans would do the same? But the Pacers have endeared themselves for more reasons than simply being a basketball team in basketball

country. The team ranks among the most storied franchises in professional hoops. In 49 years, Indy has won three championships, made 32 postseason appearances and sent four representatives to the Hall of Fame. This season will be Indiana’s 50th, and we commemorate the team’s history with this countdown of the 50 Greatest Pacers. Here, we look back on the good, the bad and the many dramatic moments brought to us by the state’s greatest pastime. How we made our list Sports reporters and personalities from around the city were solicited to submit ballots, of which we received 16. Voters ranked their 30 greatest Pacers, and we assembled the ballots into this final list. First place votes received 30 points, 30th place votes received one point. Ties were decided by the average ranking across all ballots.

Who made our list David Benner (Pacers Director of Media Relations), Andrew Crowley (NUVO Contributor), Chris Denari (Pacers TV Play-By-Play Announcer), Roy Hobbson (NUVO Contributor), Wheat Hotchkiss (Pacers Web Manager), Jeremiah Johnson (Pacers Sideline Reporter), Jon R. LaFollette (NUVO Contributor), Mark Montieth (Pacers. com Reporter), Larra Overton (Sports Reporter, FOX 59), Greg Rapaport (Pacers Web Coordinator), David Searle (Co-Host, Miller Time Podcast), Jason Spells (Sports Reporter, WTHR), Kent Sterling (Radio Host, 1430 AM), Jon Washburn (Staff Writer, 8points9seconds.com), Brian Weiss (Social Media Manager, NUVO), Ed Wenck (Content Marketing, CEDIA).

>>>

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43

Sam Perkins 1998-2001

POS PF PPG 5.3 REB 3.1 3P% 38.8 The Big Smooth arrived in Indy at the age of 37 and unable to jump over a piece of paper. But athleticism wasn’t what stood out to the Pacers — it was his ability to stretch the floor with an unconventional jump shot in which his feet rarely left the hardwood. His playing time was scattershot, but Perkins was always a threat.

42

POS SF PPG 16.6 REB 3.9 AST 2.7 3P% 34.2 Jackson is infamous for off-the-court activities — hurling haymakers during the brawl in Detroit and firing his gun in 2006 during an altercation at Club Rio. Though Cap’n Jack is among the most controversial Pacers, he played up to his role as a potent scorer on teams that otherwise could have contended for a title.

SAM MITCHELL COURTESY OF THE INDIANA PACERS

50

Brad Miller 2001–2003

POS C PPG 13.7 RPG 8.1 AST 2.4 FG% 51.4 Miller played only 101 games for the Pacers, but the 7-foot Purdue alum made the most of his short stint. He displayed offensive versatility that transcended his position as a center, and became one of the few undrafted players to make the All-Star game (2003). Not bad for the second-best Miller in team history.

49

Troy Murphy 2006–2010

POS PF PPG 13.3 RPG 9.2 FG% 46.7 3P% 41.3 It’s easy to forget Murphy, who played on a series of rebuilding Pacers teams that never made the postseason. But Murphy’s skill set as a three-point shooting big man was a precursor to today’s play-making power forward — a role team president Larry Bird unsuccessfully hoped Paul George would fill a season ago.

48

Lance Stephenson 2010–2014

POS SG PPG 9.1 RPG 4.4 AST 3.1 Before blowing into LeBron’s ear, he earned the nickname Born Ready on the hypercompetitive blacktops of NYC. There, he built an arsenal of moves that would later bring sex appeal to a slow-footed Pacers offense. Ankle-breaking crossovers, flashy no-look passes and an unbeatable swagger were all put to expert use during his final two seasons with the team.

47

Byron Scott 1993–1995

POS SG/PG PPG 10.2 FG% 46.1 3P% 38.3 FT% 82.9 After 10 seasons and winning three titles with

Stephen Jackson 2004–2007

the Lakers, Scott came to Indy as a 32-year-old guard on the backside of his career. He rarely started, but excelled as a sixth man, providing a scoring punch off the bench for teams that made back-to-back appearances in the Eastern Conference Finals.

46

Travis Best 1995–2002

POS PG PPG 8.1 AST 3.8 STL 1.0 FG% 44.2 Best spent the bulk of his career playing behind teammate Mark Jackson, but delivered highlights of his own — including the serieswinning shot against the Milwaukee Bucks in 2000 during the first round of the playoffs. The win helped Indy to its only NBA Finals appearance to date.

45

Sam Mitchell 1992–1995

POS SF PPG 6.2 RPG 2.9 FG% 46.3 Mitchell is rightly remembered as a member of the Minnesota Timberwolves, where he spent 10 of his 13 years in the league. Though Mitchell had a lengthy NBA career, his time in Indy is the result of a lackluster trade in which the Pacers gave up the sharp-shooting ways of Chuck Person.

44

Michael Williams 1990–1992

POS PG PPG 13.2 AST 6.5 STL 2.5 FG% 49.4 He earned a ring playing a limited role his rookie season with Detroit (1988-89), but Williams didn’t come into his own until he signed with Indiana as a free agent. In his two years with the team — including 113 starts — he set new career marks in points per game (15.0), assists (8.2) and field goal percentage (49.9).

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41

LaSalle Thompson 1988–1995, 1996–1997

POS C PPG 5.8 RPG 5.4 FG% 47.9 Nicknamed Tank for his imposing girth (6-foot11, 275 pounds) and raw power, Thompson was a double-double machine for the New York Knicks and Sacramento Kings. He spent most of his time in Indy as a backup, but his presence gave the team a bevy of big-man talent alongside Rik Smits and Dale Davis.

40

Rick Mount 1970–1972

POS SG PPG 10.8 AST 2.4 3P% 30.9 He is among the most decorated Hoosiers in the state’s rich basketball history, shooting his way into hardwood lore at Lebanon High School, Purdue and with the Pacers. Mount was selected by Indiana with the first pick in the 1970 ABA draft. Using the recently created 3-point line to his advantage, Mount’s long-range capabilities helped the team to its second title in 1972.

39

Adrian Dantley 1977

POS SF PPG 26.5 REB 9.4 AST 2.8 STL 2.1 Dantley did many notable things during his lengthy NBA career, earning Rookie of the Year in 1977 and playing in six All-Star games. However, he never achieved such heights as a Pacer. Dantley played just 23 games before being shipped to the Lakers in a midseason trade.

38

Gus Johnson 1972–1973

POS SF PPG 6.0 REB 4.9 FG% 44.1 Johnson came to Indy a battered and aged version of his former self. Though he averaged a double-double for eight consecutive seasons

with the Baltimore Bullets, a then-34-year-old Johnson played a limited role off the bench for a Pacers team that won its third and final ABA title.

37

Alex English 1978–1980

POS SF PPG 15.6 REB 7.7 AST 3.1 FG% 50.8 English signed with the Pacers during one of the franchise’s least glamorous eras. The team made just two postseason appearances between 1976 and 1989, and English’s two years in Indy didn’t ease the misery. Though he possessed speed and athleticism, they were maximized after a trade to Denver — where he led the league in scoring in 1983 and made eight All-Star appearances.

36

Al Harrington 1999–2004, 2007

POS PF PPG 10.7 REB 5.4 FG% 45.1 3P% 33.8 Drafted out of high school in 1998, Baby Al spent his first three years adjusting to the pace and tenacity of the NBA while playing a minimal role on a veteran team. He developed into a mature and promising player, placing second in voting for the Sixth Man of the Year Award in 2004.

35

Quinn Buckner 1985–1986

POS PG PPG 3.7 AST 2.7 FG% 47.1 Buckner’s 10-year career was built on defense. The former IU standout earned Second Team All-Defensive honors in four consecutive seasons (1977-1982). Buckner has been a color commentator for Pacers TV broadcasts since 1998, where his many catchphrases (“SMOTHERED CHICKEN!”) have become part of the local lexicon.

34

Jamaal Tinsley 2001–2009

POS: PG PPG: 10.4 AST: 7.0 REB: 3.4 STL: 1.7 “Remember Jamaal Tinsley?” you say. “Yeah, he’s one of the best point guards in Pacers history,” your buddy replies. “Mmhmm,” you respond. “Only thing is, it’s tough to recall his on-the-court moments. Wasn’t he involved in a drive-by shooting and told to stay away from the team?” “Yup,” your buddy says. “He was a bad egg. Pity.”

33

Steve Stipanovich 1983–1988

POS C PPG 13.2 REB 7.8 BLK 0.9 FG% 48.4 Stipanovich was gifted a formidable 6-foot11, 245-pound frame, but was cursed with degenerative knee issues that forced him into retirement at 28. He spent the duration of his career with the Pacers, fighting constant knee pain and multiple surgeries to post double-digit scoring averages in each of his five seasons.


32

Austin Croshere 1997–2006

POS PF PPG 7.5 REB 4.3 3P% 34.3 Croshere entered the league as a primordial stretch four during an era when most big men earned their cash on the low block. The Providence grad peaked from 1999-01, scoring 10.2 points per game and helping push the team to the 2000 NBA Finals.

31

Wayman Tisdale 1985–1989

POS PF PPG 15.2 REB 6.4 FG% 51.2 Tisdale is one of the most charismatic Pacers to ever grace the court. His outgoing and upbeat disposition matched his energetic and thundering style of play. He was money at the rim and one of the most efficient post threats to ever play in Indy.

30

George Hill 2011–2016

POS: PG PPG: 12.3 AST: 3.9 REB: 3.7 3P%: 37.6 This Broad Ripple native and IUPUI alum always stressed the fact he was never a pure point guard, a truth reflected in his stat line. But Hill’s game is as blue-collar as they come. He’s a versatile and lengthy defender, a worthy ball handler and a knockdown shooter from long-range. His game isn’t sexy, but it rarely disappoints. FIRST TIMER: Hill became the first player from IUPUI to be selected in the NBA draft when he was taken 26th overall in 2008 by the San Antonio Spurs.

29

Chris Mullin 1997–2000

POS SF PPG 9.4 REB 2.7 FG% 47.2 3P% 44.1 Once a shooter, always a shooter. Such is the case for Mullin, who came to Indy near the end of his Hall of Fame career. Though on the wrong side of 30, he started 134 of his 179 games and bolstered a squad loaded with 3-point shooting. The team ranked among the best long-range units in the league during Mullin’s three-year tenure.

GOOD RETURN: Williams was traded from Indiana to the Dallas Mavericks during the 1988-89 season. The Pacers received Detlef Schrempf and a second-round pick later used to select Antonio Davis.

27

David West 2011–2015

POS PF PPG 14.0 REB 7.0 AST 2.8 FG% 48.7 He’s a baaaaad man. The Xavier alum often did the team’s dirty work. Whether banging in the post, getting tough rebounds or spacing the floor with a crisp jumper, West was a model of consistency. He was also the moral compass for teams that made back-to-back trips to the Eastern Conference Finals, serving as the elder statesman to the cartoonish antics of Lance Stephenson. TAKING A STAND: Throughout his career, West has performed a silent protest during the playing of the national anthem. While his teammates stand in a straight line near midcourt, West places himself in line roughly two feet behind them.

26

Jeff Foster 1999–2012

POS C PPG 4.9 REB 6.9 FG% 49.7 Foster’s game-day itinerary was simple: clean the glass, play defense and stay the hell out of the way. Foster will never make the Hall of Fame, but remains a fan favorite for his willingness to get his hands dirty — some think too dirty. A 2012 Sports Illustrated survey of NBA players listed Foster as one of the dirtiest players in the league. LONG STAY: Foster spent his entire NBA career with the Pacers and played 764 games with the team, the fourth most in franchise history.

Pacers, continued page 14

BACK TO HIS ROOTS: Mullin was a standout at St. John’s University, where he was a threetime Big East Player of the Year. He returned to his alma mater in 2015 to coach the men’s basketball team.

28

Herb Williams 1981–1989

POS C PPG 15.0 REB 7.8 BLK 1.9 FG% 47.6 Williams spent an impressive 20 seasons in the NBA, with his best years coming in a Pacers uniform. During his eight-year stay in the Circle City, he was one of the few bright spots on a team that languished in irrelevancy. His lone playoff appearance with the team came during the 1986-87 season.

GEORGE HILL COURTESY OF THE INDIANA PACERS

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25

Roy Hibbert 2008–2015

POS C PPG 11.1 REB 6.8 BLK 1.9 FG% 46.2 Big Roy entered the league as a lanky 7-foot-2 enigma, but became one of the league’s elite defensive players. By the 2013-14 season, he was a two-time All-Star and the centerpiece of a stifling defense that pushed the Miami Heat to Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals. LOCAL CELEBRITY: Hibbert made three cameo appearances on the NBC sitcom Parks and Recreation along with other Indy sports stars, including Reggie Wayne, Detlef Schrempf and Andrew Luck.

24

Antonio Davis 1993–1999

POS PF PPG 9.0 REB 6.7 FG% 48.2 One half of the Davis Brothers, Antonio came off the bench for the majority of his tenure as a Pacer, backing up teammate and not-actualbrother Dale Davis. His 6-foot-9 frame added depth to the team’s frontcourt, and he was a steady post presence during an era when Indy consistently contended for a title. OVERSEAS TRIP: Davis was drafted by the Pacers in 1990 but spent the next three years playing in Greece and Italy before making his NBA debut.

23

Darnell Hillman 1971–1977

POS PF PPG 10.6 REB 8.4 BLK 1.5 FG% 47.6 Hillman may not be the greatest Pacer, but he ranks among the coolest. Sporting an afro as regal as a lion’s mane, Hillman’s athleticism and knack for rocking the rim earned him the nickname Dr. Dunk. He often played a supporting role, but his trips to the rack were exclamation points for a team that won back-to-back ABA titles in 1972 and 1973. A WORTHY NAME: Hillman won the inaugural NBA slam dunk contest which took place throughout the 1976-77 season. Dr. Dunk defeated Golden State’s Larry MacNeil during the finals and won a cash prize of $15,000.

22

Clark Kellogg 1982–1987

POS PF PPG 18.9 REB 9.5 AST 1.5 FG% 49.7 Had Kellogg played in today’s NBA complete with advanced medicine and smarter recovery methods, perhaps his career would have extended beyond the paltry 260 games he played with Indiana. While Kellogg was an admirable post player, chronic knee pains forced him to retire at 25. BEATEN BY OBAMA: Kellogg, now a basketball analyst for CBS, played a game of H.O.R.S.E. with President Obama in March 2010. The game was called, “P.O.T.U.S.” given the circumstances. The Prez bested Kellogg by one bucket.

21

Don Buse 1972–1977, 1980–1982

POS PG PPG 7.7 AST 5.1 STL 2.5 FG% 43.4 Buse rarely lit up the scoreboard and played a backup role, but his defensive acumen and ability to run an offense made him an asset. He led the ABA in steals and assists in 1976 and gave a repeat performance the following year when the Pacers joined the NBA. During that two-year peak, Buse appeared in back-to-back All-Star Games. EVANSVILLE LEGEND: Buse grew up in Southern Indiana and played Division II basketball at the University of Evansville, leading the team to the 1971 championship.

20

Derrick McKey 1993–2001

POS SF PPG 8.8 REB 4.4 AST 2.7 STL 1.1 Take the long view and McKey’s career is a mild disappointment. Drafted ninth overall in 1987 — ahead of future All-Star teammates in Reggie Miller and Mark Jackson — his time in the league was marred by injuries that diminished his athleticism and stunted his impact. But when McKey was healthy, he was one of the most steadfast defenders in Pacers history. At 6-foot-10, his size routinely frustrated opponents and his sound decision making often kept him on the court during close games. He never scored as much as fans wanted him to, but McKey nonetheless played his way into a much-needed niche. GIANT ON THE DIAMOND: Despite his size, McKey played shortstop as a high school baseball player. He hosts annual baseball camps in his native Mississippi as well as Indianapolis.

19

Ron Artest (Metta World Peace) 2002–2006

POS SF PPG 16.5 REB 5.2 AST 3.0 STL 2.2 We understand your reaction, but bear with us. Yes, Metta World Ron was a dangerous mixture of reckless and bizarre during his tumultuous four-year stay: Assaulting a fan, destroying a TV camera, asking for time off to promote an R&B act on his record label. But his talent is undeniable. He is the only Pacer to win Defensive Player of the Year (2004), and was a three-time All-Defense selection during an era when Indy pushed for a championship. He held his own offensively, too, scoring nearly 20 points per game in the two seasons he wasn’t suspended or part of a trade. If he had stayed on the straight and narrow, perhaps Artest would have won a ring and be remembered for his abilities instead of his behavior. LIGHT IN THE POCKET: For his part in the Pacers-Pistons brawl, Artest missed an NBArecord 86 games due to suspension during the 2004-05 season and forfeited an estimated $5 million in salary.

DARNELL HILLMAN COURTESY OF THE INDIANA PACERS

18

Vern Fleming 1984–1995

POS PG PPG 11.7 AST 4.9 REB 3.4 FG% 49.8 Fleming is one of the most steady-handed players in Pacers history. In the seven seasons in which he was a starter, the Long Island native was mechanical in terms of production, averaging 12 points and seven assists like clockwork. Though he gave consistent effort, Fleming spent his first two years on young teams bitten by the injury bug and didn’t make his first postseason appearance until 1987. He remained a starter until the arrival of Pooh Richardson (no, that’s not his real name) in 1992. Even as a reserve player, Fleming remained as even-keeled as they come. Nothing flashy, just professional. GOOD COMPANY: Fleming was a member of the 1984 Olympic Men’s Basketball team and played alongside future Pacers in Sam Perkins, Chris Mullin and Wayman Tisdale.

17

Detlef Schrempf 1989–1993

POS PF PPG 17.0 REB 8.6 AST 4.1 FG% 51.1 Drafted by Dallas in 1985, this West German native didn’t become a worthy rotation player until the Pacers acquired him in 1989 in a midseason trade. During his brief but potent stay, Schrempf blossomed into a versatile scoring threat and possessed a nimble athleticism despite his 6-foot-9 build. With help from Schrempf, Indy shook off the losing blues of the '80s and became regular postseason participants. In his final year with the team, he made his first All-Star appearance and was the only player in the league to place in the top 25 in points, rebounds and assists per game. FIRST OFF THE BENCH: Schrempf was named

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the Sixth Man of the Year in 1990 and 1991 and is the only Pacer to date to win the award.

16

Billy Keller 1969–1976

POS PG / SG PPG 11.8 AST 3.6 FG% 42.5 3P% 33.8 Billy Keller spent his entire career playing hoops in the Hoosier state. After graduating from George Washington High School (where he was named Mr. Basketball in 1965), he went to Purdue where he helped the Boilermakers to their first appearance in the NCAA tournament. He joined the Pacers in 1969 and won his first of three championships with the team during his rookie year. Keller was often a backup on teams loaded with talent, but he carved out a role as a sharpshooter from long range during the nascent days of the 3-point line. Though he converted less than 30 percent of his attempts from long range in his first season, he raised his 3-point percentage to 35.2 percent by his final year. DEEP THREAT: Keller made 506 3-point field goals during his career, good enough for second in ABA history behind Louie Dampier (794).

15

Jalen Rose 1996–2002

POS SF PPG 14.2 AST 3.4 FG% 45.5 3P% 34.6 Rose arrived at the Pacers a frustrated, miscast player and transformed into a go-to scorer for a team that made the franchise’s first appearance in the NBA Finals. Rose grew flustered with a lack of playing time under then-coach Larry Brown. Though his role grew incrementally under new management with coach Larry Bird, Rose’s patience turned into a breakout campaign during the 1999-2000 season. In his first year as a starter, Rose led


the team with 18 points per game and shot 47 percent from the field — including 39 percent from downtown. He was even better in the postseason, averaging 21 points in leading the team to the Finals against the Lakers. NOTED IMPROVEMENT: Rose was named the Most Improved Player in 2000, becoming the first Pacer to win the award. Other Pacers to receive the honor are Jermaine O’Neal (2002), Danny Granger (2009) and Paul George (2013).

14

Freddie Lewis 1967–1974, 1976–1977

POS PG / SG PPG 16.1 AST 4.0 FG% 42.7 It’s easy to forget Freddie Lewis, which is a damn shame. He put up impressive numbers on championship-winning teams, made multiple All-Star appearances and was so respected by teammates they named him captain every year he was in the league save his rookie campaign. But Lewis played in a time when few games were broadcast on television and has been left on the periphery of team history while some teammates had their jersey numbers retired. Nonetheless, Lewis remains one of the best to wear a Pacers uniform. What he lacked in outside shooting, he made up with an attack-first mentality, driving into the paint for floaters, easy layups and trips to the foul line — of which he averaged more than five per game as a Pacer. MOST VALUABLE: Lewis was named the ABA Playoffs Most Valuable Player in 1972, averaging 19 points per game in the postseason en route to the Pacers’ second ABA title.

13

Bob Netolicky 1967–1972, 1973–1976

POS PF PPG 15.7 REB 8.9 FG% 49.3 If the colorful and high-scoring ABA was supposed to be everything the dull and vapid NBA wasn’t, then Bob Netolicky was everything the ABA aspired to be. He was as charismatic as his jump shot was effortless, and was the league’s ultimate playboy personality. He owned a nightclub on the East Side and had a lion, ocelot and boa constrictor for pets. While Neto certainly knew how to have fun, he also took care of business on the court. He averaged a double-double in three of his first five years with the Pacers, winning two championships in the process. He also made four consecutive All-Star appearances from 1968 to 1971.

team’s all-time leader in assists per game (8.1). During Action Jackson’s time in the Circle City, the Blue and Gold regularly ranked among the NBA’s best offensive units, placing first in offensive efficiency in 1999 and 2000. Jackson lacked the speed and athleticism possessed by his contemporaries, but he flourished with an eagle-eye court vision, expert ball handling and a rigorous workout routine that endeared the Brooklyn native to the team’s hardworking Hoosier fans. RULE CHANGE: Mark Jackson impacted the game beyond the Pacers. The NBA amended its rule book with the “Mark Jackson Rule,” which forbids players from dribbling with their back to the basket below the free throw line for more than five seconds.

11

Chuck Person 1986–1992

POS SF PPG 19.0 REB 6.3 FG% 48.1 3P% 35.0 Dubbed The Rifleman for his natural shooting ability, Person ranks among the best scorers in team history. Drafted out of Auburn with the fourth overall pick in 1986, he averaged 18.8 points, 8.3 rebounds and converted 46.8 percent of his field goal attempts in his rookie season. So prolific was Person in his debut, he became the first (and only) Pacer to win Rookie of the Year. For the next five seasons, The Rifleman played a key role in washing away the losing stench of the '80s and helped Indiana make the postseason in four out of six seasons. When he was traded to Minnesota in 1992, Person left averaging 19 points per game for his career, third best in Pacers history. WHAT’S IN A NAME: Person’s nickname as The Rifleman played up to his sharp-shooting ways on the court, but Person was also named after actor Chuck Connors, who played “The Rifleman” on the eponymous TV show.

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Mark Jackson 1994–1996, 1997–2000

POS PG PPG 8.4 AST 8.1 FG% 43.4 3P% 36.2 The point guard’s role is to lead the way on offense, initiating plays and setting up easy buckets for teammates. No one ran the show better for the Pacers than Mark Jackson, the

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CHUCK PERSON COURTESY OF THE INDIANA PACERS

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10 GREATEST PAC

DALE DAVIS

10

BILLY KNIGHT

Dale Davis 1991–2000, 2005

POS PF / C PPG 9.3 REB 9.0 BLK: 1.3 FG% 54.3 Double-D earned a living cleaning glass. In nearly 10 seasons with the Pacers, Davis became the franchise’s all-time leading rebounder from the NBA era. He grabbed more than 6,000 boards, including a Pacers all-time best 2,276 offensive rebounds. Coupled with his interior defense (including 904 blocked shots), Davis’ raw, no-frills game helped the team to five Eastern Conference Finals and their only NBA Finals appearance to date. Though Davis was superseded in notoriety by teammates like Reggie Miller and Rik Smits, Davis remained a respected player around the league and was voted to the 2000 AllStar game as a reserve by NBA coaches. GET YOUNGER: After losing the NBA Finals to the Los Angeles Lakers, the Pacers traded Davis to the Portland Trailblazers in an effort to get a younger roster. In return, they received an unproven talent out of high school. His name? Jermaine O’Neal.

9

Billy Knight 1974–1977, 1979–1983

POS SF PPG 18.4 REB 5.9 AST 2.4 FG% 51.3 Knight just missed the Pacers’ ABA dynasty, arriving the season after the team’s third and final championship in 1974. But Knight came close to winning a title of his own, scoring 17 points per game his rookie season to help push the team to its fifth ABA Finals (losing to the Kentucky Colonels, 4-1). Knight’s next two seasons were his best, averaging more than 26 points and making back-to-back All-Star appearances. He was traded to Buffalo in 1977 but returned to the Pacers the following year, where he continued lighting up the score-

DANNY GRANGER

board. By his final year in 1983, Knight was the team’s all-time leading scorer with 10,780 points — a mark later eclipsed only by Rik Smits and Reggie Miller. RARE COMPANY: Billy Knight and Don Buse are the only Pacers selected to the ABA and NBA All-Star games. Knight played in the final ABA All-Star game in 1976 and played in the NBA All-Star game the following season.

8

Danny Granger 2005–2014

POS: SF PPG 17.6 REB 4.9 FG% 43.5 3P% 38.2 Granger was the Pacers’ first standout player to emerge following Reggie Miller’s retirement. Drafted 17th overall in 2005, he developed into a go-to scorer and became an All-Star in 2009, averaging 25.8 points per game. Still, Indiana missed the postseason four of his first five years, fueling Granger’s critics who said he put up good numbers on bad squads. Granger was vindicated in 2011 and 2012 when he remained the Pacers’ leading scorer for teams that became foils for LeBron James and the Miami Heat. As quickly as Granger matured, knee injuries took their toll. Before he was traded in 2014 to Philadelphia, Granger played just 75 games during a three-year period and was rendered a shell of his old dynamic self. THE HERO WE DESERVE: Danny Granger is such a fan of Batman, he had a Batcave built into his New Mexico home after signing a $60 million contract extension in 2009.

7

Jermaine O’Neal 2000–2008

POS PF / C PPG 18.6 REB 9.6 BLK 2.4 FG% 45.8 O’Neal’s arrival marked a transition phase

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JERMAINE O'NEAL

for the Pacers, who exchanged an aging core for a younger roster. O’Neal was an unproven prospect out of high school and received little playing time as a member of the Portland Trailblazers. Upon being acquired by Indiana, he grew into the most complete big man the team ever had in its NBA era. He was as potent in the post as he was from midrange and is the team’s all-time leading shot blocker (1,245). He made six All-Star appearances in eight years and finished third in MVP voting in 2004, the same season he led the team to the Eastern Conference Finals. O’Neal looked to be the anchor for a new era of Pacers basketball, but injuries made his hefty contract a burden. He was traded to Toronto in 2008, where he turned into a journeyman. SORRY: In a 2012 Grantland article, O’Neal expressed remorse for his role in the PacersPistons brawl (he was suspended 15 games). “I don’t know if I could ever apologize to the city of Indianapolis and the state of Indiana for that enough,” he said.

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Rik Smits 1988–2000

POS C PPG 14.8 REB 6.1 BLK 1.3 FG% 50.7 At a towering 7-foot-4, the Dunking Dutchman is the tallest player in Pacers history and an all-time fan favorite. He played his entire career with Indiana while averaging double-digit points and serving as a worthy complement to Reggie Miller. He is perhaps best remembered on the court for his performance in the 1995 playoffs, in which he averaged 20 points, seven rebounds and sunk the game-winning shot against the Orlando Magic in Game 4 of the Eastern Conference Finals. Foot injuries plagued Smits for much of his career, but he managed to play in 867

RIK SMITS

games -- second most in Pacers history. He retired after the 1999-2000 season, but not before helping the team reach the NBA Finals and making a lone All-Star appearance in 1998. RIDIN’ DIRTY: Upon retiring, Smits began competing in vintage motorcycle racing. He flourished in his new hobby despite his cumbersome size, earning a national award in 2008.

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Paul George 2010 – Present

POS SF PPG 16.9 REB: 6.2 STL 1.7 FG% 42.5 In terms of raw talent, the Pacers have never had a player as awesome as PG in their NBA era. A do-it-all threat with length, athleticism, shooting and shut-down defense, George has been the catalyst for Indiana’s success in the past decade. He’s only 26 and has already made three All-Star games, three All-NBA teams and back-to-back trips to the Eastern Conference Finals. Though a compound fracture in his right leg suffered in 2014 during a Team USA scrimmage looked to derail his career, George responded last season with his best year ever, setting new marks in points, rebounds and steals. He remains the go-to guy and should benefit from a refurbished offense that will quicken the pace. PG looks to be in store for a historic season as he enters his prime. He could become the greatest Pacer ever if he sticks around long enough. HE GOT GAMERS: PG graces the cover of NBA 2K17, the latest installment in the popular NBA video game franchise released in September. He is the first Pacer to make such an appearance.


CERS OF ALL TIME

PAUL GEORGE

ROGER BROWN

GEORGE McGINNIS

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MEL DANIELS

REGGIE MILLER

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE INDIANA PACERS

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Roger Brown 1967–1974, 1975

POS SF PPG 18.0 REB 6.5 AST 4.0 FG% 47.1 Never has a player so good been seen by so few. A high school star from Brooklyn, Brown was banned from the NCAA and NBA after being wrongly associated with an illegal point shaving operation. When the Pacers joined the ABA in 1967, Brown worked for General Motors while playing in amatuer leagues. He was the first Pacer signed to a contract and quickly became one of the league’s elite talents. He made the All-Star game in his rookie year, doing so three more times by 1972. But Brown became legendary in the postseason, leading the team in scoring four times and winning a trio of championships. Brown burned bright for five seasons, but did so at a time when few basketball games were broadcast on TV. He made the Hall of Fame and his jersey number (35) is retired by Indiana, but his passing from colon cancer in 1997 has left his story to be told by others. PUBLIC OFFICIAL: Brown was elected to an at-large seat on the Indianapolis City Council in 1971.

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George McGinnis 1971–1975, 1980–1982

POS PF PPG 19.6 REB 10.7 AST 3.3 FG% 46.2 McGinnis is a Circle City talent who excelled on the court at every level. He led Washington High School to an undefeated season in 1969 and averaged 30 points and 15 rebounds in his only season at IU, becoming the first sophomore to lead the Big Ten in both categories. He peaked with the Pacers, where he remains the all-time leader in points per game (19.6). He won back-to-back titles his first two years

with the team and averaged a double-double from 1973 to 1975. He led the ABA in scoring with 29.8 points per game in 1975, the same year he won the ABA MVP. He joined Philadelphia the following year and began a successful NBA career. McGinnis returned to Indiana in 1980 a shell of his former self, but forever ranks among the franchise’s all-time players. LOOK, MOM. NO HANDS!: McGinnis holds the all-time record for turnovers in a single season, coughing up the rock 422 times in 1974-75, averaging 5.3 turnovers per game.

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Mel Daniels 1968–1974

POS: C PPG: 19.4 REB: 16.0 FG%: 48.3 Daniels is the most decorated player in Pacers history: a six-time All-Star, four-time All-ABA selection, three-time champ, two-time MVP and Hall of Fame selection in 2012. He was Rookie of the Year in 1968 as a member of the Minnesota Muskies (it’s a fish), but was traded to Indiana when the Muskies went belly up after one season. In the next six years, he ranked among the ABA’s preeminent talents, hounding boards and hogging the paint to become one of the most formidable post threats of his generation. But as competitive and combative as he was on the hardwood, away from the court he was just as thoughtful and kindhearted. Teammates and former opponents speak to his gentle nature, and he wrote many poems that recall his personal life and playing days. Daniels passed away in 2015. He was 71. BIRD’S THE WORD: After retiring, Daniels joined the coaching staff at Indiana State, where he coached future Hall of Famer and current Pacers GM, Larry Bird.

1

Reggie Miller 1987–2005

POS SG PPG 18.2 FG% 47.1 3P% 39.5 AST: 3.0

Thousands of fans cheered Reggie Miller’s name during his historic run with the Pacers, but his time in Indiana began with a chorus of boos. On the night of the 1987 draft, many hoped the team would select IU standout and Franklin native, Steve Alford. When Miller, a gangling guard from UCLA, was taken with the 11th pick, the reaction was mixed. But while Alford played just four unremarkable seasons in the league, Miller suited up for 1,389 games — the fourth most in NBA history with one team — and delivered a bevy of iconic moments. The Reggie Miller that posterity will remember was born June 1, 1994 during Game 5 of the Eastern Conference Finals. Before then, MIller was a one-time All-Star and dynamite shooter. But after scoring 39 points (25 coming in the fourth quarter) and converting 6-of-11 from downtown in a do-ordie situation, Miller demonstrated his clutch-time gusto and displayed his schoolyard bona fides by giving the choke sign to director Spike Lee, who sat courtside. The Pacers left with a 93-86 win, and Miller became a household name.

More memorable moments were to come — scoring eight points in 8.9 seconds, sinking a game-winner over Michael Jordan in the playoffs, becoming the first Pacer to play in the Olympics. By the time Uncle Reggie hung up his shoes in 2005, he led the Pacers to their only NBA Finals appearance, played in six Eastern Conference Finals, five All-Star games and was the leading 3-point shooter in NBA history. But it isn’t the wins and highlights that make Reggie the greatest Pacer — every player on this countdown can claim such achievements. What separates him is a sense of pride in the city and state he represented. Indiana was his team, and Reggie was Indiana’s man. He received a final ovation during his last game. Miller pointed to the crowd and placed his other hand over his heart, the word “Indiana” embroidered on the jersey. The California kid became a Hoosier, and he’ll always be one of us. GOING OUT IN STYLE: After his final regular season game with the Pacers (an 85-83 win over Chicago), Miller was gifted a Bentley automobile by team owners Herb and Mel Simon during a post-game ceremony. n

NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // COVER STORY 17


FOOD

COMING SOON

GOOD NEWS AND NEW BREWS ROUND TOWN BREWERY SET TO OPEN OCT. 20

NUVO.NET/FOOD Visit nuvo.net/food for complete restaurant listings, reviews and more.

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A SLEW OF NEW RESTAURANTS FOR YOU

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Round Town Brewery’s grand opening on Oct. 20th at 950 S. White River Parkway W. Dr., from 5 - 9 p.m., will feature five beers from veteran brewer Jerry Sutherlin. Three years in the planning, Round Town is Indianapolis’ newest production brewery and the first modern craft brewery west of White River. Owner Max Schenk lauds the site SUBMITTED PHOTO as a friendly neighborhood Max Schenk destination in a revitalized former industrial building with a sterling view of downtown from the taproom and adjacent patio. Sutherlin and assistant brewer Bob Moore are bringing out O’Reilly’s Irish Red, Coffee Irish Red, Happy Face Pale Ale, Stray Monk Belgian Amber, Round Town Vienna-Style Lager and South Side Hoppy Wheat. Sutherlin and Moore brew within classic styles with an emphasis on balance, layers of flavors surfacing as the beer warms and closes with a clean finish. During the grand opening patrons will also be able to enjoy some Italian eats from Simeri’s Italian Restaurant or go for breakfast burritos and portobello burgers from Happy Hippies Food Truck. If you’re wanting a preliminary taste, Round Town tap handles already are pulling pints at Rooster’s Kitchen and Flatwater Restaurant. Patrons at RTB’s on-site soft opening, tailgating and off-site philanthropic events have posted five-star reviews on Facebook: see facebook.com/ roundtownbrewery. Owner Max Schenk, who launched Round Town after working in the service industry for nine years, said she “graduated from Indiana University in 2008 with the goal of starting her own business.” Sutherlin began brewing at Oaken Barrel 15 years ago, moved on to The RAM and then to Rock Bottom Downtown from 2006 - 2015. Moore, a retired U.S. Air Force Senior Master Sergeant, Iraq and Afghan veteran, majored in Applied Chemistry at Ball State. He initially brewed at Oaken Barrel with Sutherlin before taking other career paths and making a return to brewing. — RITA KOHN

THIS WEEK

Nine new spots to try right now!

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ew places are popping up everywhere, seemingly every day. It’s hard to keep up with all the new spots; luckily, NUVO has you covered on the places you’re not going to want to miss. From heavenly pastries to allyou-can-eat sushi, there is so much out there for you to eat, and you better hurry because more exciting new restaurants are just around the corner. THE GALLERY PASTRY SHOP This new spot has everyone excited with their incredible pastries. I don't know if I've ever been closer to heaven than when taking a bite of their Provence. First off, it feels like you're eating a work of art, and then when you take a bite of the creamy lavender and white chocolate mousse, followed by a light crunch of the French macaron base, you realize you are. NUVO's editorial team has come to the conclusion that the pastry chefs at this SoBro establishment are freaking wizards, using magic to create food this incredible.  GREGORY'S RUSSIAN RESTAURANT With the closing of Russia House, Indianapolis was without a staple world cuisine until just over a month ago when this new spot opened up in Castleton with a menu filled with classic Russian fare. Overindulge on beef, pork, ham and sausage with the sweet and savory soup, Meat Solyanka, or with the meat-or cheese-filled crepes known as blinchikis. Or go with something a little safer like the ever-popular chicken Kiev.  Every meal comes with an extra side of music played on the dining room's piano by the titular character of the restaurant, Dr. Gregory Baranovsky.  GEEKS SEAFOOD, SALAD AND SANDWICHES This little spot snuck into the building in Broad Ripple that was Dagwood's Deli & Sub Shop and then Greek's Pizzeria. While the building hasn't done well in the past, there also aren't many

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1. Cobia from Salt on Mass, 2. The Mug Double, 3. Gregory’s Russian Restaurant is now open. 4. The Gallery Pastry Shop is your new favorite pastry shop.

options for seafood in Broad Ripple. Pair that with awesome customer service, which is a highly important aspect of any dining experience, and that is exactly why Geeks might finally stick around in this black hole. Geeks also happens to serve one of the best Philly cheesesteak sandwiches you'll ever come across outside of Philly, and that compliment doesn't come lightly.  KASAI SUSHI BAR & RESTAURANT There are sushi restaurants where you should go for the nigiri and sashimi

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options and there are places to go for the rolls. This is a roll restaurant and while some sushi aficionados find that to mean it's lower quality, that isn't the case here. They craft some fucking incredible rolls like the Foxy Lady, the Tiger Roll, the American Dream (you can never go wrong with succulent, deep fried soft-shell crab), and for something that still resembles sushi, go for the gorgeous Rainbow Roll. Another interesting aspect to the menu here is the option of all-you-caneat sushi. ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!


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4 THE MUG (IRVINGTON) If you've ever sojourned to The Mug in Greenfield, or had a Mug Double or one of their famous tenderloins delivered to your doorstep by ClusterTruck, then you already know why this is an exciting addition to this Eastside cultural hub. The only problem you'll run into here is it's crazily popular, so you may have to wait a bit, but once you get a taste that wait will quickly slide from your mind. Don't miss out on the garlic fries. I repeat: don't miss out on the garlic fries. The Mug is owned by the same people as Tyner Pond Farms, and the farm supplies all of the meat to The Mug, making it a true farm-to-fork experience. While you’re there, make a quick trip next door to the Tyner Pond Market to get yourself some truly quality products to take home to your own kitchen.  PUNCH BOWL SOCIAL It's a chain and sometimes that can deter some people, but don't let that happen here, Punch Bowl Social is an incredible little (well, actually gigantic) spot. The Denver-based operation has taken nearly everything you could want in a dining experience and put it into one locale. First, enjoy a Southern-style meal from a menu curated by celebrity chef Hugh Acheson. Pair that with their awardwinning cocktails.  Once you're full, order another of those cocktails or a local brew and spend the evening bowling, bocce-ing, karaoke-ing, foosballing, dancing, arcade gaming or sitting by a fire and chatting with friends with a good drink in hand. There's literally something here for everyone.  REBAR INDY The novelty here is pouring your own beer from taps, which is a nice novelty if you're interested in getting to taste mul-

tiple beers (it definitely can get awkward asking a bartender to continually pour you samples). Once you've chosen your beer for the evening, you have to get some food. The menu seems like standard bar fare, and it is, but the people at Rebar have outdone themselves with their dishes like fried green tomatoes and addicting Wisconsin cheese curds. Oh, and their burger is officially in the running for one of the best in the city.  SALT ON MASS In a land of pubs and bar fare on Mass Ave, this high end seafood restaurant came in and gave us a new style of eatery in the popular cultural district. The seafood is flown in fresh daily and the kitchen prepares it to perfection. While the place is high-end it is a far cry from being pretentious, and that is nice for a night when you're going out bar-hopping or when you have a show to go to at Old National Centre — no one wants to do either of these things while dressed to the nines.  This definitely is a place to stick to the fresh options; you can always get the fish and chips or hush puppies, but why would you do that to yourself when there is pan roasted halibut and grilled cobia. If you're not a seafood fan, no worries; the menu has plenty of locally-sourced options like steaks from Fischer Farms and an Indiana tomato and mozzarella plate.  TINY HOUSE TREATS We're almost out of the warm season, but you still have time to swing by this adorable little shop while you're riding, walking or running down the Monon Trail. It's a small blue building directly next to the trail that serves yummy, classic ice cream and a few specialty sweet options: have you ever had ice cream-stuffed donuts!? n NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // FOOD 19


FILM EVENTS Heartland Film Festival’s Opening Night Film: The Book of Love October 20, 7 p.m. Jason Sudeikis stars as a New Orleans architect who befriends a homeless teen girl (Maisie Williams) after tragedy strikes him and his pregnant wife (Jessica Biel). Sudeikis’ character ends up helping the troubled teen build a raft to sail across the Atlantic Ocean in search of her long-lost father. Biel will be in attendance for the red carpet premiere, along with producer Michelle Purple and actor Richard Robichaux. An after-party will follow the film, which sounds like what Heartland would call a “truly moving picture.”

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Scottish Rite Cathedral, 650 N. Meridian St., $40 for the film and after-party, $15 for the party only, heartlandfilm.org Heartland Film Festival: 25th Anniversary Celebration October 21, 6:30 p.m. As Heartland Film’s website states, you should “celebrate Heartland’s silver anniversary in style at this signature red carpet event, where you’ll be greeted by paparazzi snapping photos before joining fellow fans for an evening of live music, drinks and food stations.” The key event of the night will be the presentation of Heartland Film’s Pioneering Spirit: Lifetime Achievement Award to actor Brian Dennehy — a strong presence in film, theater and television for the last 30 years. A two-time Tony Award winner, Dennehy has starred in such prestigious plays as Death of a Salesman and a slew of great films, including Presume Innocent, Tommy Boy and Baz Luhrmann’s stylish Shakespeare adaptation, Romeo + Juliet. AMC Castleton Square 14, 6020 E. 82nd St., Ticket prices vary, heartlandfilm.org

Heartland Film Festival 25th Anniversary Retrospective Program: Rudy October 28, 7:30 p.m. To celebrate its silver anniversary, Heartland is showing some audience favorites from the last 25 years. This one is a definitive “truly moving picture” — the ultimate underdog story, Rudy. Sean Astin stars as Rudy Ruettiger, an unconventional athlete who overcomes the odds to achieve his dream of playing football for the University of Notre Dame. Writer Angelo Pizzo, director David Anspaugh (both Indiana natives) and the real Rudy Ruettiger are scheduled to attend the screening. AMC Castleton Square 14, 6020 E. 82nd St., Tickets: $9 at heartlandfilm.org

NUVO.NET/SCREENS Visit nuvo.net/screens for complete movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes

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FIGHTING THE FORCES OF DARKNESS A Man Called Ove tackles the beast of depression

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un Facts: “Ove” is pronounced oovay. And the Swedish production, based on the 2012 novel by Fredrik Backman, was the country’s Best Foreign Language Film entry in the 89th Academy Awards. The crowd-pleaser is the fifth most financially successful Swedish film in the history of the country. I share this information because I realize that the movie is a tough sell. The premise, which I’ll get to in a minute, isn’t exactly groundbreaking, the cast doesn’t include any names familiar within our shores, it’s not sexy and it’s subtitled. But the film is a nice mix of bitter and sweet, with a strong cast. A Man Called Ove isn’t a great film, but it’s a surprisingly good one. I enjoyed it more than I expected to and I think many of you will react similarly if you decide to give it a shot. Ove (remember, it’s oo-vay) is a grouchy old man. Writer-director Hannes Holm shows us how he got that way and if he can learn to savor life again. Rolf Lassgard plays contemporary Ove, with Filip Berg portraying him as a younger fellow and Viktor Baagoe as a boy. Present-day Ove is a thundering pest. He used to be chairman of the local residents’ association. He was voted out, but that doesn’t stop him from bellowing about any infractions he notices to the suburban group’s rules. He has plenty

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REVIEW

A MAN CALLED OVE (2016)

SHOWING: OPENS FRIDAY AT KEYSTONE ART R A T E D : P G - 1 3, r

of time to patrol the neighborhood — despite his fine record, he has been let go from his job. We soon learn that Ove’s is also mourning the death of his wife and plans to join her. He attempts suicide several times during the film, but proves to be bad at it, which just makes him crankier. Flashbacks show us Ove’s childhood in a small town, where he triumphs over the obstacles he faces thanks to his determined attitude. He finds love: for a teacher on a train and for Saab automobiles (I’ve never paid much attention to cars, but I gather that this is a running joke that aficionados will enjoy). Ove’s would-be destructive lifestyle is interrupted when neighbors shove their way into his life. Pregnant Parvaneh (Bahar Pars) sees the neighborhood as … a neighborhood, and blithely dismisses Ove’s attempts to be rid of her. She has two young daughters (Nelly Jamarani and Zozan Akgun) and an affable husband named Patrik (Tobias Almborg with none of the handiness Ove considers essential. Ove doesn’t like these people, but he recognizes they need help and, while he organizes his next effort to kill himself, he kinda, sorta, becomes their honorary uncle.

Those are the basic elements of the film: complaining, suicide attempts, graveside conversations, flashbacks and baby steps toward a healthier frame of mind. Depression is an insidious beast determined to steal the life from us. Whenever someone talks with me about their emotional distress, I suggest a number of things they can do to combat it. First among my suggestions is finding someone else that needs help and helping them. It is hard to feel lousy when you’re focused on helping someone else feel better. I like A Man Called Ove because it reinforces that simple, life-saving idea: You can fight the forces of darkness by helping someone fight the forces of darkness. What else to tell you? I didn’t think much of the suicide attempts — not because I thought they were dramatically invalid, but because I thought some of them were unconvincingly staged. On the occasions where I noticed the soundtrack, it seemed pushy. If I notice what a soundtrack is trying to make me feel, I become as ornery as Ove. On the plus side, the cast is exceptional, with Rolf Lassgard as old Ove and Bahar Pars as his intrusive neighbor taking top honors. Yes, the story gets sentimental, but it’s dark when it needs to be. And it’s funny, warm and life-affirming. We can all benefit from a dose of life affirmation from time to time, don’t you think? Say oo-vay. n


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LYRICAL JOSEPHINE CLOSES HEARTLAND FILM FESTIVAL J

B Y SA M W A T E R ME IE R SWATER@NUVO . N ET

osephine feels like a country song brought to cinematic life. It’s tough yet tender, presenting gritty characters in the midst of idyllic rural settings. It’s no surprise that the film has musical roots. Director Rory Feek first turned the story into a tune for the Grammynominated country duo, Joey + Rory, which he formed with his late wife, Joey Martin Feek. After reading a series of Civil War-era letters between a Confederate soldier and his wife in Tennessee, Feek wrote the hit song, “Josephine.” The film follows the titular character while she poses as a soldier in an effort to find her husband. (Research estimates that up to 1,000 women disguised themselves as men in the Union and Confederate armies.) Dressed in her husband’s clothes and donning short hair, Josephine enlists as Joseph Robison. We see her travel across three war-torn states — a journey that shines a raw, harsh light on American identity while she hides her own. Alice Coulthard carries the film gracefully, making Josephine’s hope and heartache our own. Boris McGiver is equally effective as a fellow soldier who befriends her; he is a man struggling to bury the vulnerability beneath his bravado. And Jessejames Locorriere is simultaneously menacing and tragic as the leader of the troop, always showing the pain beneath his abusive ways.

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CLOSING NIGHT FILM: JOSEPHINE

S H O W I N G : O C T O B E R 30 , 7 P . M . A T A M C C A S T L E T O N S Q U A R E 14 ; A F T E R - P A R T Y A T T H E P R E M I E R E P A V I L I O N ; T I C K E T S : $30 , HEARTLANDFILM.ORG RATING: e

The film’s greatest strength lies in how it captures beauty amid brutality. Bryan Allen’s cinematography is breathtaking. He casts a delicate light on the characters as they wade through the devastation. And the soundtrack, which features songs from such acclaimed country artists as Loretta Lynn and Gillian Welch, also brings a gentle touch to the melancholy subject matter. The music and visuals blend perfectly. Josephine isn’t completely polished. It has some awkward, melodramatic moments. Like its protagonist, it occasionally stumbles through its setting, but it ultimately emerges as a powerful example of courage in the face of defeat. The film is even more poignant if you know about Feek’s wife and her battle with cancer. It feels like his last letter to her — a portrait of a woman painted with pure love. Feek’s wife was from Alexandria, Indiana. Their daughter’s name is Indy. Josephine feels like a tribute to them both. I can’t imagine a more beautiful swan song to close out this year’s Heartland Film Festival. n NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // SCREENS 21


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THREE W HOOSIERLAND FEATURES REVIEWED A WRITER’S ROOTS: KURT VONNEGUT’S INDIANAPOLIS THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS

hile the other films in this category are traditional talking head documentaries, The Invisible Patients is an intimate, fly-on-the-wall look at an American issue — our intricate, overwhelming healthcare system. “It’s an important film about the healthcare epidemic we’re facing today in Indiana and beyond,” Sorvig says. “It gives moviegoers a valuable and empathetic view into the lives of Hoosiers and people across America.” The film follows nurse practitioner Jessica Macleod as she guides people through family struggles, financial diffi-

Reviewing Heartland’s Indiana Spotlight films

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ast year, the Heartland Film Festival started shedding light on the movie magic right here in the Hoosier state with its Indiana Spotlight category. To be eligible for this category, 65 percent of a film has to be shot in the state. And its director, producer or writer has to be an Indiana resident or native. This year, three feature-length films and five shorts are competing for the top prize of $5,000. The features are eyeopening works of creative nonfiction. “Our Indiana Spotlight features are documentaries that will inspire moviegoers to look at Hoosier history and current events in a brand new way,” says Greg Sorvig, the director of programming and marketing for Heartland Film. Here are our reviews of those three feature films in the category — fascinating documentaries that cover vastly different corners of the state. But they have one thing in common. To borrow Heartland terminology, they’re all truly moving pictures. n

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he subject of this documentary may be Indy’s brightest star, literary icon Kurt Vonnegut. A larger-than-life mural of him shines down on us as we walk through Mass Ave, and his influence radiates across the rest of the world. The film follows him from his childhood in Indianapolis to his German capture in World War II and then through the legendary author’s entire literary career. It’s a mesmerizing, almost mythical story. Unfortunately, in terms of style, this is a rather dry documentary. It often feels like the kind of film you’d find playing in a loop in front of a display at a museum. However, it’s not without some true delights, such as appearances from local legend Dan Wakefield and NUVO’s David Hoppe. (Vonnegut would call Hoppe during Colts games simply to say,

culties and physical pain. We accompany her on monthly visits to the homes of four patients in Evansville. The heart of the film lies in the home of Roger Brown, a 30-year-old suffering from muscular dystrophy. Macleod comforts him and his mother during the end-of-life process, serving as a beacon of hope in the midst of their helplessness. Like her, the film casts a warm, gentle light in the face of death. It radiates with heart, humor, honesty and compassion — everything you could hope for during life’s most painful moments. Writer-director Patrick O’Connor takes a cue from Macleod and maintains a

“Isn’t Peyton Manning great?” and then he would hang up.) The film is filled with many fun anecdotes like this. If only the documentary were structured in a more stylish, cinematic way. A Writer’s Roots: Kurt Vonnegut’s Indianapolis never really puts you in Vonnegut’s shoes and makes you feel the trauma of his time in World War II or the weight of his success after writing classics like Slaughterhouse-Five. It opts for a casual experience rather than an immersive one, making you feel as though you’re sitting around a bonfire listening to people talk about a great friend and mentor. Maybe that’s more fitting for a film about a member of our local family who has touched so many souls in this city. “Living around Indy for 15 years now, I’ve been aware of Vonnegut and his Indy

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S H O W I N G : OCTOBER 22, 10 A.M. AT AMC CASTLETON SQUARE 14 AND OCTOBER 25, 6:15 P.M. AT AMC SHOWPLACE TRADERS POINT 12 RATING: w

tender, hopeful tone amid the harrowing subject matter. The Invisible Patients is a devastatingly beautiful film — one of the best of the fest. As Sorvig says, “This movie inspires, educates and engages — hitting all the staples of what makes an ideal selection at the Heartland Film Festival.”

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what he thought were grave markers were actually seats from the plane scattered across a field. Through old news footage and heartbreaking testimonials, we see the community go through the grieving process and rise from the agony to start anew. It’s a rich, inspiring slice of Hoosier history but also a story that will strike a chord with audiences outside of the state. (Heartland marks its world premiere.) Director Joe Atkinson is scheduled to attend the premiere screening along with members of the cast and crew. An afterparty will follow at the Premiere Pavilion outside of AMC Castleton Square 14.

A WRITER’S ROOTS: KURT VONNEGUT’S INDIANAPOLIS

S H O W I N G : OCTOBER 22, 4:45 P.M. AND OCTOBER 24, 12:45 P.M. AT AMC CASTLETON SQUARE 14 RATING: r

connections, but this documentary was a great crash course to fill in what I didn’t know,” Sorvig says. “Since watching the film, I’ve read Slaughterhouse-Five and am looking forward to visiting the Kurt Vonnegut Museum & Library after our festival. The film certainly gave me a greater sense of pride and appreciation that we can call Vonnegut our own.”

FROM THE ASHES: THE UNIVERSITY OF EVANSVILLE PURPLE ACES

fter winning five college division national championships and the hearts of everyone in Evansville, the University of Evansville Purple Aces’ triumph gave way to tragedy. The entire basketball team — coaches and administrators included — died in a horrific plane crash on December 13, 1977. An original documentary from the Indiana production company Court Street Productions, From the Ashes is a powerful film — a tender, heartfelt exploration of a harrowing event. The recollections of the crash are poignant and haunting. One witness says that he thought the plane landed among tombstones in a cemetery, but

THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS

REVIEW

FROM THE ASHES: THE UNIVERSITY OF EVANSVILLE PURPLE ACES

S H O W I N G : OCTOBER 27, 5:30 P.M. AT AMC CASTLETON SQUARE 14 AND OCTOBER 29, 10:15 A.M. AT AMC SHOWPLACE TRADERS POINT 12 RATING: e

Sorvig says, “This story will resonate strongly with our audiences and make for an especially impactful world premiere event.”


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NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // SCREENS 23


’S NIGHTCRAWLER:

NIGHTCRAWLER 3

IAN ROBERTSON

NUVO Photo Intern

1

SHOTS

2

@nuvo_promotions @NUVO Promotions

SO YOUR PIC DIDN’T MAKE IT IN PRINT? Hundreds more always available online: PHOTOS BY NATHAN WELTER nuvo.net/nightcrawler

NIGHTCRAWLER

S O R E D S P O N

B Y

4 fuzzyvodka.com PHOTOS BY RILEY MISSEL

*NUVO’s Nightcrawler is a promotional initiative produced in conjunction with NUVO’s Street Team and Promotions department.

​1 NUVO’s NightCrawler was lucky enough to be at Paw-tober Fest and Murat Movie Night this past weekend. 2 The day was filled with food trucks, craft beer and, of course, lots of pets. 3 Some even came in costume. 4 The place was packed!

24 NIGHTCRAWLER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO


NIGHTCRAWLER Q+A THIS WEEK AT: Paw-tober Fest & Murat Movie Night

SPONSORED BY:

What’s your go-to scary movie?

KRISTIN Avon The Birds

CARL Greenfield The Shining

JILL Southport Carrie

TERRY Southport The Exorcist

EMERSON THEATER

DONNA AND EARL Beech Grove Invasion of the Body Snatchers | Psycho

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OCT 22 MONTANA OF 300

MADDY AND SIMON Broad Ripple The Ring | The Strangers

We need W dad driver!! Are you free Wednesdays to deliver the best source of arts/news/music to the masses? Call Ryan today at (317) 808-4623 or email at rmcduffee@nuvo.net.

TOTO Northside Frankenweenie

MR. PRINCESS Greenfield Cujo

OCT 23

CUTE IS WHAT WE AIM FOR ("SAME OLD BLOOD RUSH

WITH A NEW TOUCH" 10 YEAR ANNIVERSARY TOUR)

NOV 3

AFTER THE BURIAL

NOV 4

MAYDAY!

NOV 5

INTERVALS & PLINI

NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // NIGHTCRAWLER 25


MUSIC

TINY CHATS

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JOAN BAEZ PAIRS WITH INNOCENCE PROJECT Those who know their folk history know this: Queen mother Joan Baez’s activism is inseparable from her music, and vice versa. Baez’s latest tour is in support of the Innocence Project, a 25-yearold nonprofit that seeks to exonerate the wrongly accused with DNA evidence. We spoke with Baez on the phone in September to ask why she chose the Innocence Project as a tour partner. For more on the wrongfully convicted in Indiana, see page 6. “I sat down with my manager and said, ‘What small thing can we do?’ Big things don’t really work. But what can I do in a concert tour that will make some kind of difference in people’s lives? [So] we got interested in one of the most pressing issues of today, which is the racial injustice and broken justice system. [Because of my work with Amnesty, for me] mass incarceration, prisons, torture, death penalty, all this stuff is all mixed in together. To do it by way of this amazing project, which is very positive and gets positive results, we just thought [it worked]. And it has a branch everywhere, so anywhere we go, there will be people directly with the project who could take a project from that area, which is most interesting to people, something they can connect with closely. It was perfect. “We started talking with different people, and the more we talked, the more it made sense. I first heard of it when I started painting about six years ago. And about three years ago, somebody sent me a book about the Innocence Project, and it had all their faces. So I painted one of the guys. That’s how I first knew about it — somebody sent me the book with all of their faces.”

YOUR TOOL IS MY TOOL

iTooLL opens year after winning $10,000 5x5 grant

A

BY S ETH J O H N S O N MUSIC@NUVO.NET

s artists, John Gieryn and Sukie Conley of Indy Art and Media Co-op are fully aware of Indianapolis’ creative potential. They also know that making cool things happen can sometimes cost a lot of money. And that's where iTooLL: A Media Tool Lending Library started. A project that’s now been over one year in the making, Conley and Gieryn initially presented their iTooLL idea at a 5x5 music education competition, where a panel of five musically inclined judges chose them as the winner of a $10,000 grant. (Editor's note: NUVO Editor Katherine Coplen sat on this panel.) Conley and Gieryn have put these funds to use, along with fellow directorial partner Ronald David Lora-Castillo, and now they're ready to celebrate

— KATHERINE COPLEN Joan Baez,Thursday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m., Palladium at the Centre for the Performing Arts, 355 City Center Drive., prices vary, all-ages

NUVO.NET/MUSIC Visit nuvo.net/music for complete event listings, reviews and more. 26 MUSIC // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

LIVE

ITOOLL GRAND OPENING

WHEN: THURSDAY, OCT. 20, 6 P.M. WHERE: KHEPRW INSTITUTE, 3549 BOULEVARD PL. TICKETS: FREE, ALL-AGES

the grand opening of iTooLL this Thursday at their location in the city’s Crown Hill neighborhood. “We wanted to use this grant to invest in infrastructure that’s going to stay around,” Gieryn says. “The tool lending library is not just one beautification project. We’re actually getting tools that are going to be stewarded by the community for people to keep creating more and more projects.” Although they aren’t as common as one might expect, tool lending libraries operate on a fairly self-explanatory basis, with library members paying an affordable yearly membership fee to rent tools at a very low cost ($1 a week with iTooLL). In the case of iTooLL, members will also be able to suggest new tools to add to the library, allowing them to have ownership of this truly cooperative project.

“The point of the project is for it to be owned by the community,” Conley says. “There are already so many good things that people are doing all over the city, so we’re more like, ‘Here’s some more support with whatever you’re trying to do.’” Early on, the iTooLL directors used information from community conversations and surveys to select what would initially be in the library upon opening. “We set it up, but then people can own what they do with it,” Conley explains. After gauging the community’s needs, the directors were able to group iTooLL’s initial stock into three categories: storytelling tools (cameras, professional lighting, stabilizers, tripods, laptops, audio recorders), event production tools (speakers, PAs, mics, projectors) and practical tools (canopies, tables, chairs). “These are tools that we know can raise the quality of events and the quality of artistic production in our city,” Gieryn says. “We’re really excited to see the diversity that the library can bring to the music and arts scenes.” As for their location, the iTooLL library will be sharing a space with the Kheprw Institute, a community organization run by a staff of young adults and seniors who are dedicated to creating a more just, equitable, human-centered, environmentally sustainable world. In reflecting on the goals of the tool-lending library, Gieryn sees this partnership with Kheprw as an ideal match.


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3826 N. Illinois 317-923-4707

UPCOMING SHOWS Wed 10/19

Thurs 10/20 Fri 10/21

TIED (formerly Tied To Tigers), THE NEVERHAWKS (Nashville) and THE LONG ARM. Doors @ 8, Show @ 9. $5. THE ACTION, MELODIOUS THONK. Doors @ 8, Show @ 9. $5.

PEELANDER-Z (Japan) w/ MR. CLIT & THE PINK CIGARETTES and AMERICA OWNS THE MOON. Doors @ 9, Show @10. $10.

HILLBILLY HAPPY HOUR PUNKIN HOLLER BOYS HARVEST EXTRAVAGANZA. Doors @ 7, Show @7:30. $5. Sat 10/22

iAMCo-op also held monthly screening events, hosting local documentaries like this one (Depicted: Councilman Leroy Robinson at the “Uncharted” #SocialScreening)

“Their four values are economy, education, empowerment and environment, and it’s so funny how those are the exact four things that iTooLL does,” he says. Gieryn explains that iTooLL will encourage entrepreneurial spirits, which aligns with the economic, educational, and empowerment goals of Kheprw. “These tools are so useful for really getting your sea legs in any sort of enterprise, because communication is king in this world,” he says. As for the environment, iTooLL will also reduce each member’s carbon footprint by decreasing the amount of media tools they purchase and use regularly. “Within the developmental timeline, it’s just a good time to be here, as money starts to come into this neighborhood,” says Gieryn on their location. “We’re giving people the ability to tell stories and are also making it cheaper for artists to live here as well.” When it comes to the library’s checkout system, iTooLL members will be

THEM GOD DAMN BANGS (Kentucky). Doors @ 9, Show @ 10. $6.

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able to reserve tools from the library via an easy-to-use app. From here, members can check out tools for a week, picking them up and dropping them off during designated operating hours (Thursdays from 6 to 9 p.m. and Saturdays from 12 to 3 p.m.). Although a risk of theft comes with any sort of lending system like this, Gieryn and company believe the library’s cooperative nature will keep members accountable. “That co-ownership piece is really big,” Gieryn says. “People will feel ownership of the library.” The three iTooLL directors hope that the library will give Indianapolis residents the freedom to pursue projects that they never could before due to lack of funding for resources. By doing this, they believe the local arts scene will diversify too. “We just hope to hear voices that we wouldn’t have heard from otherwise,” Gieryn concludes. n

PUNK ROCK NIGHT w/ THUNDERBOLT GREASESLAPPER (feat. B.A. from Sloppy Seconds), THE SLAMS (Kentucky) and

Sun 10/23

Tues 10/25

ASYLUM 20-YEAR GOTHIC HALLOWEEN REUNION W/ ESOTERIK(OKLAHOMA CITY) AND DJ COPPERTOP, DJ SPECTRE AND DJ ALYDA. Doors @ 8, Show @ 9. $5. MUSICAL FAMILY TREE AND CLASSICAL MUSIC INDY PRESENT “MASH UP TUESDAY.” w/ CORDUROY JACKSON, ROB FUNKHOUSER, JAMES MIDDLETON, JO UNIVERSAL Doors @ 7, Show @ 8. NO COVER.

melodyindy.com /melodyinn punkrocknight.com

iTooLL will encourage entrepreneurial spirits, which aligns with the economic, educational and empowerment goals of the Kheprw Institute.

NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // MUSIC 27


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MERIWETHER REMEMBERS CHUCK WORKMAN

T

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO

he Midwest soul-jazz piano legend Roy Meriwether has had an extraordinary career during his 50-plus years as a professional musician. Meriwether was born and raised in Dayton, Ohio where he gained notoriety as a child prodigy on the piano. But Meriwether came to national prominence in the 1960s, recording soulful, pop-inflected instrumentals for both Columbia and Capitol Records. I caught up with Roy Meriwether via phone in advance of his Sunday, October 23 performance in Downtown Indianapolis at Chef Joseph’s.  NUVO: You released Nubian Lady through Stinger Records in 1973. The album was recorded live at The Magic Carpet in Dayton, Ohio and as you mentioned it was independently produced and released. But it's gone on to attain a worldwide audience and it's a very valuable record in its original pressing. Tell us about that album and the continued interest from hardcore jazz fans and record collectors. ROY MERIWETHER: I took my own piano into The Magic Carpet; it was a full grand piano. A friend of my bass player brought us some equipment to record. I wanted to play without being restricted. It was in protest of being edited so much by the big companies. People used to say to me "They just need to hear you live Roy! People just need to hear you live, that's the problem." I kept getting that back in the early days. When I did Nubian Lady I just wanted to play like I'd normally play, and that's what you heard on the record. I released it pretty much as is. Nothing was edited on Nubian Lady. I played it for Clarence Avant, and it was the strangest thing. I just knew "Nubian Lady" was a hit. It had a nice ride on the solo, and even though the bass player was from the avant-garde, the beat was still present. The beat stayed present through the whole thing and I knew that made it listenable. Clarence Avant said "It's just not danceable enough." And there were about twenty kids who heard the record when I had the door open in my apartment and they’re like "What is that?" They started dancing in the yard! My girlfriend said, "Tell him to tell these kids it's not danceable!"  The only distribution that album had was a college concert tour along the Upper Midwest. It was only sold off-stage. 28 MUSIC // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

NUVO: There's one other Indianarelated project I wanted to ask you about. In 1987 you released a live album called Opening Night. I understand that album was recorded here in Indianapolis at a club called The Place To Start, which is now The Jazz Kitchen. Any thoughts on that album?

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It was never distributed at all and it did what you were talking about. It's unreal. It was on eBay for $1,000 last year. NUVO: The paper I write for here in Indianapolis is called NUVO Newsweekly, and for many years Chuck Workman was the chief jazz writer at NUVO up until the time of his death in 2012. MERIWETHER: Chuck was a friend of mine! NUVO: I know Chuck was associated with your record label Stinger in the 1970s. Tell about about your work with Chuck. MERIWETHER: My manager and Chuck were friends and Chuck helped to promote me. Chuck became the president of Stinger Records. I wasn't interested in being president at the time. It wasn't a big deal, but he was listed as president of Stinger Records. The home of Stinger Records was supposed to be in Lafayette, Indiana. It was really almost a pseudo-address. He was a big fan of mine and a big help. He booked me a lot. He was a very nice man. I was so sorry when he died.  Yeah, Chuck was the first president of Stinger Records. I made him president. I asked Mike Pence, but he didn't want be president then. [laughs]

MERIWETHER: Most of that album was recorded at Just Jazz in Anderson, Ind. There were a couple cuts on there that were done at The Place To Start.  I remember the stage at The Place To Start was very high. (laughs) It was a very high stage. I didn't like that. I love the way the stage is now at The Jazz Kitchen. The Place To Start was an okay place, I drew good crowds there. It wasn't as nice as the Kitchen is now, but that stage was very high! NUVO: You’re going to be playing in Indianapolis on Sunday, October 23 at Chef Joseph’s. I’m curious if you’re still performing "Nubian Lady" and some of the classic tracks from your past? MERIWETHER: Yes, and there's some new things too. I'm not bringing a group from New York as I normally do. I'm going to use a group from Dayton. I'll put something together with them and see what happens. I plan to do "Nubian Lady" because of the rerelease. We'll see how that works. I've never played with these guys, but they're professionals and I'll work the show up with them.   Special thanks to Ralph Adams and Rick Wilkerson for making this interview possible.

KYLE LONG >> Kyle Long broadcasts weekly on WFYI 90.1 FM Wednesdays at 9 p.m.


SOUNDCHECK

ASD, Shut The Fuck UP, Nailed Shut, Mama Moonshine, Hauteur, 5th Quarter Lounge, 21+

MewithoutYou, Into It. Over It., Needle Points, Deluxe at Old National Centre,

The Hi-Fi, 1043 Virginia Ave. Ste. 4, $10, 21+

Curry Palooza: Opal Fly and KAPOW!, Lunar System, Radio Radio, 21+

Bomb Cats, Indien, The Long Arm, UH, Sinking Ship II, 21+

PUNK

Rittz, Jarren Benton, Bulletproof and The Fool, Shadowink, Chucky Workclothes, C Mob, Ed Money 2.0, The Vogue, 21+ Tobacco, The Hi-Fi, 21+

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The Dillinger Escape Plan, Wednesday at The Vogue

NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK SUBMIT YOUR EVENT AT NUVO.NET/EVENT DENOTES EDITOR’S PICK

WEDNESDAY Q&A The Dillinger Escape Plan 8 p.m. The members of Dillinger Escape Plan are legitimately a little crazy. At least, that’s what I’ve gathered from watching footage of their live shows, which includes diving off balconies into the crowd, throwing amps into rivers, stage-diving constantly ... and, well, anything else destructive you can think of. Perhaps the injuries incurred from those years of wildness is why after years together and several albums, the band is wrapping it up in style with a farewell tour that hits Indy on Wednesday. NUVO spoke to guitarist Ben Weinman in September before the tour set off about the decision to wrap up the project. Weinman: “We have been doing this band for so long. Really I was just thinking about [these things] because there were a lot of bands breaking up, and within the time we were just making an album or something, the bands would get back together and start doing reunion shows for all kinds of money or whatever. I started feeling like, ‘Man, what’s going to happen with us? Are we just going to do this until we can’t anymore

through physical injury, or people don’t care anymore or we’ve run out of creative ideas?’ Right now, we’re at the top of our game. Twenty years in, we’re bigger than we ever were, we’re still doing well, we’re more prolific than we ever were. So how is this going to go down for us? Because I don’t want a scenario where we just do it until we hate each other, or we’re not inspired. That really just was scary to me, that idea. The only way to not have that happen is to take control of it, and really make a thematic ending to this whole story. I think ultimately the most important thing for us is that people think of Dillinger as a body of work that was something special. As opposed to one of those bands that’s like, ‘Dillinger was one of those bands that did this and that, and I think they just put out a record, but I’m not sure; but they were awesome when I was young!’ That’s the worst. So we just decided we should take this into our own hands now that we feel like we’ve accomplished everything that we want to accomplish, have put out an album that we’re extremely happy with and just close the book.” The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., prices vary, 21+

Jay Filson, Oferle, The Hi-Fi, 21+ Holiday Concert Series: Tell Tale Heart and Other Scary Stories, Garfield Parks Arts Center, all-ages

PARTIES

SUNDAY

DoItIndy Radio Hour 3rd Anniversary Concert 7 p.m. DoItIndy Radio Hour plans a long show at their Grove Haus home base to celebrate their third anniversary. On deck to perform: For The Fire, Charlie Ballantine, Katie Pederson, Tracksuit Lyfestile, and Moxxie. Do a good deed at this show too: $1 from each Fountain Square Brewing Co. beer sold will go to Safe Families Madison County.

THURSDAY

POP

Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., $20 - $35, all-ages Open Mic Night, Soho Cafe, all-ages

The Wailers, The Bluebird (Bloomington), 21+ The Halloween Howl, The Crane Bay, 21+

Il Divo, Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, all-ages

Post Malone, Jazz Cartier, Larry June 8 p.m. Three up-and-coming hiphop artists stop in Indy for a show at the Egyptian. You’ll find your friendly Engagement Editor Brian at this show.

Suicidal Tendencies, Madball, Havok, The Vogue, 21+

SATURDAY

Grove Haus, 1001 Hosbrook St., $10, all-ages

HIP-HOP

Shonen Knife, Pravada, Bullet Points, Radio Radio, 21+

Reggae Revolution, Casba, 21+ Dynamite, Mass Ave Pub, 21+ Before the Streetlights, Cute Is What We Aim For, Emerson Theater, all-ages

Beach Slang, Bleached, Hunny 9 p.m. James Snyder, a Philly scene veteran (he led punk heroes Weston for many years before the band dissolved) seems invigorated by his new project Beach Slang, a dizzyingly hard-charging guitar rock outfit with two LPs worth of heartbroken anthems. The Bishop, 123 S. Walnut St. (Bloomington), $15, 18+

Jon Bellion, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages

Citizen, Nicole Dollanganger, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages

Liquid Stranger, Bleep Bloop, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages

Grouplove, MUNA, Dilly Dally, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages

Sunday Funday, Blu, 21+

Neon Indian, Classixx, The Bluebird (Bloomington), 21+

Free Jazz Jam Sundays, Chatterbox, 21+

MONDAY

Tacular Tuesday, State Street Pub, 21+

Cass McCombs,

Ben Rector 8 p.m. Rector’s latest album — the second on his own label Aptly Named Recordings — is called Brand New. Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., $22.50 - $35, all-ages

The Hi-Fi, 21+

TUESDAY POP Helado Negro 7:30 p.m. Come for the dreamy Spanish and English pop, stay for the enchanting metallic dance creatures.

NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK

BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

Latin Dance Party, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Altered Thurzdaze, Mousetrap, 21+ Brian Culbertson, Morgan James, Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, all-ages Joan Baez, Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, all-ages SALES, The Hi-Fi, 21+ Twista, Do or Die, The Vogue, 21+

FRIDAY Open Stage Blues Jam, Hilltop Tavern, all-ages Night Moves, Metro, 21+ Greg Brown, Buskirk-Chumley Theatre (Bloomington), all-ages Dylan Schneider, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages Faith Prince, Cabaret at the Columbia Club, 21+ NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // MUSIC 29


HALLOWEEN PARTY & COSTUME CONTEST

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30 CLASSIFIEDS // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Listen to Dan’s podcast every week at savagelovecast.com @fakedansavage

This week’s Savage is so dirty it’s online only at nuvo.net/savagelove


CLASSIFIEDS TO ADVERTISE: CALL JAMES @ 317-808-4614 Phone: (317) 254-2400 | Fax: (317) 479-2036 E-mail: classifieds@nuvo.net | nuvo.net/classifieds Mail: Nuvo Classifieds, 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200 Indianapolis, Indiana 46208

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY © 2016 BY ROB BREZSNY

Payment & Deadline All ads are prepaid in full by Monday at 5 P.M. Nuvo gladly accepts Cash, Money Order, & All Major Credit Cards.

Policies: Advertiser warrants that all goods or services advertised in NUVO are permissible under applicable local, state and federal laws. Advertisers and hired advertising agencies are liable for all content (including text, representation and illustration) of advertisements and are responsible, without limitation, for any and all claims made thereof against NUVO, its officers or employees. Classified ad space is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion.

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the 1980s, two performance artists did a project entitled *A Year Tied Together at the Waist.* For 12 months, Linda Montano and Tehching Hsieh were never farther than eight feet away from each other, bound by a rope. Hsieh said he tried this experiment because he felt very comfortable doing solo work, but wanted to upgrade his abilities as a collaborator. Montano testified that the piece “dislodged a deep hiddenness” in her. It sharpened her intuition and gave her a “heightened passion for living and relating.” If you were ever going to engage in a comparable effort to deepen your intimacy skills, Aries, the coming weeks would be a favorable time to attempt it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In the coming weeks would you prefer that we refer to you as “voracious”? Or do you like the word “ravenous” better? I have a feeling, based on the astrological omens, that you will be extra super eager to consume vast quantities of just about everything: food, information, beauty, sensory stimulation, novelty, pleasure, and who knows what else. But please keep this in mind: Your hunger could be a torment or it could be a gift. Which way it goes may depend on your determination to actually enjoy what you devour. In other words, don’t get so enchanted by the hypnotic power of your longing that you neglect to exult in the gratification when your longing is satisfied. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When the wind blows at ten miles per hour, a windmill generates eight times more power than when the breeze is five miles per hour. Judging from the astrological omens, I suspect there will be a similar principle at work in your life during the coming weeks. A modest increase in effort and intensity will make a huge difference in the results you produce. Are you willing to push yourself a bit beyond your comfort level in order to harvest a wave of abundance? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Cuthbert Collingwood (1748-1810) had a distinguished career as an admiral in the British navy, leading the sailors under his command to numerous wartime victories. He was also a good-natured softie whose men regarded him as generous and kind. Between battles, while enjoying his downtime, he hiked through the English countryside carrying acorns, which he planted here and there so the “Navy would never want for oaks to build the fighting ships upon which the country’s safety depended.” (Quoted in *Life in Nelson’s Navy,* by Dudley Pope.) I propose that we make him your role model for the coming weeks. May his example inspire you to be both an effective warrior and a tender soul who takes practical actions to plan for the future. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Eighteenth-century musician Giuseppe Tartini has been called “the godfather of modern violin playing.” He was also an innovative composer who specialized in poignant and poetic melodies. One of his most famous works is the Sonata in G Minor, also known as the *Devil’s Trill.* Tartini said it was inspired by a dream in which he made a pact with the Devil to provide him with new material. The Infernal One picked up a violin and played the amazing piece that Tartini transcribed when he woke up. Here’s the lesson for you: He didn’t actually sell his soul to the Devil. Simply engaging in this rebellious, taboo act in the realm of fantasy had the alchemical effect of unleashing a burst of creative energy. Try it! VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The planets have aligned in a curious pattern. I interpret it as meaning that you have cosmic permission to indulge in more self-interest and self-seeking than usual. So it won’t be taboo for you to unabashedly say, “What exactly is in it for me?” or “Prove your love, my dear” or “Gimmeee gimmeee gimmee what I want.” If someone makes a big promise,

you shouldn’t be shy about saying, “Will you put that in writing?” If you get a sudden urge to snag the biggest piece of the pie, obey that urge. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the course of her long career, Libran actress Helen Hayes won an Oscar, an Emmy, a Grammy, and a Tony. Years before all that glory poured down on her, she met playwright Charles MacArthur at a party in a posh Manhattan salon. Hayes was sitting shyly in a dark corner. MacArthur glided over to her and slipped a few salted peanuts into her hand. “I wish they were emeralds,” he told her. It was love at first sight. A few years after they got married, MacArthur bought Hayes an emerald necklace. I foresee a metaphorically comparable event in your near future, Libra: peanuts serving as a promise of emeralds. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Welcome to the Painkiller Phase of your cycle. It’s time to relieve your twinges, dissolve your troubles, and banish your torments. You can’t sweep away the whole mess in one quick heroic purge, of course. But I bet you can pare it down by at least 33 percent. (More is quite possible.) To get started, make the following declaration five times a day for the next three days: “I am grateful for all the fascinating revelations and indispensable lessons tht my pain has taught me.” On each of the three days after that, affirm this truth five times: “I have learned all I can from my pain, and therefore no longer need its reminders. Goodbye, pain.” On the three days after that, say these words, even if you can’t bring yourself to mean them with complete sincerity: “I forgive everybody of everything.” SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For the foreseeable future, you possess the following powers: to make sensible that which has been unintelligible . . . to find amusement in situations that had been tedious . . . to create fertile meaning where before there had been sterile chaos. Congratulations, Sagittarius! You are a first-class transformer. But that’s not all. I suspect you will also have the ability to distract people from concerns that aren’t important . . . to deepen any quest that has been too superficial or careless to succeed . . . and to ask the good questions that will render the bad questions irrelevant. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the past eleven months, did you ever withhold your love on purpose? Have there been times when you “punished” those you cared about by acting cold and aloof? Can you remember a few occasions when you could have been more generous or compassionate, but chose not to be? If you answered yes to any of those questions, the next three weeks will be an excellent time to atone. You’re in a phase of your astrological cycle when you can reap maximum benefit from correcting stingy mistakes. I suggest that you make gleeful efforts to express your most charitable impulses. Be a tower of bountiful power. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1415, a smaller English army defeated French forces at the Battle of Agincourt in northern France. Essential to England’s victory were its 7,000 longbowmen -- archers who shot big arrows using bows that were six feet long. So fast and skilled were these warriors that they typically had three arrows flying through the air at any one time. That’s the kind of high-powered proficiency I recommend that you summon during your upcoming campaign. If you need more training to reach that level of effectiveness, get it immediately. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let’s imagine your life as a novel. The most recent chapter, which you’ll soon be drawing to a close, might be called “The Redemption of Loneliness.” Other apt titles: “Intimacy with the Holy Darkness” or “The Superpower of Surrender” or “The End Is Secretly the Beginning.” Soon you will start a new chapter, which I’ve tentatively dubbed “Escape from Escapism,” or perhaps “Liberation from False Concepts of Freedom” or “Where the Wild Things Are.” And the expansive adventures of this next phase will have been made possible by the sweet-and-sour enigmas of the past four weeks.

Homework: Describe what you’d be like if you were the opposite of yourself. Freewillastrology.com NUVO // 100% SUSTAINABLE / RECYCLED PAPER // 10.19.16 - 10.26.16 // CLASSIFIEDS 31


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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - October 19, 2016  

50 Seasons. 50 Pacers Greats.

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