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Vol. 24 Issue 26 issue #1124

TUTU CENTER ANNOUNCED NEWS/6

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Tutu’s Sept. 12 visit to Clowes was not only a celebration of the power of love and peace. It also marked the establishment of the Desmond Tutu Center, a joint Butler/Christian Theological Seminary venture. By Rebecca Townsend

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LIVING THE CAR-FREE LIFE Few have dumped their autos for monogamous bike relationships. And even fewer are families with young children. Shambra and her husband, James, have a fleet of bicycles, but there’s no room in the garage — or their lives — for a car. By Betsy Sheldon • Photos by Michelle Craig

Move over, Tractors Supply Company, there’s a new farm store in town. From a henhouse on wheels to a mushroom log straight from Paoli, Agrarian caters to the urban homesteader and lover of all things local. By Shawndra Miller

COME YE, METALHEADS MUSIC/26 With Indianapolis Metal Fest (remember that in 2007-2008) back for its third go-round, founder Rob Mason is ready for the most metal day ever. By Wade Coggeshall

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GOV. O’BANNON’S LEGACY 10 YEARS LATER Guest blogger Lesley Weidenbener reminds us that there was once a governor who “represented Democratic constituencies — labor and teachers — but also worked with the opposite party to get things done.”

2013 SKIP MCKINNEY FELLOWSHIP

SLIDESHOW: INDIANA FEVER VS. NY LIBERTY The Fever scored a huge comeback win, 66-63, in their final regularseason home game. They’ll begin their playoff run Friday at Chicago. Photos by TJ Foreman.

Given in honor of an Indianapolis Art Center student, community leader and mother to five (including NUVO’s Kevin McKinney), this year’s Skip McKinney Fellowship was awarded to painting and drawing instructor Vandra Pentecost.

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Long-time Indianapolis radio personality Ed Wenck will turn his talents to print when he joins NUVO as managing editor Sept. 30. Jim Poyser, a 17-year NUVO veteran, retired as managing editor last month to pursue his passion for climate-change education with the local nonprofit Earth Charter Indiana. Wenck, who won the Indiana Broadcasters Spectrum Award for a serialized feature on NASCAR and bootlegging, has contributed many freelance articles to NUVO over the years, including a June cover story, "Tale of Two Kidneys: A Love Story," which chronicled local actress Karen Irwin's experience

donating a kidney to her boyfriend. Most recently, Wenck was an account manager for ESPN 1070 and The Fan/107.5 FM/ Network Indiana. Prior to this assignment, he anchored Indy's Afternoon News on WIBC for three years and co-hosted The Wank & O'Brien Show from 2004-2010. In addition to numerous freelance writing assignments, Wenck has authored three books, most recently Know Your Zombies with Lou Harry in 2001 for Blue River Press. He attended Syracuse University where he graduated magna cum laude with a bachelor of fine arts.

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BUDGET BATTLE ABOUT TO GO NUCLEAR Eliminating homestead tax credit would affect 60 percent of households

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ABDUL-HAKIM SHABAZZ EDITORS@NUVO.NET A Abdul is an attorney and the editor and publisher of IndyPoltics.Org. a He is also a frequent contributor to H numerous Indiana media outlets, n iincluding NUVO.net. He can be

very once in awhile, leaders must exercise a nuclear option — or two. Now might be Mayor Greg Ballard’s time. rreached at abdul@indypolitics.org. As the city gets closer to its budget deadline, Democrats have voted down a plan to eliminate the local homestead property tax credit, which the mayor’s office says would with the loyal opposition. If the Democrats won’t give him the money for public safety generate about $9.5 million for the city at then he should “find” it in their districts. an average cost of about $1.83 a month for There are millions of dollars being spent a property owner in Marion County. on road and sidewalk improvements in They’re punting on expanding the IMPD Democratic districts. If I were the mayor, taxing district from the old city limits to I’d put those projects on “hold” for a the entire county so ALL citizens will be while. In addition, city services in those paying for police protection as opposed Democratic districts would also take a to most of the burden being put on resibrief hiatus. And just wait until it started to dents in Center Township. They also shot snow! Just to show the Democrats I wasn’t down, and this one kills me, a bipartisan messing around, I would take a look at the plan which would have spent $150 milstructure of the fire department and come lion extra dollars on streets, sidewalks and infrastructure in many of the neighborhoods of the their own constituents. Ironically, It’s time for the mayor of Council President Maggie Indianapolis to start acting like the Lewis was a co-sponsor and Councilor Frank Mascari was mayor of Chicago and really start at the news conference this summer when the mayor made playing hardball. the announcement offering praise for the plan. This is not good. to the conclusion that the city has one too I understand negotiations and jockeying to many battalion chiefs and maybe it was put yourself in a better position, but if you’re time for a reduction and Democratic Citygoing to jockey you need to get on the horse. County Councilor Vern Brown might be I have watched numerous budget hearings the perfect candidate. and to date the Democrats have come up Luckily for Democrats, Ballard is too nice with a lot platitudes and hot air, but no plan. a guy to do what I suggest, but you never They haven’t offered a plan on how to pay know. If Democrats keep acting as they do, for police, they haven’t offered an alternathe mayor may actually have to exercise his tive to pay for infrastructure. No, I take that own nuclear option. I would have done it a back. Democrats did offer a plan to pay for police: it was using one-time money to create long time ago. „ an ongoing expenditure and had no way to discuss sustainability. But why should that surprise anyone? So what is a mayor to do? Ballard has already offered the Democrats a compromise. According to spokesman Marc Lotter, the mayor offered a phase-in elimination of homestead tax credit so it would be spread out over two years instead of implemented in one. He offered to take a one-time loan from the fiscal stability fund to cover the loss in revenue from phasing in the elimination of the homestead tax credit; something he has opposed in the past. And he also offered to add a second police recruit class in 2014 of another 30 officers. And what response did he get from the Democrats? Ironically, crickets. I think it’s time for the mayor of Indianapolis to start acting like the mayor of Chicago and really start playing hardball

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WHAT HAPPENED? Hoosier State fate still uncertain Last Thursday in Indy, INDOT reps, select legislators, and mayors and representatives from the along Amtrak’s Hoosier State route between Indy and Chicago met to discuss local funding possibilities to save the line. The Passenger Rail Investment Improvement Act of 2008 mandated that states with passenger rail service lines of less than 750 miles take financial responsibility for the routes — or lose them. Most federal support for the Hoosier State will cease Oct. 1. “At this point the state has not made a decision either way about contributing funding,” Will Wingfield, INDOT spokesman, emailed. Details are not yet public about Thursday’s meeting, though the group is said to have “made sufficient progress to permit INDOT to schedule a meeting with the governor” for tomorrow. Other rail items of note: A press conference scheduled for Thursday in Lafayette will provide an update on a high-speed rail initiative and the Legislature’s joint transportation study committee will hold a hearing at 10 a.m. on Sept. 26 in the Senate Chambers of the Statehouse. To connect with passenger rail activists, visit the “Save the Hoosier State” and “Hoosiers for Passenger Rail” groups on Facebook. Befriend the Cultural Trail To help support upkeep efforts of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail, a new supporters group, Friends of our Trail, is selling $100 annual membership cards. Several trail-linked businesses are offering sweet deals to reward FooT members, including Chatterbox (2-for-1 weekend cover) and Nameless Pizza (buy one, get one free), as well as B’s Po Boys, La Margarita, Loughmiller’s Pub & Eatery, Nicey Treat, PEARings Frozen Yogurt & Beyond and Tastings - A Wine Experience. Visit indyculturaltrail. org to join. Run for Peace in Kenya Indiana friends of Kenya’s Moi University are rallying support and even sending some runners to participate in a peace run in towns near the campus, which were ravaged by inter-tribal violence following disputed election results six years ago. The inaugural MUKESCO race involves categories of varying distances, the longest is a 12k. Organizers say “everyone is welcome and everybody wins” in the “interfaith, intertribal, intercultural international race. Teams will include village members from varying ages, genders, and physical capabilities plus Moi University students and community members of multiple tribes, religious faiths and cultures, and the international representatives — including the Indy-based runners. Champion Kenyan runners including Kip Keino, Moses Tanui, Patrick Sang and Lorna Kiplagat will lead. “The diverse make-up of the teams is a far cry from the experiences many in Kenya had growing up, where they had little or no contact with members of other tribes or persons with a different religious faith, much less people from other countries,” Ian McIntosh, IUPUI’s director of international partnership, said. “The separation of one tribe from another is believed to have played a role when members of one tribe were set upon by members of another tribe following allegations of voting irregularities in 2007.” Students from the School of Physical Ed and Tourism have raised hundreds of dollars to support the grand prize-winning team, which will have a well drilled in its village. To contribute to the effort, visit gofundme.com/ Kenya-Peace-Run. — REBECCA TOWNSEND 6 NEWS // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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“If we really believed what the Bible tells us, you and I will not just shake hands, we would genuflect and, like the Buddhists, say, ‘The God in me greets the god in you.’ “If we really believed this, just imagine the state of the world.”

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE DESMOND TUTU CENTER AND HEATHER MELOY

Desmond Tutu spoke to a full house at Butler’s Clowes Memorial Hall.

TUTU TITILLATES, BLESSES BOESAK Desmond Tutu Center at CTS/Butler to be international hub for peace studies, reconciliation work B Y REBECCA TO W N S EN D

R TO WN SEN D@ N UVO . N ET

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hen Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu took the stage at Clowes Memorial Hall Thursday evening, he asked for a moment of silence to honor the anniversary of 9/11 and the Sept. 12, 1977 assassination of South African anti-apartheid activist Steven Biko. The rest of the evening was a celebration — of the power of love, possibility and the promise that good overcomes evil even in the face of what may appear to be overwhelming odds. Prior to Tutu’s arrival on stage, Butler President James M. Danko and CTS President Matthew Myer Boulton announced the establishment of the Desmond Tutu Center, a joint venture in peace and reconciliation studies between the two institutions. Financial support from the Dungy Family Foundation along with several other individuals made possible Tutu’s visit — and the center’s creation. “I would like to thank you both for your two institutions, for wonderful collaborating in establishing this joint center named

WORDS OF WISDOM In honor of the occasion of his visit and the center established to extend his legacy, we offer some excerpts from Tutu’s speech on PAGE 8. For video clips, please visit NUVO.net/news. after me,” Tutu said. “I am completely bowled over. One of the benefits of complexion like mine is that no one notices when you are blushing … “Adding to the very specialness of this occasion is that it is going to be a center headed up by a wonderful, gifted — indeed charismatic — compatriot with a scintillating record in the history of our liberation, this young professor, Allan Boesak.” Boesak and Tutu enjoy a close friendship, solidified through years of standing against the injustice of apartheid. “You presidents are really smart,” Tutu said to Boulton and Danko. “I can understand why you are presidents, you are smart in picking Allan to be director of this center.

You should see him addressing thousands. You’ve had a tiny taste of it here ... “The people could do anything he told them to do. He would energize them, inspire. He’s been given an incredible gift. … He was one of youngest presidents of World Alliance of Reformed Churches, not because he is precocious, just outstandingly brilliant.” Boesak said he was delighted that “a friendship of over 30 years will be solidified in something other than memories of yesterday; I look forward to building not just a future of ourselves and the young people of South Africa, but the young people of Indianapolis, the young people of Indiana, the young people of the United States and the young people of the world.” He added, “We will try to create an atmosphere of excitement. ... We will try to bring people together from across the world in a conference that every year will seek to find ways in which the legacy of Tutu can find expression. Even for those with faith in nothing more than justice...” Organizers estimate that more than 2,100 people attended the program. Tutu, the 1984 recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize and South African President Nelson Mandela’s choice to lead he post-apartheid Truth and Reconciliation Commission, is a world-renowned advocate for peace. „


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White River Fest Continues A sampling of ways to respect the river during this month-long fest includes River Watch water quality trainings and nature walks. Visit whiteriverfestival.org for a complete listing. One highlight of the remaining weeks: ”White River Past and Present” at Conner Prairie’s new Nature Walk on the river. Observe White River wildlife, learn about the river’s role In Indiana history and discuss modern humanity’s impact on it. On Sept. 28 visit Smithsonian.com for two free admissions. Saturdays and Sundays through Sept. 29, 1:303:30 p.m., Conner Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road Race for All Races As a celebration of diversity in Indy, the Asian American Alliance’s 11th Annual Race for All Races offers a 5K Walk, Run and 1-Mile Family Walk. Proceeds support high school scholarships. Sat., Sept. 21, 8:45 a.m., Indiana State Museum/ Canal, aaalliance.org. $20 individual; $15 for team of 10 or more. Better Block: Michigan Road Participants will physically change a part of the Michigan Road corridor in an urban re-design effort. Sat., Sept. 21, 2 p.m., Crooked Creek CDC, 7003 #B N. Michigan Road., facebook.com/ BetterBlockMichiganRoad. FREE Historic Photos Scan-a-Thon Bring photos of historic interest to be scanned by local historian and author Joan Hostetler for a public digital archive. Mon., Sept. 23, 3-8 p.m., Irvington Public Library, 5625 E. Washington St. Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Faith The first in a series of four public “Religion and World Civilization” seminars features three constitutional law experts: Daniel Conkle, Robert H. McKinney Professor of Law and an adjunct professor of religious studies at Indiana University; Shelia Suess Kennedy, professor of law and public policy at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis; and Richard Garnett, professor of law at the University of Notre Dame. Tue., Sept. 24, 7-9 p.m., Clowes Memorial Hall, Krannert Room, 4602 Sunset Ave., FREE, but tickets required.

ANTI-APARTHEID ...

THANKS ...

FAITH AND POLITICS ...

“I used to come here and your heart just leapt to see … especially young people on university campuses worrying about me when they ought be worried about grades and exams. … They were fantastic because they were involved in antiapartheid movement, the Free South Africa movement … out demonstrating seeking to force their institution to divest. “You had a … president who was opposed to sanctions, President Reagan. But do you know what? Because of the education of all those involved in the antiapartheid struggle supporting us, especially young people, it was fantastic because they helped to change the moral climate in the United States to the extent Congress was able to pass anti-Apartheid legislation with a presidential veto override. “That is the stuff of which your predecessors were made of. They could change.”

“We would not have seen our freedom without your help. ... It was one of the great privileges we had, to come to this country and say, ‘Please, help us.’ And you gave us the help, and today we are free. It is a privilege to be able to return and say ‘Hey guys … and guy-esses! Thank you. Thank you.’ ”

“It’s not our politics that inspires us to do the things that we are doing; it is our faith. We had to ask (South Africa’s oppressors), which Bible do you read? “And you remember, when Jesus predicted his coming death in the fourth Gospel. He says of it, ‘I if were lifted up, I will draw all.’ He didn’t say some. … ‘I’ll draw all.’ “Clever, foolish, rich, poor, white, black, Christian, Muslim, Buddhist. I will draw all, all, all. Assad. Obama. All, all, all. Gay, lesbian, transgender ... When I am lifted up, I will draw all, all, all in an incredible embrace where no one is left out.”

National Day of Remembrance for Murder Victims Service

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Wed., Sept. 25, 6 p.m., Overcoming Church, 2203 Columbia Ave., FREE.

THOUGHT BITE Syria: Here-we-go-again history. — ANDY JACOBS JR

N NUVO.NET/NEWS $20k Spirit & Place ‘Race’ proposals due Oct. 1 by Scott Shoger Central State trees: an arborphile’s proposal by Rebecca Townsend Sens. Waltz, Delaney clash over mass transit by By Ellie Price

VOICES • Holding parents truly accountable by David Hoppe • Budget Battle About to Go Nuclear by Abdul-Hakim Shabazz • This is your government: AIDS walk by John Bartholomew • Raising Dad / Saying Goodbye by Mark Lee 8 // NEWS // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

FREEDOM ... “Think of how we greet someone who removed the shackles from your ankles ... I have something really special. I have a magic wand – an incredible instrument and I wave it over people. You know? It will turn you into instant South Africans. It’s so special that only clever people can see it. “I wave it over you. Then I can say, ‘Fellow South Africans, let’s give these Americans a humdinger of an applause!’ ”

“When missionaries came to our part of the world, they had the Bible, and we had the land. And they said, ‘Let us pray.’ We dutifully shut our eyes and when they said, ‘Amen,’ we had the Bible and they had the land. “Well, some people reckon that we made a very bad, bad bargain. But, ha, no. Friends, no. For in that situation of injustice and oppression, the last thing you should give to the oppressed is a Bible. It was the most revolutionary thing you could have had. “Those people who treat us like dirt, they’ve already lost, they’ve already lost — they’ve already lost because this is a moral universe. This is where right will ultimately prevail. … “The God we worship is notoriously biased in favor of the downtrodden, in favor of the poor, in favor of the outcast.”

U.S. GENEROSITY ... “Suppose people were to go and bomb Syria. They are already devastated. You Americans are some of the most generous creatures God ever created. George Bush will probably be remembered for two things: The illegal, immoral invasion of Iraq, but he’ll also be remembered for an incredible thing he gave. He set up something called PEPFA - we salute him because he invested in resources that should be used to combat malaria, TB and HIV/AIDS. “Why don’t you drop food and not bombs?”


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Mary WhiteFace passes out information about Leonard Peltier to encourage support for his clemency plea.

PELTIER’S 69TH BIRTHDAY, CALLS FOR CLEMENCY CONTINUE B Y LO R I LO V E L Y

E DI T O RS @ N U V O . N E T There was no cake to put candles on, but the small group gathered on Monument Circle on Sept. 12 made a birthday wish anyway. They then gathered signatures in support of that wish, which will be forwarded to President Obama with a request for executive clemency for political prisoner Leonard Peltier, whose 69th birthday they were commemorating. Organized by Kelly Reagan Tudor, a Lipan Apache mother of two, the rally provided an opportunity to educate the public about Peltier. “Most people don’t know who Leonard is,” she said. “Most of them have never even heard his name.” Peltier, an Anishinaabe-Lakota and an American Indian Movement activist, has been in prison for 38 years for the murder of two FBI agents, a crime he insists he didn’t commit. Denied a wide range of basic human rights, he has endured beatings and been denied medical care for a number of health issues. Amnesty International acknowledges Leonard as a political prisoner, listing his case in the “unfair trials” category of its Annual Report: USA 2010, citing concerns about the fairness of the proceedings. In July 2013 the group once again called for his release on humanitarian grounds. They aren’t the only ones pleading for Peltier’s release. The list of notables includes Nelson Mandela; the Dalai Lama; Archbishop Desmond Tutu; the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights; the Parliaments of Europe, Italy and Belgium and the Kennedy Memorial Center for Human Rights. Before he passed away, Judge Gerald W. Heaney of the Eighth Circuit Court of Appeals reversed his previous opinion at the trial and joined those ask-

SIGN THE PETITION To sign the petition asking for executive clemency for Leonard Peltier, go to: tinyurl.com/PeltierPetition ing for Peltier’s freedom. The National Congress of American Indians unanimously passed a Resolution for Clemency for Peltier in November 2011. Carrie Castoreno, president of the Native American Student Alliance at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, speculates that the government is “scared of the uproar” his release would cause. Nevertheless, she expresses faith in the president. “I want [President] Obama to act. He can make a difference.” So far, he hasn’t. Over a year ago the White House received more than 5,000 electronic signatures and 7,000 hard-copy signatures on a petition to free Peltier. Not only has Obama failed to grant executive clemency, but he has also declined to comment on the petition, citing White House policy not to comment on individual pardon applications. To keep spirits from wavering, Peltier sent a message of encouragement to his supporters, writing: “I am Barack Obama’s political prisoner now, and I hope and pray that he will adhere to the ideals that impelled him to run for president. But as Obama himself would acknowledge, if we are expecting him to solve our problems, we missed the point of his campaign… “ “We cannot afford to sit back and wait for justice and equal treatment for our people. We cannot sit back and wait for change and ‘hope’ that conditions will get better. We have to get involved in making that change happen. We have to take charge of our destiny.” „ NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // NEWS 9


N LDO SHE Y I S A T R G Y BE HELLE C B Y C R I STO BY M TOS O H P

The Jennings crew (from left): Shambra, twins Paul and Claire, and James.

The Jennings family embraces bicycles “The ride is half the fun. It’s part of the adventure.” — SHAMBRA JENNINGS

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h b Jennings’’ ride hambra d gets more than h a few f second glances outside the Monon Coffee Company in Broad Ripple. Her tricked-out Yuba, tethered to a bike rack, musters admiring comments as she nurses an iced tea and talks about what it’s like to live car-free.


>> BICYCLE INDIANA A statewide voice for bicycle safety with loads of information about routes and events, plus Bicycle Indiana represents cyclers when it comes to legislative issues. bicycleindiana.org >> CIBA Central Indiana Bicycling Association, your one-stop connection for all-things bicycles, is intimately involved with numerous initiatives and events: NITE Ride, the Midwest Tandem and Hilly Hundred, just to name a few. cibaride.org >> COMMUTER CONNECT People think of carpooling and vanpooling when they think of Commuter Connect — and rightly so. But Commuter Connect also supports bicyclists! cirta.us/commuterconnect

Shambra and James Jennings found it easy enough to live bike-free — until their twins came along. But their used car proved an even more of a hastle.

In a city that’s becoming increasingly bike-friendly, it’s no surprise to see cordons of spoked vehicles chained to racks outside coffee shops, restaurants and grocery stores. More and more Indianapolis residents are making the bicycle their vehicle of choice. But few have dumped their autos for monogamous bike relationships. And even fewer are families with young children. Shambra and her husband, James, have a fleet of bicycles, but there’s no room in the garage — or their lives — for a car. The family travels by bike to and from work, the grocery, play dates, the park, band practice, museums and even baseball games at Victory Field — year-round, 24/7, rain or shine.

Steering clear of cars Shambra and James have never been car people. When the two met about 10 years ago, they both lived directly on bus routes — back when bus fare was 75 cents a trip. Both grew up in small Indiana towns (Shambra in Center Point, James in Richmond) where cars were a necessity. “We both moved to the city hoping for a more community experience,” recalls Shambra. “My husband and I have never been big fans of the oil industry, so when we moved to the city, riding the bus was a big part of it. Neither of us owned a car.” After the two married, they continued their lives sans autos, until their twins, Claire and Paul, were born. “We tried our best to stick with public transportation,” says Shambra. But with all the accompanying infant paraphernalia — times two — it was too

“It’s not just a personal decision. It’s going to improve quality of life, but also quality of life for entire community over time.” — SHAMBRA JENNINGS

taxing, she says, so they bought a used car. The car may have made things easier for the new parents, but Shambra recalls, “It put our lives on a downward spiral. The car was expensive to upkeep, it constantly needed work. Gasoline was outrageous. It was surprising how our carefully budgeted life was falling apart.”

Cold turkey Then, when the twins were 2 years old, the car was stolen. As the couple tried to find a car they could afford, they drove a loaner from Shambra’s sister. And all the same negatives they’d suffered with their own car became constant passengers in the borrowed vehicle, as well. According to Shambra, “We found that we spent more time at stores and in restaurants. There was fighting in the back seat. It affected our health, too. We were buying more fast food, and gained weight. And it always felt as if we had no time.” The couple made the dramatic decision to

kick the car habit cold turkey. They returned the vehicle to Shambra’s sister, and relied solely on their bicycles — with the occasional bus trip — for transportation. The Jennings’ transition to a no-car household hasn’t always been a smooth ride. Meetings with teachers sometimes require a taxi trip, and some destinations necessitate circuitous routes because of road dangers. But they’ve found that the challenges that keep most of us from embracing the bike lifestyle — traveling with children, carrying groceries, time overload, weather — are easily surmountable and sometimes even preferred.

Bringing home the groceries

>> FREEWHEELIN’ More than a bike shop, Freewheelin’ is also a community center where bicycle mechanic mentors work with kids to rebuild bikes, learn maintenance and safe riding tactics. After this educational process, the kid takes the bike home, along with a lock and helmet. Contact them if you want to serve as a mentor, know a kid who should be in their program or need to buy a bicycle or accessories. 3355 N. Central Ave., 317-926-5440 or freewheelinbikes.org R E S O U R C E S C O N T I N U E P A G E 12

First, thanks to their Yuba cargo bikes, it’s no problem to strap both kids, now eight years old, on the back carrier and pedal off to the market — with plenty of room to carry home the groceries. “My bike will hold the kids and as many bags as I used to fit into the trunk of our old car,” Shambra says. And James, who plays in the band Carnosaur, can strap his amp on one side and drums on the other and head off for practice on the city’s Eastside. Admittedly, it took them a couple of iterations of bikes before they found the best for their lifestyle. When the kids were smaller, they used a cart, then a tandem. James, described by his wife as a gearhead, S E E , C A R - F R E E , O N P A G E 12 NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // COVER STORY 11


>> INDYCOG This membership-based organization started in 2009 and has become Indy’s voice for commuter and pleasure cycling. By building a strong biking community, IndyCog educates Indy residents about the importance of bicycles in the city and how to best accommodate our twowheeled friends. Their recently published bicycle lane map, the Indy Ride Guide, is in the hip pocket or pannier of every cycler in town. IndyCog hosts expeditions that usually include stops at the local breweries. theindycog.com >> PEDAL & PARK Pretty much whatever event you’re attending on your bike, Pedal & Park is there, to park your bike safely, and give you a paper bracelet that not only connects you to your bike, but sends the signal to other event-goers that you rode your bike, and are therefore one of the cool kids. pedalandpark.org >> SUSTAIN INDY If you just moved here, or are just getting into the cycling culture, you’ll soon learn Indy’s mayor, Greg Ballard, is way into bicycles. Check out the city’s site to learn more about the growing bike lane infrastructure of the city, as well as plenty of safety tips. Indy.gov/bikeways >> YUBA BIKES Yuba bicycles and add-ons are designed to help people live their lives without a car. All of the bikes have integrated racks, high hauling capacity, and stability under load. yubabikes.com

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The Jennings use the Canal Towpath and Monon Trail to navigate the city — except on occations when the bus is a safer mode of transportation.

ponchos. Nice to have are rain-resistant pants and jackets, goggles to protect against precipitation, reinforced shoes that make for easier pedaling, and various saddle, trunk and handle-bar bags.

CAR-FREE , FROM PAGE 11 researched all the options before the two settled on the Yubas as their optimal choice. “Cargo bikes are relatively rare here [in Indy],” Shambra says. “They’re used a lot more in Europe and other areas of the U.S. where the bike movement is strong.” They ordered the Yubas from California and turned to the Bike Line in Broad Ripple to put them together. The Longtail model with the back cargo area extends two feet longer than a standard bike and carries 500 pounds of cargo. The Jennings added a host of components, upping their purchase from a just over $1,000 for the basic model to $3,000, to optimize their utility. But their decision to live where they live — Rocky Ripple — has been a critical part of their bike-style success.

Raising bike-wise children

Picking the right locale “We made a conscious choice to be in the center of the activities we need access to. We try to stay local,” she says. James works at Kincaid Meats at 56th and Illinois; they shop at Kroger and Good Earth in Broad Ripple. With easy access to the Canal Towpath and the Monon Trail, they’re able to travel Downtown and as far as Fountain Square for family outings. They can schedule play dates at the Indianapolis Museum of Art or Broad Ripple Park. The Jennings make exceptions, however, when safety demands. Claire and Paul ride a bus to school, and because the route to their school near Kessler and Michigan Road presents all sorts of traffic hazards, Shambra takes the bus to parent-teacher meetings. They keep an emergency cash stash at home for taxis for the occasional pickup of a sick kid or a bike breakdown.

COVER STORY // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

Bicycling Magazine describes the Yuba Mondo as “a twowheeled minivan for cargo or passengers.”

Shambra stresses that although they’ve happily adapted to their two-wheel lifestyle, it’s not necessarily a ride in the park. “You can’t do this with a family without looking ahead and planning your travels. Proper gear is also critical.” But she insists that it doesn’t require expensive or high-tech: “Keep it practical. Accessories are accessories and necessities are necessities.” For the Jennings, necessities include reflective vests, lights, good headgear, and items as basic as water bottles and rain

Proper gear and good planning are important components of safe cycling. Dangers include everything from blind intersections and shoulder-less streets to road-raging drivers. Years ago, James was even shot at. “There are drivers who do believe that cyclists should not be on the road,” Shambra says. “When I have my children with me, people are clearly more cautious with me and I’m grateful for that. But there have been many situations when I or my husband have been alone without kids, and people aren’t as cautious. “Some locations are worse than others,” she adds. Locations such as the intersection at Kessler and Westfield. “For some reason, that intersection is incredibly notorious for drivers to just turn pell-mell without any regard. My bike has been hit, my trailer has been hit, and I’ve been in near collisions at that intersection more than any other place in Indianapolis.” Teaching their kids to be good bike citizens is a priority. Although both children have their own bikes, to date, Claire and Paul never ride alone outside their immediate neighborhood. “Paul is already begging us, ‘Can I please go to Kroger by myself?’ Not gonna happen,” Shambra says. “But we’ve been told that tandems and now the Yuba are one of the best ways to teach a child the rules. They see you making the hand signals, they see you wearing the helmet, they see you riding on the side of the road. The kids make hand signals


along with us, they’re involved in it as much as possible. I’m excited for the day that I can say, ‘Yes, you can ride your own bike to Broad Ripple alongside me.’ But it’s not today.” As the kids get older, the Jennings recognize that the city’s bike scene is maturing, too. “We’ve been growing alongside the family bike movement in Indy,” Shambra says. “We’re starting to see more carts and tandems. You can pick up any major bike magazine, and there is almost always some article about our city. We give a lot of props to [Indianapolis mayor Greg] Ballard. We’ve been on a couple of sponsored bike rides, and he’s always there.”

A case for the bicycle The barriers to car-less living for most people are viewed as benefits by Shambra and James. Take weather: “It’s nice to be touched by the rain rather than running away from it. And if you’re working as hard as you can carrying 125 pounds of cargo, it can even be refreshing.” Or physical demands: “I don’t have a gym membership because I don’t need one. Going to the grocery store is a workout for me.” Or time. Sure, travel for outings to the Children’s Museum, Victory Field, and other city landmarks may take longer, but it brings a broader dimension to quality family time. “When we’re on our bikes, we’re talking about the things we see, we’re talking about what we’re doing, we’re talking about everything that’s around us. We’re actually communicating with each other. It may take 30 minutes to get there versus 15 minutes, but the ride is half the fun. It’s part of the adventure.” And then there’s the environmental component. “I don’t even know how much gas costs right now,” Shambra says. “It’s just not on my radar. Our infrastructure is set up for cars. But when someone decides to pursue this lifestyle, they’re deciding it’s what’s better for their children, better for their community, and better for the environment. “It’s not just a personal decision. It’s going to improve quality of life, but also quality of life for entire community over time. I can’t think of anything more inspiring than not being a slave to the oil industry, which is causing havoc all over the planet.” „

The Indianapolis area is replete with great bike shops, filled with knowledgeable customer service representatives. Here is a notexhaustive list. A1 Cyclery The Bicycle Exchange Bicycle Garage Indy (BGI) Bicycle Outfitters Indy The Bike Line Bicycle Hospital Bikes on Mass Ave Circle City Bicycles Freewheelin’ Community Bikes Gray Goat Sports Indy Cycle Specialist Joe’s Cycles Matthews Bicycles National Moto + Cycle Co. Nebo Ridge Bicycles Wheel Fun Rentals

Claire and Paul remind us that, sustainable arguments aside, it’s pretty cool to ride really fast on a two-wheeler. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // COVER STORY 13


OPENING Painting Indiana III The title leaves this addled scribe picturing a scale model of Indiana (say, filling an airplane hanger) being painted with rollers by a team directed by a Hoosier version of Christo (just named Christ). But that’s not at all the case. Painting Indiana III , recently published by IU Press, features 100 paintings by 45 artists who work in the age-old plein air tradition. Longtime Indiana State Museum curator Rachel Berenson Perry wrote the intro; Stephen Doherty, editor of Plein Air Magazine, selected the paintings (all completed in 2010-2011); and the book includes never-before-published works by artists from the Hoosier Group and Richmond School. Friday’s event at the Indiana Landmarks Center is more than a book launch for Painting Indiana III (though it is that, and you can get a signed copy); it’s also an art show giving attendees the opportunity to buy original work by some of the artists featured in the book. Sept. 20, Indiana Landmarks Center, 7-10 p.m., FREE (optional $50 patron ticket includes early entry; registration at bit.ly/PaintingIN) Art Squared A better name for Art Squared — Saturday’s tri-partite event featuring Masterpiece in a Day, the Fountain Square Art Parade and the Fountain Square Art Fair — would be Art Cubed (even if Art Squared does cleverly play off of Fountain Square). But when it comes to the price, no matter how you multiply zero by itself, you end up with zero — and, indeed, all three events are free. Well, to be precise, Masterpiece in a Day and the Art Parade are free for both participants and attendees, while vendors (but not attendees) have to pay a nominal fee to show their stuff at the Art Fair. You probably already know the score, but just in case: Masterpiece in a Day challenges artists of all stripes to make something over the course of an afternoon, with cash prizes awaiting the winners; the Art Parade invites anyone to make a family-friendly moving masterpiece out of him or herself, perhaps in collaboration with others (floats, lawn chair brigades, etc.); and the Art Fair is as it sounds, only with more of an emphasis on DIY than, say, Penrod or Talbot Street. Masterpiece in a Day: registration 9-11 a.m., performances 3-5 p.m., winners announced 6 p.m. Fountain Square Art Fair: 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Fountain Square Art Parade: from 5 p.m. All events Sept. 21; more info and registration at fountainsquare.com.

waveForms: an installation by {exurb} Well, now, this is getting ridiculous. Art to the Fourth Power just doesn’t have quite the same ring to it. But Art Squared does, indeed, have a fourth element this year: an interactive sound and video installation by Houston-based artist collective {exurb}. Co-founder Johnny DiBlasi, who recently relocated from Houston and is now teaching in UIndy’s Department of Art and Design, is putting up the piece on both Sept. 21 and October’s First Friday. Sept. 21, Wheeler Arts Center, 11 a.m.-9 p.m., FREE

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Luis Rey (bottom, right) is the star of the Children’s Museum new dino art show, The Big, Bad and Bizarre.

BOLD, BRUTAL, BURLY, BIZARRE

We could go on with the ‘b’ words in describing a new show of dino art BY A L F RED EA K ER EDITORS@NUVO.NET

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ig Brutal Teeth. Big Burly Bodies. Bizarre and Boisterous Heads. Just three stations in the Children’s Museum’s newly revamped dinosaur gallery, whose group show, The Big, Bad and Bizarre, opens Sept. 21. The gallery reboot draws exclusively from the John Lazendorf Collection, one of the world’s largest collections of paleo art. Lazendorf, a Chicago hairdresser, began collecting paleo art in the ‘90s and amassed a 500-plus pieces by 2000 (all housed in his one-bedroom apartment). He sold the collection to the Children’s Museum in 2001. Spanish surrealist art Luis Rey is the only artist to get his own station in the show: the Bright, Bold Artwork of Luis Rey. Rey’s mixed-media paleo illustrations — created using, at turns, acrylic, ink, airbrush, colored pencil and digital media — are true

EXHIBIT

THE BIG, BAD AND BIZARRE

WHEN: OPENS SEPT. 21 IN THE DINOSAUR ART GALLERY WHERE: CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF INDIANAPOLIS MORE INFO: INCLUDED WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION (SUNDAYS FREE THROUGH SEPTEMBER FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS)

to the tenets of first-wave surrealism, filtering sensibilities of hyperrealism through a dream-like color palette and milieu. Anyone who was once eight years old can probably relate to Rey’s under-theskin bonding with ancient reptiles. And as any eight-year-old film buff might notice, there’s an undeniable and apt cinematic quality to his illustrations — one thinks of the silent Lost-World, the Rite of Spring segment from Fantasia, Jurassic Park. Yet, Rey goes beyond cinema’s treatment of dinosaurs, restoring buoyancy and life to the prehistoric world. Rey’s vivid imagination recently won him the esteemed commission of illustrating Dr. Robert T. Bakker’s update (and homage) to the 1960 Big Golden Book of Dinosaurs (to be released Sept. 24).

Speaking of cinema, Rey has been endorsed by legendary surrealist filmmaker Alejandro Jodorowsky (El Topo, The Holy Mountain): “The Chaos of Luis Rey is the collective soul of the human race. His form of expression surges from the disorder. Each of Rey’s works is a cataclysm… pierced by the horns of a greedy past that refuses to die. Rey paints himself a dinosaur’s head because it is more his face than the white skin mask that his parents imposed on him.” But if Rey’s art works in a surrealist mode that could attract viewers who know what that description means, it also has pedagogical value for the museum’s core audience, according to Dallas Evans, the Children’s Museum’s Chief Curator of Natural Science and Paleontology: “Through Rey’s guiding and imaginative art, children can use clues from science to help them understand what these creatures ate, how they lived, and how they survived. Rey has captured this. His genius lies in bringing these ancient creatures to life with bright colors. Paleontology is a good gateway to science, so children can move onto other sciences as well, keeping it new, constantly evolving, and constantly changing.” „


Sat. Sept. 21, 2013 • Noon-7pm • Military Park www.indianapolischinesefestival.com Dragon & Lion Dance Tai Chi Demonstration Chinese Dance, Music, Martial Arts Asian Arts & Crafts Children’s Games Asian Food & Moon Cake Lantern Ceremony & Moonwalk

PROUDLY PRESENTED BY: Mayor Gregory A. Ballard IN PARTNERSHIP WITH INDY’S LOCAL CHINESE ORGANIZATIONS Confucius Institute • Families with Children from China • Asian American Times Lilly Chinese Culture Network • Indiana Association of Chinese Americans • IUPUI Chinese School Indianapolis Chinese Community Center, Inc. • Indianapolis Chinese Performing Arts Center, Inc.


EVENTS Goodguys 3rd Speedway Nationals First up this week on the NUVO Sports Machine, our HAL-like computerized source for tips and trends, high- and low-lights, picks and not-picks: One of the finest hot rod festivals in all the land, featuring thousands of show cars dating from before 1972 and hailing from nearly every state in the nation. But they ain’t going to just sit there: Part of the Nationals is the Goodguys AutoCross, an electronically timed speed and agility course. Plus a used car parts swap meet and a car corral. Sept. 20-22, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, $18 (discounts available), good-guys.com Ford Hoosier Outdoor Experience Now let’s crank down the carbon monoxide setting on the NUVO Sports Machine and head over to Fort Harrison State Park for a giant celebration of outdoor sports. You’ve got your fishing, canoeing, remote control boats, fish cleaning and cooking; your trapping, turkey hunting, tree stand sitting and venison preparing; your archery, bowhunting and crossbow shooting; your archeological digging and warfare reenacting; your horseback riding and dutch oven cooking; your gold panning, disc golfing, geocaching, snowmobiling, horseshoe pitching, mushroom eating, wall climbing and simulated caving. And we left some stuff out, too. Like something called gaga ball that is apparently like dodgeball, only with more glitter. It’s all free, but registration is recommended at hoosieroutdoorexperience.in.gov. Sept. 21-22, Fort Harrison State Park, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., FREE Indiana Fever What’s that you say, NUVO Sports Machine? You’re overheating? You need a cold compress on your hard drive? Why, that’s only natural. You’re coming dangerously close to core systems meltdown as the defending WNBA champion Fever return to the playoffs for the ninth consecutive year. They’ll face the Chicago Sky in the best-of-three first round. Games One and Three (if necessary) will take place Friday and Tuesday in Rosemont; and Game Two will be Sunday at Bankers Life. Visit wnba.com for more info. Indiana Ice Well, nothing better to get those reel-to-reel tapes spinning again, NUVO Sports Machine, than a nice, tall glass of hockey. The Indianapolis Ice home opener is coming up Sept. 27, 7:05 p.m., at the Pan Am Pavilion vs. the Sioux Falls Stampede. Keep in mind that with the State Fairgrounds Coliseum still undergoing renovation, the Ice are again making their home base at the Pan Am Plaza and playing games at both Pan Am and Banker’s Life Fieldhouse, where the Ice will make their first appearance Oct. 12.

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Ball State wide receiver Connor Ryan.

ONE GAME AT A TIME BY M A RK D U BEC

EDITO RS@ N UVO . N ET

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he Ball State football program is off to an excellent start, with a 2-1 record including a 40-14 win over Army and the offense scoring at an impressive pace (118 points over the first three games of the season). We caught up with team captain and wide receiver Connor Ryan to talk about the team’s goals and motto, plus his post-season plans (wherein we give a plug to Merrill Lynch). NUVO: What is the toughest part about being a college athlete? CONNOR RYAN: Time management. It’s a full-time job. We are students first. We are in the classroom all day, and then head right out to the practice field — and meetings right after that. NUVO: “Anything, anytime, anywhere” is your team motto. What does that mean to you? RYAN: A group of upperclassmen came up with it. To me, personally, it means you are willing to do anything for the team. Anytime, whether it’s winter conditioning, or on game day, or anywhere. Whether it’s home, away, in the classroom or weight room. It fits our team perfectly. NUVO: What are the team’s expectations for this season?

A touchdown shy of a perfect season, Ball State is off to a good start, thanks in part to a level-headed team captain

RYAN: One game at a time. We thought it was very important that we just not say, we want to be MAC (Mid-American Conference) champs. To get to that we realize it’s one day at a time, one practice at time. Our goal setting is on a weekly basis. NUVO: Has playing college football taught you any lessons about life? RYAN: I remember when I was younger my dad would always say, “Football is the best life teacher.” It’s been completely true. It’s taught me a lot about myself and the people I surround myself with. NUVO: Do you remember your first touchdown in college? RYAN: I do, I do. It was against Purdue, my redshirt freshman year. It was a seam route right down the middle. I’ll never forget that. It was a special moment for me. NUVO: What does it feel like to score a touchdown? RYAN: It’s hard to describe. Not many people get to experience it. You catch that ball, and you realize you are in the end zone. You have a thousand emotions going

on inside. You want to celebrate with your team, and you hear the crowd screaming. Then, fifteen seconds later, you are right back on the sidelines, and in my case, I head right back on the field for kickoff. NUVO: What are you planning to do for a career if football doesn’t continue? RYAN: I’m realistic with myself. I will be starting a job in January. I will be a financial advisor at Merrill Lynch in Carmel. I’m proud of that. My goal was to get a degree and play as much football as possible. It was a dream of mine to play in the NFL or CFL, but as of now, I’m just focused on this season. NUVO: Can we get some recommendations for good shows or books? RYAN: My favorite show is Suits, and go read Bo Schembechler’s Bo’s Lasting Lessons book. NUVO: If you were forced to write your social media status right at this very minute, what would you say? RYAN: Hungry and going to dinner. Hopefully get a nap after that. #BallStateFootball NUVO: What do you hope people will say about you when your time is up here on Earth? RYAN: That I was hardworking and a leader. A great family man. „


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EVENTS UIndy Kellogg Writers Series: Patricia Clark Poet Laureate of Grand Rapids, Mich. from 2005-2007, and now Poet-in-Residence at Grand Valley State University, Patricia Clark has plenty of awards to her name (Gwendolyn Brooks Prize, Pablo Neruda/NIMROD Award), as well as four books, the most recent of which, Sunday Rising, was published in February. Here are the first lines from “Risen from the Patricia Clark Underworld” from Sunday Rising: “Arranged on slabs of sedimentary rock, rough-edged, beige-gray with umber streaks, circle of three figures sitting upright, holding knees in postures of deep concentration as though facing each other over a glittering pool or a campfire, finding contemplation in its flames.” Esch Hall, University of Indianapolis, Sept. 23, 7:30 p.m., FREE

REVIEWS BROWN COUNTY MORNINGS PHOTOGRAPHS AND TEXT BY GARY MOORE; FOREWORD BY JAMES P. EAGLEMAN Indiana University Press, $40 t Gary Moore committed several years to capturing the morning feel of the landscape at several locations in Brown County. He likes to shoot head on, as someone coming upon a place without maneuvering for angles, framing a story or punching up a site. Presented randomly, without a specific theme or as a chronological journey, the book presents photographs of trees on the banks of rivers and lakes, along gentle rises, around grassy areas. Some emerge from mists, some stretch newly awakened into the sun, some stand quietly as sentinels. It seems like a solitary venture, up and out before others disturb the silence. Yet, my favorite photographs appear on pages 7 and 24. The former shows a brown horse meandering down a path toward an indeterminate destination. The latter depicts a brown horse — the same brown horse? — nuzzling a white horse, while a dappled horse stands as if observing the scene. I like the opportunity to imagine a story and wish the second photograph had immediately followed the first, but maybe that’s the intent — asking the viewer to wait to make connections. It’s an engaging book with a bit of lore about Brown County and a smattering of tips for making photographs. — RITA KOHN

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hen September rolls around, unsuspecting artists and writers may want to run for cover — or risk being asked to spend a week living in the window of the Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library. In what is becoming an annual tradition for the nationwide Banned Books Week, Hugh Vandivier, a writer who interviewed Kurt Vonnegut in 2002 and is a longtime supporter of the library, will spend September 22–28 lounging in a cell made of books. He has no idea what to expect. “Will it be a performance piece? Will it be the ultimate examination of Big Brother since there’s a webcam set up? I think it’s more like a panda cam, because the pandas aren’t always in the shot,” he says. Vandivier, an online editor for Angie’s List, whose work primarily focuses on editing and non-fiction writing and reportage, is excited to focus on a finishing one of the assignments during his stay: a short piece of fiction. He has also worked in Indy’s visual arts community, which prompted him to suggest an exhibition of reimagined covers for banned books.

VOICES

A short list of some of those covers demonstrates the breadth of books that have been banned: from Vonnegut’s Welcome to the Monkey House and Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, to Maurice Sendak’s classic Where the Wild Things Are and Judy Blume’s teen favorite Are You There God? It’s Me, Margaret. Young adult books get special attention this year with a talk by Chris Finan, author and president of American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression. The week also includes a First Amendment Film Fest and a set of nightly readings, or “bedtime stories” for Vandivier. He’s upgrading the library cell this year with a futon instead of a cot and an exercise bike. He might want the latter to burn off a bit of the Jockamo Slaughterhouse Five pizza he intends to eat while in captivity. Many of the local eateries that will deliver food also serve beer, so Vandivier says he may send out an occasional message, “and if someone wants to join me for an impromptu symposium, they are welcome.” Even Governor Mike Pence is in on the action, issuing a state proclamation earlier this summer formally declaring Banned Books Week in Indiana. First Lady Karen

Reimagined covers by Matt Sommers (Grendel), Mab Graves (Lolita) and Pam Wishbow (Slaughterhouse-Five) are part of Banned Books Recovered, an art show and sale at Kurt Vonnegut Memorial Library.

Visit nuvo.net/books for complete event listings, reviews and more.

BANNED BOOKS WEEK

• TIM YOUD: BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS PERFORMANCE (through Sept. 20) WHAT: Conceptual typist Youd had been hammering out the entirety Breakfast on a single page, running it through the typewriter over and over again, since Sept. 6; he plans to finish by Sept. 20. Youd’s other typing performances including Henry 18 // ARTS // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

Miller’s Tropic of Capricorn (on a Brooklyn outside of Miller’s boyhood home) and Charles Bukowski’s Post Office (on the stairs of an L.A. post office). • BANNED BOOKS RECOVERED ART SHOW AND SALE (Sept. 22-28) WHAT: reimagined covers of banned books executed by local artists. • HUGH’S BEDTIME STORIES WHAT: Notable authors will read to the imprisoned Vandivier at 6 p.m. each night THE LINEUP: Columnist Dan Carpenter (Sept. 22); author and son of Kurt, Mark Vonnegut (Sept. 23,

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Banned Books programming includes Howard Zinn Day (take that, Mitch!)

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WH ERE: EVENTS ARE AT TH E K UR T V ON N E G UT MEMORIA L L IBRA RY, UNL ES S N OT E D LIBRA RY HOUR S: 12- 9 P .M , S E PT . 22- 27 AN D 1 2 -5 P.M. SEPT. 28 T ICK ETS: FREE

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via Google Hangout); state representative Christina Hale (Sept. 24); First Lady Karen Pence (Sept. 25); author James Alexander Thom and Unitarian Universalist Reverend Bill Breeden (Sept. 26); actress Constance Macy (Sept. 27). • FIRST AMENDMENT FILM FEST Slaughterhouse-Five (Sept. 23), Good Night and Good Luck (Sept. 24), Howl (Sept. 27), beginning at 6:15 p.m. • HOWARD ZINN DAY (Sept. 26) Following the readings by Thom and Breeden (see above) from Zinn’s work, the library will show

Pence will read from the sometimes-banned children’s favorite Harriet the Spy on Sept. 25. Former governor and Purdue president Mitch Daniels also has a presence at Banned Books Week, though he probably didn’t intend to. The storm surrounding his emails regarding the late professor and author Howard Zinn inspired the library to include a Zinn night in their line-up on Thursday, Sept. 26, including readings from A People’s History of the United States and films about the book and Zinn’s life. “Howard Zinn was one of our first honorary board members,” explains Julia Whitehead, executive director of the library. “We wanted to make it clear to anyone who’s interested in learning more about him what his life and his life’s work were about. If people come in and they disagree with Howard Zinn, well, that’s great, because that opens the discussion. But if you restrict access to information about his books and his life, then you can’t have the discussion. And what do we have then?” Vonnegut cared deeply about an open dialogue, says Whitehead. “Whether the topic was religion, public school funding, war, or the environment—he didn’t want important issues to just fade away. He thought that if we’re not addressing them, then we’re not progressing. You have to have the conversation.” Vandivier agrees. “In the V broader sense, too many bro times censorship or the tim rush to ban something has rus more to do with silencing mo people whose opinions pe and beliefs are different an than th ours. That’s where we w get into the danger of only hearing opinions that th we agree with. I think most of the time th you’ll find that if you y have good beliefs and h values and you’re chalv lenged on those beliefs and values, it strengthens them rather than weakens them.” „

The People Speak , a documentary based on Zinn’s People’s History of the United States (which Purdue president Mitch Daniels attempted to remove from K-12 libraries and reading lists during his governorship). A lunch screening of the documentary You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train is also planned. • CHRIS FINAN: CORRUPTING OUR KIDS: THE ATTACK ON YA LITERATURE (Sept. 25, 7 p.m. at the Indianapolis Public Library’s Clowes Auditorium) WHAT: Finan is president of American Booksellers for Free Expression, which coordinates discounts on banned titles, a virtual list of banned and challenged titles and other activities.


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REVIEWS Butler Theatre Butler opens its season this weekend with two solo shows: Art There More of You? , written and performed by Alison Skilbeck; and Galileo, written by Nic Young and performed by Tim Hardy, this year’s Christel DeHaan Visiting International Artist. Skilbeck’s show, first presented at Butler in 2011, fea- Tim Hardy tures four London women from very different backgrounds — an ambassador’s wife, an Italian cafe owner, a ‘spirit weaver’ and a straightforward businesswoman. She told Sri Lanka’s Sunday Times of the play: “I set myself the challenge of seeing if I could write four different characters, who each tell their different stories but are linked in some way…It is a whole sequence, it does add up to more than the sum of its parts.” Based on a script for the BBC Two series Days that Shook the World , Galileo centers on the thinker’s 1663 heresy trial, when he recanted his argument for a heliocentric universe under threat of torture. Hardy, a London-trained actor and director, will direct Butler’s next fully-staged show, Romeo and Juliet , as part of his residency. The shows will be presented singly Sept. 19 and 20, then on a double bill Sept. 21. Are There More of You?: Sept. 19, 7 p.m., $8 public, $5 student Galileo: Sept. 20, 7 p.m., $8 public, $5 student Double bill: Sept. 21, 7 p.m., $12 public, $7 student All shows at the Schrott Center; more info at butler.edu. Lang Lang Lang Lang has come a long way since his days in Shenyang, the small Chinese town where he grew up. The program for his Palladium visit includes Mozart’s Piano Sonatas Nos. 4, 5 and 8, as well as Chopin’s Ballades Nos. 1-4. Sept. 19, The Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, 7:30 p.m., $15-130 Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra The ISO is giving you two options as it kicks off its season. The first is its Friday night opening gala, back after last year’s unfortunateness and starring outstanding violinist Hilary Hahn. The reception starts at 7:30 p.m., and the concert starts at 9 p.m., with music director Krzysztof Urbanski conducting Hahn for Bruch’s Scottish Fantasy, then the ISO on Brahm’s Second Symphony. Ensemble-in-residence Time for Three will play the after-party from 10:15 p.m. But if all that is beyond your price point (tickets range from $40-90), you might find your way to Saturday’s free community day, which opens from 2 p.m. with activities, performances and ticket giveaways, then winds up at 5 p.m. with an Urbanski-led performance of Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet overture and another Brahms Second Symphony. Opening Night Gala: Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., Community Day: Sept. 21, 2-6 p.m., FREE, $40-90 (includes reception and after-party) Both events at Hilbert Circle Theatre; more info at indianapolissymphony.org.

N NUVO.NET/STAGE Visit nuvo.net/stage for complete event listings, reviews and more. 20 // ARTS // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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Hoosier-born, NYC-based actress Ashley Dillard talks about the Phoenix’s season opener

BY S CO TT S H O G ER SSHOGER@NUVO.NET

Y

ou can pretty much count on the Phoenix these days for fresh-off-Broadway shows (or fresh-off-off-Broadway, if you will). And they don’t get much fresher than Christopher Durang’s Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike, which closed its Broadway run August 25 after winning just about every award you can name in 2013: the Tony for Best Play, New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award for Best Play, the Drama League Award for Best Play. And we could go on. Those character names may come from Chekhov, but as Ashley Dillard, who plays Nina, tells us, there’s just as much Durang in the stew as Chekhov — though you don’t need to know either playwright to enjoy the play, which she describes as “a farce that’s not over the top.” Dillard, a 27-year-old Highland, Ind. native making her Phoenix premiere after two-plus years working in New York City, tells us more during a break from three weeks of rehearsals. ASHLEY DILLARD: “I play Nina, a 20-something wanna-be actress who has such a lovely heart and truly believes that anything is possible. It’s been really refreshing for me to play a role like this, just because I’ve been doing a little bit darker stuff while I’ve been in New York. Everybody wants to do the really edgy, dark rock musical, which I love, but you have to have some kind of neuroses or be desperately in love with someone who doesn’t love you. “I don’t really like Durang. There’s something about absurdism that I don’t really connect to, but when I read this play... It has such heart to it and the characters are kooky, but they’re real. And they’re all going through something to relatable. “I feel like every day that I go to rehearsal is like a master class in acting. Watching Chuck [Goad], Diane [Kondrat], Jen [Johansen], Dwandra [Lampkin] and Pete [Lindblom]: they are so talented. Chuck Goad, who plays Vanya, has the best monologue, ever; that’s my favorite point in the show. Not to bring up my own character, but she has this line, “You must always get your hopes up,” and I think that’s a lovely sentiment, not just for myself, but also for this play. Yeah, you’re in your fifties and you’re not where you thought you would be, but life’s not over yet. I think with Durang pieces, there are always character archetypes and my character fulfills one of them: she’s the bright light. “Funnily enough, almost every single one of the cast members lived in New York at some point. So they totally understand my plight. I came back here and said, “I was so happy I smelled a skunk!” It’s hard because I really love New York; I think it’s a great place and a great theater community. I can

PHOTO BY ZACH ROSING

Ashley Dillard (left, as Nina) lights up the room alongside a more world-weary Jen Johansen (Masha). THEATER

VANYA AND SONIA AND MASHA AND SPIKE

WHEN: SEPT. 19-OCT. 20 WHERE: PHOENIX THEATRE TICKETS: $18 GENERAL ADMISSION FIRST WEEKEND; THEN $28 ADULT, $18 STUDENT

REMAINING 2013 PHOENIX SHOWS: • RANCHO MIRAGE (NATIONAL NEW PLAY NETWORK ROLLING WORLD PREMIERE) WHEN: OCT. 24-NOV. 24 WHAT: SIX FRIENDS DISCLOSE ALARMING SECRETS AT AN ILL-FATED DINNER PARTY. FROM THE WRITER WHO BROUGHT YOU YANKEE TAVERN AND BECKY’S NEW CAR . • A VERY PHOENIX X-MAS 8: ANGELS WE HAVE HEARD WHILE HIGH WHEN: NOV. 29-DEC. 22 WHAT: A REFRESHED VERSION OF THE PHOENIX’S ANNUAL HOLIDAY PAGEANT, FEATURING ALL-NEW SKETCHES, SONGS AND DANCES — AND PROBABLY SOME SOCK PUPPETS.

go see Broadway shows for $5, but at the same time, it’s hard to be a working actor. I mostly tell people I’m a server who likes to act on the side. “I’ve been working professionally for eight years, but I’ve been doing theater my

whole life. We have our community theater in Highland that does one show a year, outside. It’s always a disaster because no one can hear anything and there are always people beeping when they drive by, but those are still some of best memories I have. “Indiana State is a great theater school. They don’t have a musical theater degree so I kind of made my own path. I just found a voice teacher in the music department who took me on all four years, got a dance minor and majored in acting. It was like trying to do it all — and putting on my own programs of musical theater! But I felt 100 percent prepared when I left, over-prepared sometimes, because you do it yourself. A lot of people who come out of conservatories know their stuff, but they’re not always self-motivated to go out there and go to auditions at four in the morning and stand in line — and then find out that they’re not seeing non-Equity people today. “I can watch a great movie for two hours and feel moved by it, yeah. But then I can go to a theater and have my life changed. I saw Rent when I was 12, on its first national tour. I’d always liked to sing and liked to act, but I saw that and was overwhelmed with possibilities — this is what life could be; you could do this for a living. That’s such a theater person thing to say: Rent changed my life. But it’s true! „


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Thaw e Chris White’s Thaw is a simple story about the complex process of giving birth. Two women escape to snowedin cabin, committed to following through on a natural birthing process. As the pregnant Jasmine, Amy Hayes is believable and steadfast in her portrayal of labor pains and a single mother’s uncertainty. Playwright White doubles as an actor, portraying the quirky and lovable, albeit undertrained, midwife. Their performances are well-executed, and dense dialogue clips along with laughter and complexity. But things get belabored when a third character — a father figure, admirably played by Ronn Jonstone — enters the scene. Jasmine and the midwife’s search for strength in each other and oneself is undercut when this dad enters the scene, and the writing does little to ground his presence. He’s an unnecessary distraction from the play’s more interesting subject — the friendship and love shared by mother and midwife. Qualms aside, Thaw’s open-ended journey is, on the whole, thoughtful and funny. — KATELYN COYNE Through Sept. 21 at IndyFringe Basile Theatre EclecticPond Theatre Company: Romeo & Juliet t EcelcticPond is remounting its 2012 rendition of Romeo & Juliet (or R&J, as some materials have it) with a couple interesting twists. First off, eight of the play’s fifteen actors are presenting the play in true repertory style — that is, by switching up parts each night. Second, as director Thomas Cardwell explained in his curtain speech, the company is hoping to chop down this 90 minute version of R&J to only 60 minutes for school presentations. Because EclecticPond is using this run of R&J as a workshop to figure out how best to make further cuts, audiences should expect to include themselves in the creative process, rather than sitting back to watch an altogether polished piece of theater. EclecticPond’s players will likely reach their goal of truncating R&J, but elements are still very much in process. Hesitating actors seem to not feel fully at home in their parts, and at least 10 minutes could have been chopped from the running time if actors had simply picked up their cues in a timely fashion. Each night, different casts make different choices. Audience who choose to participate can return on subsequent nights for half-priced tickets. — KATELYN COYNE Through Sept. 29 at Irvington Lodge

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UIndy Faculty Artist Series: Gala Opening Concert e UIndy’s gala opener found a nearly full house treated to an evening of exceptional music-making, all under the knowledgeable and skilled hands of Maestro Raymond Leppard. JS Bach’s Concerto in C minor began the concert, with soloists Pamela French, oboe, and Austin Hartman, violin, showing themselves to be a dynamic duo. They blended and complemented each other’s playing superbly. Leppard then led the ensemble (sans winds) in a thoroughly charming performance of Edvard Grieg’s From Holberg’s Time. The small string ensemble’s sound was rich and full, as if produced by a group double its actual size, yet still had the intimacy of a quartet’s. The second half was devoted to Mozart with the ensemble was joined by the University of Indianapolis Concert Choir, beginning with a sweet reading of his Ave Verum Corpus. Two movements from Vesperae solennes de Confessore then followed, with versatile soprano Kathleen Hacker as soloist for the simple yet moving Laudate Dominum. Students Hannah Holmes (soprano), Elisabeth Kleinsmith (mezzo), Andrew Wegg (tenor) and Glen Hall (bass-baritone) were featured for the Magnificat, and blended well as a quartet. If this concert is an indication of the rest of the season, then it looks to be an excellent one. — CHANTAL INCANDELA Sept. 16 at Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center Indianapolis Symphonic Choir: Mood Indigo e The Indianapolis Symphonic Choir, represented by the 20-member Chamber Singers conducted by Michael Davis, kicked off its 2013-14 season with a cabaretstyle performance that channeled both the Robert Shaw Chorale with its homogeneity of tone, elegant phrasing, rhythmic vitality and quietly nuanced balance — and the smooth sound of Fred Waring’s Pennsylvanians. Notable were “On the Street Where You Live,” in an up-tempo ragtime mode, and the sonorous ballad “Long Ago and Far Away.” Humor reigned with a playful radio script segment built around the lyrics of Paul Simon’s “Cecelia,” and a smile inducing “The Very Thought of You” with Gary Walters on piano. The show ended with Chorale members leaving the stage to create a surround-sound effect throughout the acoustically lovely Cook Theatre, set up with cabaret tables and indigo candle holders. — RITA KOHN Sept. 15 at Indiana Landmarks Center

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OPENING Salinger The Salinger-iana floodgates have opened. And this doc (and its accompanying biography) is one of the first salvos, offering up new info on his childhood, work methods, relationships and, most tantalizingly, unpublished work (according to the doc, up to five unpublished collections and novels, including a study of the Vendanta religion and a novel based on his first marriage). PG-13, Opens Friday at Keystone Art

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Thanks for Sharing Stuart Blumberg, who wrote The Kids Are All Right , tries out his hand directing this study of a group of friends in recovery. Starring Mark Ruffalo, Tim Robbins, Josh Gad, Gwyneth Paltrow, Joely Richardson and Patrick Fugit. R, Opens Friday at Keystone Art Prisoners Hugh Jackman goes vigilante when his two daughters go missing, aided by Detective Jake Gyllenhall, in this thriller from Denis Villeneuve (the Oscar-nominated Incendies). R, Opens Friday in wide release Computer Chess The Indiana State Museum IMAX’s art film series rolls on this weekend with Computer Chess, directed by Andrew Bujalski (the “Godfather of Mumblecore”) — and, of local relevance, production designed by People for Urban Progress co-founder Michael Bricker. A black-and-white comedy about the early ‘80s world of computer-based chess, the 2013 Sundance winner was described as “very odd, weird, strange, idiosyncratic” and “the funniest, headiest, most playfully eccentric American indie of the year” by Village Voice. NR, Opens Friday at Indiana State Museum IMAX

FILM EVENTS Glorifying the American Girl (1929) Filmed in early two-strip Technicolor and right around the advent of practical film sound, Glorifying is a backstage musical powered by the Ziegfeld Follies with a cameo by Johnny Weissmuller (Tarzan). Garfield Park Art Center, Sept. 21, 8 p.m., $4 (or $20 for 6 films) Ava DuVernay Continuing this week is IU Cinema’s mini-fest of work by DuVernay, who founded the African American Film Festival Releasing Movement (AFFRM) to achieve wider distribution for black independent filmmakers. Venus vs. (2013) is a new doc looking at Venus Williams’ call for financial parity in pro tennis. Narrative feature Middle of Nowhere (2012), which won DuVernay a Best Director Award at Sundance, tells of a woman coming to terms with her husband’s incarceration. And her feature debut, I Will Follow (2011), depicts one day in the life of a woman packing up her family home after he aunt’s death. DuVernay will attend all screenings, and give a lecture Friday afternoon. IU Cinema (Bloomington), Sept. 19-20, FREE After the Thin Man (1936) The first sequel to The Thin Man finds the ever-elegant Nick and Nora returning to their San Francisco home, only to find that Nora’s cousin’s husband is missing. Artcraft Theatre (Franklin), Sept. 20 and 21, 2 and 7:30 p.m., $5 (discounts available)

NUVO.NET/FILM N Vi it nuvo.net/film for complete Visit movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes 22 // ARTS // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

Kaitlyn Dever (left) steals scenes as a dissruptive sullen kid in Short Term 12.

CREDIBLE AND COMPASSIONATE Short Term 12 gets soapy in spots, but achieves a strong sense of authenticity

BY ED J O H N S O N -O TT EJOH N S O N O T T @ N U V O . N E T

I

used to work in a facility similar to the one in Short Term 12. A group of people with special needs lived there and the staff tried to help them prepare to move into new settings where they would live with substantially less support and supervision. Our challenge was to help them get ready for the trials of independent living while maintaining a safe, nurturing environment. The problem was that while most of the residents were eager to move on, some of the individuals grew to like our little Nerf World so much they were hesitant to leave. Short Term 12 takes place in a facility that serves special needs people younger than 18. One of the kids we meet appears to be autistic, but most of the residents suffer from emotional issues, with many having endured neglect or more overt abuse. Writer-director Destin Daniel Cretton used his experiences working in a similar place to build his story, which chronicles the lives of a few direct care staff members and residents. Cretton’s background in the field helps the film achieve a strong sense of authenticity. I believed the characters and found the interactions between the young staff and their clients credible. The drama is balanced out with humorous bits that fit naturally into the flow of the movie. Cretton spent years preparing the sweet, engaging feature. A short film version of the tale was celebrated on the festival circuit several years ago. Cretton’s efforts, along with the performances of a talented cast, help the film transcend its Afterschool Special set-up. For the most part, that is. The film gets soapy in spots, which I didn’t mind. Yes, I rolled my eyes when the film’s “here we go again!” final moment. And I bemoaned the excessive tidiness of a screenplay that gives one staff member the same self-injurious behavior and abuse history as the young girl she is attempting to help.

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Brie Larson works at a facility for people with special needs in Short Term 12. REVIEW

SHORT TERM 12

R A T E D: R S T A R R I NG: B R I E LA R S O N, J O H N GA L L A GH ER, J R . , K A I T LY N D EV ER , R A M I MA L EK NOW P LA Y I NG: A T K EY S T O NE A RT e

But those are just annoyances in a production that is very good overall. Brie Larson (The Spectacular Now) and John Gallagher (The Newsroom) center the story as staff person’s hiding their romantic relationship. The affable Gallagher reminds me of The Office veteran John Krasinski, while Larson appears on the verge of breaking through to the big time. Rami Malek is amusing and relatable as

a new hire that initially alienates the kids by calling them “underprivileged.” Keith Stanfield impresses as a resident about to turn 18, which means he will have to leave the facility and enter the non-Nerf city. And Kaitlyn Dever steals scenes as a sullen kid with a troubled past that threatens her future. In 1979 I sought a job at a special education school after being moved by a TV movie about a mentally-challenged couple. At that school I met an amazing kid named Donald. We adopted each other a few months later and have been father and son ever since. I can imagine Short Term 12 inspiring people to enter the field. It’s gratifying to see a well-crafted, entertaining movie that might also serve as an agent of change. „


NOW PLAYING

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The Grandmaster e A gorgeous, ornate visual feast. The tone is reserved, melancholy; the martial arts scenes pure poetry, every frame meticulously composed. The stars are charismatic actors Tony Leung ( Lust, Caution, In the Mood for Love) and Zhang Ziyi ( Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Memoirs of a Geisha ). The movie comes from gifted filmmaker Wong Kar-wai ( Chungking Express, Days of Being Wild, In the Mood for Love ). — ED JOHNSON-OTT PG-13, In wide release Drinking Buddies r Chicago filmmaker Joe Swanberg’s first “commercial” effort nicely combines the “mumblecore” director’s penchant for realism (it’s filmed, in part, in Chicago’s Revolution Brewery) with some old-school Hollywood comedy tropes (rapid-fire relationship shuffling, for instance). Starring Olivia Wilde (Thirteen on House M.D.), Jake Johnson (Nick on New Girl), Anna Kendrick ( Up in the Air ), Ron Livingston (Office Space) and, in an uncredited role, SNL vet (and Wilde’s husband) Jason Sudeikis. It’s all improvised, and he’s working with a cast that can whip up great lines on the spot: “They have a girl who plays the cello. I think that’s ironic, but I can’t tell anymore” (Livingston’s character on a band he’s recording). — SCOTT SHOGER R, At IMAX Indiana State Museum Riddick y Think Assault on Precinct 13 on a scorched planet with lots of alien predators and you’ll sort of get the idea. While far from memorable, it’s entertaining enough throwaway fare. Vin Diesel’s pan-racial hulk-with-a-soft-voice persona helps out a lot. — ED JOHNSON-OTT R, In wide release and IMAX The Family y Comedy and jarring violence mix in Luc Besson’s (the Taken films) tale of a Brooklyn-based former Mafia big-

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wig (Robert De Niro) relocated to France as part of the Witness Relocation Program along with his wife (Michelle Pfeiffer) and teenage kids (John D’Leo and Dianna Agron). Tommy Lee Jones is the FBI agent assigned to keep things cool – a hard task when dealing with a family that draws attention in a country known for impatience with Americans. Jones is merely serviceable, but De Niro and Pfeiffer are good. The shifting tone of the production is problematic – Besson’s attempts to establish real threats while being dismissive of the violence are unsuccessful, and the comedy isn’t funny enough. R, In wide release Insidious: Chapter 2 u Cast members Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, Lin Shaye and Ty Simpkins reunite in this sequel to the hit horror film I didn’t see. In the latest from James Wan ( The Conjuring) the Lambert family goes spook hunting in an attempt to de-ghostify their lives. The movie skates by on BOO moments instead of solid scares, and the pacing is poor. PG-13, In wide release Austenland i The conceit is that guests get to step into the land of Pride and Prejudice and similar Austen books to enjoy a pretend romance in a role-playing live-action costume drama. Imagine a half-assed version of such an attraction, where the actors hired to make the environment seem real have limited acting skills and a propensity to break character. And imagine a sloppy, broad comedy that isn’t nearly as amusing as it should be, made harder to watch by several miscast actors in highly visible places. — ED JOHNSON-OTT PG-13, At Keystone Art

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // ARTS 23


BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

Great Fermentations, one of our mainstays for home brewing and wine making supplies and instruction with a home base at 5127 E. 65th St., now has a satellite store in Avon on the northwest corner of US 36 and Dan Jones Expressway. “Both stores are vibrant center for hobbyists. I am hoping to whet peoples’ interest in making their own fermented beverages,” enthuses Great Fermentations founder Anita Johnson. Both stores carry barley, hops, yeast, 100 different wine ingredient kits, fermenters, bottles, draft supplies, grape presses, oak barrels, cheese kits and new pickle/saurkraut crocks. I stopped at the remodeled Kahn’s store at 2342 W. 86th St. It feels a lot cozier. The wall of craft beers features Upland’s Sampler Pack along with their line up, including C-V [the remake of Indiana’s quintessential Champaign Velvet, originally brewed in Terre Haute]. Kahn’s staff reports C-V is “gaining popularity.” Also well represented are Cutters, Fountain Square, Flat 12, Sun King, Three Floyds and Triton. If there’s an Indiana brand you ask for, they’ll carry it. We also noted the presence of Heartland Distillers products, including Indiana Vodka and Prohibition Gin. Off-the-beaten-track pale ales caught my attention at Broad Ripple Brewpub and Rock Bottom College Park. John Trotter at BRBP went back to his German roots with GPA — German Pale Ale —a fusion between two distinct styles, India Pale Ale and Kolsch. “We start with English Malt and kettle hops [usually imparting a fruity aroma], then finish with German yeast and Noble hops [which impart a bitter, tangy flavor],” explained Treeter. “You get a clean malt profile with lemony, grassy hop aftertaste.” At Rock Bottom College Park, brewer Liz Laughlin invites us to “taste the deliciousness” of her newest inspiration, Singletrak Pale. Unlike the expected American Pale Ale, Singletrak is low in alcohol and its medium body malt is balanced by a citrus hop finish with hints of spicy cinnamon in between. Both brewpubs also have cask ales on tap. Referred to as “Real Ale,” cask ales are unfiltered, have a lower carbonation than other brews, and are best served slightly warmer. Following a successful reception in Ohio and Kentucky, Upland is expanding into Chicago with Upland Wheat, Dragonfly IPA and selected seasonals, including Infinite Wisdom Tripel and Harvest Ale.

EVENTS Forks Over Knives The 2011 doc Forks Over Knives tackles the claim that “most, if not all, of the degenerative diseases that afflict us can be controlled, or even reversed, by rejecting our present menu of animal-based and processed foods” (from the film’s official synopsis). The folks at the Carmel Green Initiative are presenting this screening, and a Whole Foods Market representative will be around afterward to answer questions. Sept. 18, Carmel Clay Public Library, 6:30-8:30 p.m., FREE (plus free door prizes) Prairie Plates An all-new foodie event pairing beautiful artisan edibles (from Goose the Market, New Day Meadery, Sugar and others) with Connor Prairie’s sylvan scenery and heirloom gardens. A shine-only event; tickets will be refunded in case of inclement weather. Sept. 20, Conner Prairie, 6:30-9:30 p.m., $50 (reserve at 776-6006)

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ONE-STOP, URBAN FARMING SHOP Things you can buy from Agrarian: Portable coops, beehives, mushroom logs, antique egg baskets B Y S H A W N D RA M I L L ER EDITORS@NUVO.NET

M

ove over, Tractors Supply Company, there’s a new farm store in town. Town being the operative word: Agrarian Indy is a rustic oasis on a busy SoBro corner. The front window showcases the shop’s signature item, a henhouse on wheels — the same model that houses about a hundred happy flocks owned by Nap Town Chickens patrons. If that doesn’t draw you through the door, consider the cedar-built raised bed, the local honey and honey pots, or the native bee houses hanging above a shelf of folksy “Farm Fresh Eggs” signs. Perhaps you’ll walk out with your very own mushroom log, straight from Paoli, Ind., with plans for cultivating some nutritional powerhouses. This is a farm store catering to the urban homesteader and lover of all things local. With about half of Agrarian’s stock coming from local artisans and farmers, its customers can brag, “Even our hens are locavores.” (The non-soy-based, GMO-free, organic chicken feed comes from Wanamaker, Shelbyville, and Lebanon, where there is a mill onsite.) The store came about because of the complementary interests and shared passions of proprietors Andrew Brake, Anne Collins, and David Stuckert. Brake founded Nap Town Chickens in 2011 as a resource for the city’s chicken farmers. He’d considered expanding that endeavor into a shop, but thought the demographic too narrow. But Collins, who keeps her own flock and enjoys antiquing, thought urbanites would support a shop featuring an array of homespun supplies and gifts. Stuckert, a retired executive with carpentry skills, had built coops for Nap Town’s customers, and easily expanded into raised beds. The threesome expect to draw customers from across the sustainability world. “If someone is a rainwater harvester,” Brake says, “maybe they’ll be interested in chicken farming, and we can turn them on to that.” Chicken farmers coming in to buy feed and supplies — the store’s soft opening was in late August — are often drawn to the beehive, handmade by a local beekeeper and displayed with all the accoutrements. “Many chicken farmers say they want to do bees next,” says Stuckert. Brake adds, “We want to turn them into mushroom farmers, and they can do their canning, preserving…” In short, Agrarian expects to support the full cycle of small-

PHOTOS BY MARK A. LEE

The Agrarian team (from left): Anne Collins, David Stuckert, Andrew Brake. Below: One of Agrarian’s trademark hen houses on wheels. FARM

AGRARIAN URBAN HOMESTEAD & SUPPLY

GRAND OPENING: SUNDAY, SEPT. 22, 1-5 P.M. WHERE: 6 6 1 E. 4 9 T H S T . , 9 3 8-1199 WEBSITE: A GR A R I A NI ND Y . C O M HOURS: TUE-SAT: 10 A.M.-5 P.M., SUN: 12-4 P.M. CLOSED MONDAY. TOUR DE COOPS: Agrarian’s grand opening falls, un-coincidentally, on the same day as Tour de Coops, Nap Town Chickens’ annual bike tour of northside henhouses. This year, the self-guided tour starts from Agrarian and runs from 1-5 p.m. Twelve show coops are included, plus two Project Poultry schools with coops (Project Poultry being Nap Town Chickens’ effort to put a coop in, or outside of, every school). Pre-sale tickets are $8 at naptownchickens.org; day-of tickets run $10. A portion of proceeds will fund the installation of a fully furnished and stocked coop at a local school.

scale urban farming. The trio plans to offer classes not only on chicken-keeping, but also on skills from lacto-fermentation to beekeeping to mushroom cultivation. In fact, education is a key part of the shop’s mission. With Animal Care and Control rescuing more fowl than ever before, starting flock owners off on solid footing can head off a lot of trauma. “There’s a wealth of knowledge and many have offered to come teach classes,” says Collins. “I think people are out of touch with where their food comes from and how things are made, and are wanting to know that skill. So they’re reinvestigating it and bringing back their roots.”

She’s assembled an enticing blend of items that fill that hunger for the nostalgic. Among the treasures are antique egg baskets that Grandma might have carried to the coop each morning as a girl. “I searched them all out by hand at flea markets because (when) I collect my eggs I like putting them in a vintage basket instead of a plastic one…It’s a connection to the old ways of doing things.” Harkening back to the old-timey as well, Stuckert plans to build mobile raised beds modeled after old pushcarts from Europe. In short, urbanites should be well-supported as they venture into a lifestyle that’s new to some, but a longtime necessity to others. As Brake points out, “Poor people have been doing it for a long time now. And now rich people are doing it…It’s become a hip thing to do.” From his perch behind the long counter, he chuckles, “I’ve never been as cool as I am right now.” „


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BY HOWARD HEWITT

INDIANA IS ON A ROLL For the second straight year an Indiana wine won top honors at the prestigious 22nd Annual Indy International Wine Competition held in early August at Purdue University. Huber’s Orchard, Winery and Vineyards took the honor for the competition’s top wine with its Vignoles. A year ago River City Winery won the prize also with Vignoles. “I think Vignoles really hits a consumer sweet spot,” Ted Huber said in explaining the second straight Vignoles win. “Consumers want nice fruit but more and more without the sweetness.” The wine comes in with a modest .73 percent residual sugar and a light 12 percent alcohol. The Vignoles is grown on the Huber 80-acre vineyard. Vignoles is a French hybrid grape that has been found to grow well in the Midwest. Characteristically, the wine is semi-dry with low sugar and tastes of pineapple, honey and melon. On my palate it was the honey and a maybe a Honeydew melon flavor that dominated the wine. Some wine drinkers not familiar with Vignoles might compare it to a Gewürztraminer. It has a bit of a floral characteristic on the nose but doesn’t overpower the wine. The wine can have an odd bananalike flavor that is, fortunately, missing from Huber’s wine. “It’s always very well-received in our tasting room,” Huber says. “People are bashful about trying a semi-dry wine but pleased once they do. The tropical fruit on the palate makes it approachable. There’s nothing else quite like it. It really holds its own.” Success is nothing new to Huber’s 80,000 case operation and tourist destination. “I think we’ve won something like 20 Governor’s Cups,” Huber said. The

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Indy International presents the Cup to the Hoosier winery with the most medals each year.th the most gold medals. They also won the Eagle Award for the Best Rose Wine, Huber’s Catawba Rose. Don’t dismiss the Indy International as just any competition. The organizers bill the competition as “the largest scientifically organized and independent wine competition in the United States”. Judges come from across the county and all wines are tasted blind. This year more than 2,500 wines were entered from 35 states and 15 countries. “It all starts with agriculture - growing top quality grapes lead to award winning wines,” Huber said. “Southern Indiana has proven this many times with our ability to produce world class wines.” Hubers won double gold, the highest honor before the top wines are chosen, for Vignoles, Starlight White, Chamourcin, and Raspberry wines. They won gold medals for six other wines, silver for nine wines. Several Michigan and Illinois wineries also took home medals. (See: indyinternational.org) Huber’s Vignoles ($14.99) represents a movement among several Indiana winemakers to reduce residual sugar while maintaining the fresh fruit qualities of their wines. The Vignoles is an outstanding summer sipper but would also be good with creamy cheeses or salty meats like prosciutto.

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COME YE METALHEADS

Indianapolis Metal Fest at Old National Centre Saturday B Y W A D E CO G G ES H A L L MU S I C @ N U V O . N E T

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he first incarnation of Rob Mason’s Indianapolis Metal Fest in 2007 was a hit. About 30 acts, including legends Obituary and Brazil’s Shadowside (playing their first U.S. show), crowded into Birdy’s and the Knights of Columbus building across the street. The following year, Indianapolis Metal Fest II, didn’t go quite as well. Bands such as Divine Heresy, Kittie and Sweden’s Mustasch (again, making their U.S. debut) were slated to play at the Madame Walker Theatre. But city officials got nervous, and Mason had to make a last-minute venue change. While the new location had adequate space, it didn’t have the proper occupancy license. The fire marshal shut the event down before everyone could perform. “I think I still have a little post-traumatic stress disorder from that night,” Mason says. Five years later, he’s got a better feeling about the outcome of Indianapolis Metal Fest III. Slated for Sept. 21, it will be housed in the cavernous confines of the Old National Centre, specifically in the basement venues Deluxe and Deco. Dan Kemer, vice president of music for Live Nation and talent buyer for Old National Centre, offered to host Mason’s event. “We’ve got a great building here,” he says while seated in ONC’s Grand Ballroom with Mason and Mason’s wife and promotion partner, Sarah. Before moving to Indy five years ago, Kemer organized metal festivals in Cleveland, where he lived previously, and promoted metal shows in Cincinnati. “It’s such a good market here for metal, but the outlets aren’t there,” he says. “It’s one of the most loyal fan bases if you take care of them. I just think in Indianapolis, there really hasn’t been the right situation for these fans.” Indeed, venues the size of Old National Centre rarely host artists like Incantation, Acheron and Funerus, who are some of the headliners for IMF III along with late additions Chimaira and The Browning. Such underground acts are usually relegated to 21-andolder venues, or they’ll play somewhere like a VFW hall that’s not used to hosting such entertainment. Sarah thinks local metal fans are starved for a combination like IMF III. “At a certain point you have a cap of where you can play or bring your family,” she says. “Under 21 shows here are almost nonexistent.” Mason says ticket response for IMF III has been strong so far. With dozens of bands scheduled to perform, the current plan is to have two stages. A third could be

• Wheel House Festival by Katherine Coplen and Hannah Switzer • Sigur Ros at Lawn by Katherine Coplen and Zac Steger

Rob Mason, recording an episode of Metal Fest on IMC

ANI DIFRANCO TALKS PETE SEEGER Songwriting legend Ani DiFranco, who plays Old National Centre this Thursday, was inspired by another songwriting legend Pete Seeger for the title of her new album Which Side Are You On? And the title track – with Ani-added inverted question mark – became known to DiFranco after she was asked to perform at a celebration for Seeger. Well, we’ll let her tell the story below– she’s much better at it. DiFranco’s new album is evenly split between deeply personal love songs (“Unworry,” “Zoo”) and strident political ones (“Amendment,” “Splinter”). It was released last January. “I discovered ‘Which Side Are You On’ because I got the call to play at Pete Seeger’s 90th birthday party, which was at Madison Square Garden and had a whole slew of – well, you can imagine everyone who played that night. And everyone who sang that night was everyone in the room, a la Pete. It was a really special gathering, and a benefit for Clearwater, the organization he helped start to clean up the Hudson River and continues to support. “We were all playing songs that night that Pete had either penned or put out there in the world and put to work. So, I got the job of playing, ‘There’s a Hole in the Bucket’, with Kris Kristofferson, which was very funny scenario. ‘Well, fix it, dear Liza,’ [she sings, mimicking Kristofferson]. And I played ‘Which Side Are You On,’ with Bruce Coburn. So I went and looked up Pete’s recorded version from 1950s and I researched the song, which was written by Florence Reece for a mining strike. So I endeavored to learn it for that occasion. And I couldn’t help but kind of tinker with it. I was practicing it in dressing rooms on tour leading up to that night, and I just had the will to contemporize the lyrics. “So, by the time I was done, I sort of made it my own. It became a cornerstone of my shows and I decided to record it. So, the first thing I did was call Pete back and say, ‘Hey, I’m making a recording of my version of this song. Will you play on it?’ And he did. So it all came full circle, and has everything to do with Pete Seeger.”

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— KATHERINE COPLEN Ani DiFranco with Ari Hest Thursday, Sept. 19, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St. 7:30 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

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PHOTO BY SARAH MASON

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INDIANAPOLIS METAL FEST III

WHEN: SATURDAY, SEPT. 21, NOON, W H E R E : OLD NATIONAL CENTRE, 502 N. JERSEY ST., INDIANAPOLIS T I C K E T S : $35 A D V A N C E O R $ 4 0 A T D O O R

added upstairs in the Grand Ballroom if demand exceeds expectations. “We’ve got the space,” Kemer says. “It’s just a function of the number of people coming.” Given the proliferation of musical styles emanating from metal in recent generations, Mason says the IMF bill won’t be a litany of monolithic music. “The coolest thing is there’s a little something for everybody,” he says. “I think we’ve got something from just about every subgenre of metal going, out of 43 bands.” He’s also excited about the number of area acts playing at the festival, including Devil To Pay and Eyes On Fire. Mason’s band Betrayed With A Kiss, in which he plays guitar, was originally scheduled to play, but was recently removed from the lineup. “Locals don’t get g a chance to play p y here much,” Mason says of Old National Centre. “Dan agreeing to let that happen was a huge thing. Not to mention, the nationals coming

in gives our local guys an opportunity to play for fans they otherwise wouldn’t.” A similar opportunity for Mason’s previous band, Thundercore (a name he takes no ownership of), is what got him into the promotion side. They got to open for Soilwork at an arena show in Milwaukee. “I fell in love with the whole atmosphere,” Mason says. “It was like a family reunion for metal heads.” After that he sought out a local promoter who agreed to mentor him. Mason’s been involved in that side of the business for over a decade now. He also produced and hosted the TV show Metal Fest on Indy’s Music Channel from 2008 until the beginning of this year. At least six months of planning have already gone into IMF III. “As soon as this one’s over, this is the next one I’ll be working on for a year,” Mason says. Kemer shares his optimism. In fact he sees no reason why Indianapolis Metal Fest couldn’t take over all of Old National Centre in the future. “I can picture having headlining acts in the theater,” Kemer says. “But right now we’ve got a great footprint downstairs. I think it’s important that it’s all under one roof.” „


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TRAVERSING JAZZ FEST VARIOUS LOCATIONS, SEPT. 12 – 16

WEDNESDAY 9PM FINER-DELL ZELL-JET W. LEE THURSDAYS 10PM MIDWEST RHYTHM EXCHANGE FRIDAY 10PM REVENGE W/ DJ EVILTWIN, BAD FAERIE AND SPECIAL GUEST DJ GIR SATURDAY 9PM CUT CAMP & MONSTER ENERGY DRINK PRESENTS WEE MAN (FROM JACK ASS) TUESDAY 7PM SHINE IN THE VLLAGE PRESENTS ... TIM SPAINHOWER 10PM OPEN STAGE WITH KOLO BELL

HAVE YOU EVER EXPERIENCED HEARTBURN, ALLERGIES, MIGRAINES OR ARTHRITIS? THE CONCENTRICS CENTER FOR RESEARCH IS CURRENTLY LOOKING FOR ADULTS WHO HAVE EVER EXPERIENCED ANY OF THESE CONDITIONS TO PARTICIPATE IN A RESEARCH STUDY.

Plan a leisurely visit with Mark Sheldon’s jazz photographs at Schrott Center for the Arts Gallery at Butler, through Oct. 31. Sheldon approaches portraiture with the ear of Matisse, who stripped his canvases of “excessive noise,” concentrating on essential elements to engage viewers with the subject’s special-ness. Sheldon’s photographs contextualize each player in the moment; no room for squares undulates with the sound of jazz in its myriad forms. Composer/pianist/vocalist/raconteur Allen Toussaint imbued Jazz Fest’s opening program on Sept. 12 with New Orleans’ eclectic energy. Dapper in a toucan-hued silk jacket and two-tone pants, Toussaint with his effervescent combo — Toussaint on piano; Renard Poche’ on guitar, trombone and other assorted instruments; Roland Guerin on bass; and Herman LeBeaux on drums — traversed his oeuvre of rhythm and blues. He moved between finesse and funky, his fingers dancing on the keyboard, his sonorous vocals floating throughout Schrott Theatre’s intimacy. While weathering Hurricane Katrina necessitated a performance style change with a temporary move to New York City, he remains centered in his endearing humanity. Toussaint is a superb storyteller who takes us on meandering journeys with musical sights and sounds, lyrics reflecting emotions, themes delving into souls or skirting issues. After a slow opening number he jumped into a frolicking “Whatever Happened to Rock and Roll.” Admitting, “I don’t know anything about working in a coal mine,” his rendition of the song that has become an anthem deftly illustrates his sense of internalizing something foreign to him. The ride from Chicago to New Orleans on the Illinois Central line City of New Orleans brought us into the action with a sing-along, followed by sharing a bag of Mardi Gras goodies, followed by a full-set encore. “I can’t leave without a thank you,” he said. “We’ve never been here before but we’d like to come back.” “And we’d like you to come back,” came a voice from the audience. He smiled and drifted off, on his way to make a lot of fans happy with photo-ops. John and Jill Rothwell, who made their first trip to Butler from La Fountaine, stopped to show me their digital treasure. On Sept. 13, WFYI brought Hugh Laurie: Let Them Talk – A Celebration of New Orleans Blues to my living room. Described as “Laurie’s personal journey into the heart and soul of the mixture of blues and jazz that grew out of New Orleans at the beginning of the last century,” the documentary features him at the piano with guests Toussaint, Irma Thomas and Tom Jones. In Schrott’s lobby prior to Toussaint’s program, bassist Mike Fox and keyboardist Clay Wulbrecht brought their understated interpretations to standard jazz charts. Fox, an IUPUI freshman, and Wulbrecht, a senior at

PHOTO BY MARK SHELDON

Diane Schuur performance at The Cabaret for Indy Jazz Fest Lafayette’s Jefferson High School, met at an Indy Jazz Fest Education Program and, feeling a kinship, teamed up. They have appeared at Indy Reads Books First Fridays events, among others, set up by Rob Dixon, director of the Jazz Fest Education Program. “These students represent what Indy Jazz Fest does all year ‘round to keep jazz alive in schools,” summarized Dixon. Jazz singer/pianist/songwriter/arranger Diane Schuur thrilled the 9:30 p.m. Cabaret at the Columbia Club audience after leading a two-hour master class earlier in the day at the Schrott Center and performing at a 7 p.m. Cabaret program. With Pat Mallenger on saxophone and clarinet, George Fludas on drums, and Jake Vinsel on acoustic and electric bass, Schuur wove playful whimsy and soulful longing around a program of love songs. Within this radiant context, the ambiance between the four generated the kind of warmth you get from a Maurice Sendak book — under it all there’s an adoring respect for the gift of a distinctive voice in all its manifestations. Described as Schuur’s No.1 fans, attorney Don Foley and his wife, Susan, sponsored Schuur’s appearance. They met for the first time on Sept. 13. — RITA KOHN

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can’t think of a contemporary band that could convincingly carry on after losing three of its most talented members. But legendary Cuban supergroup Buena Vista Social Club have done exactly that and seem to be doing so with ease. The prodigious skills and larger-than-life personalities of Compay Segundo, Ibrahim Ferrer and Rubén González helped to define Buena Vista Social Club’s image and sound. After the trio’s passing in the mid-2000s the group called on its deep reserves of talent and reformed as a touring unit under the name Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club. The current 15-member lineup features four important artists from the original Buena Vista roster. Omara Portuonda is known as the grand old lady of Cuban music. While her early recordings made her a star in Cuba, her participation in the the Buena Vista Social Club project brought her to international attention and established her reputation as one of Cuba’s greatest musical ambassadors. Manuel “Guajiro” Mirabal’s distinctive musicianship have earned him the title as “the trumpet of Cuba.” Throughout the '40s and '50s Mirabal played in many of Cuba’s most popular bands, but didn’t make his solo recording debut until 2004 at age 71. The selftitled album is a brilliant tribute to Cuban music icon Arsenio Rodriguez. Eliades Ochoa is a master of the Cuban son style of music and a distinctive presence in the band with his trademark cowboy hat and unique harmonic guitar, a tres with added D and G strings. And then, there’s Barbarito Torres, a master of the laúd, a Cuban variation on the traditional Spanish lute. I recently had the opportunity to speak with Torres in advance of Orquesta Buena Vista Social Club’s upcoming Indianapolis appearance. “I began to play the laúd at 10 years old,” he said. “My first contact with the laúd was through the music of the local campesinos or farmers. The laúd is traditionally the leading instrument in guajiro music, which is the music of the Cuban countryside.” Torres quickly mastered the instrument and began playing professionally at an early age. “I started my career in my hometown Matanzas,” he said. “I joined my first group Serenata Yumunina in 1970. I was 14 years old. We became known for our music broadcasts on the local station Radio 26.” While still a teenager Torres moved on to lead his own ensemble. “After Serenata Yumunina, I started my own group Cuarteto Tradicional Matancero and I became the band’s musical director.” After a brief interruption, Torres would soon make a move to Havana and join the ranks of the country’s most prestigious musicians. “In 1973, I went off to serve in the armed forces,” Torres said. “But I continued to play in Latin American music groups during that time. After my release from the army, I eventually traveled to Havana and began playing campesina music there. I was playing on television and recording with many groups. Eventually I had an opportunity to join Grupo Manguaré, which is one of the

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

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most renowned music groups in Cuba. They formed in 1971, and they still continue to play. They’ve been recording campesina music for a long time and they were one of the first groups to establish the popularity of campesina and guajira music.” While in Havana Torres’ musical virtuosity continued to open up big opportunities for him. He spent several years in the band of campesina music icon Celina González and became a member of Cuban supergroup The Afro Cuban All Stars. These musical experiences eventually led Torres to what would become the defining moment in his music career. “I started with Buena Vista in 1996,” Torres said. “The band was multi-generational and it gave me an opportunity to meet and record with important musicians who were much older than me, like Compay Segundo, Rubén González, Ibrahim Ferrer and Cachao. I was one of the youngest members of the group at that time.” The project exceeded Torres’ wildest expectations and gave him a chance to develop his solo career on the global stage. “The album became a worldwide success, and the documentary film added to our popularity,” Torres said. “The success of Buena Vista gave me an opportunity to have my first international solo release Havana Cafe in 1999 and the follow-up Barbarito Torres in 2003.” „ Thanks to Artur Silva for his help translating this interview. >> Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net


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JAZZ Ravi Coltrane The second son of John and Alice Coltrane, Ravi Coltrane, is coming to The Jazz Kitchen as part of the Indy Jazz Fest to bring a little traditional jazz history with him, as well as a little improvisation on those traditions. His style seamlessly combines nods to the past with fresh improvisational elements, like a quartet that plays as two pairs of instruments which function, musically, as a duet —”each duo with a reciprocal agenda regarding pulse and tempo.” The Jazz Kitchen, 5377 N. College Ave., 7 & 9:30 p.m., $32, 21+ ELECTRONIC Starfucker This four-piece from Oregon is already on their sixth album and they’re ready to rock Bloomington. Originally, the band was intended to be a solo project for Josh Hodges, but eventually grew and toured enough to necessitate a permanent lineup, picking up Strength’s Patrick Morris most recently. This band is the perfect music for when you want to dance, but the kind that’s a gentle, back-and-forth sway to groovy tunes (in the vein of MGMT and The Morning Benders). The Bluebird, 216 N. Walnut St., Bloomington, 8 p.m., $15, 21+

THURSDAY LOCAL LABELS Black Mass The creepiest creeps in Central Indiana are also the most secretive: nobody knows exactly who runs non-profit microlabel Auris Apothecary. The founder chose the name Dante Augustus

Scarlatti — the name under which he also performs symphonic harsh noise music. He’ll be joined at this label event by Locrian (Chicago drone noise) and Torturess (Bloomington bass masters). The Bishop, 123 S. Walnut St., Bloomington, 9 p.m., $7, 21+ ROCK Ani DiFranco with Ari Hest Ani DiFranco is a legend in live acoustic performance, since her first album release way back in 1990. Her finger-picking style is extremely physical and immensely moving, for those not already aware of DiFranco’s storied performance style. Hest has been touring the U.S. for many years, bringing his similar style and flavor of percussive picking. Together, the pair sounds like the perfect show for those who like their acoustic rock a little bit edgier. Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 7:30 p.m., $40, 21+ My Yellow Rickshaw, Rathskeller Biergarten, 21+ Open Mic Night, Chef Joseph’s, all-ages Jeff Coffin, all-ages Jesse Ruben, Caitlin Crosby, DO317 Lounge, 21+

FRIDAY EXPERIMENTAL Big Robot, Shannon Lee Hayden Expanding the realms of imagination, Indianapolis’ Big Robot offer up a live music experience unlike any other, interweaving aesthetic expression with cuttingedge computer interactivity At this performance, the trio will be celebrating the release of their debut multimedia album, which has been four years in the making according to

Scott Deal, percussionist/programming in the group. Cellist/composer Shannon Lee Hayden will also open the evening with a set of her own original electroacoustic music. By combining audio/video, acoustic music and electronics, the group creates art/music that explores the cross points of virtual and physical gesture, sound, and space. With all three members of the group being apart of IUPUI’s Music Technology Department, the trio discovered chemistry through their similar interests, “listening to music late into the night and talking about it,” according to Deal. At the Irving Theater, the trio will perform their debut DVD in its entirety, alongside their older established repertoire of songs, according to Deal. Throughout their performance, interactivity of various kinds will be utilized. Although interactive technology provides the group with a world of possibilities, Deal also explained that Big Robot’s live lineup, featuring a percussionist, a multi-instrumentalist, and a laptop performer, can sometimes be limiting, forcing the trio to be imaginative. “We do all kinds of things. This concert, there’s one piece where the only thing I play is the bicycle wheel.” Deal said. With their debut DVD, Deal explained how the group pursued their inner creativity, following where the music was taking them and being “relentless” in that. Nevertheless, he expressed the group’s overall intent to make their art/music accessible to all audiences. “It’s one thing for it to be intellectually stimulating for scholars, but it’s another thing to shoot for making something really fascinating for people who are not in that world,” Deal said. Deal’s musical background is expansive, having appeared at venues, festivals and conferences in North America and Europe. Having premiered dozens of solo, chamber and mixed media works, his passion for new and emerging artistic technologies is evident through his founding of the Telematic Collective, an Internet performance group comprised of artists and computer specialists that has performed in numerous capacities. At IUPUI, Deal explores and then


early, [and] aren’t up during the day. So it’s a lot of late night phone calls, texts, booking, venue talking, and stuff like that. It’s been a rough two and a half years, but it’s been completely worth it.”

SOUNDCHECK facilitates emerging modes of musical expression through technology. For example, much of his work over the summer dealt with machine learning in a music performance context. Despite his expertise in music technology and artistic interactivity, Deal and his Big Robot cohorts are still just musicians at heart. “That’s what we are — musicians,” he said. “We just are really fascinated by the artistic territory that computers allow us to go to.”

— JOEY MEGAN HARRIS Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St., 8 p.m., $8, 21+

— SETH JOHNSON Irving Theater, 5505 E. Washington St., 8 p.m., $5, all-ages PHOTO BY KRISTEN PUGH

METAL Indianapolis Metal Fest Kickoff Show Kick off Indianapolis Metal Fest (happening the next day at Old National Centre) with a free show featuring tons of local and regional acts. The Burned Earth is headlining, along with 12 other groups of varying degrees and genres of metal. Can’t afford the ticket to the next day’s fest? Come along to this one – it’s absolutely free. Rock House Cafe, 3940 S. Keystone Ave., 4 p.m., FREE, 21+ ENDINGS The Final Lazy Hawk Show Who will take one of Indiana’s most-beloved grassroots promo company’s place when Lazy Hawk puts on their swan show this Friday? “What we’re doing is we’ve spent the

Veseria last two years building a name for ourselves, building a trust with bands, putting on good shows and getting weird,” Will Schlosser, also known as Lazy Hawk, laughs “We just think we’re at a level where we don’t need to book Lazy Hawk shows anymore. We just want to push the bands that we really care about and love and book shows that we really love. It doesn’t necessarily have to be a Lazy Hawk show to do that.” He’s calling the show promotion side of his biz quits with a final show this week at Radio Radio, featuring Veseria, Phoenix on the Fault Line, Midwest State of Mind and Model Stranger. Schlosser’s got a lot of help behind the scenes from his wife, Bebe. And they’re consummate professionals; you may be a bit surprised that the husband and wife duo haven’t spent their whole lives booking shows and handling bands. But their catalyst

to begin booking started somewhat recently. “Bonnaroo 2010 kind of changed things for me and my wife musically,” said Schlosser. “We wanted to be more involved, so when we got back we were like, ‘Let’s do something with what we’ve got going on here locally. Our first show was in 2010. It started with meeting the right people and getting in touch with really good music here locally.” Then, the Schlossers branched out. “And then, we’d go to Chicago and we’d meet bands. We met Model Stranger. They got us in touch with other bands, [including] Bullet Called Life, Blue Eyed Jesus, and other Chicago bands. It just made sense to bring them to Indy to markets where they hadn’t been. And, hopefully soon be getting Indy bands up to Chicago to markets where they haven’t been,” Schlosser said, “It’s not really easy; it’s a lot of two or three hours of sleep per night. Musicians don’t typically get up

HIP-HOP Wale Born as Olubowale Victor Akintimehin and raised in the United States by his Nigerian parents, rapper Wale first tried his hand at a music career in the late 2000s, recording his first song “Rhyme of the Century” and signing a deal with a label in 2006. After one of his songs, “Dig Dug (Shake It),” became the most requested song by a local artist in D.C. radio history, Wale’s name started to spread around the DJ scene and before he knew it, he was signing a deal with Ronson’s Allido Records and Interscope. Since then, he’s parted ways with Interscope and signed with Rick Ross’ Maybach Music Group and Jay-Z’s Roc Nation. Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 9 p.m., $25, 21+ ROCK Woomblies Rock Orchestra This is the way to get a taste of all of those soaring rock ballads, without having to stop eating your schnitzel and drinking your beer. The Woomblies Rock Orchestra is true to the name, with string players and other multi-instrumentalists filling out the lineup to create a rich, layered effect.

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The Woomblies have an impressive repertoire of covers, so there is a high likelihood of your hearing something that makes you stand up and raise those horns with a hearty, drunken “Woooo!” The Biergarten at the Rathskellar, 401 E. Michigan St., 7 p.m., $5, 21+

METAL Metal Fest III Turn to page 26 to read our interview with Metal Fest founder Rob Mason, who is bringing more than 40 metal bands to Old National Centre this Saturday. Deluxe, Deco at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., noon, $35 advance, $30 at door, all-ages

JAZZ FEST Indy Jazz Fest Block Party This is the big one, finishing up the Indy Jazz Fest 2013. Eleven bands from the festival have joined forces to present a snapshot of Indianapolis jazz and raise money for Indianapolis Jazz Foundation’s Jazz Education programs. There will be a little bit of every kind of jazz represented, so come out to say goodbye to the festival until it rolls through next year. Food and drink stations will be available, however, seating is limited. Jazz Kitchen, 5377 N. College Ave. 3:30 p.m., $17, all-ages FEST Ferdinand Folk Festival Who doesn’t love freebees? Especially when it’s a folk festival, tying in local and nationally recognized artists like the Dirty Guv’nahs, and that celebrates the arts and environment. You don’t need to go bargain-hunting to find family fun. Ferdinand Folk Festival, 2065 Main St., Ferdinand, IN., FREE, all-ages Raise the Roof Blues Party, H.J.Hicks Centre for the Arts, Greenfield, all-ages We Are Forever, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Joe Crookston, Indy Folk Series, all-ages Lloyd Dobler Effect, Rathskeller Biergarten, 21+ Yvonne Alu, Chef Joseph’s, all-ages Crème de les Femmes and the Bearded Lucys Present Live from Indianapolis: A Burlesque Tribute to SNL, Indy’s Jukebox, 21+ The Drexels, Melody Inn, 21+ The Shilohs, The Tontons, DO317 Lounge, 21+ N NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK

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BEYOND INDY CHICAGO Airborne Toxic Event, Vic Theater, Sept. 18 Wax Tailor, Metro, Sept. 18 Citizen Cope, House of Blues, Sept. 19 Melissa Ferrick, SPACE (Evanston), Sept 19 Rakim, The Shrine, Sept. 19 Common, House of Blues, Sept. 20 Eagles, United Center, Sept. 20 Earth, Wind, and Fire, Chicago Theatre, Sept. 20 Kud Cudi, Logic, Tyler, The Creator, Sept. 20 Chicago World Music Festival, various venues, Sept. 21 J. Cole, Arie Crown Theater, Sept. 21 The Wiggles, Rosemont Theatre, Sept. 21 Scout Niblett, The Hideout, Sept. 21 Immortal Technique, Metro, Sept. 22 Arctic Monkeys, Riviera Theatre, Sept. 23 Clap Your Hands Say Yeah, Lincoln Hall, Sept. 24

LOUISVILLE Mayer Hawthorne, Headliners, Sept. 19 Sol Cat, Zanzabar, Sept. 25 Cropped Out Festival, American Turners, Sept. 27 Gov’t Mule, Brown Theatre, Sept. 27 Aaron Carter, Headliners, Sept. 28 Vince Gill, Whitney Hall, Sept. 29

CINCINNATI Band of Heathens, Southgate House, Sept. 19 Weezer, Horsehoe Cincinnati, Sept 20 Andrew W.K., Northside Tavern, Sept. 21 Billy Joe Shaver, Sanctuary (Newport), Sept. 21 Titus Andronicus, Revival Room, Sept. 24


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REAL ESTATE Homes for sale | Rentals Mortgage Services | Roommates To advertise in Real Estate, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

RENTALS DOWNTOWN LOVE DOWNTOWN? Roomy 1920’s Studio near IUPUI & Canal. Dining area with builtins, huge W/I closet. Heat paid. Shows Nicely! Large! Views! Brand New Carpet! $465/month ($450 for smaller unit available too). Won’t last long! Leave message 722-7115.

RENTALS NORTH BROAD RIPPLE 5149 N. College. 3bdrm, 1ba. Bsmt, AC, Appliances, . hrwd flrs. $825/mo + Dep. 803-7367188 317-937-6858

COMMERCIAL RENTALS

Call 317-716-5529

THE GRANVILLE & THE WINDEMERE 1BR & 2BR/1BA Apartments in the heart of BR Village. Great Dining, Entertainment & Shopping at your doorstep. On-site laundries & free storage. RENTS RANGE FROM $575-$625

WTR-SWR & HEAT PAID.

Salon Booth Space Available Castleton. Private or shared. New equipment. 6520 E. 82nd Street. Call 317-577-4995 x106.

or email Benjamin at benjamin@1mastermovers.com

THE MAPLE COURT Large 2BR RENTS RANGE FROM $650-$700 TENANT PAYS UTILITIES.

SALES/MARKETING

CALL

Now Hiring! Studio Movie Grill is looking for experienceD HIGH VOLUME SERVERS. Open interviews daily from 8am - 8pm at our new 86th Street location.

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* CRIMINAL BACKGROUND CHECK REQUIRED

QUALIFIED CANDIDATES MUST HAVE:

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• Excellent Communication Skills • Bonus Incentives • GED or High School Diploma • Friendly Work Environment • Neat Appearance • Management Positions Available • Positive Attitude Call James for interview between 9am-5pm 317-351-4238

GENERAL

DRIVERS

Tired of corporate greed & social injustice? Get paid to fight back!

Looking for experienced CDL class A company drivers and owner operators to haul dry freights over all 48 states. REQUIREMENTS: • Must Have a Class A CDL with

clean record. • Must be at least 23 Years of Age • Must Have 2 Year of OTR Experience FOR DRIVERS: We provide good and clean trucks, brand

Studio Movie Grill | College Park 3535 W. 86th Street Indianapolis, IN 46268

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benefits & advancement opportunities

PLEASE CONTACT US BY PHONE @ 317-408-3211 OR APPLY ONLINE @ WWW.HKTRANSPORTINC.COM

studiomoviegrill.com

38 CLASSIFIEDS // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

Citizens Action Coalition is hiring Full Time Community Organizers:

Call (317) 205-3535 to schedule an interview

new 2013 trailers, every 15 days pay, direct deposit FOR OWN/OP: Brand new 2013 trailers, every 15 days pay, direct deposit and up to 30¢ per gal fuel discount.


ISLAND WAVE MASSAGE Swedish or Deep Tissue Massage. Corporate Massage Available. State Certified, Male Therapist R U STRESSED? Breaking your back at work or Call Rex 765-481-9192 gym? Jack tackles it! Light or Relax the Body, Calm the Mind, Certified Massage Therapists deep sports massage. Aft/Eve. Renew the Spirit. Jack, 645-5020. WILL TRAVEL Yoga | Chiropractors | Counseling Theraeutic massage by certified therapist with over 9 years To advertise in Body/Mind/Spirit, CERTIFIED experience. IN/OUT calls Call Marta @ 808-4615 available. Near southside MASSAGE location. Call Bill 317-374-8507 Advertisers running in the CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY section THERAPISTS www.indymassage4u.com have graduated from a massage therapy school associated with one EMPEROR MASSAGE PRO MASSAGE of four organizations: Stimulus Rates InCall $38/60min, Top Quality, Swedish, Deep $60/95min (applys to 1st visit Tissue Massage in Quiet Home International Massage American Massage Therapy only). Call for details to discover Studio. Near Downtown. From Association (imagroup.com) Association (amtamassage.org) and experience this incredible Certified Therapist. Japanese massage. Paul 317-362-5333 Northside, avail. 24/7 International Myomassethics Association of Bodywork MASSAGE IN WESTFIELD 317-431-5105 By Licensed Therapist. $40/hr. Federation (888-IMF-4454) and Massage Professionals GOT PAIN OR STRESS? Call Mike 317-867-5098 (abmp.com) Rapid and dramatic results from a highly trained, caring professional Additionally, one can not be a member of these four organizations with 14 years experience. but instead, take the test AND/OR have passed the National Board of www.connective-therapy.com: Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork exam (ncbtmb.com). Chad A. Wright, ACBT, COTA, CBCT 317-372-9176

BODY/MIND/SPIRIT

MARKETPLACE

PAYING $325 And Up For Complete Cars! FREE TOWING! Call Us Direct Today At 317-662-2527

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Delivery Food From Your Favorite Broad Ripple Restaurant! Don’t just settle for a bad pizza or a bland sandwich! Total-Takeout. CASH FOR CARS com is now “Delivering Dining Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Diversity” from 14 fantastic, Top Dollar Paid. We Come To delicious Broad Ripple You! Call For Instant Offer: restaurants to your home or 1-888-420-3808 business near Indy’s North Side www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) & surrounding areas. Go to TotalTakeout.com and place your CASH FOR CARS order online, or call 514-3176! We buy cars, trucks, vans, runable or not or wrecked. Open 24/7. 317-709-1715. FREE HAUL AWAY ON JUNK CARS.

LEGAL SERVICES LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, an experienced Traffic Law Attorney,I can help you with: Hardship Licenses-No Insurance SuspensionsHabitual Traffic Violators-Relief from Lifetime SuspensionsDUI-Driving While Suspended & All Moving Traffic Violations! Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law FREE CONSULTATIONS www.indytrafficattorney.com 317-686-7219

ADOPTION PREGNANT? ADOPTION CAN BE YOUR FRESH START! Let Amanda, Carol or Brandy meet you for lunch and talk about your options. Their Broad Ripple agency offers free support, living expenses and a friendly voice 24 hrs/day. YOU choose the family from happy, carefully-screened couples. Pictures, letters, visits & open adoptions available. Listen to our birth mothers’ stories at www.adoptionsupportcenter.com 317-255-5916 The Adoption Support Center

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY © 2013 BY ROB BRESZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “If Taylor Swift is going to have six breakups a year,” observed comedian Bill Maher, “she needs to write a new song entitled ‘Maybe It’s Me.’” He was referring to Swift’s habit of using her romantic misadventures to stimulate her lyric-writing creativity. With that as your prompt, Aries, I’ll ask you to do some soul-searching about your own intimacy issues. How have you contributed to the problems you’ve had in getting the love and care you want? What unconscious behavior or conditioned responses have undermined your romantic satisfaction, and what could you do to transform them? The next eight weeks will be prime time to revolutionize your approach to relationships. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Philosopher Alan Watts used to talk about how the whole world is wiggling all the time. Clouds, trees, sky, water, human beings: Everything’s constantly shimmying and jiggling and waggling. One of our problems, Watts said, is that we’re “always trying to straighten things out.” We feel nagging urges to deny or cover up or eliminate the wiggling. “Be orderly,” we command reality. “Be neat and composed and predictable.” But reality never obeys. It’s forever doing what it does best: flickering and fluctuating and flowing. In accordance with astrological omens, Taurus, I encourage you to rebel against any natural tendencies you might have to fight the eternal wiggle. Instead, celebrate it. Rejoice in it. Align yourself with it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Author Elaine Scarry defines “the basic impulse underlying education” as follows: the “willingness to continually revise one’s own location in order to place oneself in the path of beauty.” Consider making this your modus operandi in the coming weeks, Gemini. Always be on the lookout for signs that beauty is near. Do research to find out where beauty might be hiding and where beauty is ripening. Learn all you can about what kinds of conditions attract beauty, and then create those conditions. Finally, hang around people who are often surrounded by beauty. This approach will be an excellent way to further your education. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Life is either always a tightrope or a feather bed. Give me the tight-rope.” So declared writer Edith Wharton. But she was an Aquarius, and more temperamentally suited to the tight-rope. Many of you Cancerians, on the other hand, prefer to emphasize the feather-bed mode. I suspect that in the next nine months, however, you will be willing and even eager to spend more time on the tight-rope than is customary for you. To get primed for the excitement, I suggest you revel in some intense feather-bed action in the coming weeks. Charge up your internal batteries with an extraspecial deluxe regimen of sweet self-care. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Half of a truth is better than no truth at all, right? Wrong! If you latch on to the partially accurate story, you may stop looking for the rest of the story. And then you’re liable to make a premature decision based on insufficient data. The better alternative is to reject the partially accurate story and be willing to wait around in the dark until the complete revelation comes. That may be uncomfortable for a while. But when the full truth finally straggles in, you will be very glad you didn’t jump to unripe conclusions. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A Chinese entrepreneur named Nin Nan dreamed up a unique way to generate capital: He sold dead mosquitoes online for a dollar apiece, advertising them as useful for scientific research and decoration. Within two days, he received 10,000 orders. Let’s make him your patron saint and role model for the next few weeks, Virgo. May he inspire you to come up with novel ways to stimulate your cash flow. The planetary omens suggest that your originality is more likely than usual to generate concrete rewards.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “The most important thing is to find out what the most important thing is,” wrote Shunryu Suzuki in his book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind. That’s your assignment for the next three weeks. Do whatever it takes to find out beyond any doubt what the most important thing is. Meditate naked an hour a day. Go on long walks in the wildest places you know. Convene intense conversations about yourself with the people who know you best. Create and sign a contract with yourself in which you vow to identify the experience you want more than any other experience on earth. No waffling allowed, Libra. What is the single most important thing? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sometime in the next nine months you may feel moved to embark on an adventure that will transform the way you understand reality. Maybe you will choose to make a pilgrimage to a sacred sanctuary or wander further away from your familiar comforts than you ever have before. Right now is an excellent time to brainstorm about the possibilities. If you don’t feel ready to actually begin your quest, at least formulate a master plan for the magic moment when you will be ripe. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In the indigenous culture of Hawaii, “mana” refers to a spiritual power that may abide in people, objects, and natural locations. You can acquire more of it by acting with integrity and excellence, but you might lose some of it if your actions are careless or unfocused. For instance, a healer who does a mediocre job of curing her patients could lose the mana that made her a healer in the first place. I believe that similar principles hold true for non-Hawaiians. All of us have an ever-shifting relationship with the primal life force. What’s the current state of your own personal supply, Sagittarius? It’s time to make sure you’re taking full advantage of the mana you have been blessed with. Your motto: “Use it or lose it.” CAPRICORN (Dec.22-Jan. 19): Have you been getting enough? I doubt it. I think you should sneak a peek into the hiding place where your insatiable cravings are stored. If you’re brave enough, also take a look at your impossible demands and your unruly obsessions and your suppressed miracles. Please note: I’m not suggesting that you immediately unleash them all; I don’t mean you should impulsively instigate an adventure that could possibly quench your ravenous yearnings. But I do believe you will benefit from becoming better acquainted with them. You could develop a more honest relationship, which would ultimately make them more trustworthy. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Don’t tape your thumbs to your hands and stalk around pretending to be a dinosaur. Don’t poke three holes in a large plastic garbage bag and wear it as a tunic while imagining that you are a feudal serf in a post-apocalyptic, sci-fi dystopia. Don’t use a felt-tip marker to draw corporate logos on your face to show everyone what brands of consumer goods you love. To be clear: I would love you to be extravagantly creative. I hope you will use your imagination in novel ways as you have fun playing with experimental scenarios. But please exercise a modicum of discernment as you wander way outside the box. Be at least 20 percent practical. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are magic,” says the poet Marty McConnell. That’s good advice, Pisces -- not just in regards to your intimate relationships, but about all your other alliances, too. If you’re seeking a friend or consultant or business partner or jogging companion or new pet, show a preference for those creatures who look at you like maybe you are magic. You always need to be appreciated for the sweet mystery and catalytic mojo you bring to your partnerships, but you especially need that acknowledgment now.

Homework: Unleash an outrageous boast about how you’re going to pull off a certain feat that you’ve previously lacked the chutzpah to attempt. Testify at Freewillastrology.com. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.18.13 - 09.25.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 39


LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, the original Indy Traffic Attorney, I can help you with: Hardship Licenses Probationary Licenses No Insurance Suspensions Habitual Traffic Violator Charges and Suspensions Lifetime Suspensions Uninsured Accident Suspensions Operating While Intoxicated Charges and Suspensions BMV Suspensions, Hearings, and Appeals Court Imposed Suspensions All Moving Traffic Violations and Suspensions

Free Consultations Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law www.indytrafficattorney.com

317-686-7219 CRIMINAL CONVICTION HOLDING YOU BACK? A new Indiana law allows the expungement of convictions for certain non-violent crimes, even some felonies. CALL TODAY TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY D. ALAN LADD ATTORNEY AT LAW 1-317-951-0087 1-888-951-0087 Over 30 years experience.

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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - September 18, 2013  

The new minivan? A Rocky Ripple family embraces the car-free life