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TABLE OF CONTENTS CITY 411 ............................................................................................ 5 A&E ..................................................................................................... 12

C I T Y G U I D E S

DINING............................................................................................. 27

ANNUAL MANUAL

SHOPPING...................................................................................... 46

NIGHTLIFE ..................................................................................... 37 INDEX ............................................................................................... 55

ANNUAL MANUAL 2011

PUBLISHER: Kevin McKinney (kmckinney@nuvo.net) EDITOR: Laura McPhee (lmcphee@nuvo.net) ARTS EDITOR: Jim Poyser (jpoyser@nuvo.net) NEWS EDITOR: Austin Considine (aconsidine@nuvo.net) MUSIC EDITOR: Scott Shoger (sshoger@nuvo.net) CALENDAR MANAGER: Chi Sherman (calendar@nuvo.net) EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS: Derrick Carnes, Tyler Falk, Catherine Green, Keelee Hurlburt, Rita Kohn, Danielle Look PHOTOGRAPHY: Charles W. Clark™ (5, 6), Stacy Kagiwada (38), Mark Lee (32, 42) Laura McPhee (27, 30, 48, 50, 51, 53), Jonothan Scott (37) Stephen Simonetto (17, 22, 43) ; all others are staff photos or submitted by artist/venue LAYOUT & DESIGN: Charles W. Clark™ (cclark@nuvo.net) PRODUCTION MANAGER: Melissa Carter (mcarter@nuvo.net) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER: Christa Phelps (cphelps@nuvo.net) PROMOTIONS MANAGER: Sarah Myer (smyer@nuvo.net) DIRECTOR OF SALES & MARKETING: Josh Schuler (jschuler@nuvo.net) BUSINESS MANAGER: Kathy Flahavin (kflahavin@nuvo.net)

Got questions, comments or suggestions about this or other NUVO CityGuides? Send them to cityguides@nuvo.net

EDITORIAL POLICY: NUVO Newsweekly covers news, public issues, arts and entertainment. We publish views from across the political and social spectra. They do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher.

SUBSCRIPTIONS: NUVO Newsweekly is published weekly for $52 per year by NUVO Inc., 3951 N. Meridian St., suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208. Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, IN, ISSN #1086-461x.

MANUSCRIPTS: NUVO welcomes manuscripts. We assume no responsibility for returning manuscripts not accompanied by a stamped, selfaddressed envelope.

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to NUVO, inc., 3951 N. Meridian St., suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208.

DISTRIBUTION: The current issue of NUVO is free. Past issues are at the NUVO office for $3 if you come in, $4.50 mailed. NUVO is available every Wednesday at over 1,000 locations in the metropolitan area. Limit one copy per customer.

Copyright ©2011 by NUVO, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission, by any method whatsoever, is prohibited. ISSN #1086-461X

MAILING ADDRESS:

3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208 TELEPHONE: (317) 254-2400 FAX: (317) 254-2405 WEB: www.www.nuvo.net E-MAIL: nuvo@nuvo.net Every issue of NUVO is printed on 100% recycled paper.

A HANDBOOK OF INDY ESSENTIALS In the 20 years since we first began publishing NUVO Newsweekly, we have also published frequent and separate guide magazines devoted to the best green-living, dining, shopping and nightlife options Indianapolis offers, along with guides devoted to summer fun and the annual arts season. Most popular, of course, is the Best of Indy issue each July, containing the results of our annual readers’ poll. This year we introduce an eighth magazine: the NUVO Annual Manual. A handbook of all things great about our city, the Annual Manual presents the highlights and top choices in Arts + Entertainment, Dining, Nightlife and Shopping categories, as well as an introduction to Indianapolis via our City 411 cheat sheet. These are the stores, galleries, concerts, plays, bars and restaurants where we go to meet our friends, buy our groceries, discover new artists, challenge our perceptions and connect with our neighbors. Browse it for ideas, consult it in emergencies, let us know if we omitted something egregious. Most importantly, find inspiration to get out, go and do as many of these events, visit as many of these venues, and support as many of these neighbors as possible. Unlike other products on the market, we are proud to note that the editorial content of the Annual Manual is in no way tied to advertising. While we have great respect and a whole lot of appreciation for our advertisers, they can only buy ads, not editorial recommendations or inclusion in this or other NUVO CityGuides. That doesn’t mean we always get things right, however, no matter how noble our intentions. See an omission, typo or objectionable entry? Let us know at cityguides@nuvo.net. We’re already planning ways to improve with the 2012 Annual Manual, and your input is of great value. „

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Monument Circle, Indy’s epicenter

CITY 411 There’s a reason why Indianapolis is known both affectionately and pejoratively as one of America’s biggest small towns. On the one hand, we are a thriving metropolis. Ranked usually somewhere between the 10th and 15th largest of US cities depending on the source, Indianapolis had a reported population of just over 800,000 in 2009. Throw in the residents who live in Marion County, but not Indianapolis-proper, and the number reaches closer to one million – nearly double what it was in the 1960s. We are also the seat of state and county government, not to mention home to more than five world-class university campuses. For all our growth and metropolitan functions, however, there are many ways in which the city remains locked in its past and a traditional way of life. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing. By and large, there are few hidden agendas with Indianapolis and its residents. You are safe to take things and people as they appear. And while change is sometimes excruciatingly slow to arrive, progress does, eventually, occur. It wasn’t so long ago that “different” was synonymous with “wrong” in Indianapolis, just as it continues to be elsewhere in the state. Our city has grown more tolerant of diversity in recent years, however. And the variety reflected in our personal and cultural beliefs and practices are far more evident and embraced than ever before. These first few pages are meant to help you navigate Indianapolis more easily. From an overview of state and city governments to a breakdown of essential neighborhoods, as well as auto alternatives for traversing Naptown more easily. And for good measure, a tribute to the hometown men and women from Indianapolis who have gone on to make legendary names for themselves beyond the Circle City. „

CITY HALL The City-County Building at 200 E. Washington is home to the mayor, the city council, police headquarters and court system. While it may not look it now, when the building was completed in 1962, it was heralded as an emblem of “modern” urban architecture. The 28-story glass structure was the city’s first skyscraper and raised quite a fuss for being the first structure in Indianapolis taller than Monument Circle.

Mayor Greg Ballard

Less stately and lacking a tourist draw, CCB is mostly for business. Drop by or drop a line to your City-County Councillor or Mayor Greg Ballard. Visit www.indy.gov.egov/council for information regarding the council, how to determine your representative, meeting times and proposals. Call 3274241 for constituent concerns. The Mayor’s Action Center is your resource for reporting more immediate concerns and concrete problems regarding city services. Call 327-4MAC or visit during office hours, 8 am – 5 pm, Mon.-Fri. MAC is located in room 2160 of the City-County Building. More contact information, including web email form, is available at www. indygov.org/eGov/Mayor

City-Council President Ryan Vaughn

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Indiana State Capitol Building

STATEHOUSE The first seat of Indiana state government was located in the small, Southern town of Corydon when the Indiana territory achieved statehood in 1816. It wasn’t long, however, before patterns of Western migration required a more centrally-located capital and in 1821 a new city of Indianapolis was founded to fill that need. The original Statehouse in Indianapolis was located between Market and Washington Streets. Demolished in the 1960s, by then the structure had fallen into disrepair and was considered a relic not worth saving. The current Indiana Statehouse at 200 W. Washington Street dates to 1835 and is considered the grandest example of 19th-century Neo-Classical Revival architecture in the state. Here is where you will find the offices of the Governor, State Senate, House of Representatives and State Supreme Court. House and Senate Chambers also. The attraction most worth seeing, however, is the stunning Rotunda with its soaring columns, stained glass dome and ornate statutes. Should you feel inspired, the space is available for weddings and other ceremonies, but generally booked more than a year in advance.

Assembly convenes each January and runs through March 14 in “short” years and April 29 on “long” years (which also happen to be the budget years). Communicating with your elected representatives is an essential part of a successful democracy. To that end, we encourage you to write, email or call your State Senator or Representative whenever you feel so moved. Visit www.in.gov/legislative to determine who is representing you, as well as a wealth of legislative information including bill trackers and document archives. Indiana House of Representatives 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204-2786 (317) 232-9600 (800) 382-9842 Indiana State Senate 200 W. Washington Street Indianapolis, IN 46204-2785 (317) 232-9400 (800) 382-9467

ASK MITCH!

If you didn’t do it in third grade, book yourself a Statehouse tour. Three different versions are available, depending on age, interest and time. Contact Statehouse Tour Office Coordinator Jennifer Hodge at 2335293 or captours@idoa.in.gov The General Assembly The legislative authority of Indiana lies with the General Assembly comprised of a Senate whose 50 members serve four-year terms and a House of Representatives whose 100 members serve two-year terms. Legislative districts are redrawn every ten years. A “part-time” legislature, the General

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Want to take your concerns or compliments to a higher power? Gov. Mitch Daniels keeps his office and office hours at the Statehouse year-round. Thanks to a helpful “Ask Mitch” program, Indiana voters are encouraged to stay in touch with the governor via phone (232-4567) or a weblink at www.in.gov/gov.


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ADVOCATES AND ALLIES With so much government in the city, there’s bound to be a good amount of watch dog groups, advocates, allies and activist working to keep our elected officials representing their point of views. Since we can think of no more important political concern than the environment, nor a more compelling reason for good citizenship, NUVO tends to support fellow tree-huggers and greenies in their efforts. Here are a few of our friends and neighbors who would welcome your support and involvement. Look for the NUVO Green CityGuide on stands and online April 20 for a more complete handbook of living green in Indy. A Greener Indiana Part newsletter, part information repository, part social networking interface, A Greener Indiana is a must-belong-to portal among Hoosier environmentalists. If you’re looking for information on everything-green or want to meet like-mined greenies, you found the right place. www. agreenerindiana.com CICS In 2009, NUVO joined the Central Indiana Commuter Services, which helped us become part of the Green Business Initiative by the Greater Indianapolis Chamber of Commerce. CICS is all about reducing air pollution and traffic density in the city through a variety of programs including carpooling, vanpooling and other options that promote commuting opportunities for employees. www.327ride.net, 212 W. 10th Street, Suite C485, 327-7433 Earth Charter Indiana Their mission: “catalyzing mainstream enthusiasm for sustainability throughout Indiana.” Sounds like ours! With relationships to the Earth Charter International and Earth Charter U.S., the local chapter has launched the Sustainable Indiana 2016 project, an ambitious effort designed to create a balance between people, industry, and nature. www.earthcharterindiana. org, 3535 Kessler Boulevard, North Drive, 525-1856 Friends of White River The White River needs all the friends it can get. It’s gotten a bad rap for a couple hundred years now, from the fact that it’s basically non-navigable, to its current, antiquated combined sewer overflow system that dumps human sewage into the river every time it rains. Friends of White River strives to change that. www.friendsofwhiteriver.org Green Piece Indy Sorry this isn’t the place to get organic weed, but they do have tips on where to find just about everything else organic in Indy. Green Piece Indy sends out an email newsletter with easy, local planet-saving tips. Sign up for their GreenClippings email to get

green deals, or pay just $15 for their Green Savings Indy book for big savings on local green products. Because you don’t have to go broke to go green. greenpieceindy.com Hoosier Environmental Council Led by Jesse Kharbanda, the almost 30-year old HEC is the state’s largest environmental organization, and they are constantly pushing for sustainability in our urban and rural communities, while watching over the air, water and soil. www.hecweb.org, 3951 N. Meridian Suite 100, 685-8800 Indiana CAFO Watch Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations are cramming millions of animals into small buildings, fouling the local environment, increasing antibiotic resistance, while creating a horrific existence for the creatures. Methane bubbles hover over manure pits, threatening to burst, while Indiana’s rural roads are torn apart by trucks hauling crap to giant crap-fields. Try living next to one. It’ll literally make you sick. www.indianacafowatch.com, 1-765-962-2184 Indiana Recycling Coalition The IRC is a statewide organization dedicated to education and legislative reform about all-things-recycling. IRC’s e.Scrap Action program targets electronic waste as a major waste management priority, and a year long assessment of e.scrap problems resulted in a “toolkit,” downloadable from their Web site. www.indianarecycling.org, 1500 N. Delaware St., 632-5915 Keep Indianapolis Beautiful From their neighborhood clean-ups, to creating pocket parks and other green spaces, to planting forests of trees each year, KIB and its volunteers make a big difference in Indy by rejuvenating its neighborhoods and communities. www.kibi.org, 1029 Fletcher Ave. Suite 100, 264-7555 Toxdrop No, that’s not the name of some new, exotic candy that will sooth your sore throat. Toxdrop is the service offered by the City through the mayor’s Office of Sustainability where you can load up your CFLs, paint cans, fire extinguishers, antifreeze, lead acid batteries, thermometers, gasoline and unwanted spouses. We made up that last part to see if you were paying attention. www. sustainindy.org/toxdrop.cfm

Looking f or more enviromental news and events? Check out the NEWS section at www.nuvo.net

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shopping Jim Jones (1931-78) Before founding his Jonestown cult in Guyana, and then convincing 900 followers to literally drink the kool-aid that killed them in a horrific 1978 mass suicide ritual, Jim Jones founded his first church, The People’s Temple” at 1502 N. New Jersey here, in Indianapolis. The small church would quickly prove unsuitable for the growing congregation which would occupy several other spaces before relocating to California and then Guyana by mid1970s. David Letterman Could there be a more famous native of Indianapolis? We think not. As he is fond of discussing on his Late Show, David Letterman was born and raised in Indianapolis. A graduate of Broad Ripple High School in 1965 and Ball State in 1969, Letterman is known-best locally as the goofiest anchor and weatherman WTHR Channel 13 has ever employeed.

“All my jokes are Indianapolis. All my attitudes are Indianapolis. My adenoids are Indianapolis. If I ever severed myself from Indianapolis, I would be out of business. What people like about me is Indianapolis.”

—KURT VONNEGUT

LOCAL LEGENDS Believe it or not, Indianapolis has given birth to some of the most famous and infamous names of the past century in arts, entertainment, sports, journalism, politics and, well, murder. Here’s a quick rundown of the hometown heroes, heroines and creeps we can’t seem to forget and local landmarks with which they will forever be associated. Babyface (Kenneth Edmonds) Born in Indy, the ten-time Grammy award-winning musician and producer is a graduate of North Central High School. He’s also the namesake of the 25 mile stretch of I-65 running through the city. Joyce Dewitt You might know her best as Janet on the iconic 1970s show Three’s Company alongside John Ritter and Suzanne Somers. Dewitt graduated from Speedway High School before going on to earn her BA from Ball State. John Dillinger (1903-1934) One of the most notorious bank robbers of the 20th century, Dillinger was born in Indianapolis and grew up in nearby Mooresville. He’s buried at Crown Hill (p.13), but for a better glimpse into his past visit Indiana’s oldest bar, the Slippery Noodle Inn. Legend has it those bullet holes in the wall are from Dillinger and his gang’s target practice.

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Charles Fairbanks (1852-1918) US Vice-President (1905-1909) under Theodore Roosevelt, Fairbanks was a successful Indianapolis lawyer and politician for whom Fairbanks, Alaska is named. In 1908, he built the home that still stands at 2960 N. Meridian Street and lived there until his death. One of the few grand mansions to survive the demolition crazed 1970s, it is now used for office space. Benjamin Harrison (1833-1901) Benjamin Harrison resided at 1230 N. Delaware for more than 25 years, with the exception of his four-year residency at the White House from 1889-1893, and often campaigned from the front steps. Buried at Crown Hill Cemetery, Harrison’s home remains a wonderful historical treasure of turn-of-the-century Indianapolis. Now a museum, the house is staged almost exactly as it was when the Harrison family called it home (p.15).

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Steve McQueen (1930-1980) The King of Cool got his start on the mean streets of Indy, almost literally. Born in Beech Grove, McQueen was shuffled between a series of downtown apartments before being shipped out of state to his father at the age of ten. “Indianapolis will always be my hometown,” the film icon told a biographer. “But I’ve never been a Hoosier.” Check out the new McQueen ‘Birthplace Collection’ at the Beech Grove Public Library (www.brpl.ib.in.us) Ryan Murphy All those years of show choir at Warren Central High School and then as a member of the IU “Singing Hoosiers” genuinely paid-off for Indy’s own Ryan Murphy. The creator of the FOX television hit Glee, which just won its second consecutive Golden Globe for Best Television Series, Murphy continues to oversee his cash cow as executive producer and writer. Dan Quayle Fairbanks may have been the first VP from Indy, but Dan Quayle is definitely the most famous. Second-in-command under President George Bush, Sr. (198993), the Indianapolis native is best known for his way with words. While funny Quayle quotes are low-hanging fruits, we couldn’t resist this one: “I am not part of the problem. I am a Republican.” James Whitcomb Riley (1849-1916) With his penchant for dialect and a fascination for all things pastoral, Riley’s poems of an idyllic, albeit funny, Heartland resonated throughout the country a hundred years ago, but no place more than home. When he died in 1916, his body lay in state at the Capitol, an honor previously given to no one other than Abraham Lincoln (also born in Indiana). Riley’s home at 538 Lockerbie, builit in 1872, is now a museum www.rileykids.org/museum.

Oscar Robertson: One of the greatest men to ever play the game of basketball, NBA Hall of Fame player Oscar Robertson will forever be known here in Indianapolis as the young man who led his incredible team from Crispus Attucks High School to win the State Championships in 1955 – the first all-Black high school in America to take a state title. Robertson would add an Olympic Gold Medal (1960) and NBA Championship (1971) to his list of accolades before retiring. Booth Tarkington (1869-46): His best known-works are all but obscure, but notable nonetheless. Alice Adams won Tarkington a Pulitzer Prize in 1912 and became an Oscarnominated film starring Katherine Hepburn in 1935. The Magnificent Ambersons won Tarkington his second Pulitzer in 1919 and became an Oscar nominated film directed by Orson Welles in 1942. Ambersons, in particular, is a magnificent account of Indianapolis’ Irvington neighborhood a century ago and the manners and morasses of its earliest residents. Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007) The man himself, Indy’s patron saint of all that matters, Kurt Vonnegut was born, raised and often returned to Indianapolis. Author of Slaughterhouse Five and many other acclaimed-works, Vonnegut grew up just behind the Tarkington home, in the 4300 block of Illinois, and graduated from Shortridge High School in 1940. The recently opened Kurt Vonnegut Library in downtown Indianapolis is a wonderful place to begin any quest about this native son (p.15). CJ Walker (1867-1919) Madame Walker, as she came to be known, was the nation’s first milliondollar American business woman and the country’s first African-American millionaire thanks to her keen business acumen and wildly popular hair care products. She built her factory on Indiana Avenue, a structure that would eventually become (and remains) a cultural hub for the Indy’s AfricanAmerican community (p.14). David Wolf Who says you can’t grow up to be an astronaut if you’re born in Indianapolis? North Central High School and Purdue University graduate David Wolf has several out-of-this-world experiences thanks to his job at NASA, including three Space Shuttle journeys and an extended stay on the Russian Space Staion. Wonder Bread Born right here in Indianapolis in 1921 at the Taggart Baking Co. and the foundation of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for generations of Americans, the “wonder” came from its ability to stay “fresh” after being sliced and packaged.


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shopping Johnson, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Dinah Washington and Count Basie also performed in Avenue clubs. While the jazz is mostly gone now, African-American history and culture remain central to the area thanks to the Walker Theater Center, Urban League and FreeTown Village. www. discoverindianaavenue.com MASS AVE Forty-five degrees from ordinary The epicenter of Indy arts and culture, Massachusetts Avenue in the Chatham Arch neighborhood is where you’ll find great live theater, public art, and independent galleries welcoming neighbors and visitors nearly every day of the year. Laid out in 1821 as one of four diagonal streets that led straight to the heart of Downtown, the historic area has long drawn the city’s most creative minds and spirits. From the elegant Moorish mystery of the Murat Theater (1909) to the German-Renaissance Athenaeum designed by the city’s most famous architect, Bernard Vonnegut (author Kurt’s grandfather). The creative spirit extends to the district’s unique shops, restaurants, pubs and clubs. www. discovermassave.com

Indianapolis Cultural Trail

GETTING AROUND CULTURAL DISTRICTS BROAD RIPPLE We’re open if you are Looking for something different? Step into Broad Ripple Village. Take in live music, go for a friendly game of darts or billiards, or tear up a dance floor. This is the place for a night out with friends. Nighttime debauchery gives way to a well-balanced, sporty-yet-chic culture that appreciates good health and a refined abode. Specialty stores and galleries make it easy to design an interior that belongs in a magazine, and the broad spectrum of non-intimidating, non-commercial recreational shops take advantage of the outdoorsy demographic. Plus, wandering into the surrounding neighborhood is like a treasure hunt, since many of the adorable bungalows contain delicious lunch spots or chic little salons. wares. www.discoverbroadripple.com FOUNTAIN SQUARE Anything but square Just southeast of downtown, this funky and decidedly retro Indianapolis neighborhood has it’s roots in a decidedly working-class history and attitude that lingers in the pragmatic and honest approach to revitalization that has worked so well over the past decade. The district has some of the city’s best www.discoverfountainsquare. com one-of-a-kind stores that shouldn’t be missed. After dark,

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Fountain Square knows how to party. From Big Cars to burlesque, with a little punk rock thrown in for good measure, you’re options are limited only by your imagination. www. discoverfountainsquare.com CANAL DISTRICT Discovery runs through it The best place in Indianapolis to be a tourist, no matter where you live, this section of the city encompasses the Central Canal and all of the museums at White River State Park including the Eiteljorg, State Museum and NCAA Hall of Champions. The Indianapolis Zoo is here as well, and the best summer concert venue in Indy, the Lawn at White River. Victory Field, home of the Indianapolis Indians, is the real gem, however. Voted most beautiful minor league ballpark in America by Sports Illustrated, a seat in the stands provide one of the best views of the Indianapolis skyline you’re likely to find anywhere. www.discovercanal.com INDIANA AVENUE Rhythm. Reborn. Few of us can remember Indiana Avenue in its heyday. At the height of the jazz era, more than 33 jazz clubs and bistros lit up the Avenue. Local artists such as Freddie Hubbard, Jimmy Coe, Noble Sissle, Erroll “Groundhog” Grandy and Wes Montgomery cut their teeth on Indiana Avenue and went on to make enormous contributions to the jazz world, while legends like J.J.

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WHOLESALE DISTRICT Front and center. While the Circle Centre Mall may dominate the downtown business landscape, some of Indianapolis’ oldest shops, bars and restaurants are also found in the Wholesale District. Only a city center could support businesses that have been there since the beginning. There’s something about shopping in an area that’s never seen a strip mall that allows each store, whether it has been there for decades or not, to keep its own identity. And, though relatively small, the island of tall buildings and marble lobbies somehow make every errand more fun, since it’s easy to imagine they’re being done in a bustling metropolis. www.discoverwholesaledisctrict.com IRVINGTON While not an “official” cultural district, the Eastside neighborhood of Irvington started as an artists’ colony and has never lost the bohemian and independent spirit since its founding way back in 1870. Named after Washington Irvington, author of The Legend of Sleepy Hollow and Rip Van Winkle, the enclave is one of the bestpreserved examples of the Romantic architecture that dominated Indianapolis during the Belle Epoque and for decades afterwards. Original storefronts and restored structures make browsing Irvington a wonderful option, as do the growing number of locally-owned retail and restaurant offerings.

Looking f or more events and arts? Check out the A&E section at www.nuvo.net

AUTO ALTERNATIVES CULTURAL TRAIL Connecting the city’s cultural districts is the world-class urban bike and pedestrian path known as the Indianapolis Cultural Trail. Begun in 2007 with expected completion in 2011, the Trail makes navigating the city much easier for runners, cyclists and other outdoor enthusiasts – throwing in some of the city’s best public art installations along the way. Find out more and get a map at www.indyculturaltrail.org MONON TRAIL Part of the Indy Greenways network, this 10+ mile rail line turned urban trail traverses a remarkable variety of landscapes and neighborhoods north and south, from Carmel to the Fairgrounds and south to downtown where it will soon intersect with the Cultural Trail. Bikers, bladers, runners and walkers crowd the path in warm weather, but for plenty of great reasons. www.indianatrails. org/Monon_Indy BIKE LANES They are few and far between, here in Indy, but we do seem to get more of them all the time. At the beginning of 2011, we have nearly 23 miles of designated bike lanes on major streets including New York, Michigan and Illinois (with Capitol Ave. being added in 2010)., and the 5-mile stretch of Allisonville Road from Binford to 82nd Street. Get a map of current and proposed lanes at www.sustainindy.org/bikeways. cfm INDYGO Bus service in Indianapolis is sadly lacking compared to other cities of the same size and population. Under funded and under utilized, the city’s only system of public transportation is more timely than many will suggest, but routes/ stops are notoriously inconvenient if your destination is outside of the downtown area. Find route maps and timetables at www.indygo.net. MEGA BUS Feel like taking a road trip but don’t want to drive or spend a ton of cash? Mega Bus has routes from Indy to Chicago, Columbus and Cincinnati. Indianapolis’ downtown stop location for departures and arrivals is located at the IndyGo Bus Shelter at 200 E. Washington Street, in front of the City-County Building, with seats as low as $20 each way. Check www.megabus.com for more info.


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wUG LAKU STUDIO & gARAGE

ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT Indianapolis has always been home to thriving arts communities – from the artists who first settled Irvington to the ongoing legacy of Herron School of Art and Design, from the legendary years of studios at the Ferris Building to the now thriving Murphy Arts Center in Fountain Square, our city continues a tradition of interesting, innovative and imaginative arts and entertainment options. Some of these attractions are self-evident, others historic. The home of President Benjamin Harrison has been drawing history buffs as visitors for more than a century, while the Kurt Vonnegut Library has been open less than a month. The hullabaloo that is now IDADA’s First Friday in Indianapolis is a remarkable opportunity to visit galleries, meet artists and discover new work each month. Throw in world-class museums, one of the best symphonies in the country, theaters offering everything from the classics to avant garde productions, and spell-binding performances from any one of the professional dance companies – and you’ve got every reason to get out and enjoy the arts in Indianapolis. Sports continue to be a part of our city’s identity, just as they have since the first race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway 100 years ago. But don’t get too distracted by the Indianapolis Colts or Indiana Pacers. We’ve got one of the best teams in the WBNA, the Indiana Fever, playing home games in downtown Indy, as well as one of the most beautiful minor league baseball parks and teams in the country over at Victory Field. We keep an up-to-date calendar of A+E events at www.nuvo.net, and publish a NUVO CityGuide focused exclusively on Arts each September. In the meantime, peruse these suggestions and start planning your next arts venture now! „

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MUSEUMS + ATTRACTIONS Central Library The Indianapolis-Marion County Central Library building is an architectural landmark that bridges past and future, combining Paul Cret’s neoclassical building from 1917 with Evan Woolen’s extensive new addition, completed in 2007. Both pieces are gems that provide visitors with opportunities for personal reflection and public engagement, not to mention stateof-the-art information technology and services. The beautiful reading rooms, with towering windows and wooden bookshelves, are great places to live out your dreams of becoming the next great American writer. But given the library’s tight budget, there are limited hours, so double-check before you visit. www. imcpl.org, 40 E. St. Clair St. Children’s Museum of Indianapolis The Children’s Museum of Indianapolis is considered the largest children’s museum in the world and is home to a number of innovative permanent exhibitions as well as rotating ones. The Dinosphere is another claim to fame, featuring life-sized replicas of

dinosaurs, petrified dinosaur eggs and interactive stations where kids and grown-ups can learn about dinosaur habitats and lifestyles. As you drive by the museum, it looks like there are real dinosaurs busting through the exterior of the structure! The Lilly Theatre also offers live entertainment for children, featuring some of Indy’s most talented theater artists. www. childrensmuseum.org, 3000 N. Meridian Street, 334-3322 Conner Prairie Conner Prairie is an outdoor living history museum featuring first- and third-person Midwest interpretations of America’s indigenous and settlement stories. On the land originally settled by William Conner and his first wife, Mekinges — daughter of Delaware Chief William Anderson — the museum is old school but not behind on the times. With solar panels and a wind turbine, Conner Prairie features a mixture of the new and the old. Historic areas provide authentic, unique and entertaining educational experiences, including Prairietown, Lenape Village and the Museum Center. The state-ofthe-art amphitheater hosts Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s Symphony on the Prairie. www.connerprairie.org, 13400 Allisonville Rd., Fishers, 776-6006


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Crown Hill Cemetery Dillinger is buried here. Sunlight filters through old-growth trees on row after row of Civil War dead. Kurt Vonnegut said that, as a boy, he liked going to Crown Hill to shoot crows. This, in other words, is a place with plenty of history. It is also a rolling, bucolic refuge at the heart of the city, where it’s not unusual to spy a deer or two. Hoosier poet James Whitcomb Riley’s grave marks Indianapolis’ highest point (842 feet) and affords a splendid view of Downtown. In the summer and fall walking tours are available. www. crownhill.org, 700 W. 38th St., 925-3800 Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art Since its opening in 1989, this institution’s mission has been to inspire an appreciation for the art, history and cultures of the American West and the indigenous peoples of North America. Through exhibitions, educational programs, cultural exchanges and special events, the museum is an evergrowing locus helping to keep Native American culture alive. Located within the White River State Park, the Eiteljorg Museum holds the largest collection of contemporary Native American fine art in the country and nurtures these artists with its unique Fellowship for Native American Fine Art. www.eiteljorg. org, 500 W. Washington St., 6369378 Garfield Park A southside treasure, Garfield Park provides an array of delights, from its recently revived sunken gardens with European classical formal gardens, to art exhibitions at its cultural center, frequent ethnic festivals and the simple pleasures of walking or biking through its gracefully undulating landscape. And when it’s cold outside, the 10,000 square foot Garfield Park Conservatory, with its rainforest theme of exotic plants and a variety of orchids, ferns and palms, will make you feel like you’re mile away from Indianapolis. If you look close enough you might even spot a tree frog or zebra finch. www. garfieldgardensconservatory.org, 2450 S. Shelby St. Indiana History Center Located downtown along the canal, the state archives are a godsend to history buffs and amateur geneologists alike. You don’t have to have a desire to dig through the archives, however, to pay a visit. And when you do, make sure you stop in the Basile History Market gift shop. They have it all when it comes to products related to the state of Indiana in any way – particularly books by or about Indiana residents and history, as well as maps and other historical items. Many items can be purchased online. www.indianahistory.org, 450 W. Ohio St., 234-0026. Indiana Live Casino Okay, this one’s for the grownups. Particularly those among us who are tired of having to board a river boat to spend some time with one-armed

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bandits. At this huge 233,000 squarefoot facility there are 2,000 slots, along with poker, blackjack and roulette for the high rollers. And, just like Vegas, there’s plenty of opportunities to drink, dance and meet new friends. Twenty minutes west of Indy, but a lot closer than Nevada or Monaco. www. indianalivecasino.com, 4300 N. Michigan Road, Shelbyville, IN. Indiana Medical History Museum Indiana Medical History Museum is located in the Old Pathology Building, the oldest surviving pathology facility in the nation, at the Central State Hospital. In 1972 the Old Pathology Building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places. After the closing of Central State in 1994, the building took on greater significance because its research laboratories, autopsy and photography rooms, anatomical museum and library remained intact as an example of early scientific study of mental illness. The museum now offers tours, maintains a collection of over 15,000 artifacts and displays changing and permanent interpretive exhibits. www.imhm.org, 3045 W. Vermont St., 635-7329 Indiana State Museum Features hands-on, interactive, familyoriented permanent and changing exhibits on the arts, sciences and culture from the Ice Age to the present. The structure and grounds alongside Central Canal is itself an exhibit, featuring a steam clock that marks the hours with Back Home Again in Indiana played on eight brass whistles, the English, Banter, Mitchell Foundation fountain and the Watanabe Family Gardens. The Grand Lobby features daily storytelling and sing-along programs and houses Faces of Indiana, Indiana’s Treasure. If that’s not enough, an IMAX Theater is on the Canal Level. www.indianamuseum.org, 650 W. Washington St., 233-4629 Indiana War Memorial Originally built to honor those who fought and died in the First World War, the War Memorial has gone on to commemorate the contributions made by the U.S. military in wars before and since. But even pacifists can be moved by the scale and deco imagination that inform this remarkable building. They simply don’t make things like this anymore. In fact, Indianapolis is second only to Washington D.C. in acreage and number of monuments dedicated to veterans. Visiting the War Memorial is like stepping across a threshold into another dimension. Admission is free. www. in.gov/iwm/, 431 N. Meridian St.

Looking for more arts and entertainment event listings or venue inf ormation? Check out the A+E section at www.nuvo.net

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Hall of Fame Museum at IMS Indianapolis Motor Speedway Hall of Fame Museum This one’s pretty standard for first-time visitors to the city, and it’s a good one for home town folks too (though we recommend going any time OTHER than the month of May if you can help it). Home to 100 years of IMS history, including some of the coolest race cars, from every era, such as the Marmon “Wasp,” winner of the first Indianapolis 500 in 1911. There are also 90-minute tours of the track area where you can visit the victory podium and the famous “Yard of Bricks” at the start/finish line. www.indianapolismotorspeedway. com/facility/35204-Museum/, 4790 W. 16th St., 492-6784 Indianapolis Museum of Art Housed on meandering bucolic grounds with meticulously manicured gardens, this beautiful museum offers a visual experience that extends beyond the traditional confines of art viewing. It holds a collection of 42,000 works that span the range and scope of art history. Japanese, African, Native American art, the list goes on. The newest addition to this already renowned museum is the 100-acre Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, featuring numerous sculptures behind the IMA. Get a nourishing and delicious bite to eat at the museum’s Nourish Café, headed up by chef Ty Hunt. www.imamuseum. org, 4000 Michigan Rd., 920-2660 Indianapolis Zoo Where else can you see a bunch of wild animals in Indianapolis (besides the statehouse). Located at White River

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State Park, you can see red pandas, the endangered Amur tiger and polar bear, and even touch live sharks. You can also learn from the best about animal conservation. Indy’s zoo was the first in the world to breed the endangered Grand Cayman blue iguana and the only zoo to breed the Jamaican iguana. But it’s not all about the animals. The zoo’s beautiful 3.3 acre botanical garden, White River Garden, has hundreds of plant varieties on display. www.indianapoliszoo.com, 1200 W. Washington St., 630-2001 Madame Walker Theatre Center This historic theatre center is an open venue for a range of arts and cultural festivals, events, classes and live performances. The Walker building, erected eight years after the death of Madame C.J. Walker, was originally the world headquarters of the cosmetics manufacturing company founded by Walker herself. It also houses shops and serves as a center of life on Indiana Avenue with a restaurant, meeting rooms, a ballroom and the Walker Theatre. The building is listed in both national and state registers of historic places and is one of the great jewels of Indianapolis. www.walkertheatre. com, 617 Indiana Ave., 236-2099 Morris-Butler House Museum A restored 1865, 16-room Victorian mansion built by John D. Morris and now owned by Historic Landmarks Foundation of Indiana, the building is a nationally recognized museum of Victorian decorative arts and preservation education. Events at the


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museum include holiday performances, educational programs, seasonal exhibits and guided tours in which you can order and enjoy Victorian-style tea with your friends. Open Wednesday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. www.historiclandmarks.org, 1204 N. Park Ave., 636-5409 NCAA Hall of Champions NCAA Hall of Champions occupies a refurbished, two-story historic building along the canal in the White River State Park complex of cultural centers. The Hall represents all 23 sports sponsored by the NCAA. A soaring gallery of rotating, interactive exhibits highlights the 88 championships, while showing what it takes to be an NCAA student athlete. Theater presentations include films on NCAA sports events. But the highlight of your visit will undoubtedly be the small version of a gym from the 1930s, where you can shoot baskets and engage in an impromptu game. www.ncaahallofchampions.org, 1 NCAA Plaza, 700 W. Washington St., 916-4255 Pres. Benjamin Harrison Home The 16-room, red brick house built 1874 in the Italianate style popular in the late 19th century is operated by the Benjamin Harrison Home Foundation as a museum featuring original furnishings and Harrison family mementos. The house became a national landmark in 1966. Harrison, the 23rd U.S. President and Indiana’s only president, noted for his front porch campaign, actually added the front porch in 1895, well after his presidency. He died in the house in 1901. Tours run on the hour and halfhour, but get there early to enjoy the gardens surrounding the house. www. presidentbenjaminharrison.org, 1230 N. Delaware St., 631-1888 Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library Indianapolis is where it all began for Kurt Vonnegut. This was his birthplace and boyhood home. The city also provided inspiration and source material for Vonnegut’s novels, short stories and nonfiction works. But there hasn’t been a place in Indianapolis where a Vonnegut fan could go to make contact with Vonnegut’s home base -- until now. The Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library supplies visitors with information about the author’s life and ideas, displays a choice selection of memorabilia along with some of Vonnegut’s visual artwork, offers a companionable reading room and, of course, a gift shop. To learn more about the Vonnegut Library’s ongoing programs, including a regular reading group and volunteer opportunities, go to www.vonnegutlibrary.org, The Emelie Building, 340 N. Senate, 652-1954

Looking for more arts and entertainment event listings or venue inf ormation? Check out the A+E section at www.nuvo.net

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White River State Park On the west side of downtown Indy is a vibrant park that includes an outdoor amphitheater, an urban garden, various public sculptures, all within earshot of either Central Canal or the White River. This is a space to visit and wander in a leisurely manner as its amenities include various destinations found elsewhere in this product (Indiana State Museum, The Eiteljorg, the zoo, etc.), along with 250 acres of green space. Rent a bike, Segway or pedal boat, stroll the canal, enjoy a festival or concert, see Shakespeare performed, you name it, you can pretty much do it. wrsp.in.gov

VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS ARTBOX ARTBOX just opened a new space near the Omni Severin hotel, but the one worth checking out on First Friday (see IDADA) is the space in the Stutz II building. The interior is a beautiful, high-ceilinged exhibition space with a polished cement floor where you’ll find a mixture of sculpture and painting. Sometimes you’ll even find an installation. Other times, you’ll walk in and find yourself in the middle of a show/fundraiser for a worthy cause. The quality of the artwork here — a mixture of work from local and nationallyrecognized artists—is uniformly high and the curation top-notch. www. artboxindy.com, 217 W 10th St, 317-955-2450 Art Bank Gallery A combined gallery/studio showing the work of the local artists who rent space here. It’s a bit more chaotic — in a good way — than your typical gallery, with paintings hanging salonstyle on every available wall space. The enthusiasm of the artists is contagious, and their “Rob the Bank” events, involving a real bank vault, are worth checking out. While the quality of work here might strike you as being a bit uneven at times, you can find some shining gems here. You can also find artwork in the Art Bank that won’t push you over your credit limit. 811 Mass Ave, 317-624-1010 Arts Council of Indianapolis The Arts Council’s proud mission is to “build financial support and widespread appreciation for meaningful engagement in the arts.” Their vision is to make Indianapolis a recognized arts and cultural destination. Always active within the arts community in various ways — an arts calendar, a database of artists, programming at the Artsgarden, etc. — the ACI recently moved into new digs where they can “be the art” as well. With a gorgeous mural on the exterior of the building, and regular visual art exhibits on the inside, Gallery 924 is quite a sight to behold. Stop by and say hello! www.indyarts.org, 924 N. Pennsylvania St., 631.3301

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Athenaeum One of Indy’s most revered architectural wonders and cultural destinations, The Athenaeum is home to a number of performance and exhibition spaces, from the Biergarten outside to various niches and stages inside. The premier space, however, is a vast and impressive auditorium, somehow both grand and intimate at the same time. It is now a host to various theater performances, along with musical acts and other festivities (including NUVO’s own Cultural Vision Award ceremony in June), and the lobby outside the main theater serves as a visual arts exhibition space as well. www. athenaeumfoundation.org, 401 East Michigan Street, 655-2755 Beef & Boards Dinner and a show is what B&B is best known for — as well as an outstanding gift shop. Located in College Park, the theatre entertains more than 155,000 people annually. The buffet comes with the ticket. Food prepared by the in-house chef, a full-service bar and gourmet desserts are additional features to the main attraction: the stage. Classic hits and well-known favorites — primarily musicals — reign supreme here, making this a theater the entire family can enjoy. The theater operates year-round and nightly (except Mondays when special musical acts can be seen). www.beefandboards.com, 9301 Michigan Rd., 872-9664 Big Car Gallery Located in the Murphy Arts Center, Big Car gallery is a beloved destination for those adventurous art and music enthusiasts who enjoy a mélange of art forms: visual arts, music and performance — often all at the same time. Big Car was a 2010 honoree in NUVO’s Cultural Vision Awards, for its genre-bending, collaborative approach and its proven ability to attract a diverse, multi-generational audience. The gallery has also had a hand in kick-starting an economic revival in the Fountain Square neighborhood. A mustsee space during the city’s monthly First Friday events. www.bigcar.org, 1043 Virginia Ave. #215 339-0911

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Cabaret at the Columbia Club Located in the historic Columbia Club on Monument Circle, The Cabaret features intimate performances in the classic cabaret style. While beloved local performers like Deb Mullins, Shannon Forsell and Brenda Williams can be regularly seen, The Cabaret also brings in top performers from around the country and beyond. Expect a wide range of musical genres, from bebop and blues to boogie and Broadway musical tunes. All the amenities are in place: a variety of hors d’oeuvres, appetizers, a full dinner and luscious desserts. Plus, you can choose from an array of fine wines — or just enjoy a martini. www.TheCabaret.org, 121 Monument Circle, Suite 516, 275-1169 Center for the Performing Arts You might quibble about the appearance of Neil Sedaka in the lineup the Jan. 29, 2011 gala concert that will cap the Carmel facility’s opening week. But under the state-of-the-art Palladio Dome, in the 1600-seat theatre dubbed the Palladium, the sonics are sure to be perfect. The concert will also feature the Center’s artistic director Michael Feinstein performing along with Chris Botti. The Palladium will be just one of the venues at Carmel’s Center for the Performing Arts; there will also be a 500-seat proscenium theater, the Tarkington, that will be the new home of the Civic Theater, and a 200-seat studio theater as well. www. thecenterfortheperformingarts.org, 355 W. City Center Drive, 317-660-3373. Clowes Memorial Hall This 2,200-seat hall opened in 1963 to national architectural news coverage. Unique interior elements include no interrupting aisles for center seats, proximity to the stage (only 113 feet from stage to the last row) and a special acoustic design for symphony playing. Three balconies form a horseshoe around the main floor orchestra seating, replicating the proximity to stage. Butler Ballet, Butler Symphony and other music groups perform regularly at Clowes, but the concert hall hosts such diverse attractions as Broadway Across America shows, standup acts like George Carlin, Bill T. Jones’ dance

Michael Feinstein, Artistic Director, Center for the Performing Arts

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Shannon Forsell, Artistic Director, Cabaret at the Columbia Club ensemble and country artist Emmy Lou Harris. www.cloweshall.org, 4602 Sunset Ave., 940-6444 ComedySportz ComedySportz has been serving up great improv and comedy performances to Indianapolis audiences since 1993. Located along Mass Ave, ComedySportz features family friendly contests between two teams of improv specialists, with plenty of interaction with the audience. In addition they present more adult-oriented shows, AKA their “Unscripted Series,” and the ComedySportz performers are some of the most talented — and quick-witted — actors imaginable. ComedySportz competes in regional and national contests, giving other, bigger cities a run for their money. Did we mention the food and alcohol that goes along with the fun? www. indycomedysportz.com, 721 Massachusetts Ave., 951-8499 Crackers Comedy Club As far as live entertainment goes, a weekend show at either Crackers location is the closest thing you can have to a guaranteed good time. There is almost always a well-balanced blend of opening, featured and headlining acts making for a perfect first-date or night out with any group of friends. Comedy is the ultimate lubricant for all social situations, and Crackers is the best club in the city—according to critics and NUVO readers alike. They have two venues, one downtown amid

the buzzing nightlife of Meridian St., and another larger venue in Broad Ripple. www.crackerscomedy.com; 6281 N. College Avenue, 255-4211; 247 S. Meridian St., 631.3536 Dance Kaleidoscope Dance Kaleidoscope is a contemporary company whose dancers are trained in classical ballet and Graham Technique. DK offers a diverse repertoire in various venues, with their mainstage performances presented at Indiana Repertory Theatre. The company performs in additional venues, though, such as White River State Park Everything is top-notch, from costuming to lighting to choreography; check out Assistant Director David Hochoy’s blog on their site. DK is all about collaboration, performing to live music and spoken narrative, while bringing in guest choreographers. www.dancekal. org, 4603 Clarendon Road, Rm. 32, 940-6555 Dean Johnson Gallery “Instead of pictures for the drawing room, electric gadgets for the kitchen,” declared Bruno Munari back in 1966 in an influential essay entitled “Design as Art.” No gallery in Indy encapsulates that vision better than the Dean Johnson Gallery but the contemporary house-wares and furniture on display in this gallery are not always entirely functional. You might see a furniture maker, say, cross the line into the realm of conceptualism in pieces with no obvious practical use. Then again, you

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ISO Ensemble-in-Residence, Time for Three might see items where the conceptual and the practical are pristinely merged, as in a previous show that featured Morgen Bosler’s three-sided funeral urns. www.deanjohnson.com, 646 Mass Ave., (317) 634-8020

Hard Rock Cafe Indianapolis and WTTS present Hard Rock’s Battle of the Bands! Indy’s winning band will compete nationally for a spot on stage live in London at Hard Rock Calling! Qualifying events are at Hard Rock Cafe in February and March. Come root on your fav to represent Indy in the national competition!

Visit www.hardrock.com/indianapolis for event details.

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Gregory Hancock Dance Theatre This troupe offers a socially conscious form of professional modern dance dedicated to the presentation of thought-provoking issues through a diverse repertoire. This troupe doubles in size during the summer when dancers from professional companies, college programs and area schools work alongside veteran GHDT members as part of the theatre’s unique, preprofessional mentoring initiative. Perhaps best known for their alternative version of Nutcracker, the company frequently performs in the Pike Performing Arts Center (6701 Zionsville Rd.). Their season line up often features immersions in world cultures, illuminating cultural diversity through dance and stage design. www. gregoryhancockdancetheatre.org, 329 Gradle Drive, (317) 846-2441 Harrison Center for the Arts Transformed from a largely abandoned church to a thriving cultural milieu, the Harrison Center is home to Redeemer Presbyterian Church, artist studios and the Harrison Art Gallery. The gallery has become a significant destination, with rotating exhibitions held throughout the year that usually emanate from a theme, lending curatorial cohesiveness and art viewing on a high, yet accessible, intellectual level. The center offers party planning and event coordination, and it’s an essential stop along your First Friday itinerary. Overall, the center is one of the most familyfriendly — i.e. all ages — places in all of Indianapolis. www.harrisoncenter. org, 1505 N. Delaware, (317) 396-3886

IDADA/First Fridays IDADA stands for Indianapolis Downtown Artists & Dealers Association, and its signature event is First Friday — held on the first Friday of each month. If you don’t attend, you are missing one of the best arts gatherings this city has to offer. The downtown, from the Harrison Center at 16th and Delaware to Mass Ave to the neighborhood of Fountain Square, is transformed into a festival of visual arts, wine, music and friendship. A great event for 20-somethings to figure out that Indianapolis is a place to stay, put down roots and maybe make up your own art. www.idada.org, contact: info@idada.org 332-5612 Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art (iMOCA) It might call itself a museum, but iMOCA is so much more. It is really a source of energy, bringing work by contemporary artists from across the country to Indianapolis for showings. Located inside the Murphy Art Center in the glorious Fountain Square arts district, iMOCA is open Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. With extraordinary exhibitions such as Frank Warren’s PostSecret work, this is one cool place to be. www.indymoca.org, 1043 Virginia Ave., (317) 634-6622 Indiana Repertory Theatre The cream of the crop for Indianapolis theater, the IRT presents the gamut — from classics to new, speciallycommissioned works. The plays are staged on either the upper or lower stages, which give audiences varying degrees of intimacy, yet always outstanding, powerful performances. Productions have a well-deserved reputation for superb lighting and set design, plus top theater artists (actors, directors, etc.) are drawn from all over the country. Special performances are regularly scheduled for student groups through the Discovery Series, which is also open to general audiences. The IRT also offers theater classes for adults and children. www.irtlive.com, 140 W. Washington St., (317) 635-5252


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Indianapolis Opera Since its creation in 1975, the IO has presented 100 + operatic productions representing the work of many different composers. To the composer’s vision, the company performs in the original language with English subtitles. Renowned singers join the IO Chorus for a season of four operas at Clowes Memorial Hall (4600 Sunset Ave.). A proactive audience development component begins with IO’s acclaimed Music!Words!Opera! education program in cooperation with area schools. This program involves the study and creation of works in opera. This year’s focus is on a modern adaptation of the classic, Carmen. www. indyopera.org, 250 E. 38th St. (IO’s administrative office), (317) 283-3531

IndyFringe IndyFringe’s signature is the extraordinary ten-day Fringe Festival, that brings local, national and international theater artists together for one boggling of fun. Occupying multiple venues, including Mass Ave itself, IndyFringe presents compelling avant-garde theater, dance and comedy for audiences of all types. The rest of the year is no different, as the IndyFringe building is the location for local and touring groups, from kidsoriented productions to more adultthemed shows. Regular occupants like Jabberwocky, in partnership with Storytelling Arts of Indiana, bring storytellers together to tell their tales. www.indyfringe.org, 721-9458, 719 E St. Clair St.

Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra Indiana’s largest performing arts organization, the ISO is one of the only 17 full-time (i.e. year round) U.S. orchestras, with a fully diversified repertoire appealing to a large demographic complement. From just Symphony-on-the Prairie to the classical, pops, family and Yuletideseries seasons, and some Happy Hour programs thrown in for the younger demographic, the ISO annually performs about 200 concerts to audiences exceeding 400,000. www. indianapolissymphony.org, 32 East Washington Street, Suite 600; 262-1100.

Phoenix Theatre Located in a converted church, the Phoenix is an Indianapolis treasure. Under Artistic Director Bryan Fonseca, this award-winning Equity theater delivers a season each year that is exciting and interesting, full of plays and musicals that have just finished their Broadway or Off-Broadway runs. The Phoenix is dedicated to selecting and presenting new works that challenge stereotypes and engage audiences with important social issues. There are two stages — an upper hall and the Basile Theater below that servesdrinks. The Phoenix also offers great acting and playwriting classes. www.phoenixtheatre.org, 749 N. Park Ave., (317) 635-7529

Mab Graves’ “Effie” from a recent Harrison Center exhibition. 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO // 2011 // annual manual

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Indy Fringe performers Miss Didi Panache and Wayburn Sassy

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Theater Within The Theater Within is an outreach program of The Church Within, a church that seeks to affirm people no matter what path their spiritual journey has chosen for them. The Theater Within tries to present challenging, quality productions that you won’t see anywhere else in town. They focus on presenting plays that will start conversations, inviting the audience to contemplate and discuss what they have seen and the production’s philosophical implications. Located in Fountain Square, The Theater Within is a great addition to the neighborhood and the city’s arts scene as a whole. www. thechurchwithin.org/theaterwithin, 1125 Spruce St., 637-5683

wUG LAKUS STUDIO & gARAGE Just walking into the colorful Wug Laku’s Studio & Garage is an elegant, exciting surprise! Located in an urban industrial warehouse in Circle City’s Industrial Complex, WLS&G presents innovative and thought-provoking crafts and contemporary fine art on a monthly basis as part of the IDADA First Friday Gallery Tour. Featuring two galleries and a working artists’ space in the garage area, this delightful venue is sure to please. WLS&G is open on First Fridays from 6-9 p.m. www.wlsandg. com, 1125 Brookside Ave., (317) 270-8258

Don’t miss the 2011 NUVO Arts Guide! Online and on newsstands Wednesday, September 7.


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FILM Heartland Film Festival This annual fall film festival is a tenday event full of independent films from around the world, fun activities for film enthusiast and classy award ceremonies. Emphasizing films about the strength of the human spirit, the Heartland Film Festival features truly moving pictures and the best in independent filmmaking. Heartland presents more than $100,000 in prizes and Crystal Heart Awards to its topjudged submissions. Selected student films receive Jimmy Stewart Memorial Crystal Heart Awards and cash prizes. In addition to the festival, they occasionally premiere new films, complete with visits from famous film actors and directors. www.trulymovingpictures.org, 200 S. Meridian St., Suite 220, 464-9405 Indiana Film Society Since 1988, this group has championed obscure films — the ones that gather dust on the back shelves of old momand-pop video stores. Every year, it focuses its film series on the forgotten films of a specific genre or era. The spring series will include two films each month. Admission is free. Films screen at a brand new venue, the Indianapolis Senior Center. www. indianafilmsociety.org, Indianapolis Senior Center (708 E. Michigan St.), 263-6272

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Indianapolis International Film Festival Since 2004, this annual festival has exhibited films from nearly every state in the country and more than 50 countries around the globe. It features the best in independent and innovative film from both award-winning professionals and emerging filmmakers. It has included such popular, critically acclaimed films as (500) Days of Summer and Sita Sings the Blues. Currently films screen at the Indianapolis Museum of Art. A key aspect of the IIFF is the close proximity of filmmakers to audiences. See the films, hang around and then go get a drink with your favorite director or actor. www.indyfilmfest.org, Indianapolis Museum of Art (4000 Michigan Rd.), 560-4433 Keystone Arts Cinema The Keystone Arts Cinema, located in the Fashion Mall, fills a real void; it’s a place where you can enjoy top indie films, foreign films, documentaries… you name it, it’s the cream of the celluloid crop. Plus, the Cinema’s hotdogs, gourmet popcorn and Indie Lounge, the attached bar where you can purchase your choice of beer and take it into your movie, are all delicious. The environs are comfortable, and the film-going experience is elegant, especially if you turn off that cellphone! www.landmarktheatres.com 8702 Keystone Crossing, 579-3009

The superb “A NY Thing” was actually a French offering at the 2010 IIFF Tobias Theatre Dubbed “The Toby,” this state of the art and environmentally-friendly venue housed in the Indianapolis Museum of Art is a great venue for cinema and lectures on the power of film. Past guest speakers have included legendary filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich, actor Crispin Glover, director Chris Paine

(Who Killed the Electric Car? ) and musician/composer Sufjan Stevens. Live music performances are acoustically sublime, and if you arrive early, you might get to sit in one of the giant, red beanbag chairs. The Toby is also home to the Indianapolis International Film Festival. www.imamuseum.org, 4000 Michigan Rd., (317) 920-2660

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Last Fridays, 6:30p Live jazz, dinner, cocktails

Living the legacy and celebrating the arts on Indiana Avenue.

Blue Moon Sunday

www.walkertheatre.com

Jazz on the Avenue

Sundays, 7p Live band, open mic

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317-236-2099

Laughin’ on the Avenue Last Tuesdays, 8p Comedy show

FLIX

Monthly, 7p Independent film series

Indianapolis Indian slugger Pedro Alvarez, before being called up to the Majors in 2010

SPORTS Brickyard 400 This is the crown jewel of NASCAR races. Named for the old brick paved track of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the Brickyard 400 is NASCAR’s most attended event of the year, with over a quarter of a million fans showing up annually. At the time of the inaugural race in 1994, the Brickyard 400 was the only race to be held at the Speedway other than the renowned Indy 500. Show up for the race or just the qualifications, either way you’re bound to find a lot of hot grills, cheap beer, and fast cars. www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com, Indiana Pacers For a team that created the most successful dynasty in ABA history, the Pacers have had a tough grind since the ’76 ABA-NBA merger. After over a decade of failure, the team began to play .500 ball in the early 1990s and had become one of the Eastern Conference’s top clubs by mid-decade. After their first Finals appearance in 2000, the notorious rumble in Detroit and the resulting suspensions ended any hopes of a title shot. With a controversial $30 million bailout behind them, the Pacers are now marching forward into strange but hopeful territory. www.pacers.com, Indiana Fever Four years after the start of the WNBA, and only ninety years after the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment, the Indiana Fever was born as an expansion franchise to coincide

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with the opening of Conseco Fieldhouse in 2000. Still a young team, the Fever has already shown Indy they mean business. By 2005, they had already appeared in the playoffs a handful of times. In ’08, when the owners were threatening them with disbandment after a lackluster season, these ladies answered back with their best season yet. The future only looks bright for the Fever. www.wnba.com/fever Indianapolis Indians Some might be irked that Indy doesn’t have a professional baseball team to call its own, but nothing beats traveling downtown to see our Indians. Victory Field—voted the Best Minor League Ballpark in America by Sports Illustrated—is a stadium that has the best of the modern amenities as well as an old time feel that lends considerable charm to America’s favorite pastime. Get your tickets to a regular season game, or the locally famous Monday Dollar Menu Night (alas, the beer remains full price)—either way, it’s bound to be a great game. www. indyindians.com Indiana Ice They skate fast, they check hard, they fight tough—what more can you ask? When it comes to sports, you can’t match the white-knuckled intensity, hardboiled action, and fierce competition of a live hockey game. The Ice have been skating the rink of the Pepsi Coliseum since they made the move from Danville, Illinois in 2004. After consecutively finishing 3rd or 4th in their division since 2005, the Ice won the Clark Cup Championships in 2009


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Starting strong in the 2010 season, they will definitely bring the action once the puck is dropped. www.indianaice.com Indianapolis Colts The Colts have been at the core of Indianapolis sports since their black-ops move from Baltimore in 1984, but it took more than a decade for them to become a home team worth fighting for. They had the greatest one-year turnaround in NFL history, going from 3 wins in 1998 to 13 wins in 1999, and have since made two Super Bowl appearances with one memorable win. With Peyton Manning at the helm, we understand why it’s easy to let your blood run blue. After all, they were the first NFL team to have cheerleaders. www.colts.com Indianapolis 500 Often billed as The Greatest Spectacle in Racing, this one is worth the price of admission. The Indy 500 has been the calling card of Indiana sports since the first checkered flag was waved in 1911. With a seating capacity of 400,000, the Indianapolis Motor Speedway is the largest sports facility in the world, and is always packed full when the drivers start their engines. Amidst the excitement and sunshine of a fair weather race, any average Joe can become a motor sports fan. Just about the purest taste of Indianapolis our state can offer. www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com Major Taylor Velodrome One of only a handful of velodromes in the country, this open-air cycling track on the campus of Marian University hosts collegiate, international and local races throughout the spring and summer. With its taunting slopes and steep turns, the Velodrome provides some of the fastest racing opportunities for cyclists and spectators in the world.

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Don’t miss Friday night races with some of the best local cyclists throughout the summer. Next to the track are skateboarding and BMX parks, open to the public. Check the Indy Parks schedule for season opening and closing dates. www.indygov.org, 3649 Cold Spring Road, 327-VELO. Moto Grand Prix The Indianapolis Grand Prix motorcycle race is a relatively new racing event to come to the Speedway. The inaugural race was held in 2008, and it has only gained popularity since. It was held 99 years after the last motorcycle event took pace at the Speedway in 1909, when the track was still paved in brick. A small strip of that old brick remains at the finish line, a reminder of the good old days, but these bikes are nothing like the bikes of old—they’re faster, they’re more dangerous, and they’re covered in sponsors. www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com Roller Derby From the Naptown Roller Girls to the Circle City Socialites, Indy has all of your roller derby needs taken care of. And we’re not talking about the roller derby of old. Forget the fights and the flash—these girls are hardboiled athletes who take their sport seriously. And they do it for free. In a world where million dollar sponsorships and stale advertising campaigns are commonplace, this is exhilarating. These ladies have collected torn tendons, dislocated ankles and broken bones to bring roller derby in all its gravel and glory to the Indianapolis area. www.naptownrollergirls.com www.circlecityderbygirls.com

BEST OF INDY READERS’ POLL ARTS, ENTERTAINMENT AND MEDIA Best Museum: Children’s Museum of Indianapolis Best Art Gallery: Stutz Art Space Best Performing Arts Group: Indianapolis Symphonic Orchestra Best Comedy venue/group: Crackers Best Theatre: Indianapolis Repertory Theatre Best Film Festival: Heartland Film Festival Best Outdoor Festival: Broad Ripple Art Fair Best Public Art Installation: “LOVE” (Robert Indiana), IMA Grounds Best Cultural District: Broad Ripple Best Public Park: Downtown Canal/White River State Park Best College/University: Butler University Best Blog/Web site: IndyMojo Best Radio Station: WTTS 92.3 Best Radio Personality: Dave Smiley Best Television Station: WTHR 13 Best News Anchor/Reporter: Andrea Morehead, WTHR Best Trafffic Reporter: Mimi Pearce, WTHR Best Sports Reporter: Dave Calabro, WTHR Best Weather Forecaster: Angela Buchman, WISH Best Pro Sports Team: Indianapolis Colts Best Amateur Sports Team: Naptown Roller Girls Best College Sports Team: Butler University Men’s Basketball Best Place to Volunteer: Indianapolis Humane Society Best Charitable Event: Mutt Strut benefiting Indianapolis Humane Society

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“Hard Truths: The Art of Thornton Dial” opens at the Indianapolis Museum of Art Feb. 25 (pictured: “Stars of Everything”)

GO & DO 2011

A YEAR OF ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT EVENTS AWAITS YOU Each week in the pages of NUVO Newsweekly, and every day on NUVO.net, we’re working to provide readers with the best options fo r arts and entertainment events in the city. Here’s a breakdown of what we’re most looking forward to in 2011, as well as a few shameless plugs for upcoming monthly N UVO CityGuides. Check the weekly Go & Do section in NUVO each week and the Calendar of Events on www.nuvo.net for more complete and accurate information as the actua l date of the event approaches.

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

The month is cold, but there are plenty of options to warm you up. Devour Downtown (www.indyrestaurantweek. com/winterfest) continues through the fifth. Try fixed menu offerings at some of the city’s best restaurant for $30. Throughout the month, the Arts Council of Indianapolis sponsors Art & Soul (www.indyarts.org/artsoul), a celebration of the traditional and contemporary rhythms, movements, textures, and colors that distinguish African-American art and artists in Indiana continues at the Arts Garden. The downtown Central Library (p.12) will hosts its annual “Meet the Artists” exhibit, featuring the work of local African-American artists in various mediums, through March 26, (imcpl.org).

There’s really only one word to describe March in Indiana, and that word is, of course, basketball. Indianapolis will host both the Men’s and Women’s Big Ten Tournaments (www.bigten.org) the first two weekends of the month. In addition to the games, there will be a billion parties and special events downtown geared toward celebrations. Once the game ends and those out-oftowners go home, get ready for the St. Patrick’s Day parade to end all parades on March 17. While the weather is typically the most unpredictable element, the day kicks off with an annual run, the “greening” of the city canal, before the parade itself begins at 11:30 a.m. (indystpats.com). For more ideas on what to do in Indy, at least after-dark, look for our annual Nightlife CityGuide on stands and online March 9.

March Madness extends into April here in Indy, with the Women’s NCAA Final Four Championships (www.ncaa.com) April 3 and 5. Of equal importance is the third annual Record Store Day (www.recordstoreday.com). Get your ass to Luna Music or Indy CD and Vinyl on the 16th for in-store performances and promotions in celebration of independent music and music retailers. As if the gods themselves had arranged it, April 20 is the release date for our annual tree-hugger Green CityGuide, as the big Earth Day Indiana Festival occurs the following Saturday, April 23, at White River State Park (www. earthdayindiana.org). For a great night of art and community, head down to the 18th annual Stutz Artists Open House (www.stutzartists.com) either Friday or Saturday, April 29-30.

It’s all about the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in the month of May. Starting on the very first day of the month, a benefit for the Indianapolis Humane Society known as Mutt Strut (indymuttstrut.org) draws thousands of dogs and their owners for a lap around the famous track before the IRL cars arrive. Once the pooches leave the track, however, it’s all systems go for non-stop racing themed events and action. There are parades and parties and balloon races and minimarathons to get excited about – all before the 100th running of the Indy 500. For festivities in and around the track, see 500festival.org. For actual Motor Speedway events, see www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com. Need a diversion from all of the racing around in circles, er, ovals? Don’t miss the 41st annual Broad Ripple Art Fair

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JUNE

JULY Feeling patriotic or just love fireworks? Well, you’re in luck. Fireworks displays at parks throughout Marion, Hamilton and Johnson Counties will provide ample choices. But if you want the Big Daddy of Independence Day celebrations, you’ll need to come downtown for the annual Freedom Blast. Typically, the museums at White River State Park offer free admission while a family-friendly festival and concerts take place at The Lawn. The night ends, as it always does, with mega-fireworks shooting from atop the Region’s Bank Tower just before 10 p.m. A few weeks later, get ready to enjoy 10 days of excellent movies at the Indianapolis International Film Festival (www.indyfilmfest.org) at the IMA July 14-24. IIFF offers thought-provoking and entertaining shorts, documentaries and features from around the world that seldom disappoint. July also

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(www.indianaaidsfund.org), an annual event supporting services and programs for more than 10,000 Hoosiers living with HIV/AIDS. The Heartland Film Festival (www.trulymovingpictures. org) also takes place this month, with screenings of mostly independent films, many with Hoosier ties, Oct. 13-22. And while no dates have yet been announced at press time, expect the 5th annual Broad Music Festival to once again supply live music extravaganza at venues throughout the Village and featuring all your favorite bands (www. broadripplemusicfest.com). Also in October, our annual Dining CityGuide featuring our recommendations of more than 100 of the city’s best restaurants.

at the Indianapolis Art Center, May 21-22. This annual weekend festival has come to symbolize the start of summer for Indy residents and a wonderful opportunity to shop local art (www. indplsartcenter.org). Most important day of the month: Bike to Work Day on Friday, May 21. Do it, we double-dog dare you. Need more ideas for how to kick-off the return of sunny days? Pick up our Summer CityGuide on stands and online May 25th.

The month begins in a big way for us with the 13th Annual NUVO Cultural Vision Awards (cva.nuvo.net), June 3 at the Athenaeum. Everyone is invited to help ucelebrate the innovative and inspiration individuals and organizations making Indy better for us all. But we’re not the only cool thing going on this month. First, there’s the Indy Pride parade and festival downtown (www. indyprideinc.org) which should not be missed. The same day you need to find time to also visit the Talbot Street Art Fair (www.talbotstreet.org), an outdoor block party and art fair in one of the city’s greatest neighborhoods. Just down the block, you’ll find the Independent Music and Art Festival (IMAF) at the Harrison Center for the Arts (www.harrisoncenter.org). Need something a little less active but no less artsy and entertaining? By now the Indianapolis Museum of Art will have begun their IMA Summer Nights Film Series and be screening classic films in the outdoor amphitheater on Friday nights (www.imamuseum.org). June sees the return of Brew-Ha-Ha, an annual celebration of craft beer benefiting the Phoenix Theater (www. phoenixtheater.org). Over 50 brews are available for sampling. Good luck with that. Finally, don’t forget the annual N.I.T.E Ride on the 25th. when thousands of cyclists take to the streets for an after-dark ride though the city streets (www.niteride.org). Full day of cycling-related activities precedes at the Velodrome.

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NOVEMBER

The annual Mass Ave Criterium will be August 13, 2011 means the return of Indiana Black Expo July 11-17. The two-week Summer Celebration is the largest and longest-running annual celebration of African-American culture in the US. The Convention Center hosts most events, but concerts and other special programming occur throughout the city. Check www.indianablackexpo. com for full schedule of events. And lest we forget, festivities surrounding the end-of-the-month Brickyard 400 (www. indianapolismotorspeedway.com) – as if you needed a reminder. Perhaps the biggest event of all, we release the results of our annual Readers’ Poll in the Best of Indy CityGuide at the end of the month.

AUGUST From Aug. 8-21, we’ll be celebrating the “Year of the Soybean” down the block at the Indiana State Fair (www. in.gov/statefair). Yep. The “Year of the Soybean.” We didn’t make that up. (You can still eat corn dogs, cotton candy, elephant ears and giant pork tenderloins, however). Speed is the name of the game when the 3rd annual Mass Ave Criterium (www.mac.nuvo. net) brings the region’s fastest cyclist to the streets of Indy on the 13th for the 2011 Criterium State Championships. Just a few days later, get ready for the highlight of the summer with Indy Fringe (www.indyfringe.org), a 10-day festival of theater performing and visual arts that takes over the Mass Ave district for what we can barely resist calling our favorite event of the year (Aug. 19-28). While there are a billion good and even a few great festivals celebrating everything from strawberries to Greek culture, don’t let the month end without attending the Feast of Lanterns (wwwindyfeast.org). Held the last Saturday of August at Spades Park on the Eastside, this is a quintessential neighborhood festival with food, amusement rides and musical performances by some of the city’s best local artists. The real highlight, however,

is the beautiful canopy of paper lanterns draped across the park and illuminate the night and the festival magically.

SEPTEMBER Rib America Festival (www.ribamerica. com) returns to Military Park Sept. 2-5 for a selection of some of the world’s best BBQ and a healthy dose of live music from national and regional acts. The Indianapolis Arts Season officially kicks off the week after Labor Day, with the Arts Council of Indianapolis’ Start with Art luncheon (www.artscouncilof indianapolis.org) and our annual NUVO ARTS CityGuide the week following Labor Day. There is also the Penrod Art Fair (www.imamuseum.org) on the grounds of the IMA, Saturday, Sept. 10, with more than 300 artists expected to participate in this year’s 45th annual event. The following weekend, Sept. 16-18 sees the return of the annual Irish Fest (www.irishfest.com) at Military Park. Live music and entertainment, not to mention great food and beer, all Irish-themed of course. While a date and location are usually revealed in the spring, plan now for the coolest night of independent and progressive local art and entertainment at Oranje (www. oranjeindy.com) in mid-September. For the past few years, Oranje has transformed an abandoned downtown warehouse into a one-night only epicenter of Indy’s arts scene.

OCTOBER Circle City Classic (www. circlecityclassic.com) returns to Indy with one of the best parades in the country and one of the most traditional football match-ups, Sept. 30 – Oct.1. A joint collaboration between Indiana Black Expo and Indiana Sports Corp., the net proceeds from the Classic fund scholarships and support initiatives for Indiana youth pursuing higher education. Saturday, Oct. 8, head downtown and help raise money by participating in the Indiana AIDS Walk

The headline event of the month is the city-wide Spirit and Place Festival (www.spiritandplace.org), Nov. 4-13. Individuals and organizations will explore a central theme, the human body, with art, music, food, lectures, films, dance and whatever else our creative neighbors come up with. Tonic Ball (www.tonicindy.com) is also a November favorite. The annual event, typically held at Radio Radio and the Fountain Square Theater, is a benefit for Second Helpings (www.secondhelpings. org). Local musicians are challenged to interpret the songs of one or two artists. Recent years included nights centered around the Beatles, the Elvi (Presley and Costello), Talking Heads, Madonna and Queen. For the booklovers among you, keep an eye out for the annual Ann Katz Festival of Books at the JCC (www.jccindy.com). A full schedule of visiting authors and readings make it one of the mostcomplete and contemporary literary festivals in the city. And plan all your holiday gift purchases with the NUVO Shopping CityGuide the Wednesday before Thanksgiving.

DECEMBER Let’s just hope that come December 2011, all we have on our mind is a Colts’ trip to Lucas Oil Stadium for the 2012 Super Bowl (www. indianapolissuperbowl.com). In case the Holiday Season makes the list of things you’re thinking about as well, Don’t miss Butler Ballet (www.cloweshall. org), the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra (www.indianapolissymphony. org) and Indiana State Museum (www. indianamuseum.org) holiday offerings. For NYE events, the Masquerade Ball (www.masqueradeball.com) at Union Station is always worth the money, as are traditions like a NYE version of Punk Rock Night at the Melody Inn (www. punkrock.com).

Looking for more arts and entertainment event listings or venue inf ormation? Check out the A+E section at www.nuvo.net

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Saffron Café

DINING Eating out is a favorite past-time for us at NUVO. Thankfully, Indianapolis is home to some excellent local and independent dining options that make eating out affordable and delicious almost any day (or night) of the week. We’ve listed a variety of options here. Price is always tricky, though. What’s “affordable” to one person could quite easily be a “splurge” to another. That’s why we’ve tried to include everything from the best place to eat cheaply to the pricier options that are always worth it, but also expensive by just about any budget. Keep in mind that alcohol with your dinner will always bump up the price category, as well. Healthy, vegetarian options aren’t always the easiest to come by in Indy. But we’ve done our best to represent the slim pickins here. There are also a good number of ethnic flavors to be found throughout the city, and we’ve included the best. Traditional favorites like Bazbeaux, voted Indy’s best pizza for 20 years by NUVO readers, are included. But so are new favorites such as Recess, Pizzology and Pure. For those who simply want a good cup of coffee and perhaps an accompanying desert, not to mention a peaceful getaway or free wi-fi, we’ve listed the city’s finest coffee houses. The best way to experience Indy’s burgeoning local dining scene is simply to explore. Take the time to discover new restaurants and flavors no matter what your budget. Don’t see anything that satisfies your appetite here? Check out our more comprehensive restaurant listings and weekly food reviews at www.nuvo.net. Also, be on the lookout for our annual NUVO Dining CityGuide published each October. There you’ll find dozens and dozens of more options in whatever categories makes your mouth water most. „

RESTAURANTS 3 Sisters While healthy fare seems to be enjoying a bit of a resurgence in local restaurants these days, the good folks at 3 Sisters have been serving up delicious and creative offerings that are both good to eat and good for you in Rroad Ripple for years. Legendary breakfast options compete with a good selection of lunch and dinner items for a favorite meal here. In particular, vegetarians and vegans will find plenty to eat at this charming Victorian home converted into a comfortable and cozy restaurant near the canal. www.3sisterscafe.wp.net, 6360 Guilford Ave., 257-5556 $-$$ Abyssinia Located in a strip mall on West 38th St., Indy’s longest-standing Ethiopian restaurant may not be much to look at, but inside you’ll find a menu offering a satisfying selection of dishes from one of the world’s most distinctive cuisines. Served on injera, the absorbent bread that’s used to sop up flavorful meat and vegetarian dishes that are eaten with the fingers, Abyssinia provides what amounts to some of the world’s most exotic comfort food. 5352 W. 38th St., 299-0608 $$ Adobo Grill This Mexican favorite serves high-end Mexican fare intended to introduce diners to a more subtle, yet intense array of flavors, while also supplying such traditional entrees as Chile Relleno ($13.50) and Enchiladas de Pollo. Some

of the city’s best margaritas are also on offer. Adobo recognizes the merit of happy hour. It offers dollar Barbacoa de Res, tacos al pastor and fish tacos from 4-6 p.m. weekdays, along with plenty of daily drink specials. Also try samplings from the Ceviche bar. www. adobogrill.com, 110 E. Washington St., 822-9990 $$ Amici’s This beloved restaurant always feels like home, plus it features one of the best juke boxes in town. Try the chicken botticelli or the pasta tossed with sautéed chicken livers. Also, the pizza and calzones will fill you up nicely as you enjoy a walk in the adjoining neighborhoods. This restaurant definitely epitomizes the idea that restaurants are places that make you feel like you’re part of the family. Amici’s features an outdoor Italian garden, so now it can feel like your yard, too. 601 E. New York St., 634-0440 $$ Bazbeaux And the award for the longest winning streak of NUVO Best of Indy awards in our 20-year history goes to… NUVO readers have never selected anything other than Bazbeaux as the city’s Best Pizza. In addition to excellent locations (Mass Ave and Broad Ripple) and terrific staff, what makes Bazbeaux so enjoyable is the variety of options. Pour over a massive list of ingredients and craft your own masterpiece, or skip the work and choose one of the standard favorites like the Basilica, which drops tomato sauce for pesto, adds black

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shopping olives and sun-dried tomatoes, and finishes off with feta cheese. www. bazbeaux.com, 811 E. Westfield Blvd. (multiple locations), 255-5711 $-$$ Boogie Burger Boogie Burger rocks, plain and simple. So it came as no surprise to us that NUVO readers voted it home to the Best Burger in Indy this year. Broad Ripple’s little dining-car-of-a-restaurant-thatcould does lots of things well. There’s a basic burger that rookies might want to start with, but don’t wait long to venture into the condiment options which are all dwarfed by the bacon, but still good. Veggies and vegans don’t dismay. The black bean and soy options at Boogie Burger are excellent. Don’t forget an order of garlic fries or onion rings. www.boogieburger.com, 977 E. Westfield Blvd., 255-2540 $

Café Patachou

Bar & Gr ill 5565 N Keystone Ave • 255-3189 (Parking located on 56th St)

CATCH ALL THE NFL AND NHL ACTION HERE! -MONDAYMONDAY

MOVIE NIGHT 8pm and 10pm -TUESDAY-

POKER NIGHT $100 Cash 1st Prize -WEDNESDAY-

THE FAMILY JAM

feat. Adam Catron and Josh Oldham -THURSDAY-

ALTERED THURZDAZE pres. by Indy Mojo/G9 Collective

-FRIDAY AND SATURDAY-

THE BEST JAM BANDS IN THE MIDWEST -SUNDAY-

NFL SUNDAY, EVERY GAME! and Cornhole Tourneys and cookouts when the weather is warm! 5 pool tables, dartboards, boardgames, 20 TVs, Hidef, 130” Big Screen www.themousetrapbar.com

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Café Patachou Billing itself as the student union for adults since 1989, Café Patachou’s original location at the corner of Pennsylvania and 49th Street in the Meridian-Kessler neighborhood has been serving up some of the most delicious breakfast and brunch options, quickly and mostly affordably, for more than two decades. While the family of Patachou dining establishments has expanded over the years to now include Napolese and Petit Chou, the original café (with a brand-new expanded dining room and snazzy outdoor

patio) is a neighborhood kitchen with sophisticated tastes. Take a morning to discover the goodness for yourself. www.cafepatachou.com, 4911 N. Pennsylvania St., 925-2823 $$ Eagle’s Nest Part of the city’s skyline, the Eagle’s Nest at the Downtown Hyatt Regency is that round bit you see a top the hotel. What you might not know from a groundview is that the restaurant has 360 windows which provide a stunning view AS THE RESTURANT TURNS! No lie. It’s like a merry-go-round for grownups. Bring a date, order a bottle of wine with entrée you settle on, and then sit back and watch the world go by. Reservations recommended. www. indianapolis.hyatt.com, 1 S. Capitol Ave., 616-6170, $$$ Euphoria Located in the Buggs Temple property on the canal downtown, Euphoria offers fine dining for moderate splurging in a warm, stylish atmosphere. Expect to find tasty, interesting meals in a lavish presentation, with a serious beverage assortment that’s sure to supply the perfect counterpoint to your dish. Euphoria also features an extensive cheese selection and serves up specials from its deliciously diverse bar menu on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4-6 p.m. Drop in to experience Chef demos on Tuesdays from 5-6 p.m. or make a reservation for your favorite dine-out


city411 night. www.indycanal.com, 337 W. 11th St., 2nd Floor, 955-2389 $$$ H2O Sushi An eclectic mix of traditional-style sushi and modern flavor combinations that borrow on a variety of traditions – European, South American, and North African, to name a few – H2O continues to evolve while always delivering quality we’ve come to expect. While the menu boasts customary sushi bar items like sashimi and nigiri, Chef John Adams also offers creative specials, such as black mussels steamed in spicy tomato and corn sauce and seared foie gras with pain perdue, arugula, quail egg, Marcona almonds and Pedro Ximinez vinaigrette. Everything is made from scratch. www.h2osushibar.com, 1912 Broad Ripple Ave., 254-0677 $$$ Le Peep This place has been an Indy breakfast mainstay for years. Some mornings we wake up and all we can think about eating is Le Peep’s French Toast and/ or the one of the pan-handled skillet dishes, most notably The Wanderer, comprised of peasant potatoes, bacon, onions, tomatoes and combo cheese, topped with two basted eggs. Healthier options as well are available as well. The downtown location is a great spot to fill up on the grub before embarking on the journey south to Lucas Oil Stadium. Service is always top-notch and full of smiles. www.lepeep.com, 301 N.

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Illinois St., 237-3447 $-$$ Legend Café The Legend Café is a highly recommended lunch spot for those in-the-know. Servings are plentiful so feel free to order halfs, but we recommend a full-size NY Sloppy Joe: turkey, corned beef, Swiss cheese, coleslaw and Thousand Island dressing on pumpernickel. You can thank us later. For the veggies among you, there’s Emma’s Sloppy Joe which beautifully substitutes onion and cucumber in place of the bird. Leave room for desert. Lots of fresh-baked options. www.legendirvingtoncafe. com, 5614 E. Washington St., 5362028 $ Loft Restaurant at Trader’s Point How long does it take to become an icon? In the case of the Loft Restaurant at Traders Point Creamery, less than a decade. From farm to fork is as close as it gets here, and the freshness matters in everything from the salads to deserts. For a delicious entrée, everything’s good. But we can’t resist the awardwining Farm Burger, a handcrafted patty of 100 percent grass-fed beef with lettuce, red onion, garlic aioli and a topping of TPC’s superb Fleur de la Terre cheese served on a whole grain bun. www.traderspointcreamery. com, 101 Moore Rd.,733-1700 $$-$$$

Boogie Burger Mama Carolla’s Mama Carolla’s Old Italian in Broad Ripple is, hands-down, the most romantic restaurant in the city according to NUVO readers in each year’s Best of Indy poll. From the twinkling lights to heavy wood accents, all housed in what actually feels like a house, there’s something cozy and refreshing about a visit to Mama’s in this case. The reasonable prices mean it’s affordable for two, even with a good bottle of wine to complement the traditional Italian menu. When the weather permits, take your date to the

patio dining room for an even more romantic evening. (And don’t forget about their new café next door for breakfast Good Morning Mama’s!) www.mamacarollas.com, 1031 E. 54th St., 259-9412 $$ Meridian Located in a grove of trees immediately south of the historic Central Canal and alongside its namesake street, Meridian has the look and feel of an elegant country inn, with a spacious woodbeamed dining room and a cozy bar. This setting is a handsome complement

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shopping a cozy pizzeria with all the style of a classic Italian restaurant. Build a pizza yourself or choose from some winning combinations like the BLT (bacon, caramelized leeks and taleggio) or PFG (pancetta, roasted fingerling potatoes and gorgonzola). To satisfy your sweet tooth, try the Nutella Stuffed Pizza or the rotating selection of Patachou’s own Premium Gelato. www. cafepatachou.com, 114 E. 49th St., 925-0765 $$-$$$

Pizzology to Meridian’s food which emphasizes fresh ingredients and elegant presentation. If you’re on a budget, try a salad with a delicious seasonal soup. The Lobster Pot Pie is especially recommended. And the cocktails are profound. 5694 N. Meridian St., 4661111 $$$

dogs, fries, double cheeseburgers and more. Be sure to grab some cash (they don’t take credit cards) and eat a nice pork sandwich or a Coney dog covered in fried chili and wash it down with some homemade root beer in a thick, frosty mug. www.mug-n-bun.com, 5211 W. 10th St., 244-5669 $

Mug-n-Bun Did somebody say tenderloin sandwich? The Mug-n-Bun drive-in restaurant’s patty is pounded out wide, then fried to a crisp, just the way it should be. Some things that never change here: favorite onion rings, Dad’s root beer floats,

Napolese Rustic Neapolitan pizza is becoming more and more in demand here in the States and this new sister eatery to Café Patachou’s is happy to oblige. Just around the corner from Patachou’s Pennsylvania St. location, Napolese is

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Oakley’s Bistro Literally, one of the best restaurants in the city. Chef and owner Steve Oakley is an artist with flavor. And we aren’t just saying that. He’s a James Beard award nominee as well for his creative pairings of things like a rich pancetta vinaigrette and a mild fish like tilapia. This is just the tip of the iceberg. The meatloaf, based on an old family recipe, will amaze you. While there are many opportunities to spend a lot of money on a good meal in this town, choose Oakley’s if you want every bite to be worth it. www.oakleysbistro.com, 1464 W. 86th St., 824-1231 $$-$$$ Oceanaire The key to excellent seafood is freshness, which is why Oceanaire has been named as Indianapolis’ best seafood restaurant. Oceanaire ships its seafood in daily from all over the world, guaranteeing both freshness and variety. The classic décor adds to the

atmosphere, and the mixture of tables and booths provides a great setting for groups of any size. The oyster bar is also a great touch. The staff should also be commended for its efforts towards sustainability and ecologically responsible food practices. www. theoceanaire.com, 30 S. Meridian St., Suite 100, 955-2277 $$$ Passage to India Passage to India formerly Udupi Café is the only restaurant of its kind in the city, specializing in authentic Indian vegetarian and vegan cuisine. The expanded menu offers a rich array of dishes from the two great schools of Indian cooking, northern (with its dairy leanings) and southern (known for its robust use of spice), resulting in a dining experience that relies on an uncommonly rich array of flavors, textures and degrees of heat. Try the lunchtime buffet or one of many vegan and vegetarian curries. 4225 Lafayette Rd., 299-2127 $-$$ Peppy Grill Open 24 hours, you can’t go wrong popping into Peppy any time of day or night. Located in the Fountain Square Cultural District, a diverse crowd has been known to frequent the intimate dining room to order some classic, greasy diner food. The food is cheap and quick, but don’t get too full on the thick French fries and cheeseburgers and forget about the giant slices of pie.


city411 Friendly cooks and servers make Peppy a regular haunt for the downtown crowd. Breakfast is a must, and don’t forget to pop a dollar into the jukebox. 1004 Virginia Ave., 637-1158 $

isn’t treated as an afterthought, know one needs to leave hungry or underwhelmed. www.pureeatery. com, 1043 Virginia Ave., 602-5724 $-$$

Pizzology Like any other piece of art, the pizzas at Neal Brown’s Pizzology take time to fully appreciate. Like a song you must hear repeatedly before it strikes a chord, or a classic book that must be read with patience, you will eventually come to adore this somewhat foreign fare – and be worldlier for it. Brown has struck the perfect medium of creativity and accessibility in his latest venture. His take on Pappardelle & Bolognese is exactly what you’d expect from the restaurant’s seriously traditional standpoint – rustic, robust and meaty. The beer lineup is artfully simple and good, like everything else in the place. www.pizzologyindy.com, 13190 Hazel Dell Pkwy, 844-2550 $

R Bistro Chef Regina Mehallick takes special care in arranging the weekly menu in order to best incorporate seasonal, locally made produce, offering one of the most creative menus in Indianapolis. The result is an imaginative culinary treat. Reasonable portions and pricing leave clientele satisfied, while upscale décor makes for a sophisticated ambiance. Given the intimate dining space, it is highly recommended to make reservations at R Bistro, especially on weekends. Consult the Web site to see what seasonal offerings are available. www.rbistro.com, 888 Massachusetts Ave., 423-0312 $$$

Pure A welcome and tasty addition to the menu of Fountain Square dining options, Pure is perfectly located on the first floor of the Murphy Arts Center – next to Indy Swank and under Big Car. If there’s a cooler place in town to be sandwiched, we know not of it. Dedicated to offering fresh, honest food, Pure is a friendly café with imaginative and flavorful offerings. One of the rare places where vegetarianism

Recess Recess proves that our local chefs are committed to making Indianapolis a real destination. With Greg Hardesty, Gabe Jordan and Eli Anderson on top billing, this Midtown eatery is a who’s who of Indianapolis’ culinary superstars. For about $40 -- $60 per person (sans alcohol), Executive Chef and owner Hardesty takes you on a food tour through his mental playground with a singular prix fixe menu that changes nightly. Supplemental courses are sometimes offered, along with choice

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of entrée. Along with the outstanding food, an impressive and carefully chosen assortment of beer and wine rounds out the experience. 4907 N. College Ave., 925-7529, www.recessindy.com $$$ Saffron Café With a wide variety of delicious North African (mostly Moroccan) dishes that can best be described as a circus for the senses, Saffron is one of our favorites. We recommend the delicate and delicious saffron rice foremost, but the Antipasto Plate, a combination of three appetizers: hummus, zaalouk and bakoula served with mild feta cheese

and pita wedges is high on the list as well. You might also try one of two specialty dishes: a Kafta Sandwich, finger rolls of finely ground, deeply seasoned and char-grilled beef served on an open-face pita and the Couscous Royale, a medley of vegetables served over couscous and steamed in a clay pot. www.saffroncafe-indy.com, 621 Fort Wayne Ave., 917-0131 $$-$$$ Santorini Greek Kitchen Santorini Greek Kitchen is another longtime favorite of NUVO readers. This year’s top place as Best Greek/ Mediterranean Restaurant is win 20C 50246

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number eight for one of Fountain Square’s most vibrant eateries. Before we forget, make sure you have galaktaboureko for dessert. Seriously. Other than that, we recommend just about anything else on the menu. Spanakopita, souvlaki, saganaki are all tasty, and while the Tomato Balls might like more like pancakes, they still burst with flavor. Belly dancers perform on Friday and Saturday nights, so make reservations as the tables fill up fast. Settle down for a long meal because the portions are enormous, leaving even the biggest appetite fully satisfied. Full bar; non-smoking. www.greekkitchen.dine.com, 1417 Prospect St., 917-1117 $$ Scotty’s Lakehouse The newest effort of local entrepreneur Scott Wise, The Lakehouse is a gastropub with inspired bounty. It has a great, Indiana-centric beer lineup that melds into the food itself. Most fried sides at Scotty’s Lakehouse are served with a trio of sauces: chipotle ketchup, garlic mayo and Sun King beer mustard. The latter, made with Sun King’s malty Wee Mac Scottish ale, is outstanding. The beer mellows the mustard’s tart edge enough to make it addictive. The Lakehouse also makes a point of being as green/sustainable as possible. www. scottyslakehouse.com,10158 Brooks School Rd., Fishers, 557-2900 $$

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Shapiro’s Deli Shapiro’s has been the favorite deli of NUVO readers for at least 20 years, and won this category every single time we’ve taken your votes. According to the folks at Shapiro’s, they’ve only had a few simple goals since the place opened more than a century ago: “Cook good. Serve generously. Price modestly. People will come.” They might be on to something. The food is delicious, the portions are huge, the prices are mostly modest and the place is always packed. You can dine in or carry out; but don’t miss the bakery items either way. Cheescake is much better for you than corned beef. www. shapiros.com, 808 S. Meridian St., 631-4041 Smokehouse on Shelby Located in the heart of Fountain Square, Smokehouse gets its sauces right. They’re so good you won’t be able to choose which you like best, so put ‘em both on one of the best pulled pork sandwiches you’re liable to find anywhere in town. It’ll melt in your mouth. You can also get wings, burgers and slabs of ribs – and a full complement of classic sides. Their fried biscuits are delightfully reminiscent of New Orleans style beignets. Unlike beignets, they come without confectioner’s sugar in favor of the fresher, less sweet apple butter – a down home touch with a touch of class. www. fountainsquareindy.com, 1105 Shelby St., 685-1959 $$

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St. Elmo Steakhouse This downtown institution has been serving perfectly cooked steaks exactly the way patrons ask for them for more than 100 years (not to mention a host of other delicious dishes and the best shrimp cocktail on the planet). Serving downtown patrons since 1902 means that the folks at St. Elmo’s not only know how to deliver excellent meals to satisfied customers, they can also help you make the best selection. Known for the classic turn-of-the-century Chicago saloon style décor, St. Elmo offers an upscale experience with excellent service. www.stelmos.com, 127 S. Illinois St., 635-0636 $$$

Yats If there is one restaurant readers of NUVO prefer above all others in Indy, it’s gotta be Yats. No doubt that’s because the iconic Joe Vuskovich and his crew love equally and want to make sure everyone gets a chance to eat some of the best creole food anywhere outside of New Orleans. Each day brings a new set of six to ten menu items, including vegetarian options, according to mood and availability. The price, however, is always cheap and the company is always exquisite. www.yatscajuncreole. com, 659 Massachusetts Ave., 317686-6380 and 5463 N. College Ave., 253-8817 $

Taste This unique café and marketplace, owned and operated by highly trained and experienced chefs Marc Urwand and Deidra Henry, offers gourmet coffee drinks, a full breakfast menu, a lunch spread of salads and gourmet sandwiches, pantry necessities, and catering services, all housed in a stylish, open space with expansive windows giving a great view of the avenue. Everything is good here, but pay attention or you might get sticker shock at the grand total. www. tastecafeandmarketplace.com, 5164 N. College Ave., 925-2233 $$

Zing This historic brick building that ends Indiana Avenue brings a new concept to Indy: small plates. It’s meant for slow, communal dining, and plates are brought at staggered times so people have time to share and finish before new, hot plvates arrive. Some must-tries include Mahi Tacos in an Asian-inspired tempura shell with cilantro cream and Medjool dates stuffed with sausage and wrapped with bacon. Afterwards, share (or don’t!) something from the daily-changing dessert menu, or get your sweet fix from a specialty martini. www.zingrestaurant.com, 543 Indiana Ave., 636-7775 $$-$$$


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Looking for more listings of local restaurants? Check out the FOOD+DRINK section at www.nuvo.net

Taste Café

Coffee Houses Earth House Café As a collective, Earth House Café is the perfect place to stay in touch with the community and important issues. Earth House is Indiana’s only 100-percent organic and fair trade coffee shop, offering coffee and tea drinks as well as organic foods on Friday nights and during events. Along with delicious food and drink, Earth House also offers classes like yoga and African drumming as well as exhibiting local artists, musicians and films. Their refurbished upstairs performing space is one of the new treasures of downtown Indianapolis. Check out the Web site for the great line-up. www. earthhousecollective.org, 237 East St., 636-4060 $$ Hubbard & Cravens With two neighborhood locations in Broad Ripple and Meridian-Kessler and three locations on the Clarian campus in downtown Indianapolis, H&B serves more than customers—it serves friends and neighbors. Hubbard & Cravens cares about creating inviting environments to become the hub of communities, providing a friendly community gathering place that customers can call their own. H&C also roasts its own beans, and distinctively smooth, rich coffee (in any variation) is the result. www.hubbardandcravens. com, 4930 N. Penn. St., 251-5161 & 6229 Carrollton Ave., 803-4155 $$

Lazy Daze Coffee House The menu at Lazy Daze is similar to what you find at any coffeehouse — coffee, tea, iced drinks, hot drinks, decaf, small, medium, large, etc. — but what sets Lazy Daze apart is the atmosphere in which one consumes the menu. Lazy Daze’s dim lighting, mismatched furniture and extensive collection of local artists’ wares create the perfect backdrop for live poetry readings every Thursday and live acoustic music even more often. Regular events like these create Lazy Daze’s unique local flavor and indie environment, which puts chain coffeehouses to shame. www. lazydazecoffeehouse.com, 10 S. Johnson Ave., 353-0777 $ Monon Coffee This favorite neighborhood coffeehouse feels like home with its steamy windows, toasty environment and truly friendly service. Order any variety of coffee concoctions, like the signature Choo Choo Brew, from the black chalkboard menus behind the counter. Freshly baked pastries, including an excellent vegan carrot cake, are temptingly displayed on the counter tops. For lunch, try the curry chicken salad sandwich with fresh carrot juice and settle into an overstuffed chair with your computer (they have remote access) or the paper. home. indy.rr.com/mononcoffee, 920 E. Westfield Blvd., 255-0510

BEST OF INDY READERS’ POLL FOOD AND DRINK Best Chinese: Yen Ching Best Japanese: Naked Tchopstix Best Thai: Siam Square Best Indian: India Garden Best Italian Restaurant: Mama Carolla’s Best Mexican/Spanish: La Hacienda Best Greek/Mediterranean: Santorini Best Middle Eastern/No. African Restaurant: Saffron Best Pub Food: Claddagh Irish Pub Best Delicatessen: Shapiro’s Best Burgers: Boogie Burger Best Pizza: Bazbeaux Best Burrito: La Hacienda Best Steak: St. Elmo Best Seafood: Kona Jack’s Best Wings: Scotty’s Brewhouse Best Pork Tenderloin Sandwich: Indiana State Fair Best Desserts: The Flying Cupcake Best Coffeehouse: Hubbard & Cravens Best Breakfast/Brunch: Café Patachou Best Late Night: Hot Box Best Vegan/Vegetarian: Yats Best Upscale Dining: St. Elmo Best Budget-minded Dining: Yats Best Romantic Dining: Mama Carolla’s Best Wait Staff: St. Elmo Best Wine List: Corner Wine Bar Best Brew Pub/Tasting Room: Sun King Best New Restaurant: Pizzology Best Restaurant: Yats

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Freddie Gibbs brings down the house at J azz Kitchen.

NIGHTLIFE There’s no shortage of venues in Indianapolis for those interested in getting their music, drink or dance groove on. While larger venues like the Murat Egyptian Room, Verizon Wireless Music Center and Conseco are best bets for national acts, great local and up-and-coming bands can be found almost any night of the week at clubs like Radio Radio, Birdy’s, the Jazz Ktichen and Slippery Noodle. And if the names don’t give it away, variety is key. Excellent jazz at Chatterbox or Jazz Kitchen, world-class blues at the Noodle, the punkest of all punk at the Dojo and saucy burlesque at White Rabbit are standard fare. To help quench your grown-up thirsts, we’ve included our favorite local watering holes — the bars, pubs and clubs that never let us down when we’re looking for good drinks, good friends and, ultimately, good times. The legendary Alley Cat tops that list when we feel like hitting the Best Dive Bar in the city. For slightly more upscale occasions there’s Northside Social or Nicky Blaine’s. And new establishments like Ball and Biscuit and the Bar at the Ambassador have found a place alongside Old Point Tavern and Brass Ring as favorites, as well. Beer is big in Indy these days. To that end, we’ve included some mighty fine breweries and brew pubs that have set up shop in the city. And for those, like our Managing Editor Jim Poyser, who live to dance — we’ve got it broken down for you by night of the week. Clubs come and go, as do dedicated DJ nights. Stay current and informed by checking our Clubs + Bars listings at www.nuvo.net. And don’t miss the annual NUVO Nightlife CityGuide on stands and online beginning March 9, 2011. „

LIVE MUSIC Birdy’s Nestled amidst a sea of fast-food restaurants along Keystone Avenue, Birdy’s is one of the premier live music venues in the city. Boasting an excellent sound system and a room that holds a good-size crowd, there’s not been a weekend night in recent memory when there wasn’t great music going on here. Booking both national acts and emerging local artists, as well as hosting the biggest and best annual battle of the bands in Indy, if you like music, sooner or later you’ll end up at Birdy’s. www.birdyslive.com, 2131 E. 71st St. 254-8971. Chatterbox Jazz Club The Chatterbox, a live jazz staple for 25 years in the Mass Ave Cultural District, is one of the city’s smallest and hottest nightspots. You’re never going to get anything less than a great set from whomever is performing, especially if that’s Chatterbox regular Cynthia Layne or any number of headliners who seem to wind up here after playing at any one of the nearby bigger venues. The Chatterbox is a rarefied breed in Indy’s nightlife scene: thoroughly sophisticated, yet entirely proletarian. Not coincidentally, it’s also a regular NUVO Best of Indy winner. www.chatterboxjazz.com, 435 Massachusetts Ave., 636-0583 The Dojo All-ages, collectively-run, DIY to the bones and not always climate-

controlled, The Dojo plays host to a steady diet of hardcore, punk and metal — filling a much-needed role for fans 21 and younger — and will accept a booking from any local promoter who can follow a level-headed code of conduct (no blatant sexism, racism or homophobia). Now based in a strip mall just north of downtown after a move last year from the east side, the venue became a membership-only club in January; first-time attendees are asked to pay a one-time, $1 fee. www. diydojo.com, 2207 N. College Emerson Theater The granddaddy of Indy’s hardcore scene, national and regional acts ranging from the All American Rejects and Coheed and Cambria to Kill Hannah and Mindless Self Indulgence have toured through this all-ages venue in recent years. With a holding capacity of 400 people, the former art moderne neighborhood theater had its seats removed for an in-your-face glimpse of your favorite punk, hardcore and metal bands. Voted best all-ages venue by NUVO readers, the crowd is largely and predictably determined by the names on the marquee. www.emersontheater. com, 4630 E. 10th St., 357-0239. Jazz Kitchen The Jazz Kitchen is a quintessential jazz supper club in the heart of Meridian/ Kessler; a must-stop venue for national and local acts voted one of the city’s best live music venues every year by NUVO readers. Any night with Frank Glover or Rob Dixon on the marquee is a guaranteed winner. Enjoy excellent

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shopping food and service during the show in the main room or at the bar. The outdoor patio deck is a particularly nice spot to watch the 54th and College world go by. The cuisine has a distinctly New Orleans accent with an emphasis on fresh ingredients; the crab cakes are terrific and the cocktails are sincere. www.thejazzkitchen.com, 5377 N. College Ave., 253-4900. Locals Only Art & Music Pub Despite the clique-ish name, Locals Only is a neighborhood bar that welcomes everyone.The folks at Locals Only have made the best of a good thing, attracting a diverse crowd of roots, blues and hard rock performers to a stage with pretty good sound and a charmingly battered old upright piano. Blues jam on Tuesdays and Free Music Thursdays feature revolving lineups of some of the best local talent. www. localsonlyindy.com, 2449 E. 56th Street, 255-4013.

Margot & the Nuclear So and So’ s at Earth House

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Melody Inn With walls lined with band stickers and the dark ambience of a rock show, the Historic Melody Inn is the place for rockers in Indy. They feature live local music most nights, including their notorious Punk Rock Night every Saturday, and have racked up more NUVO Best of Indy awards than any other club in recent years. When the hardcore gets a little much and you need something quieter, retreat to

the PBR lounge in the back for more intimacy. There’s usually a low cover charge, and parking is free and easy to find. www.melodyindy.com, 3826 N. Illinois St., 923-4707. Radio Radio Thanks to the experience and expertise of owner and Zero Boy David “Tufty” Clough, Radio Radio in Fountain Square is consistently one of the best live music venues in the city. The club not only gives local acts the chance to play on a regular basis, but they also feature great national acts working their way up the ladder of success as they criss-cross the country in search of new fans. Hang out here and you’re bound to see the “next big thing” while enjoying great music, great drinks and great people – all in a smoke-free atmosphere. www. futureshock.net, 119 E. Prospect Street, 251-6957. Slippery Noodle Inn During the day, it’s an unassuming place to knock back a few drinks. But at night, the Slippery Noodle is one of the top blues clubs in the country, if not the world. There’s live blues seven nights a week, featuring a mixture of local, regional and national acts. The city’s oldest bar, rumor has it those holes in the brick are from Dillinger and his gang’s target practice; rumor also has it this was one of the city’s first and most successful brothels. Whether or not those things are true, believe


city411 they hype about the music. www. slipperynoodle.com, 372 S. Meridian St. 631-6974. White Rabbit Cabaret Fountain Square’s newest nightspot has quickly become one of the city’s most popular. A throwback in all the best possible of ways, the White Rabbit Cabaret is more speak-easy than ultralounge, which fits just fine with the retro/rockabilly vibe Fountain Square is known for. With a superb line-up of live music and performances from burlesque to banjo, not to mention $2.50 Pint Night on Tuesday, there is no excuse not to hop on down and discover the White Rabbit for yourself. (Closed Monday). 1116 Prospect Street, 686-9550 Vollrath Tavern One of the newest clubs on the scene, but having already demonstrated staying power, the recently revamped Vollrath is more than your average neighborhood bar. In less than two years, owner Brian Alvey has created a club known for two weekend staples: original local music and cheap beer. The Vollrath also has deep ties with Indy’s history — it was once a speakeasy and brothel during the Prohibition era and is rumored to have been the stomping ground of both Al Capone and John Dillinger

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know to ask. www.ballandbiscuit. com, 331 Massachusetts Ave., 6360539

Alley Cat Ah, our beloved Alley Cat. What can we say about an establishment that won the “best dive bar” award from NUVO readers so many years in a row, we finally just retired the jersey. A hole-in-the-wall to beat all hole-in-thewalls, you can’t even get here without threading through Broad Ripple’s back alleys. Cheap drinks, good music and lots of pool playing, the Cat is the best place in the city to be at last call for a variety of reasons – not the least of which is you usually don’t have to go home alone. 6267 Carrollton Ave., 257-4036.

Bar at the Ambassador Chic speakeasy: that’s the vibe emitted by The Bar, a welcome new lunch/ dinner/late night spot in the St. Joseph neighborhood on the ground level of the 1924 Ambassador apartment building. Slide into a corner booth and you feel like you’re in a 1930s tavern, frequented by only the classiest mobsters. The Bar is the perfect place to make a big business deal, to sip a cocktail with dignity after you’ve just been dumped, or simply enjoy the company of friends. Atmosphere is excellent, drinks are strong and affordable, food is getting better. 43 E. 9th St., 602-2279

Ball & Biscuit The Ball & Biscuit’s theme is nostalgic with items from the time of speakeasies. The drinks also harken to another time, in more ways than one. Hamhattan, Silver Gin Fizz, Sidecar and Aviation are all classic cocktails with small twists. But you’ve also seen them at Euphoria, the Indianapolis haunt where chef Brad Gates and mixologist Zach Wilks formerly held court. You can always count on top shelf, small batch alcohol at The Ball & Biscuit and a solid lineup of choice cheeses for noshing. As with any good speakeasy, there’s good contraband off the menu — if you

Bartini’s Downtown Indy’s newest and trendiest nightspot, Bartini’s has helped bring a bit of swank to the cavernous space occupied by Cadillac Ranch in historic Union Station. Boasting 30+ types of martinis (smores, sweet tart and key lime pie, for example), the real allure here is the ratio of young, horny men to young, horny women. Careful attention to detail and more earnestthan-snobby staff help make Bartini’s feel less chain-like, though there is practically one in every large US city. www.bartinisindy.com, 39 Jackson Place, 636-0100

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Blu Martini Voted Indy’s best ultra lounge by NUVO readers, this trendy, ultra-chic Northeast side nightspot serves up artfully prepared steaks and seafood as well as impeccable sushi. The drink selection is impressive, and, with the thoroughly modern decor, you definitely won’t feel like you’re in a strip mall. This bar’s psychedelic setting and high-fashion music — lucid beats and acid jazz — make us wonder: Are we still in Indiana? Martinis, wines, you name it, with sushi, sushi and more sushi on the menu. www.blumartini.net, 4705 E. 96th St., 566-8850. BuDa Lounge One of Mass Ave’s hippest nightspots, BuDa is an intimate Asian-infused cigar/martini bar offering drinks and a relaxing setting. Featuring specialty martinis like the Dirty Geisha, Ricksaw, and Flying Grasshopper, the drinkery also features a 12-foot tall cigar humidor and a broad range of cigars. The upscale BuDa Lounge also offers a selection of unique, artsy sushi rolls, like the Kamikaze, with lobster and crab meat, rolled in rice, topped off with avocado or the popular, special lobster roll, topped off with crab meat and wasabi; the roll is then torched like a crème brûlée. www.budalounge.com, 429 Mass. Ave., 602-3643

“When you are here, you are in Morroco!”

—Chef Sentissi

HOURS:

M-Th. 11:30 am - 9:00pm Fri. 11:30 am - 10:00pm Sat. 4:00pm - 10:00pm Sun. 4:00pm - 9:00pm CALL TO RSVP, 317-917-0131 OR VISIT WWW.SAFFRONCAFE-INDY.COM

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OPEN - LUNCH & DINNER Plenty of free on-site parking!

Locally owned and operated. TAVERN ON SOUTH is a casual, yet sophisticated restaurant and bar located in the shadow of Lucas Oil Stadium and just a short walk from Victory Field as well as the Convention Center and downtown business district...

Great Place for Private Events Outdoor Dining on Both Levels

www.tavernonsouth.com

Ball & Biscuit Brass Ring Although the interior evokes the famous bar scene from Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, this lounge is hardly all work and no play. The menu is full of the usual bar staples, but the ingredients aim to elevate the cuisine, with offerings such as Asian-style quesadillas and the ambitious extraextra-thin crust pizza. The full bar, offthe-menu specialty drink, “Love,” along with the weather-permitting street-front seating are a few reasons to add the Brass Ring to your list of watering holes. www.thebrassringlounge.com, 1245 S. Shelby St., 635-7464 Chumley’s Beer House Undoubtedly the best location in Broad Ripple for people watching no matter the time of day or night, Chumley’s street side seating is outdone only by the selection of 50 delicious beers on tap. A laid-back and no-frills bar with friendly staff and prime views, you don’t have to be a beer snob or drop a lot of cash to enjoy some good brew. If you’re so inclined, or if the weather’s crappy, there are plenty of alternatives to people watching for entertainment: pool tables, televised sports and a jukebox. www.chumleysbeerhouse. com, 838 Broad Ripple Ave., 4661555.

Looking f or more events and nightlif e? Check out the music section at www.nuvo.net

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Claddagh Irish Pub One of the best pubs in the city, particularly if you like Irish atmosphere, hospitality and beer, Claddagh also has Indy’s best fish n’ chips, according to NUVO readers. It uses Wild Pacific Cod fillets, coated with a special Bass Ale batter and then cooked to a golden brown perfection and served with pub chips, cole slaw and a creamy and dreamy tartar sauce. Our mouths are watering just thinking about it. Most everything is good here, particularly when accompanied by a Guinness, and there’s a great take-out menu as well. www.claddaghirishpubs.com, 234 S. Meridian St., 822-6274 Corner Wine Bar A little bit of Paris bistro on an otherwise very Midwestern corner. NUVO readers have been so impressed they’ve voted it as having the Best Wine List a total of eight times, going back to an early win in 1995. With over 150 wines and champagnes to choose from, this tiny bistro has something for every taste and budget. Thankfully, this includes several excellent house wines. They also feature a menu that is both imaginative and a perfect as an accompaniment to the wine. A bit pricey, but excellent and well-worth the splurge. Desserts here are delicious a www.cornerwinebar.com 6331 Guilford Ave., 255-5159 Metro With a prime location on Mass Ave, Metro is a high-end pub with the hippest clientele and best ambiance in


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the city and a favorite of NUVO readers for having the best karaoke in the city. The competition is stiff and so are the drinks, but no matter how good a crooner you are or aren’t it’s a friendly place to hang out and enjoy yourself. Pool tables, bar-top video games are other options, as is a good dose of people watching. The clientele is mostly gay, but everyone is welcome and everyone should try this place at least once! www.metro-indy.com; 707 Massachusetts Ave., 639-6022. Nicky Blaine’s We’ve said it before, and we’ll say it again: There’s a reason Nicky Blaine’s wins this category so frequently (four times, thus far!) and that’s because it is undoubtedly the coolest place in town for the sophisticated set. An upscale speakeasy just off Monument Circle and deep underground, Nicky Blaine’s offers fantastic drinks and a top-drawer selection of cigars in a beautiful and often stimulating environment. And we aren’t kidding about the martinis. Back in the day, we used to give a Best Martini in Indy award, and this place always won. www.nickyblaines.com, 20 N. Meridian St., 638-5588 Northside Social The new Northside Social has a very particular allure: comfort-chic. The place goes beyond yesterday’s craft beer flights and gourmet burgers to new terrain like aromatherapeutic aperitifs. Social sources locally made infusions — scents like Thai basil, lemon and cucumber — to impart strong smells and a hint of flavor to some of their choice-ier cocktails. Everything on the beer list is priced around $5, which helps to counteract the sticker shock of the $10-plus martinis. In the latter’s defense, some libations boast acai, matcha and other healthful additions, so they’re clearly looking to carve out a niche with these premium offerings. www.northsidesocial.com, 6525 N. College Ave., 253-0111 $$ Old Point Tavern The Old Point Tavern, where Julian Opie’s electronic go-go dancer does her thing at the corner of Massachusetts and Alabama, is a time-tested place to start the evening — or finish it off. Great chili and well-packed sandwiches made with topnotch ingredients have made this a Mass Ave institution. Is there a better spot to sit and watch the downtown world go by? This pivotal intersection features theater goers, music revelers and just plain big-city revelers. Sit outside and enjoy the good life. 401 Massachusetts Ave., 634-8943 $-$$ Rathskeller Indy’s premier biergarten pairs one of the best beers to meet draft form, the Spaten Optimator, with expertly done German food. A must-try: Brat n’ Kraut Balls, a blend of juicy brats, sausage and beef, lightened by just the right amount of sour delivered via modest amounts of kraut, served with a brilliant beer-infused cream sauce. Set in the historic, 19th-century Athenaeum Building downtown, The Rathskeller is

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reminiscent of both a quaint inn tucked in the Bavarian hills and a lively beer hall in Munich. The Rathskeller also features the Kellerbar, stocked with 12 imported draft beers, over 50 imported bottled beers, and hosts Indy’s best bands. www.rathskeller.com, 401 E. Michigan St., 636-0396 Scotty’s Brewhouse Conveniently located within walking distance of Lucas Oil Stadium, Victory Field and Conseco Fieldhouse, Scotty’s offers year-round opportunities for pre, post or in-lieu of the game drinking and eating opportunities. A great place to visit before or after the game, Scotty’s also has a great crowd eager to root on the home team when tickets aren’t available or a bar is the preferred vantage point to take in all the action. The Sunday morning brunch menu is a big hit for those who don’t find tail gating as exciting as good food, good brew and good people with a waiter. Warning: Scotty’s gets full fast, so get here early. www.scottysbrewhouse. com, 1 Virginia Ave., 571-0808. Talbott Street The city’s most popular club for samesex couples or those looking to do some same-sex coupling. It also happens to be one of the oldest, and still one of the best, dance clubs in Indianapolis. Gay, straight or bent in any manner, it doesn’t matter. House music is a staple, DJs are great and the live drag show is a must-see. Thursday night shows boast the most adventurous programming, including big-name DJs and touring alternative music acts. www. talbottstreet.com, 2145 N. Talbot St., 931-1343

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Ten Finally, one for the ladies! Indy’s only club dedicated to lesbians, the Ten continues to offer some of the best dance nights and drink specials in town, as well as great karaoke nights, excellent DJs and weekly drag shows. Closed Monday and Tuesday, check out the open mic talent show on Sundays featuring music, poetry and comedy. DJ Vanillasoul controls the house and the beats Friday and Saturday. Beer is always available for a buck or two and the crowd is mostly friendly to just about everyone who drops in. www. the-ten.com, 1218 N. Pennsylvania St., 638-5802. Vogue There’s no better place to get your dance groove on than at the Vogue in Broad Ripple. At least that’s what NUVO readers have indicated eight of the last ten years and chosen the Vogue as having the Best Dance Floor in Indy. While the weekend schedule is typically filled with live bands, there are a good number of nights set aside for DJs. Case in point - the weekly Retro Rewind dance party with DJ Marcus. And if you’re not into dancing or even rocking out, keep in mind the Wednesday-night $1.50 Bud and Bud Lights specials. www.thevogue.ws, 6259 N. College Ave., 259-7029.

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Scott Wise, Thr3e Wise Men proprietor as well as the “Scotty” of Brewhouse and Lakehouse fame.

FREE TEXAS HOLD ‘EM

$2.50 BUD & BUD LIGHT PINTS $6.99 DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS (SIDE INCLUDED)

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LOCAL BREW Barley Island Brewing Co. Founded in 1999 in a 19th-century livery and stable that became a depository for liquor during Prohibition, and a beer warehouse after Repeal, Barley Island has appropriately gained notice as “party central” for historic Noblesville, though it calls itself “Home of the Fifth Basic Food Group.” In 2009, owner Jeff Eaton expanded operations to Broad Ripple where special brews from other breweries are introduced during monthly tappings and are available alongside house brews. When long time brewmaster Jon Lang co-founded Triton Brewing, Mike Hess stepped in to continue making brews named for legendary Hamilton County characters and events. www. barleyisland.com, 639 Conner St., Noblesville, 770-5280; 701 Broad Ripple Ave., 257-5600 Bloomington Brewing Company Founded in 1994 as the first microbrewery in Southern Indiana, Bloomington Brewing Company joined Lennie’s Restaurant, which introduced gourmet pizza to Indiana in 1989. With its brewing operation in plain sight behind the cozy bar and tables, BBC joined Lafayette Brewing Company to introduce the concept of quality over quantity for beer in college towns. With sustainability as their business model, brewmaster Floyd Rosenbaum has been nurturing hops plants for use in BBC brews. With their 1000th brew BBC is expanding capacity for statewide distribution with brewster Eileen Martin and a support staff brewing at a new facility. www.bbcbloomington.com, 1795 E. 10th St., Bloomington, 812323-2112 Broad Ripple Brewpub Founded in 1990 by John Hill as the first Indiana brewpub, Broad Ripple Brewpub celebrated its 20th anniversary throughout 2010 with a weekly team quiz, inspired by the pub’s British roots, and with retrospective brewings by Kevin Matalucci. BRBP’s English-pub ambience belies the building’s former life as an automotive shop. Referred to as “the best neighbor anyone can have,” BRBP opens its adjacent parking space to dog festivals, farmer’s

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markets and anything anyone wants for the good of community. BRBP remains a homebrewer’s haven and a founding force for the State Fair Brewer’s Competition and Brewers Guild of Indiana beer festivals. www. broadripplebrewpub.com, 840 E. 65th St., 253-2739 Brugge Brasserie Founded in 2005 by Ted Miller, Brugge introduced Indiana to Belgium beer and changed the landscape of the state’s craft beer industry. With distinctive holes in the middle of its tables to hold paper cones of pommes frites, outdoor seating and an expansion to the upperlevel party room, Brugge has become a noted destination by the sheer force of Miller’s persona writ large. The Brugge brand grows from Ted’s derring-do, including revamping the Terre Haute facility that produced the world famous Champagne Velvet brand as a modern brewery to grow Indiana’s craft beer capacity. www.bruggebrasserie.com, 1011a E. Westfield Blvd., 255-0978 Oaken Barrel Brewing Company Oaken Barrel Brewing Company’s founding in 1994 has its impetus from Broad Ripple Brewpub during Ted Miller’s tenure as brewmaster. Oaken Barrel is equally connected with the Indiana Brewing Company’s historic legacy, which includes the family of Kurt Vonnegut. Making OB a destination place is its exhibition of late 19th- early 20th-century posters and bottle labels. Owner Kwang Casey proudly presides over all this notoriety in a former day care facility where brewmaster Mark Havens heads a team of assistant brewers and interacts on a weekly basis with The Bucket Brigade – members of the lauded MECA Homebrew Club. www.oakenbarrel. com, 50 N. Airport Dr., Greenwood, 887-2287 Ram Restaurant and Brewery The Ram opened downtown in 1996 and in Fishers in 2005, but unlike Rock Bottom, both locations are supplied by the downtown brewing operation. Thus, you’ll find the same beer but a different cuisine. Brewmaster Andrew Castner follows in the footsteps of his recent predecessors, Jon Simmons and Dave Colt, creating daring flavor profiles to grow the palates not only of


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loyal local customers but also of visitors to Indianapolis who stop at The Ram as a familiar location from their home base and other travel destinations. Approaching its 40th corporate anniversary, The Ram’s presence in Indiana will be rolling out a series of festive events. www.theram.com, 140 S. Illinois St., 955-9900; 12750 Parkside Dr., Fishers, 596-0079 Rock Bottom Restaurant and Brewery Since opening in Downtown Indianapolis in 1996 and in College Park in 2005, Rock Bottom has been showing how a chain can provide distinctive brews. They may be the same style, but you’ll find different sets of flavor profiles emanating from the art and craft of brewmaster Jerry Sutherlin at 10 W. Washington and brewmaster Liz Laughlin at 2801 Lake Circle Dr. Each has a following, but there is a core of craft lovers visiting both locations who can expound on the merits of each. www.rockbottom.com, 10 W. Washington St., 681-8180; 2801 Lake Circle Dr., 471-8840 Scotty’s Thr3e Wise Men Brewing Company This newest Scotty’s location brings brewmaster Omar Castrellon to Broad Ripple sports bar from his former home at the now closed Alcatraz, where he was founding brewer at the first downtown brewpub. Castrellon now brews a distinctive line up for all Scotty’s sites to serve on tap and for carryout in growlers. The décor features picnic tables, a huge bar, a wall cooler with other craft beer for sale, and viewing access to the brewing operation as well as large screen televisions. Everything about the location is expansive and open, including Castrellon’s brews. www. thr3ewisemen.com, 1021 Broad Ripple Ave., 255-0978 Sun King Brewing Company Since opening in 2009 just south of Easley Winery, founding brewers Clay Robinson and Dave Colt have introduced a new generation of bar-hoppers and diners to craft

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beer. They’ve also managed to bring their canned beers to Indianapolis’ Victory Field. But Sun King Brewing Company equally prevails at arts venues including the Athenaeum, Fringe and Indiana Repertory theaters. Building on their dynamic-duo reputation as award-winning brewers at The Ram downtown, Robinson and Colt have created a resounding buzz for beer with myriad flavor profiles. Their tastings on-site draw attention to the historic Cole Noble neighborhood. www. sunkingbrewery.com, 135 N. College Ave., 602-3702 Tomlinson Tap Room Featuring craft brews from across Indiana on a rotating basis means there’s always something new, fresh and unexpected on tap at the newly opened Tomlinson Tap Room. A partnership between City Market and the Brewers of Indiana Guild, the intent is to bring to Indianapolis standards, specials and seasonals from each of Indiana’s currently operating craft breweries. With over a half dozen new brewing operations poised to open across the State, Tomlinson’s 16 tap lines sport a never-changing array of handpulls. www.indycm.com/ tomlinsontaproom, City Market, 222 Market St., 423-BEER Upland Brewing Company Founded in 1998, Upland Brewing Company pushes the “green” envelope throughout its operation, finding ways to grow while leaving the smallest footprint. Upland strives to connect with its geographic location and to be involved with regional philanthropy, especially to preserve natural resources and support the Exotic Feline Rescue Center. In 2006, brewmaster Caleb Stanton developed Upland’s first Lambics, using fruits from local Huber Orchards. Their release in 2007 garnered national attention and moved their beer to expanding markets through the bottling operation and most recently their pet-friendly Midtown Tasting Room just south of Broad Ripple. www.uplandbeer.com, 350 W. 11th St., Bloomington, 812-3362337; 4842 N. College Ave., 602-3931

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DANCE MOVES TUESDAY DJ MetroGnome at Coaches Tavern DJ MetroGnome can be found at Coaches Tavern every Tuesday for his wildly popular “Take That! Tuesdays” party. MetroGnome’s selection ranges from classic hip hop, to soul, to funk records and turns the otherwise small bar in to a sea of dancing music fans. When asked what piece of advice he would give any one coming to his shows, he responded, “I’m not a pop DJ. I play records you may not know, but come with an open mind and I’m sure you’ll have fun.” (Weekly) www.coachestavern.com Juxtapoze at The Melody Inn A true EDM buffet, Juxtapoze offers something for everyone on a weekly basis. Boasting a large rotating cast of characters as well as special out-oftown DJs and producers, Juxtapoze regularly features drum and bass, house, techno, dubstep, and many other sub genres of electronic dance music. Twice a month The Mel is doubly hopping when the cozy PBR Lounge opens for simultaneous action in both the front and back rooms of the historic working man’s bar. (Weekly) www.melodyinn.com Let Go! at The Lockerbie This first-Tuesday-of-every-month DJ event attracts one of the most diverse (and dedicated) group of dancephenes in the city. The tiny pub’s dance floor atmosphere is unlike any other in the city: hot, sweaty bodies packed into a microscopic square of open space where every kind of dancing is acceptable (as long as you’re moving!) and all types of lifestyles are represented. DJs Andy and Annie Skinner (and new resident Action Jackson) keep their guests moving with familiar, mainstream hits paired with danceable beats from the underground community. (Monthly) www. lockerbiepub.com

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WEDNESDAY Retro Rewind at The Vogue The notorious “college kid” weekly event consistently draws in the biggest weeknight crowd for cheap drinks, bountiful grinding opportunities, and a high possibility for a hook-up… but only if you’re into that sort of thing. As occasional Retro supporters, I hit the clubs with friends for fun, sing-alongable music and the sheer size of the party. Sometimes, Retro Rewind even celebrates hump day with seasonal themes featuring special contests, games, and party favors. (Weekly) www.thevogue.com OMG! With Action Jackson It’s easy to miss a good party at The Casba, as the literally-underground bar is barely noticeable (or audible) from the street. But every Wednesday, the bar is transformed into an electro/hiphop assembly under the reigns of host Action Jackson. Specializing in genre bending mixes that span multiple styles of music, he is equally comfortable spinning hip-hop, Baltimore club, electro, old school classics, dancehall, rock, and everything in between. OMG! also features special guest DJs each week from Indianapolis & surrounding cities- all with a goal to make your body move. (Weekly) www.casbaindy.com PBW: Penny Beer Wednesday at Tru This recently launched weekly event features Top 40/electro/hiphop blends by DJ Stylistic. The Indianapolis-born DJ launched his music career under the wings of fellow DJs MetroGnome and Top Speed, which most recently resulted in this mid-week residency at Tru Nightclub. With unbeatable drink specials ($0.01 beer after a $4 cover) and booty-shaking pop music, PBW aims to please the college crowd. (Weekly) www.trunightclub.com

THURSDAY Keepin’ It Deep at Blu with Slater Hogan Featured by NUVO as Indy’s best weekly house event in 2010, Keepin’ It Deep continues to provide regular opportunities for house fans to experience the classier side of

A typically jam-packed Talbott Street dance floor.

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DJ Slater Hogan downtown Indy. Special national acts such as DJ Collette, DJ Dan, and Mark Farina billed events last year, as well as regular support from locals such as Manic, Adam Jay, Slater Hogan, John Larner, Tyler Stewart, Ashley Ross, Clay Collier, Deanne, and Grenadine. While you’re there, check out Blu’s sister club next door, Hyde, for an upscale retreat with fellow Indy residents who enjoy the finer things in life. (Weekly) www.bluindy.com Altered Thurzday at The Mousetrap Last August, the burgeoning need for a dubstep weekly was finally answered by G9 & IndyMojo.com. Altered Thurzday’s home (Broad Ripple’s hippie haven, The Mousetrap) is unquestionably the perfect venue for EDM’s grooviest sub-genre of music. As jam and electronica’s musical boundaries continue to dissolve into each other, Altered’s dubstep offerings are effortlessly appealing to EDM fans and Mousetrap regulars alike. Wild laser shows, abundant hoop and poi spinners, cheap craft beer, fog effects, and no reservations on the dance floor create an addictive dancing environment you won’t find anywhere else in the city. (Weekly) www.themousetrapbar.com

FRIDAY Blend at Tru While some argue that Top 40 receives too much radio play and thus decays the music’s appeal in a dance club, others agree that singling along with hoards of people at the same time makes for the best dance floor experience. Realizing the need for an event catered to the desires of those caught in the middle of this debate, Matt Allen launched a weekly event at Tru Nightclub that merges the energy of electro beats with the familiarity of mainstream music. The cover-free Friday night dance party has been gaining momentum since its inception and now also features guest DJs and producers. (Weekly) www. trunighclub.com

SATURDAY DJ Marcus Dance Night at The Vogue There is no denying that Top 40 music runs Broad Ripple in terms of musical preference. Consequently, it comes as no surprise that The Vogue, the village’s most popular and enduring club, is the ultimate destination for Saturday night dance floor shenanigans. With rules like “ladies free until midnight” and “free with college ID until midnight” as well as unheard of drink prices and Top 40 hits from DJ Marcus, dancing at The Vogue is always a viable option for the young and young at heart. (Weekly) www.thevogue.com

SUNDAY Ascension with DJ Deanne Talbott Street is always a sure-thing if you want to get your dance groove on, but the surest thing of all is when DJ Deanne is spinning the beats. While she plays a variety of clubs here and elsewhere, the first Saturday of each month finds Deanne filling the house DJ spot with her monthly Ascension. Citing influences such as Ralphi Rosario, Peter Rauhofer, Roger Sanchez and Robbie Rivera, Deanne’s style is defined by the spirit and energy of house music, which is probably why she has so many loyal and local fans. (Monthly) www.talbottstreet.com Reggae Revolution at Casba Indy’s longest-running dance night, Danger and DJ Indiana Jones have been spinning the reggae and reggae-infused beats at Casba for as long as we can remember and we’ve been dancing our asses off to their selections for nearly as long. Indy can be a sleepy town as the weekend winds down, but if you’ve got any boogie left in you by 10 pm on Sunday, head over to Casba. $2.50 Red Stripe and Casba shots don’t hurt either. (Weekly) www.casbaindy.com

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PARTY PROS Club nights come and go, so if you really want to know where the best dance party is on any given night, check with these time-tested promoters. An offshoot of the nationallyrecognized indie rock blog My Old Kentucky Blog, MOKB Presents brings in name-brand rock artists (Bonnie Prince Billy, Jonathan Richman, Meat Puppets) as well as buzz acts (Man Man, Fiery Furnaces, Earl Greyhound). Lately, hip-hop and EDM has crept into the mix: rappers Freddie Gibbs and Dominique Young Unique are part of early 2011’s lineup. mokbpresents. blogspot.com DJ Kyle Long and visual artist Artur Silva — the Cultural Cannibals — throw this city’s most adventurous and multi-cultural parties, from Bhangra nights at Hyde to Carneval at Jazz Kitchen, Fela Kuti tributes at the (sometimes closed) Urban Element to Balkan dance nights at White Rabbit. culturalcannibals.wordpress.com Looking to party with art school kids and indie rockers? A Squared Industries has you squared away, with a monthly event calendar that includes a monthly dance night at The Lockerbie, an ‘80s night at Rock Lobster and traditional EDM sets throughout the city. asquaredindustries.com Ostensibly a social networking site and web portal, Indy Mojo is also

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responsible for EDM nights throughout the city, as well as bigger, one-off shows (Boombox this February, an NYE event at Tru). Their Mojostock fest, held on a farm near Verizon Wireless Music Center, features umpteen hours of local jam bands and EDM performers. indymojo.com As the name suggests, Musique Boutique is a label releasing high-end house music, mainly by its founders, DJs Slater Hogan, John Larner and Shawn Collins. But lately, the outfit has been most active in event promotion, bringing in big names for their weekly, Keepin’ It Deep at Blu Lounge, and renting out The Vogue when someone like Green Velvet is in town. facebook. com/pages/Muzique-Boutique Old S.O.U.L. Entertainment has almost single-handedly helped The Jazz Kitchen diversify its lineup — if you see neo-soul, funk or hip-hop on the stage of the College Avenue supper club, it’s sure to have been booked by the fiveyear old event promotions outfit. Check out Root Movements at the Kitchen the first Wednesday of the month, then head to Facebook to see what else is up. facebook.com/oldsoulent As reliable as its ageless founder DJ Indiana Jones, Crush Entertainment is responsible for just about everything happening at Broad Ripple’s underground lair Casba (including a Sunday reggae night), as well as club nights that tend towards mainstream sounds without exactly selling out. crushentertainment.com

BEST OF INDY READERS’ POLL MUSIC AND NIGHTLIFE Best Club DJ Slater Hogan Best Live Music Venue (Bar/Club): Radio Radio Best Live Music Venue (Theater/Amphitheater): The Vogue Best Live Music Venue (All ages): Murat Egyptian Room Best Mid-week Venue: Jazz Kitchen Best Dance Floor: The Vogue Best Open Mic Night: Slippery Noodle Inn Best Karaoke: Living Room Lounge Best Jukebox: Alley Cat Best Billiards/Pool: Alley Cat Best Place to People Watch: Alley Cat Best Bartenders: Melody Inn Best Drink Specials: Scotty’s Brewhouse Best Bar Food: Scotty’s Brewhouse Best Place for Sports Fans: Scotty’s Brewhouse Best Place for Suits: Nicky Blaine’s Best place for Punks: Melody Inn Best place for Hipsters: Mousetrap Best Ultra-Lounge: Blu Best GBLT club/bar: Talbott Street Best Place for Hooking Up: Howl at the Moon Best Place for a Lap Dance: PT’s Best Indiana Beer: Sun King Best Indiana Wine: Oliver Winery

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Indyswank

SHOPPING

Shopping, whether for yourself or others, can be one of those experiences people either hate or love. We tend to be a little in love with shopping local, especially at any number of local shops anchoring the city’s Cultural Districts. Here we’ve focused on our favorites within a few categories. In each case, there is an emphasis on local merchandise and eco-friendly practices. Our “Specialty” listings, for example, are almost exclusively vendors like Global Gifts the Village Experience which offer locally crafted, fair-trade or environmentally responsible products made from renewable or recycled materials. Other stores, like Luna Music, Big Hat Books and Homespun Modern Handmade are notable both for their independent attitude and the priority given to local artists and artisans. You’ll find a similar emphasis in our Food + Drink suggestions. Stores like Good Earth and Georgetown Market, as well as Goose and Pogue’s Run, offer a wide-range of delicacies made locally and/or made naturally. Farmers’ markets abound during the spring and summer months in Indy, usually from May through October. Our sincere hope is that when you shop, you shop local. Support the neighbors who are working to make our city a more enjoyable and sustainable place for us all to live. Take the time to browse a new neighborhood or shopping district and discover for yourself why shopping local can often be a much, much better choice for you and those you are shopping for. Shopping tastes are as individual as shopping lists, which makes selecting only a few a very difficult task. For even more suggestions, check out the Shop Local section at www.nuvo.net. And don’t forget to pick up our NUVO Shopping CityGuide published the day before Thanksgiving each November. „

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BOOKS Big Hat Books The quintessential independent book shop, Liz Barden’s Big Hat Books has been the winner of NUVO’s Best of Indy reader’s poll for five consecutive years. The cozy little shop remains a consistent source of finely selected books for readers with a variety of interest. The helpful staff makes selecting just the right book easier, though we usually leave with an armful. The big name readings and book signings, mixed with an impressive list of local authors, fill a schedule rounded out with workshops and book clubs. www.bighatbooks. com, 6510 Cornell Ave., 202-0203 Bookmamas A great neighborhood bookstore located in one of the greatest neighborhoods in the city. Irvington’s Bookmamas is a constantly evolving inventory of used books, as well as a hub for the literary-minded or just bookish among us. While the hours are tricky (Wednesday and Thursday late afternoons and evenings; Friday 11 a.m. – 8 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.), Bookmamas frequently hosts events as diverse as a Jane Austen Book Club, Confunction Junction (open mic music and poetry), and the Ichabod Crane “Things that go bump in the night Society” meetings. Lots of great (and affordable!) gift options here. www.bookmamas.com, 9 Johnson Ave., 375-3715.

Hero House NUVO’s own cartoonist Wayne Bertsch and buddy Mike Rittenhouse have teamed up to open the city’s newest store devoted to all things comic. Meant as a place for fans and budding creative types, Hero House buys, sells and trades comic books of all genres. They also carry a good deal of anime and manga. Even better, they’ve got a good selection of local and regional cartoonists books and ‘zines (including works by Bertsch and Rittenhouse). For the budding cartoonists, there is a line of art supplies available. www.theherohouse.net, 1112 Prospect St., 636-7990. Kids Ink Teacher and librarian Shirley Mullin knows children and knows books; the best possible combination for someone who owns and operates the city’s only bookstore devoted to children’s literature. For more than a decade, this small store has been a neighborhood haven for Meridian Kessler residents, as well as visitors from all over Indy. Bursting at the seams with the type of creativity all kids need to spark imagination, the books here are carefully selected, many with local themes or by local writers, and the store carries a wide selection for various age groups. 5619 N. Illinois St., 255-2598


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MUSIC

FASHION

Arthur’s Music Store A Fountain Square landmark since 1952, the Arthur family, who opened the shop more than five decades ago continues to run it today. While the shop may be small, the selection is top-of-the line and the staff is both friendly and knowledgeable. Guitars are certainly the most popular product, but Arthur’s is one of the only local music stores that sells and repairs unique instruments like pedal steels, accordions, hammer dulcimers and harps, with sheet music to match. Lessons are also available. www. arthursmusic.com, 931 Shelby St., 33803524

J Benzal Some men eschew fashion, others firmly embrace the concept. For the local man with a desire to become the quintessential sharp-dressed man, J. Benzal on Mass Ave offers high-end suits, ties, outerwear and accessories with an emphasis on fine Italian menswear that is so often missing from other men’s retailers. Exquisite selection, knowledgeable staff and excellent location make this a increasingly popular stop for the most fashionable men in town. www.jbenzal.com, 739 Massachusetts Ave., 222-12116

Indy CD and Vinyl Broad Ripple’s best music source is a small space taking big advantage of its prime location on the Avenue and its enthusiastic clientele. The shop provides the village with a comprehensive stock of vinyl and cds appealing to a range of tastes that includes local artists. This is the place to find out who’s playing what and where. Great in-store performances supply the under 21 crowd with some of the best live music (and cheap) options available, as well as appealing to those old enough to drink beer. www.indycdandvinyl.com, 806 Broad Ripple Ave., 259-1012. LUNA Music Voted the city’s best source for local readers by NUVO readers each of the past five years, Luna Music’s great locations, groovy staff, outstanding selection and eclectic in-store programing seem to be the secret. Indy’s home-grown music store has two convenient locations near where you hang out anyway, both teeming with a large selection of new and old vinyl as well as CDs. A great source for discovering local music, as well as sporting a healthy dose of books and assorted rocky memorabilia, Luna is everything a great record store should be. www.lunamusic.net, 5202 N. College Ave., 283-5862 and 431 Massachusetts Ave., 917-5862 Vibes Music Now settled in its new location at 54th and the Monon, Vibes carries a little bit of everything at prices just about everyone can afford. In addition to new releases every week (usually Tuesday), they’ve got an extensive used vinyl section that is browse worthy and gem unearthing quite often. If you’re feeling lucky, dig around in the $4.99 bin. And don’t miss a selection of t-shirts meant to fully complement that PBR you (or your significant other) are frequently holding. www.myspace. com/vibesrecords, 1051 E. 54th St., 726-0927.

Looking f or more listings of local independent retailers? Check out the SHOP LOCAL section at www.nuvo.net

Broad Ripple Vintage Shoppers used to cookie cutter stores and boutiques will find their visit to Broad Ripple Vintage mesmerizing to the point of distraction, quite possibly forgetting the purpose for visiting in the first place: to shop, not to gawk in wonderment as though at a museum. With racks jammed full with carefully selected fashions from decades gone by, be prepared to spend a good amount of time treasure hunting. And when you find it hard to pick just one thing, have no worries: prices are not very steep. 824 E. 64th St., 255-4135. Frankey’s Still one of the best and trendiest fashion spots in town, Frankey’s has the latest in his and her fashions – the good stuff, not the crap you find at the mall. Each year NUVO readers vote Frankey’s the best choice for picking up the latest fashions, and we know why. Check new arrivals regularly. – Prices are commiserate with the labels, but not outrageous. Two locations make it easy to be a fashion “do”. www.frankeys com, 912 Westfield Blvd., 720-0270 and 1300 E. 86th St. (Nora Plaza), 580-1111. French Pharmacie There is a price to pay for being one of the most beautiful boutiques in the city, and Broad Ripple’s French Pharmacie charges quite the fee. This is the high end of the high-end, but it’s worth every centime. Where else are you going to find a Le Corbusier chair on a zebra skin rug? They’ve got French antiques, vintage reproductions, and cutting edge Danish design cohabitating next to fashion by designers like Thomas Wyle and Philipp Lim. www. frenchpharmacie.com, 823 1/2 E. Westfield Blvd., 251-9182. Girly Chic Boutique While they’ve moved down the block a bit, the charm and vintage chic remain. Everything here is fit for a princess, even grown-up ones with stylish taste and a girly streak. Lace, flowers, frills and prints abound here, as does an air of grace and elegance. If you’re shopping for a girl’s girl, this is the place to start. It might even make a convert out of a few non-twirling skirt females as well. Check www.girlychicboutique. blogspot.com for sales and specials. 922 E. Westfield Blvd., 217-1525.

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IndySwank A great addition to Fountain Square, IndySwsank is a vibrant retail space specializing in vintage women’s fashion. Each piece here is carefully selected for style, condition and funkyness. While not over the top, a lot of items here take a commitment to an overall fashion theme – most likely one rooted in the 1950s or 60s. In addition to great dresses, coats and skirts, hats are well-represented here, as are fabulous handbags from several eras. And while the emphasis is on retro, there are new items (including jewelry and accessories) in the store made by local designers and artists. www.indyswank.com, 1043 Virginia Ave., 632-6440 Nurture Brought to you by the amazing Kristen Cohn of Silver in the City, located just across the street, Nurture is a nice addition to the retail shops on Mass Ave and Indianapolis in general. A store for babies, with a hip and modern twist, Nurture stocks high-end kids clothes, gear and gift items with personality and, in many cases, eco-friendly materials. The new winter line features adorable leggings, pullovers and longsleeve tees in a variety of price ranges. Sizes start at infant and go up through size 8, with a good selection in all sizes. www.nurtureonline.com, 433 Massachusetts Ave., 423-1234. Pitaya Since its initial opening in 1990 in Bloomington, the store has consistently kept customers’ interests in mind. It offers a large selection of trendy and utterly adorable attire for every occasion, from formalwear to weekend wear. While many retail stores sell cheap clothes that fall apart after one season, Pitaya’s selection is reasonably priced and quality. Walking inside is like opening a brand new pack of 84 crayons -- the clothing is arranged in order by color and the store’s interior is just as bright and shiny as the staff, which is always willing to help out. www.pitayaonline.com, 842 Broad Ripple Ave., 465-0000 Über A beautiful store with some of the most beautiful items you’re likely to find anywhere in town. With vintageinspired clothing nestled among

mysterious perfumes and eccentric furnishings, none of which appear to belong in the American Midwest, Über offers a variety of escape mechanisms – all designed for comfort, yet styled for pleasure. Beautiful things abound here, as does friendly service and individual detail. A great place for gifts, an even better place for to start a new wardrobe. 5912 N. College Ave., 7220710. Value World Old-school second-hand store that rarely disappoints. You have to be prepared to do some digging, but treasures aren’t too difficult discover. Lots of good condition brand name items, many with the tags still attached, for under $10. Rumor is you can often find 50 percent off coupons that will allow you to stock up for the season pretty cheaply. (multiple locations) 1201 E. Prospect St., 353-8140; 3616 E. 10th St., 353-8140; 4959 W. 38th St.,3538140; 2350 E. 52nd St., 353-8140 .

SPECIALTY Global Gifts Partnering with more than 35 developing nations worldwide, Global Gifts continues to bring Indianapolis a mix of art culture that has been handed down for centuries elsewhere in the form of beautiful and affordable jewelry, home items, textiles, pottery and decorative art. Revenue from the fair trade store goes to help struggling artisans not only achieve a higher quality of life but also to reach a market that would otherwise be unavailable to them. www.globalgiftsindy.com, 1468 W. 86th St., 879-9090 and 446 Massachusetts Ave., 423-3148. Homespun Modern Homemade We recently heard someone describe this delightful new store as a brick and mortar Etsy, and we couldn’t have said it better ourselves. Here’s where you will find some of the most inspiring and original arts and crafts made locally in one of the city’s coolest neighborhoods. From jewelry to soaps, t-shirts to tea pots, as well as a revolving stock of clothing, this Irvington shop makes some of the coolest handmade items available in a convenient brick and mortar retail setting. Stop by and see


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shopkeeper Amanda Taflinger to learn more or do the bulk of your shopping. You won’t be disappointed, and we wager you’ll be back many times. 5624 E. Washington St., 351-0280. Indy Cycle Specialist If the other bike shops make you feel just a little intimidated when you roll up on your Huffy, relax. Indy Cycle is for you. No bike snobbery and very little spandex, this is old school, commuter and mountain biking. (Though avid riders and racers are welcome too!) Need help moving the little prince or princess up from training wheels? This is the place. Thinking about using the bike lanes to commute to work instead of driving? Start here. www. indycyclespecialist.com, 5804 E. Washington St., 356-5765. McNamara Want to say happy holidays with flowers this year? Locally and nationally renowned, McNamara Florist is ranked in the FTD’s Top 20 in the United States and Canada. Although the business has vastly expanded since its humble beginning in an Indy street corner building in 1954 to a florist powerhouse, McNamara continues to be a neighborhood florist and cater to customer service. Each location features a full on-site floral arrangement staff that will help the least green of thumbs arrange the perfect arrangement and even offers same day delivery for those acts of spontaneity. www. mcnamaraflorist.com/aboutus.asp, 3969 E. 82nd St., 579-7900. Magic Bus Having expanded the size of the store to nearly double, improved the lighting and garnered a bigger inventory – Magic Bus could be a one-stop shop for all your holiday shopping. There’s a good selection of clothing (some hemp, some organic, most with funny/funky sayings on the front), personal products made from natural and organic ingredients, all manner of incense, candles and aromatherapy. Cool space, nice staff and fun inventory. Stickers, magazines, lighters, keychains and other small items are affordable and desirable stocking stuffers. 1073 Broad Ripple Ave., 251-5463.

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Mass Ave Knit Shop Knitters of all skill levels will soon find themselves return to this shop again and again. With what must be the best selection of fibers in town (including cashmere, silk and angora; as well as natural, organic and hemp) Mass Ave Knits gives even the most timid knitter unlimited options. In addition to the great merchandise, a variety of classes in knitting, crocheting and even lace making are also held regularly. Stop in to browse or scout out your hangout. We guarantee you’ll be back, needles in hand. www.massaveknitshoponline. com 862 Virginia Ave., 638-1833 Mass Ave Toys A land of wonder, magic and fantasy, Mass Ave Toys almost seems like a wind-up toy itself with the frantic energy that is the earmark of a good toy store. Here you’ll find many favorites from yesterdecade, but also collectibles and new fangled toys that never seem as good as the old stuff. Spend some time and you’ll discover the perfect gift for kids of all ages, including a favorite adult. Stock always changes, so make several trips for maximum discovery. www.massavetoys.com, 409 Massachusetts Ave., 955-8697. Midland Art and Antiques Market Tucked away in a historic warehouse is 40,000 square feet of paradise for anyone with an eye for style, whether it be artsy and modern or chic and retro. More than 125 dealers boast furniture, china, glassware, paintings and more from both yesterday and today. It’s best not to be in a rush here; the best items are often a bit obscured at a glance. www.midlandathome.com, 907 E. Michigan St., 267-9005. Silver in the City/ At Home in the City Voted the Best Gift Shop in our annual reader’s poll just about every damn year, the store so nice they named it twice is a shopper’s paradise – particular at the holidays. The friendly staff can help you find a variety of gifts for both men and women – including the ecofriendly category with a wide selection of reused and recycled items. When we aren’t stocking up on cool stuff for home, we’re drooling over the amazing selection of jewelry that never

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seems to be depleted or common. www.shopsilverinthecity.com, 434 Massachusetts Ave., 866-955-9925. Village Experience A two-part approach to cultural education and empowerment, sisters Anne and Kelly Campbell use their small store Broad Ripple as a venue for micro-financing groups, women’s projects,local artisans, and global cooperatives to develop fair trade products. The shop features stunning hand-crafted pieces in a variety of price ranges. We fell in love with knit scarves, gloves and hats recently arrived from Kenya, as well as the line of colorful handmade aprons. The best gift the sisters offer, however, is a series of ecotours in developing parts of the world meant to give travelers a “real, off-thebeaten path, village” experience. www. experiencethevillage.com, 6055 N. College Ave., 602-3696.

FOOD AND DRINK Best Chocolate in Town For more than ten years, this little shop on Mass Ave has been living up to its name with a reputation for daring, delicious and delightful chocolates. With gift baskets ranging from $10$100, Best Chocolate in Town literally

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has something for everyone. They’ve got truffles, toffees, caramels and coffees – not to mention chocolate covered pretzels, popcorn, peanuts and a number of other sinfully delicious items lathered in milk, dark, light and/ or white chocolate goodness. www. bestchocolateintown.com, 880 Massachusetts Ave., 636-2800. Flying Cupcake The Flying Cupcake is a neighborhood you wish was in your neighborhood. Come for dreamy treats with names like What’s up Doc? (moist carrot cake packed with coconut and raisins topped with velvety cream cheese), Chocolate Ganache (chocolate cupcake topped with a rich chocolate ganache and white chocolate shavings), The Bee’s Knee’s (light honey pear cupcake scented with ginger and topped with honey buttercream)… we could go on, and on, and on. Menu changes daily, if not hourly. Expect amazing and popular holiday-themed delicacies. www. theflyingcupcakebakery.com, 5617 N. Illinois St., 396-2696. Georgetown Market When you walk into Georgetown Market, you’ll know instantly that you’ve entered a different kind of store. From fresh, organic produce and delicious deli items that please vegans and meat-eaters alike to handpicked Natural Living staff who will do their best to answer your every health

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question, Georgetown Market is a family-owned business whose goal is to help you “eat better, live well and feel your best!” This is a great place for gift certificates, gift baskets and select gift items. www,georgetownmarket. com, 4357 Georgetown Rd., 293, 9525. Good Earth Located just north of the Broad Ripple canal, Good Earth has been one of the city’s best (and, often, only) options for buying natural, organic and otherwise green products since opening its doors in 1971. Family-run and neighborhoodfriendly, the store has a wide range of food items, but is also a good source of gifts with natural body care, cosmetic and clothing selections. Just as important, the staff is as committed to providing helpful, often educational, information to help shoppers make the best selection for their particular needs. www.good-earth.com, 6350 Guilford Ave., 253-3709 Goose the Market Chef Christopher Ely and his staff have impeccable taste and you are guaranteed to find a new beer or wine option every visit that pairs well with that sexy charcuterie we love so much! The notorious Bacon of the Month Club is the perfect gift idea (4lbs of bacon in 4 months for $69) includes a T-shirt, Recipe featuring the months’ bacon and Deli Tales book. We

recommend gifting that with a bottle of Stone’s Sublimely Self Righteous (22oz, $7.75) or Founder’s Breakfast Stout (4-12oz bottles $12.25). www. goosethemarket.com, 2503 N Delaware St., 924-4944 Kahn’s If you aren’t sure what you’re looking for in the wine, beer or spirit gift category, head over Kahn’s on Keystone and let them help. Voted the best liquour store in Indy by NUVO readers the past four years, it’s the undisputed best place in Indy to find beer, wine and liquor (including an impressive stock of local products). We recommend that you either know what you want before you walk in, go directly to an employee and ask for a recommendation or set aside a few hours to browse the over 900 beers and 5000 wines Kahn’s offers. The staff is knowledgeable and the frequent tastings, classes and other events give ample opportunity to take full advantage of the outstanding selection. www.kahnsfinewines.com, 5341 N. Keystone Ave., 251-9463 Locally Grown Gardens Locally Grown Gardens is open seven days a week, usually at least until 8 p.m., though owner and former MCL Bakery Corporate Chef Ron Harris says they never really close. If there are customers at his indoor farmers market, well, he’ll be there too, offering items like fruits, vegetables, flowers, honey,


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The Flying Cupcake cider and ever firewood, which are sourced locally in many cases. A great place to fill a basket with seasonal, local goods as a gift or meal starter. www. locallygrowngardens.com, 1050 E. 54th Street, 255-8555. Mass Ave Wine Shoppe Mass Avenue Wine Shoppe is one of our favorite places in the city to make wine purchases, and certainly the best option for downtown dwellers. We like to get in here on Tuesday’s for their regular weekly wine tasting from 5:306:30pm to sample new wines and then make our selections for the week off of the famous ‘Wall of Wines’ 100 Wines $15 or less! Jill Ditmire, the owner, is in nearly every Tuesday and she takes note of our tastes to give insightful recommendations. This is a great spot to meet neighbors and make new friends, not to mention do some great shopping. They also offer Gluten Free Beers. www.massavewine.com, 878 Mass Ave., 972-7966 Nicole-Taylor’s Pasta & Market If you’ve spent time at a local farmer’s market recently, odds are you’ve come across the amazing offerings of Nicole-Taylor’s Pasta. Or the lack of offerings if you weren’t an early bird, as these handmade pastas are quick to sell out. Luckily, they now also have a permanent location in the shops at 54th and the Monon Trail. The market is well-stocked in pasta, most featuring the use of local products, as well as other delicious items to compliment any gift basket or holiday meal. Menu is seasonal and varies. www.

nicoletaylorspasta.com, 1134 E. 54th St., 257-7374. Pogue’s Run Grocer After three years of planning, countless volunteer hours, and a major renovation of a near eastside building, Pogue’s Run Grocer opened its doors in December 2010. An initiative of Indy Food Co-op, the store offers fresh produce, organic and local alike, along with soy-based and gluten-free foods, all-natural cleaning and hygiene products, vitamins and supplements. There is also a deli offering fresh sandwiches and sides at reasonable prices (excellent choices available for vegetarians!). www. poguesrungrocer.org, 2828 E. 10th St., 426-4963 Rene’s Bakery For the past five years, Rene Trevino and his talented staff have been making some of the most beautiful and delicious pastries and deserts this side of Paris. Truffles, eclairs, tortes and cookies are the sweet stuff; but they also have a wonderful selection of breads, muffins, scones and croissants. Many of the items are available around town at the Monon Coffee Company, Best Chocolates in Town, Capital Grill and Broad Ripple Brew Pub. But we heartily recommend a trip to the bakery itself for the full experience. www. renesbakery.com, 6524 Cornell Ave., 251-2251 Traders Point Creamery Indiana’s only 100% grass-fed organic dairy farm makes for a great day trip to stock up what is hands-down the

freshest, healthiest and yummiest cheeses, yogurt and milk you’re likely to find in these parts. You can browse the Farmer’s Market, tour the working farm and then wind down at the Dairy Bar or Loft Restaurant offering specialty dinner menus prepared with fresh, organic ingredients from Traders Point and other sustainable farms.! www. tpforganics.com, 9101 Moore Rd., Zionsville, 733-1700.

Don’t miss the 2011 NUVO Shopping Guide ! Online and on newsstands Wednesday, November 23.

BEST OF INDY READERS’ POLL SHOPPING Best Liquor/Wine Retailer: Kahn’s Best Natural/Organic selection: Good Earth Best Farmer’s Market: Broad Ripple Best Bakery/Sweets: Long’s Bakery Best Book Store: Big Hat Books Best Music Store: Luna Music Best Florist: McNamara Best Home/Gift Store: Silver in the City Best Pet Store: Three Dog Bakery Best Bike Shop: Indy Cycle Best Shopping for Bikes & Bike Gear Best Auto Dealer: Butler Scion Best Men’s Fashion: Broad Ripple Vintage Best Women’s Fashion: Pitaya Best Vintage Fashion: Broad Ripple Vintage Best Vintage/Antiques Home: Midland Antiques Best Spa: Philipe’s Day Spa Best Hair Salon: Snips of Irvington Best Yoga/Pilates Studio: Invoke Best Health/Fitness Center: YMCA Jordan Best Tattoo/Piercing Studio: Metamorphosis Best Smoke Shop: Magic Bus Best Adult Toy Store: Cirilla’s

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INDEX 3 Sisters ............................. 27 A Greener Indiana ..............7 A Squared Industries .....46 Abyssinia ............................27 Adobo Grill ......................... 27 Alley Cat ..............................39 Amici’s .................................27 Art Bank ...............................16 ARTBOX................................16 Arthur’s Music ..................49 Arts Council of Indianapolis ........................16 Athenaeum .........................16 Ball & Biscuit .....................39 Mayor Greg Ballard .......... 5 Bar at the Ambassador.39 Barley Island Brewing ...42 Bartini’s ...............................39 Bazbeaux ............................27 Beef & Boards Dinner Theatre ..................16 Best Chocolate in Town.52 Big Car Gallery ...................16 Big Hat Books ...................48 Bike Lanes ..........................10 Birdy’s ..................................37 Blu .........................................45 Blu Martini..........................39 Boogie Burger ..................30 Bookmamas ......................48 Brass Ring .........................40 Brickyard 400 ..................22 Broad Ripple ......................10 Broad Ripple Brewpub ..42 Broad Ripple Vintage .....49 Brugge Brasserie ............42 BuDa Lounge ....................39 Cabaret at the Columbia Club ...................16 Café Patachou..................30 Canal District .....................10 Casba ...................................44 Center for the Performing Arts ................16 Central Indiana Commuter Services ......... 6 Central Indiana Land Trust............................ 6 Central Library ..................12 Chatterbox Jazz Club ....37 Children’s Museum of Indianapolis ........................12 Chumley’s Beer House .40 Circle City Socialites ......23 City-County Building ........ 5 Claddagh Irish Pub .........40 Clowes Memorial Hall .....16 Coaches Tavern ...............44 ComedySportz ..................17 Conner Prairie ...................12 Cork and Cracker ............52 Corner Wine Bar .............40 Crackers Comedy ............ 17 Crown Hill Cemetery .......13 Crush Entertainment .....46

Cultural Cannibals ..........46 Cultural Trail .......................10 Dance Kaleidoscope ....... 17 Gov. Mitch Daniels ............ 6 Dean Johnson Gallery .... 17 Dojo ......................................37 Eagle’s Nest ......................30 Earth House Café ............35 Earth Charter Indiana .......7 Kenneth ‘Babyface’ Edmonds ............................. 8 Eiteljorg Museum .............13 Emerson Theater ............37 Euphoria .............................30 Charles Fairbanks ............ 8 Flying Cupcake .................52 Fountain Square ..............10 Frankey’s ............................49 French Pharmacie ..........49 Friends of White River ......7 Garfield Park ......................13 Georgetown Market .......52 Girly Chic ............................49 Global Gifts ........................50 Good Earth .........................52 Goose the Market ...........52 Gregory Hancock Dance Theatre...................18 Green Piece Indy ................7 H2O Sushi ...........................31 Pres. Benjamin Harrison ...........................8,16 Harrison Center for the Arts .........................18 Heartland Film Festival ..21 Hero House ......................48 Homespun Modern Handmade ........50 Hoosier Environmental Council .....7 Hubbard & Cravens ........35 IDADA/First Fridays ........19 iMOCA ...................................19 Indiana Avenue .................10 Indiana CAFO Watch .........7 Indiana Fever ....................22 Indiana Film Society .......21 Indiana General Assembly.............................. 6 Indiana History Center ...13 Indiana Ice .........................22 Indiana Live Casino .........13 Indiana Medical History Museum ...............................13 Indiana Pacers .................22 IRC ...........................................7 IRT ..........................................19 Indiana State Museum ...............................13 Indiana Statehouse .......... 6 Indiana War Memorial ....13 Indianapolis 500 .............23 Indianapolis Colts ...........23 Indianapolis Indians .......22 Indianapolis International Film Festival .......................21 Indianapolis Motor Speedway ...........................14

Indianapolis Museum of Art .....................................14 Indianapolis Opera ..........19 Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra ............................19 Indianapolis Zoo ...............14 Indy CD & Vinyl .................49 Indy Cycle............................51 Indy Mojo ............................46 IndyFringe ...........................19 IndySwank .........................50 Irvington ..............................10 J. Benzal .............................49 Jazz Kitchen ......................37 Jim Jones ............................ 8 Kahn’s ..................................52 Keep Indianapolis Beautiful ................................7 Kahn’s ..................................52 Keystone Arts Cinema ...21 Kids Ink ................................48 Lazy Daze Coffee House ....................35 Le Peep ................................31 Legend Café .......................31 David Letterman ................ 8 Locally Grown Gardens .52 Locals Only Art & Music Pub ..........................38 Lockerbie Pub...................44 Loft at Trader’s Point ......31 LUNA Music .......................49 Madame Walker Theatre Center ..................14 Magic Bus ...........................51 Major Taylor Velodrome .........................23 Mama Carolla’s .................31 Mas Ave District ...............10 Mass Ave Knit ....................51 Mass Ave Toys ..................51 Mass Ave Wine Shoppe ................................53 Mass Ave .............................10 McNamara ..........................51 Steve McQueen ................. 8 Melody Inn .........................38 Meridian ...............................31 Metro ...................................40 Midland Antiques .............51 MOKB ...................................46 Monon Coffee ...................35 Monon Trail.........................10 Morris-Butler House Museum ................14 Moto Grand Prix ...............23 Mousetrap .........................45 Mug-n-Bun ........................32 Steve McQueen ................. 8 Ryan Murphy....................... 8 Musique Boutique ..........46 Napolese ............................32 Naptown Roller Girls ......23 NCAA Hall of Champions .........................16 Nicky Blaine’s ....................41 Nicole-Taylor’s Pasta ....53 Northside Social ...............41 Oaken Barrel .....................42

Oakley’s Bistro .................32 Oceanaire ...........................32 Old Point Tavern ...............41 Old S.O.U.L. ........................46 Passage to India ..............32 Peppy Grill ..........................32 People for Urban Progress ..................7 Phoenix Theatre ...............19 Pitaya ...................................50 Pizzology ............................33 Pogue’s Run Grocer .......53 Pure ......................................33 Dan Quayle ......................... 8 R Bistro ...............................33 Radio Radio .......................38 Ram Restaurant and Brewery ......................42 Rathskeller .........................41 Recess ................................33 James Whitcomb Riley ... 8 Oscar Robertson ............... 8 Rock Bottom .....................43 Saffron Café ......................33 Santorini Greek Kitchen ................................33 Scotty’s Brewhouse ........41 Scotty’s Lakehouse .......34 Scotty’s Thr3e Wise Men Brewing .........43 Shapiro’s Deli ....................34 Silver in the City ................51 Slippery Noodle Inn ........38 Smokehouse on Shelby ...........................34 St. Elmo Steakhouse .....34 Sun King Brewing Co. ....43 SustainIndy ..........................7 Talbott Street ....................41 Booth Tarkington .............. 8 Rene’s Bakery ..................53 Taste ....................................34 Ten .........................................41 Theater Within..................20 Theatre on the Square ..20 Tobias Theatre ..................21 Tomlinson Tap Room .....43 Traders’ Point Creamery............................53 Tru .........................................45 Über ......................................50 Upland Brewing Company ............................43 Value World .......................50 Vibes Music .......................49 Village Experience .........52 Vogue ....................................41 Vollrath Tavern .................39 Kurt Vonnegut ..............8, 16 White Rabbit Cabaret ....39 White River State Park ...16 Wholesale District ...........10 David Wolf ........................... 8 wUG LAKU STUDIO & gARAGE ..........................20 Yats ......................................34 Zing .......................................34

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Annual Manual 2011  

An insider's guide to everything Indianapolis has to offer all year long.