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THISWEEK

Vol. 24 Issue 25 issue #1123

EDUCATION AS EMPOWERMENT NEWS PG. 06

COVER PAGE 10

Even roaming bands of armed rebels can’t dissuade Indy teacher Faustin N’tala’s educational activism in the Democratic Republic of Congo. By Rebecca Townsend

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New EDM festival Wheel House joins a fest-filled weekend including returning favorites Jazz Fest, Irish Fest and Sister Cities Festival.

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The Indianapolis Peace and Justice Center protested America’s growing interest in the upcoming Syrian conflict.

Coach Chuck Pagano reflects on defeating a nightmare; quarterback Andrew Luck appreciates the power of a solid sprint.

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BRINGING COMEDY TO INDY FOR 32 YEARS

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We received many passionate responses to last week’s cover story on the future of the Hoosier State line.

Indiana has to make choices

More happening behind the scenes in transit

Firstly, Megabus pays the same through fuel taxes as everyone else does. Indiana actually funds roads with a majority funds from sources than the gas tax and fees. Only 28% of the cost of building and maintaining Indiana roads comes from the gas tax and fees. Secondly, in 1941, the “James Whitcomb Riley” made the trip in 3 hours 3 minutes. With track upgrading to 110 mph and returning the train to its original route through Lebanon and Kankakee it would be a lot more attractive. Finally, the choice is up to Indiana. Illinois is upgrading the line between Chicago and St. Louis for 110 mph running and so is Michigan between Pontiac and Chicago. It doesn’t take rocket science to see that a Cincinnati/Louisville-Chicago fairly high speed service through Indiana would make travel a lot easier and more productive.

So, from 2000 to 2009 Indiana only spent $150,000 on rail “investment” while receiving $71,364,980 in federal funds, and now the republicans (who have known about this October 1st deadline for 5 years now) are complaining about spending $3,000,000? There are many good points in the article, but there are many forces at work behind the scenes attempting to stop funding. The automobile industry (and it’s many offshoots, such as gas and oil companies, tire companies, road construction companies, transportation companies, etc.) would like nothing better than to see all mass-transit eliminated, or done by a private company (that, like the other industries I mentioned, contribute heavily to politician’s “re-election campaigns”). I sure hope the state does the right thing & funds this. Eliminating Amtrak would be a huge mistake.

— Northside Joe

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VOICES ELECTRIC MOBILITY IN INDY THIS WEEK

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Car sharing and charging stations signal change

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ASHLEY KIMMEL EDITORS@NUVO.NET

know I have probably bored most of you Kimmel, a grad student at K with how geeked out I am on Indianapolis IIUPUI, has been blogging about public transit for NUVO a right now and the cool initiatives that are ssince early 2012. happening around the city that make me feel that way. But I have found yet another reason to really love what local Hoosiers are doing in order to improve the city. We all know I have harped on the transit The Hoosier Electric Vehicle Association also issue long enough, and when the “powboasts cleaner energy, less dependence on ers that be” said “no” to the transit bill foreign oil, local job creation and that electric and now another “no” to the sidewalk and vehicles are simply “fun to drive.” infrastructure bond issue, I, like many othThe car-sharing initiative also adds a ers, became disheartened to the point of new layer of public transportation to the frustration and decided to devote my time city’s makeup. The ability to rent a car and thoughts to other things. short-term will provide an extra option to About a day after the transit bill was put our residents while we sit and wait for the on hold (again), I bought a car. This came transit bill to finally pass and the city’s bus partially from the disheartened feeling system to improve. and partially because I took a new job in “One of the most exciting things about the “’burbs,” but, after two years of being car-free, I had to make the purchase. I looked into a strategic plan for car sharing and got on By next year, our city will have board with on demand rideshare services such as Uber 500 vehicles, with 1,200 charging and Lyft, but it just was not stations in 200 locations. going to work for me. While shopping for a car, my heart and mind went instantly to an electric vehithis is how it can impact residents without cle. Though personally an electric vehicle a car, who may HAVE to suddenly drive is not quite suitable for my lifestyle (I somewhere,” said Jane Cook, HEVA vice went with a hybrid), I long for the day president. “If you have to go a county that the technology and capability will away; if you have to take a disabled relative to takeover the driving scene and we can somewhere; if you must take a large object begin installing more charging stations, with you—these are the times when a bus expanding bus routes and developing in Indianapolis won’t do.” transportation alternatives instead. For an initiative of this caliber to be And it doesn’t look too far off. successful, it takes a lot of public awareWith the order that Mayor Greg Ballard ness and education. For this reason, signed in December, stating that the entire National Plug In Day was developed. municipal fleet become electric or plugNPID is a nationwide celebration, aimed in hybrid by 2025, Indianapolis received to heighten awareness of plug-in vehicles some much-needed national attention. and their benefits. The mayor’s support and the attention it This will be the third annual event, held gave us allowed Project Plug-IN, an elecon Sunday, Sept. 29. The local event will tric car-charging infrastructure deploybe at Clay Terrace Mall from 11 a.m.-2 ment initiative developed by the nonprofit p.m., behind Whole Foods. Electric vehicle Energy Systems Network, to begin making owners will have a chance to tailgate and Indianapolis one of the most electric vehithere will be information booths, speakers cle-friendly sites in the U.S. and display vehicles. Back in June, NUVO reported that aninAs Indianapolis falls behind other citternational development company, Bolloré ies in public transit development, it is my Group, chose to invest roughly $35 million hope that a city-wide electric car-sharing to launch the largest electric vehicle carprogram will not only give those without sharing program in the country. a car an option for travel, but will make Right here in Central Indiana. those residents who do have cars take a By next year, our city will have 500 second look at the need for car ownership. vehicles, with 1,200 charging stations in These initiatives, and the other car-sharing 200 locations. The charging stations will be and car-pooling programs like Uber and free to users, but the program will come at Lyft, are a solid effort on Indy’s part to take a minimal cost. some cars off the road. Driving with very little financial cost is Indianapolis, I anxiously applaud you. „ only part of the attraction of electric vehicles.

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WHAT HAPPENED? Welcome Archbishop Desmond Tutu One of the world’s most esteemed spiritual leaders will speak at Clowes Hall at 6 p.m. on Sept. 12. Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, 81, the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, returns to Indy after offering Butler University’s commencement speech in 2002. This trip involves another trip to Butler — to celebrate the new Desmond Tutu Chair of Peace, Global Justice, and Reconciliation Studies. The first occupant of the chair, a joint appointment through Butler and the Christian Theological Seminary, is Tutu’s old friend Allan Boesak, a South African theologian who stood on the frontlines of antiapartheid activism with Tutu. “Archbishop Tutu is coming not only to give his personal blessing to Dr. Boesak’s leadership, but also to inspire us all to carry forward the cause of reconciliation in our own lives and communities,” CTS President Matthew Myer Boulton said in an announcement of the event. Tickets are sold out, but opportunities for Indy to engage and benefit from reconciliation work are only beginning. Citizens v Citizens at Penrod A summary of citizen Robin Mitchell’s recent note to the news desk: My daughter, son-in-law and five children live in Indy by Kessler. On April 1, Citizens Energy/ United Water/ Suez Environmental back-flowed black water containing feces into my daughter’s home. Despite the company going on camera on Fox59 and admitting fault, they have yet to fix the problem and — to this day — my daughter cannot live in her home. To make matters worse her insurance company State Farm has cut off all help to her and she is living on her savings while her house remains un-livable. My oldest grandson Gabe is disabled and the three youngest toddlers that were 3, 2, and 1 at the time were premies with breathing problems. Mitchell aimed to rally interest and support at Penrod by organizing green-shirted demonstrators. Booze and bikes don’t mix Three unfortunate, untimely and booze-besot deaths Labor Day weekend serve to underscore deafness to an ongoing life-or-death issue among Indy’s drivers. Consider the latest statistical mash-up of state crash data by the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute: “In 2011, Indiana had 133 fatal crashes and 140 fatalities involving a vehicle driver legally impaired by alcohol (i.e., blood alcohol content at or above 0.08 g/dL). Twenty percent of fatal collisions involved a driver that was legally alcohol-impaired. The average economic cost of collisions involving an alcohol-impaired driver was $58,333. Collisions involving motorcycles increased 3.6 percent in 2011, while fatal collisions involving motorcycles increased 6.4 percent, from 110 in 2010 to 117.”

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EDUCATION AS EMPOWERMENT Indy teacher’s educational activism meant to undermine legacy of violence, corruption in the Democratic Republic of Congo

B Y REBECCA TO W N S EN D RT O W N S E N D @ N U V O . N E T

thing is OK until something happens.” This summer’s uprising in Lubumbashi, which relates to the desire of some members hen Faustin N’Tala, a French teacher of the Katanga Province to stop exporting and soccer coach at the International the profits of their area’s natural resources, School of Indiana, arrived on June 21 is a separate issue from the long-running in Lubumbashi — a city of 4 million peoclashes between the DRC military and variple, the second-largest in the Democratic ous rebel groups associated with neighborRepublic of Congo — he found the city on ing countries along the eastern border, high alert. including Rwanda and Uganda. Along the Armed secessionist rebels were threatening border, a United Nations peacekeeping force the city. Not a great time for tourists to visit, is engaged in helping the DRC and diplobut for N’Tala, the potential for chaos and mats are currently pursuing disarmament violence only served to underscore his deterof negative forces that include the M23 and mination to continue his grassroots work to the FDLR, a Hutu militia. The UN estimates empower the people of the DRC through the the fighting has displaced more than 100,000 people in the past year, “exacerbating an ongoing humaniEducation can get people of the Congo tarian crisis in the region which includes 2.6 million out of turmoil and economic crisis.” internally displaced people and 6.4 million in need of food — FAUSTIN N’TALA TEACHER and emergency aid.” The DR Congo’s populaAND WAZA ALLIANCE FOUNDER tion is almost 70 million. Its land mass is about 900,000 educational outreach and support activities of square miles — about the size of the his WAZA Alliance for Quality Education. continental U.S. east of the Mississippi. “You can’t visualize landing in a The people speak 250 languages, add in country where you are on high alert — regional dialects and that number exceeds machine guns everywhere,” N’Tala said 400. French is “the language of education,” in a recent interview. “It doesn’t take a N’Tala said. In urban areas, which are subhuge fire — it takes a spark. You hope ject to frequent and unpredictable power nobody is going to pull the trigger by outages, television provides some exposure accident because everybody else will to the language, but in rural areas do not think it’s the beginning of the game. have such access. “This is an environment where everyThe average age in the DRC is 16.

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“Two hundred-and-fifty-thousand teachers walk to school — and they are followed by close to 20 million students every day,” N’Tala said. “If we could train these 250,000 teachers to be good citizens , we can have an impact more than 20 million people and turn around the state of the nation.” Illiterate people are easier for political and military interests to control, he explained. “What I’m doing can be dangerous,” N’Tala said. “When people begin to think, that’s not a good thing.” N’Tala came to the U.S. in 1998 to study at the University of Indianapolis. When he finished his undergraduate degree in education he began teaching at the International School of Indiana. At that time, his country was entering into a conflict, sometimes called the African World War, which killed an estimated 6 million people as the troubled legacy of the Rwandan genocide spilled across the border and intermingled with local politics and business. For the safety of his family, N’Tala opted to stay in Indiana, but the desire to help improve conditions in his homeland led him in 2008 to found the WAZA Alliance. His mission: To improve S E E , E D U C A T I O N , O N P A G E 08

Prayers and encouragement for immigration reform On Sunday, more than 650 people of faith, including members of the Indianapolis Congregation Action Network members and the Catholic Archdiocese of Indianapolis, met with Congresswoman Susan Brooks to encourage to help House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, move immigration reform to a vote by October. A news release following the event included the following reflection from “aspiring American” Fabian Olan: “We appreciate the Congresswoman’s support of legalization and a pathway for DREAMers, but anything short of full citizenship would destroy families and create a second-class status that is contrary to Hoosier Values of family, freedom, and fairness.” — REBECCA TOWNSEND 6 NEWS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

COURTESY OF FAUSTIN N’TALA

An almost 90 year old pile of copper slag, a symbol of mining activities in the past century in the south of the D.R. Congo stands tall as an unforgettable sight in Lubumbashi.


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September 11: We Remember This issue hits the streets on the anniversary of the terror attacks and people will be marking the occasion in several ways. A wreath-laying ceremony, along with a donation-based luncheon to support the 9-11 Memorial and Project 9-11 will take place at the memorial from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Don Bacso of Dyer, Ind., who was working in the World Trade Center’s North Tower when the first plane struck, will keynote the event at 1:30 p.m. Wed., Sept. 11, 11 a.m.-2p.m. 9/11 Memorial, 421 W. Ohio St. Suicide Prevention: Out of Darkness Organizers expect more than 1,500 people to join the Out of the Darkness Community Walk. Part of a nationwide series of more than 300 walks this fall, the walk will raise funds for the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention’s local and national programming. Speakers include survivors sharing their stories and an overview of local suicide prevention programs. About 700,000 people each year require medical care for a suicide attempt and more than 38,000 deaths occur, according to the AFSP. “We know that the best way to prevent suicide is through the early recognition and treatment of the mental disorders that can contribute to suicide,” Robert Gebbia, AFSP executive director, said in a news release.” Unfortunately, stigma about disorders such as depression, bipolar illness, and alcohol and substance abuse, keeps people from getting the treatment they need. The Out of the Darkness Walk is about eliminating that stigma. It’s about bringing hope to those who have been affected by suicide.” Sat., Sept. 14, 1:30-4p.m., Celebration Plaza White River State Park Indy Talks Bikes and Walks Looking back to a time when half of all students walked or biked to school and the phrase obesity epidemic had yet to be coined, organizers with Health by Design, the Indiana Safe Routes to School Partnership, Indy Talks, the Marion County Prosecutor’s Office and the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department are hosting “Let’s Walk and Roll to School.” With handson demonstrations and an overview of programs to make neighborhoods better suited for kids in transit, the goal is to bump the percentage of walkers and rollers up from today’s 13 percent mark. Sat., Sept. 14, 10 a.m. - noon, IMPD North District, 3120 E. 30th St. FREE

THOUGHT BITE All it takes to make a good songwriter is a better memory than anyone else. (Maybe that applies to Thought Bite writers, too.) — ANDY JACOBS JR

N NUVO.NET/NEWS Lake County judge declares right-to-work law unconstitutional By Lesley Weidenbener Rockport clash moves to state Supreme Court By Megan Banta

VOICES • Raising Dad: The Final Chapter By Mark A. Lee • Considering the Syrian Crisis: Legacy of War By Gena Martinez • Empire is a drag By David Hoppe • The Mighty Mahern By Abdul-Hakim Shabazz

SLIDESHOW • Hoosiers Protest Government Support in Syrian Conflict By David Cerola 8 // NEWS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

COURTESY OF FAUSTIN N’TALA

ABOVE: N’Tala during the keynote speaking in Lubumbashi CENTER: Mendenhall and N’Tala buying food at a market. They bought everything in the picture, including “delicious” live termites. RIGHT: During a teacher workshop. N’Tala shows teachers how to use a record book to record students attendance and grades.

EDUCATION , FROM PAGE 06 the quality of life for the children of DRC by improving the quality of their education. His vision: That each child has access to a quality education in a school that has qualified teachers and plenty of resources. Teachers at elementary schools are often not qualified to do their jobs, N’Tala said, noting that most do not have more than a high school education. Those with advanced degrees work for private companies; the chemistry lab at the mining company pays “literally 1,000 times more” than teachers earn. “Our concern is that in the midst of all this, the big loser is the learner,” N’Tala said. “The learner is not getting basic fundamental skills they need in literacy, reading, writing and math. They do not get a competitive advantage when it comes to employment in the country — they cannot beat international candidates — even for jobs like welding, carpentry and masonry.” Teacher training is a major focus for WAZA. In 2008, its pilot project in teacher training hosted 71 teachers (organizers had planned for 50). This summer marked the sixth annual series of teacher trainings. The group reached 260 teachers in Lubumbashi, Kambove, Kolwezi and Kapolowe-Gare, a rural area about 100 miles away. Beyond discussing classroom protocols and the pitfalls of bribing students and their parents to supplement insufficient incomes, N’Tala pushes questions such as, “Why do we die so young?” The country’s life expectancy is 56 years — and the country has the world’s 12th highest

WAZA ALLIANCE For more information on the WAZA Alliance, visit waza-alliance.org, facebook.com/WazaAlliance and follow @ WazaAlliance on Twitter. For a slideshow and video of WAZA activities, visit NUVO.net. infant mortality rate. N’Tala’s father died at 59, his mother at 48. He hopes that as teachers begin to learn home economics, family planning and volunteerism, they can begin to effect positive change in their communities — and for the country overall. More than 1,000 teachers have taken WAZA training. “If 10 percent understand the value – that education is the greatest investment for new generation of Congolese, then I’ll say it is successful,” N’Tala said. “You don’t have to be president of the republic or a minister — you just have to be where you are in your classroom and you can spark a new generation of leaders right there.” In addition, WAZA raises money to support students through their primary education. For each $300 raised, the group can pay for a year’s tuition and all necessary books and supplies. A family of six, on average lives on about $360 a year, so the $25 monthly tuition often leads to debt-fueled drop-outs, N’Tala said. WAZA identifies students facing such circumstances, pays their debt and allows them to continue their studies.

WAZA is now sponsoring 28 students, 15 in rural areas and 13 in the city. The first group, which began as 8-year-old second and third graders, is now in secondary school at age 13. This summer’s visit also included a vision-screening component thanks to the leadership of Gordon Mendenhall, a retired University of Indianapolis professor, and two volunteer medical doctors from the DRC. The group screened 437 students and teachers over four days. A quarter of those tested need — and received — glasses. Other ongoing WAZA initiatives include administrator training and improving access to and production of children’s literature. “Democracy might not survive because of the local education of the community as a whole,” N’Tala said. “Education can get people of the Congo out of turmoil and economic crisis – it’s used as a tool for survival.” „ Editor’s note: In the interest of full disclosure, the reporter must acknowledge that she is friends with N’Tala and frequently coaches soccer with and against him.


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EDM IN THE Paul Oakenfold, Wolfgang Gartner P take stage in Broad Ripple

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als. of festiv ll u f s d n dy ke town. In and wee f o ir a e e id h s t Cities f chill in on every n; Sister eel st hint o h a fest w ir it o f t w t d , a ll n h a u t all aro lcome f them and Wh r, we we st jam-packed o ances in venues bration; e le b e ble m c e l t a p n mo ver-relia atio orm f e e n r h r e e t very Se e h p t t is f in o d d f d .A ken ays and ay o This wee returns with 11 d ia Street for a d of DJs and drops run this year? – t g t r s s il e o y k e u can a Jazz F l, and yo ed. outh to G ti Park for two d onna take on the a s iv t it s b e a F s –g o Op e Fall move ly book ettles int t in Military Park e’s Beech Grov omplete c d n e House s k id s e s e South Irish F your we consider 10 COVER STORY // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Sometimes, an idea is almost too good. “I originally was looking to bring in a DJ to do one of our Party in the Parks [which are held yearly in Opti Park],” says Matt Schwegman, Vogue talent buyer/promoter and Wheel House Festival co-owner. “As I started reaching out to different international DJ acts, I realized that due to the amount of extra lights, video walls and production that these acts need, we could build this into something much bigger.” Schwegman got in touch with long-time promoter and DJ Slater Hogan of Keepin’ It Deep with the idea for a full-fledged multi-day EDM festival in Opti Park. It’s a fest that makes sense: the Indy EDM community is flourishing and diverse. “There are quite a few different scenes going on here,” Schwegman says. “Mainly, because there are a some promoters in town that care a lot about what is happening. The guys at IndyMojo have built an amazing fan base and their fans are crazy loyal. The guys at Keepin’ It Deep [Hogan and John Larner] have been throwing parties in town for years and people trust that they will have a good time at their events. Then, throw in A-Squared, Crush Entertainment and a few others, and you’ve got yourself a pretty vibrant, diverse scene.” Wheel House will have only one stage, with a variety of interactive activities and vendor sites for attendees. Opti Park is a small space, mostly used for sporting events – in fact, that use gave Wheel House its name. “Myself, Slater Hogan and Steve Ross, owner of the Vogue, had been brainstorming for a few days,” Schwegman said of the fest’s name. “After a few of the cliche EDM-type names (“Electric Enchanted EDM Garden?”), we thought about the actual park that we are hosting the event in. Opti Park’s main attraction is a small Little League baseball diamond. Wheel house is a term that refers to the hitter’s sweet spot.” Schwegman and team knocked it out of the park with the Wheel House lineup. It’s one of the most impressive festival lineups in recent memory, albeit one geared to a certain scene. Locals will take the same stage as legends, which will conclude with an after party each night at The Vogue featuring more stunning acts. Although Schwegman jokingly refers to Wheel House as “his baby,” A-Squared Industries, IndyMojo, Keepin’ It Deep, Crush Entertainment, Rad Summer, Oranje, Switch District and Bleeding Edge have all been involved in one way or another in putting this fest together. “It has been a total team effort amongst a lot of different people here in Indy,” Schwegman says.” Before Wheel House, we dialed up legendary producer Paul Oakenfold. As the founder of Perfecto Records and resident DJ at many of London’s most famous dance clubs, Oakenfold could easily rest on his musical laurels. But he’s consistently cranked out interesting new albums and mixes; scored plenty of films and games; stayed intimately involved with his imprint; and introduced successful new residencies. In the last year and a half, Oakenfold has ramped up his touring schedule, perhaps in anticipation of the release of Popkiller, his third studio artist album, which will boast collabs with Azealia Banks, Eve, Miguel, Cee Lo Green and more. Important to mention those are big names in mainstream hip-hop and R&B – a trend in Oakenfold’s contemporary work, and consistent with the mainstream EDM explosion of the last five years. Oakenfold will close Friday night of the festival.


Q & A WITH

WHEEL HOUSE 5-10 p.m. Heading to Wheel House? Fest co-founder Matt Schwegman breaks down the Wheel House Festival lineup day by day with reasons to be excited about each performer.

NUVO: Tell me about your upcoming fulllength, Popkiller.

“Husband/wife duo Annie and Andy Skinner [A-Squared DJs] are hometown heroes making their return after having a baby!”

PAUL OAKENFOLD: Yeah! Popkiller is my new artist album that I’m working on in between running all over the world doing shows. It’s really coming together well. It’s song-based, very much. It’s much the same as my last two artist albums; what has changed, now, is that electronic music has become a lot more mainstream. I think this album will be perceived to be more mainstream, but it’s very much the same as the last two. Collaborations and strong songs. NUVO: Has there been anything frustrating about the mainstreaming of EDM that you’ve witnessed? Any misunderstandings of the music that you make? OAKENFOLD: No, I think it’s a very exciting time at the moment, in America, for electronic music. In Europe, in England, it’s very much like your older brother has been there, seen it, done it and now it’s your turn. You’re this young boy in America, and it’s exciting. It’s the first time it’s really happened. That’s what I love about it – that you see the energy and passion in people’s faces. Last night, there were over 1500 people on a Thursday night in Columbus, Ohio, really going crazy to electronic music. It’s really wonderful to see. NUVO: I love the magical little Lego video for “Who Do You Love” [directed and created by 13-year-old Scottish boy Morgan Spence]. I don’t think I was quite as cool as Spence as a 13-year-old, with that kind of understanding of club and festival culture. OAKENFOLD: In Europe, we have this attitude, right or wrong, that we’ve been there, seen that, done it. That attitude is different in America. There’s so much going on and so many people want to come in, play, DJ and enjoy it. The video came about purely because we were putting out various tracks of music. The kid got in touch with us, or his parents did, and said, “Look, we love a track you did called ‘Ready, Steady, Go.’ Could we used that song for a project?” Because they were obviously looking to get permission. I said, “Yeah, of course you can; but can you send me the project, because I’m really curious!” They send [details], and I’m like, “Wow, this is great.”

“I am excited to see Keys N Krates. They’re our only ‘band’ on the entire bill. They do live remixes of songs and their own stuff. I have only heard amazing things about their live show.” “Flosstradamus opened for Major Lazer at the Vogue in 2012 and were awesome. They have a great mix of hip-hop and trap; people will be dancing” SUBMITTED PHOTO

Paul Oakenfold

So I said, “Why don’t we try something, and see if it works?” I’ll send you a new song we’re doing and you do the video for it. And if the video is good enough, we can use it. And if not, no worries. And they got really excited; the family comes from a tiny little town in Northern Scotland. No one expected to see that video. We were all blown away. So we went up in Scotland, invited them for dinner, sat down and spoke about it. It was a great moment – he did a wonderful, wonderful job. NUVO: Over the last year and a half, you’ve reinvested a lot of energy into touring again as a DJ. Why the schedule change? OAKENFOLD: Realistically, all roads were leading to it. I went against the grain and I was doing less DJing and focusing more on writing music for film and games.... About over four years ago, I really decided to focus on residencies. So I went to Vegas and … there was not much going on there. I did a residency; I was there every Saturday. And we got together a fantastic team, and had a club with 5,000 people. We were really building the foundation of electronic music. We had a place where not just the locals would go; Vegas, like New York, is a destination with a lot of traffic flowing through. You knew that you could maintain a lot of people every week because of the flow through. I really believed that could work. I got to the point that – after being in the same place for two or three years – I had to start traveling more abroad. That’s what I’m doing now, and I’m really enjoying it.

Indy native Topher Jones will perform at Friday’s Vogue after party. We hit up the Hoosier DJ/producer to find out what’s new on his playlist – and what will never leave.

I’m setting up the record. You’re out there, you’re playing, you’re road-testing your music, getting the chance to talk to people and setting up the tour for the next record. NUVO: What can you identify that’s more frustrating now about making music than it was in, say, 1986? OAKENFOLD: There’s the huge frustration of the Internet. You spend enormous amounts of time making a piece of music; it goes out there and is disposable, because of the amount of music out there. The turnaround is really quick. Your record is taken, it’s already on the Internet. People download it for free. And then, it’s copied. The trend in electronic music is that if you have a record that’s a hit, straight away, that sound, your idea, is copied. There’s a thousand versions of it. And then, we’re all on to the next thing. It’s difficult to make a record, or an album, like we used to. You’d go to the store and buy it, look at the credits, play it from beginning to end. It’s no longer a moment. It’s very difficult to get the moment. We as a society are always looking for what’s next, what’s next, what’s next – we’ve got that, let’s move on. It’s difficult. You just saw it with the Lady Gaga record, that was leaked four weeks before it was meant to get out. Then they had to rush it, get it out there, and before you knew it, it was everywhere. And now we’re on to something else. „ Opti Park 780 E. 66th St. times vary, prices vary, all-ages (kids 12 and under free)

What are five new EDM tracks you’re currently obsessed with?

What are five old EDM tracks you never get tired of?

• One Republic vs. Alesso, “If I Lose Myself”

• Armin Van Buuren, “Communication”

• Bruno Mars, “Locked Out of Heaven” (Sultan and Ned Shepard Remix) • Topher Jones ft. Katie Sky, “Talk About It” • Ivan Gough, Stevie Mink, Steve Bleass, “BOOM!” • Topher Jones, “Get Down”

• Topher Jones and Amada ft. IdoVsTheWorld, “Hello Chicago” (Topher’s Festival Mix) • The Killers, “Mr Brightside” (Thin White Duke Remix) • Nu Nrg, “Dreamland” • Jan Johnston, “Flesh” (Tiesto Remix)

“I’ve never heard of Paul Oakenfold. ... I kid! People really took notice of the festival when they saw his name on the lineup. He is one of the pioneers of the entire genre. Phrases like ‘living legend’ don’t get thrown around very often, but in this case, they should.” Vogue after party lineup includes: Tritonal, Topher Jones, The Dub Knight, Cadillac G, OhBeOne (10 p.m.-3 a.m.)

1-10 p.m. “X5ight is up-and-coming electro/house duo from Indiana. starting to create a big buzz in the Midwest.” “Be prepared for your face to be melted by Shy Guy Says. This local 8-bit villain combines a mix of many sounds with some bass that may set off some car alarms.” “Action Jackson is one of the most well known DJs in Indy and also, one of the best. You will hear hip-hop, dubstep, rock and more in his set. Soooo good.” “LA-based DJ/producer Salva is known for his remix work. I recently watched a few of his videos and saw a crowd go bananas during his set.” “Araabmuzik opened for Sleigh Bells at The Vogue last year. and absolutely killed it. He’s known for making live beats and instrumentals on a MPC drum machine at a blistering pace. He is really quite incredible to see live.” “Things we love about Josh Gard, a.k.a. Figure: A) he is from Indiana B) his bio says Genre: Bass Heavy Music C) he did a whole album about monsters D) his song ‘Beetlejuice.’ ” “I love seeing The Crystal Method live. They have headlined the Vogue a few times and I can remember quite clearly as it being some of the best parties we have ever had here in Broad Ripple. Crazy dance party are the words that come to mind.” “We are really lucky to have house superstar Wolfgang Gartner on our lineup. There is a reason he is closing out the event.” Vogue after party lineup includes (Note: This is an official OranjePeel Party): House Connection Tour, (Bad Boy Bill and Richard Vission), Bryan Downs, Lockstar, Gabby Love, Helicon (10 p.m.-3 a.m.) NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // COVER STORY 11


GETTING AROUND TOWN WITH SELECTED FAVORITES FROM Indy Jazz Fest is taking on a whole new personality this year, with a zippy look, feel, tempo and intent. It’s “all around town” in new venues, brewpubs and breweries, and taking over Main Street in Speedway. Indianapolis Jazz Foundation president Gene Markiewicz points to a roster of activities to bring jazz front and center. At the Indy Jazz Fest kickoff at the Jazz Kitchen on August 12, Markiewicz greeted a sizable crowd of jazz lovers with the urgency of someone building on a hundred year-old-legacy. Indy has a rich history of “spilling out in the streets,” in the words of jazz great David Baker. Baker’s 1940s generation, building upon their forebears, became the imprinters of Indianapolis jazz nationwide and internationally. The new players emerged — and are emerging — from this heritage. Scanning the program lineup for the 11-day festival, you’ll find something for everyone. “Jazz is great!” enthuses Markiewicz. “It can be complex and yet simple. It is an art that can require you to concentrate or veg out. You can listen to one recording and hear it differently every time you play it. It is an art that expresses a player’s and listener’s emotion. Live jazz can feed off the audience in a way no other art form can.” Markiewicz points out that while “Jazz has a solid foundation of loyal fans and players, it would be nice to have more mainstream fans, so we can have more clubs, so we can have more gigs, so we can play more jazz so fans can listen to more jazz. Why should we care?” he asks. “Because jazz is America’s true art form.” Indianapolis Jazz Foundation meets its twin goals of jazz education and performance via year-long programs in schools and public performances, by groups like the Indianapolis Youth Jazz Ensemble and First Friday Student Combo Performances and Combo Competitions at Indy Reads Books. At Indy Jazz Fest Sept. 14 and 21 programming includes free, open-to-all ages master classes, clinics and panel discussions supported by the Foundation, the Fest and Brewers of Indiana Guild. “It’s something we always have done,” said Ted Miller, Brugge owner and brewer. “Craft beer and arts have a hand-in-hand relationship. The same people have a love for both. The education side of Indy Jazz Fest is fantastic.” Miller credits The Pub Creep, a new addition to the Fest, to the camaraderie between Dave Allee, Jazz Kitchen owner, and brewers, particularly linking Allee with Miller and Kevin Matalucci, Twenty Tap owner, as members of Broad Ripple High School Class of ’87. “We look after each other,” quipped Miller, who says Zach Lapidus will be the first music event in Brugge’s upstairs room. Billy Hannan at Broad Ripple Brewpub adds that BRBP owner John Hill “Is a very big fan of jazz. He used to go to jazz concerts in London (before emigrating to Indianapolis). It’s a big thrill for him to have Cynthia Lane headline at BRBP.” Hannan recalls Rob Dixon and Gordon Bonham “used to come to play at BRBP.” He mused on how nice it would be to have them and others come back to bring jazz to a family-friendly space in the dining room. That could be a way around what Markiewicz refers to as, “the drag in Indiana due to laws that restrict students from being in the presence of alcohol; they can’t go to places to hear live music readily. It is really great to sit in a jazz club in Cincinnati, for example, and see young jazz fans listening to live jazz.” „ PHOTO CREDIT

Ramsey Lewis, Diane Schuur, Ravi Coltrane

— RITA KOHN Read an interview with Eddie Palmieri on page 30.

12 COVER STORY // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

• Allen Toussaint Toussaint is a leading exponent of New Orleans R&B. The Howard L. Schrott Center for the Arts, Butler University, 8 p.m., $42.

• Ramsey Lewis Lewis’ 50-year leading role in jazz, pop and R&B has earned him accolades as a soloist and collaborator Madame Walker Theatre Center, 8 p.m.; prices vary, all-ages

• Funk & Soul: Bashiri Asad & Xenobla Green (Indianapolis); AJ & The Jiggawatts (Nashville, TN); Sky Hi (Nashville, TN) The Jazz Kitchen, 7:30 p.m., $15, 21+

• Diane Schuur As a vocalist/pianist Schuur combines ‘40s-’50s jazz with ‘50s-’60s pop. The Cabaret at the Columbia Club, 7:30 p.m. & 9 p.m. [sold out].

• Four 80 East featuring Matt Marshak At the forefront of the nu-jazz movement Four 80 East produce an “improvisational dance-infused sound” drawn from a variety of sources. the Jazz Kitchen, 8 p.m. & 10:30 p.m., $25, 21+

• The Farrelly/Markiewicz Jazz Quartet Speedway in front of Lino’s Italian Restaurant and The Dallara IndyCar Factory at the newly remodeled Main St. between 12th and 13th Streets, 7 p.m., FREE, all-ages

• Piano and Vocal Masterclass with Diane Schuur Schrott Theater for the Arts, Butler University, 11 a.m., FREE, all-ages

• Guitars Masterclass with Bill Lancton The Jazz Kitchen, 11 a.m., FREE, all-ages

• Piano Masterclass with Steve Allee, Steve Corn & Zach Lapidus: A Tribute to Claude Sifferlen The Jazz Kitchen, 1 p.m., FREE, all-ages

• Brian Nova and the Steve Allee Trio featuring Stan Hillis Jazz guitarist/vocalist Nova joins one of Indy’s favorite trios. The Jazz Kitchen, 7:30 p.m., $22, 21+

• AfroLatino Jazz with Direct Contact Latin Jazz trio A collaboration of African/Latino dance and music for a highenergy, family-centered program. Central Library, 3 p.m., FREE, all-ages

• Buselli Wallrab Jazz Orchestra presents Miles Davis’ “Birth of the Cool”; and the Zach Lapidus Trio Indiana Landmarks Center, 7:30 p.m., $27, all-ages

• “Pub Creep” with Bill Lancton Red Hot Whiskey Sippers Sun King Brewery, 6:15 p.m.; FREE, all-ages

• Eddie Palmieri Latin Jazz Band Indianapolis Museum of Art Terrace, 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages


• “Pub Creep” with Zach Lapidus Brugge Brasserie, 5:30 p.m., FREE, all-ages

• The Blues Side: Tad Robinson, Cynthia Lane, Gordon Bonham The Jazz Kitchen, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $20, all-ages

• Indy Jazz Fest Band/A Salute to Indiana Composers: Steve Allee, Rob Dixon, Frank Smith, Bill Lancton, Everett Greene, Cynthia Layne, Mark Buselli, Kenny Phelps

PHOTO BY DANIEL AXLER

Sister Cities in 2012

Christel Dehaan Fine Arts Center, University of Indianapolis, 7 p.m., free, all-ages

• “Pub Creep” with Tad Robinson Flat 12 Bierwerks, 5:30 p.m., FREE

FESTIVAL

• Ravi Coltrane Downbeat Magazine calls Coltrane’s saxophone playing “elusive beauty.” The Jazz Kitchen, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $32, all-ages

Unacquainted with the unfortunately named but truly awesome game of hurling? It’s the national sport of Ireland, and dates back over 3,000 years. Players use wooden sticks to hit a small ball between goalposts – that’s the beginning of explaining it, anyway. Experience a sport older than Ireland itself at demonstrations on Friday, Saturday and Sunday in the park. Not interested in team sports? Join the kilted mile on Sunday at 2 p.m. on Blackford St. Awards for categories like “Best Dressed” and “Bonniest Knees” will be awarded after the kilted runners cross the finish line. Entry fee is $10 (separate from festival entrance). „

Pop quiz: Can you name Indy’s eight sister cities? We guess even the most informed Indy citizen might have a bit of trouble, so we’ll give ‘em to you. Indy is connected with Campinas, Brazil; Northamptonshire County, UK; Cologne, Germany; Piran, Slovenia; Moriza, Italy; Hyderabad, India; Hangzhou, China; and Taipei, Taiwan. Of course, you don’t have to book a flight to discover more about these farflung destinations. Just plan to come to Sister Cities Festival on Saturday. The fest moves to Georgia Street this year (it was held outside City Market in 2012), but it still boasts the same schedule of live music and cultural activities. There’s a collection of international games for children to play, a world sports park (including cricket and bocce ball) and a global marketplace. Helado Negro (real name Roberto Lange) is Saturday’s headlining act; the son of Ecuadorian immigrants, Lange’s music is infused with the sounds of South Florida, his birthplace. He’s released an ongoing series of impressive EPs, the latest being Island Universe Story Two, an expressive, danceable collection of tracks that exist in perfect harmony with newest LP Invisible Life. Lange is writing in Spanish and English now, adding layered synths and Latin guitar to his dreamy tracks. Other acts include Sweet Poison Victim (Ghanian rock); Jiridon (AfroColombian) and Meztli-Cultural (Mexican folk), as well as a performances of Chinese and Indian cultural dance. Sister Cities is programmed by the Mayor’s Office. „

Sept. 12 – 15 Military Park, 601 W. New York St. times vary, prices vary, all-ages

Saturday, Sept. 14 Georgia St., Downtown Indy noon, free, all-ages

PHOTO BY FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

Irish Wolfhounds will be exhibited at Irish Fest.

dubh or sporran? Head to the market. “All the world’s a stage and most of us are desperately unrehearsed.”

• Jeff Coffin and his Mu’TET Saxophonist Coffin is joined by drummer Futureman, bassist Felix Pastorious, trumpeter Bill Fanning and keyboardist Chris Walters for an across the board program of international music-making. Apparatus, 7:30 p.m., $22, all-ages

• “Pub Creep” with Cynthia Layne Broad Ripple Brewpub, 5:30 p.m., FREE, all-ages

• Aaron Diehl Quartet/CD Release Party As the 2011 Cole Porter Fellow in Jazz, Diehl’s original voice incorporates his legendary forebears. The Jazz Kitchen, 7 p.m. & 9:30 p.m., $32, 21+

• Closing Finale: Jazz Kitchen & YATS Block Party 11 bands, 2 stages. On the Yats outdoor stage: Sunset Stomp; Monika Herzig; Adam Thompson; Clifford Ratliff; Sophie Faught; Jared Thompson. On the Jazz Kitchen indoor stage: Farrelly Markiewicz Quartet; Unity: Cynthia Layne, Everett Greene, Steve Allee, Rob Dixon, Kenny Phelps, Frank Smith; Bill Lancton MG6; Zack Lapidus / Herbie Hancock tribute; Seven Pleasures reunion concert. 54th & College Ave., 3:30 p.m.- midnight, $17 [of which $5 goes to support jazz education in Indianapolis]

• Clinician: Jamey Aebersold, How to Improvise The Jazz Kitchen, 11 a.m., FREE, all-ages

• Jazz panel discussion The Jazz Kitchen, 1 p.m., FREE, all-ages; (under 21 attendees will need to leave immediately following this program)

• Donations for jazz education in Indianapolis are welcome at all ‘Pub Creep’ breweries, where $1 from each pint sold during the event supports jazz education. • Grillin’ & Groovin’ presented by Marsh is the latest IndyJazzFest CD to benefit IJF education programs. Subtitled “11 delicious grooves to get your grill on!’ it’s a treat for your ears and soul to feast on cuts from Owl Studios releases featuring Cynthia Layne, Garaj Mahal, The Dixon-Rhyne Project, Rob Dixon Trilogy, Bill Moring & Way Out West, Steve Allee., Fareed Haque, and Derrick Gardner and the Jazz Prophets. Indy Jazz Fest Band will perform in select Marsh stores performing every Friday and Saturday through September 19 as an “all around town” set of mini-CD release parties. The CD sampler will be sold at 40 metro area Marsh stores for $10.

For fans of all things Emerald Isle, it doesn’t get much better than this weekend in Military Park. Irish Fest is an Indy institution – four straight days of all things lucky and green. “We are excited about returning crowd favorites The Elders and The Fenians,” Terry Sweeney, festival director, says. “They’ve not been to the festival in couple of years. Two new bands appearing for the first time at the festival are Tallymoore and Hounds of Finn.” What else is at the fest? Let our favorite Irish sayings guide you. “There are only two kinds of people in the world, the Irish and those who wish they were.” Lucky for us, no one is checking Irish citizenships at the door. Come one, come all to Military Park. A brief note on pricing: children 13 and under are free; adults are $10 in advance and $15 at the gate. Students, IBEW members and those in the military pay $5 a day. Thursday is $5 for everyone – but there’s no shopping, demonstrations or sports; just music. “It is better to spend money like there’s no tomorrow than to spend tonight like there’s no money.” Starting Friday, bring plenty of cash to spend on gen-u-ine Irish goodies in the Irish Market including food, gifts, jewelry and, of course, kilts. Need a sgian

FALL FESTIVAL This southern suburb of Indianapolis boasts a four-day fest and carnival for those not looking to get caught in Downtown traffic. Stay on the Southside and hear performances from The Waiting, Track Seven, Tim Nolan, Vinnie and the Moocher, Alan Kaye and the Toons and more. The fest features carni-

The best part of Irish Fest? The lineup of music, from rock to quiet folk, and everywhere in between. The Elders are the headliner this year, with additional performances by Ennis, Tom Sweeney, Evans and Doherty, The Fenians, Mother Grove, Fighting Jamesons, The Kreellers, Hounds of Finn, The Kells, Tallymoore, Hogeye Navvy and many more. Find the full schedule on indyirishfest.com. “The reason the Irish are always fighting each other is they have no other worthy opponents.”

val games, rides, food and the like. Mayor Greg Ballard will lead the parade down Main Street on Saturday morning (busy weekend for the Mayor, who will also speak at Sister Cities). There’s a small stage on Fourth and Main on all four days and a larger stage with performances at 8th and Main on Saturday evening. Technically, the two stages, parade and carnival are separate events (presented by the Beech Grove Promoters Club and the Beech Grove Chamber of Commerce, respectively), but attendees can explore both in one day. “The Beech Grove Promoters club

has been in existence for 60 years. Bill Ciriello Sr. (a founder) is still active in the organization,” Tim Latimer, secretary of the Club, says. “Through this event, the Promoters Club raises money for All American Day in the Park [fireworks] on July 3, a scholarship fund and several other local not-for-profit groups like the high school renaissance rrogram, the high school music program and many more.” „ Sept. 11 – 14 Beech Grove, 600 Main St. times vary, prices vary, all-ages NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // COVER STORY 13


EVENTS Versailles ‘73: American Runway Revolution Filmmaker Deborah Riley Draper will be on hand Thursday for a screening of her documentary about a color-barrier breaking runway show (prominently featuring African-American models for the first time) that saw five U.S. designers (Bill Blass, Halston, Stephen Burrows, Anne Klein, Oscar de la Renta) battling France’s top houses (Yves Saint Laurent, Givenchy, Cardin, Ungaro, Dior) in front of a star-studded audience. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Sept. 12, 6 p.m., $9 public, $5 IMA member

VISUAL

THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

Scratching the Subsurface Graffiti experts could well become experts if they pay attention during the all-day Scratching the Subsurface event, which will start at IUPUI’s Cultural Arts Gallery with discussion led by Midwest Street Art’s Pete Brown and SubSurface’s Dan Thompson, before heading to Fountain Square for a tour of walls painted during SubSurface. Presented by Midwest Graff and Spirit & Place. IUPUI Cultural Arts Gallery, Sept. 14, 1-4 p.m., FREE Clowes Conversations: The Art and History of Tagging Samuel E Vazquez (who goes by the nom-de-graffiti of Brame UW) doesn’t half-ass it when it comes to community engagement. And so this is not just a conversation — though it is that, kicking a series of such conversations that’ll feature Bela Fleck and Butler prof Frank Felice (Nov. 14), actor Will Gould on radio theater (Jan. 14) and Dance Kaleidoscope’s David Hochoy (Feb. 5) through the course of the year. So, yes, you can talk about tagging, but Vazquez will also lead guided tours through his work — and then engage participants in a live tagging demonstrations to a soundtrack provided by a guest DJ. Clowes Memorial Hall, Sept. 17, 6 p.m. gallery walk, 7:30 p.m. conversation, 8:15 p.m. tagging demo and after-party, FREE with ticket, cloweshall.org Art vs. Art Online voting opens this week for Art vs. Art. It’s not as fun as watching your least favorite canvas get chainsawed, but that can be said of a lot of things. Visit artvsart.net through Sept. 26 to participate. The Vogue, Sept. 27, artvsart.net

CONTINUING Freddie Kelvin: Playing with Patterns M10 (at Circle City Industrial Complex) through Sept. 27 Forms in Silver: Photography by Gayle Moore and Tom Potter Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center through Sept. 27 Brian Duff: Flowers and Flood AV Framing Gallery through Oct. 10 Brinton Farrand Art Bank through Sept. 30 Slava Mogutin and Ted Oonk iMOCA through Sept. 21 Heartland Art: Selections from Your Indiana Collection Indiana State Museum through Sept. 15

N NUVO.NET/VISUAL Visit nuvo.net/visual for complete event listings, reviews and more. 14 // ARTS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

3

“A Marketer’s Dream” by David Kramer

1

2 3

“Euphoria” (top) and “It’s a Pony!“ by Heather Stamenov

“Color Sentences” by Gautam Rau

“Working the Social Network” by David Kramer

THIS IS THE END ... OR NOT FIRST FRIDAY, BY THE NUMBERS Opposites Attract: Heather Stamenov and Lauren Kussro w There’s something inspiring about seeing these two artists’ work together. Kussro’s wall hanging sculptural work is inspired by sea creatures such as barnacles, while Stamenov’s large-scale expressionistic portraits show young people getting together — and in the case of “Euphoria” — getting off. In this oil on canvas painting you see a young woman’s legs spread apart as she dives into the ocean, and a pair of dolphins jumping out of the water in the space between them. And it’s easy enough to experience this kind of euphoria: the Stutz is open for your (free) viewing pleasure 1-5 p.m. weekdays. Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery through Sept. 27

Irony and ambivalence reign on a cool First Friday

Setser line the walls of Indy Reads Books this month. But the standout there is the ceiling-hanging installation, created out of handmade felt, that makes the reading area an inviting, intimate place to let the imagination fly, something like your own cave or childhood fort. Indy Reads Books through Oct. 19

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Gautam Rao: Unblocked e Gautam Rao’s “Sunset on the Water” (acrylic on canvas) is, according to the wall text, inspired by Monet’s Water Lilies series. On one hand, it’s an explosion of color and light, picturing what (if you stand back far enough) really does resemble a sunset. On the other hand, it might just remind you of a pixelated screensaver. Rao’s art seems to borrow both from pointillism and Internet-age mathematics, arriving at 2

Kyle Herrington: Backyard Phenomena t Kyle Herrington’s response to various extraterrestrial threats, spelled out on a wall-hanging piece, “BE SCARED OR DON’T,” sums up the attitude of ambivalence this artist has toward THE END. Case in point: In one assemblage you see a meteor that has crashed into a disco ball. You also see here the outline on the floor of a dead body adjacent to a finish line streamer. You might wonder if the outlined dude met his death while cross-country disco dancing. Elsewhere, 3-D meteors pop out of 2-D canvases, alongside a number of paintings that seem flat by comparison (a “dome” in one painting looks like nothing so much as a pizza pie). Qualms aside, this show just might succeed in provoking a laugh or two. Harrison Center for the Arts through Sept. 27 5

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Meredith Setser: Subterrane Nimbus (left); Kyle Herrington: Backyard Phenomena an astounding synthesis that you just have to see up close to believe. Gallery 924 through Sept. 27 Icons and Irony r Text plays a big part in the work on the walls here. The screen print “Morons” by world-famous “anonymous” street artist Banksy portrays the auctioning off of a painting with nothing but text reading, “I can’t believe that you actually buy this shit.” You also see text in David Kramer’s paintings that show beautiful women or products but read like oh-so-ironic greeting cards. Is there any way to greet 3

such work other than with a shrug (ironic or not)? The standouts here are the 25 offset lithographs from Love is a Pink Cake, a 1953 book by Andy Warhol and Ralph T. Ward that celebrated their love for one another via text and illustration. Even the most iconic — and ironic — of pop artists had feelings that couldn’t be shrugged off. Long-Sharp Gallery (at The Conrad) through Oct. 11 Subterrane Nimbus r Fine examples of the art of printmaking by Herron assistant professor Meredith 4

— DAN GROSSMAN


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Kevin Grass’s “Suburbia,” is part of American Commentary at the Evan Lurie Gallery. SUBMITTED PHOTO

ALL IS NOT WELL

Evan Lurie says he’s in a better place, but dystopian undercurrents run (intentionally) deep BY D A N G RO SS M AN E D I T O R S @ N U VO.NET

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t’s been a dystopian year for the Evan Lurie Gallery. A year of work straddling the borderlands between realism and surrealism — maybe by way of hinting that all is not quite right behind the idyllic facades lining Carmel’s Main Street. The trend continues with new work from the Tarpon Springs, Fla.-based Kevin Grass opening Sept. 14 at the gallery. Lurie first came across Grass’s work at Miami’s Art Basel in 2012, when he was struck by one painting called “Inheritance.” It shows what looks like a four-level bunk bed — or mausoleum slots — with three slots taken by grandfather, father and son. They’re stacked one on top of another, passing bottles of beer, and the scourge of alcoholism, from one generation to another. On the top tier, you see a skeleton with a beer bottle in hand. Other pieces by Grass at Art Basel didn’t appeal as much to Lurie. “There has to be an intrinsic element there that surpasses the subject of what you’re looking at and takes you to a different realm of thought,” Lurie says. “So he understood that. And I said to him: “Look at some neorealist artists’ work, and I gave him a list of all the ones I’m very attracted to. And he went, and he looked at that, and he came back, and he said, ‘I have some ideas. Let me do some drawings.’” Grass then turned a few of the drawings into paintings for this month’s show, taking into account pointers from Lurie. “There was one in particular, a drawing of these kids playing with a toy lawn mower and a doll and these kids playing by a tree,” Lurie says. “And he asked, ‘Well what do you think?’ I said, ‘What I like is the concept of it. I’m going to tell you where I would go in terms of my mind: take the kids out and put adults in them in those situations acting as kids.’ So then the narrative becomes that of people trying to recapture their lost childhood, and it becomes a narrative of the times.”

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EXHIBITION

KEVIN GRASS: AMERICAN COMMENTARY

WHEN: OPENING SEPT. 14, 5-10 P.M. WHERE: EVAN LURIE GALLERY MORE INFO: EVANLURIEGALLERY.COM

The end result of this collaborative process, “Suburbia,” is one of seven of Grass’s paintings in the show. Some might be surprised at the extent of this artistic collaboration, but Lurie considers it par for the course. “It always is,” Lurie says. “It needs to be. And that’s not always the case once you’ve built an understanding of each others style and tastes. But initially it happens quite often because every gallery has their own kind of theory.” Lurie seems upbeat while talking about the future of his gallery, despite his February 22 arrest in Indianapolis for soliciting an undercover IMPD officer posing as a prostitute. In the immediate aftermath, the city of Carmel distanced itself from Lurie, whose vision of creating synergy between artists and designers helped to launch the city’s Arts & Design District. Negotiations for a $60,000-per-year consulting contract for Lurie (his old contract had expired in the spring of 2012) were promptly terminated by the city. Lurie, whose name is engraved on the building that houses the Arts & Design District’s flagship gallery (and who owns the first two floors of the building), says he’s in a better place. “What’s changed if anything is my motivation to do more for the community,” Lurie says. “Sometimes it takes something to happen to motivate you to do other things. And it was a terrible decision. I made some bad choices which have in turn been good learning experiences. And it would have been nice to figure this out another way, but it took that to get to refocus and in some way positive and good things will come from it.” „


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Penrod Arts Fair 2013

Indy’s “nicest day” seems so magically easy. Ask anyone “Who makes this happen? Why?” and you’ll likely get a blank stare. So this year my quest was not just to find the perfect gifts in the myriad of artists’ booths, spot amazing new talent on the stages, engage with arts organizations’ representatives and enjoy entertainment and food. I wanted to find out how and why. “I want to be involved in a meaningful way,” volunteer Jim Barry told me. “I am distressed by the loss of arts in the schools. We’re not all alike. Some of us need the arts to anchor ourselves, find our purpose. We need to find the funding to bring all the arts into our schools and to keep the arts alive for everyone all over the community. We need people to make art, people to enjoy art.” Barry is one of 600-plus active Penrod devotees involved in yearlong planning. He and his cohorts put in beaucoup hours to transform the spacious grounds of the Indianapolis Museum of Art into a wonderland of fun. It’s all a fitting legacy for its namesake, Penrod Schofield, the 11-year-old Midwestern boy dreamed up by author Booth Tarkington. Others agreed, and one voice added maybe the essence of ‘Who’ and ‘Why’ is in Flat 12’s Penrod 22. It’s not just a glass of beer. It’s a way of honoring the original 22 people who nearly five decades ago recognized arts are essential to our well-being. — RITA KOHN PHOTOS BY MICHELLE CRAIG

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5X5 at the Harrison Center for the Arts

PHOTOS BY STACY KAGIWADA

The folks behind 5X5 (CICF, Efryomson Family Fund, Christel DeHaan Family Foundation) dished out their fourth and final $10,000 check Friday night, this time giving Adrian Pumphrey (right) a chance to pursue his goal of creating an Indianapolis Young Songwriters Guild that would give teen poets, songwriters and producers a chance to come together for meetings, concerts and a recording project. Pumphrey beat out four other pitches, including a tantalizing (if a bit confusing) vision of an interactive map on the Monon at King Park and an ambitious plan to install public art in each NESCO neighborhood. After announcing the winner, Harrison Center exec director Joanna Taft handed over her cell phone as collateral to Pumphrey in lieu of any sort of oversized check. — SCOTT SHOGER

WHAT YOU MISSED

Horrorhound Weekend 2013

PHOTOS BY MIKE ALLEE

Halloween may still be months away, but those looking for their fix of the macabre found plenty of pushers at last weekend’s Horrorhound, held on the city’s east side. The big draw was an appearance by monster icon Robert Englund (aka Freddie Kruger) along with three cast members from The Walking Dead. One convention hall was devoted to “MaskFest”, a gathering of top makeup and special effects artists from across the country. — MIKE ALLEE 18 // ARTS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO


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Kay (Lisa Ermel) reassures her dad, Stanley (Jeff Stockberger) in Beef & Boards’ Father of the Bride. Father of the Bride r Splendid acting and a sprightly script peppered with sharp dialogue are a perfect pairing for another Beef & Boards highlight. Eddie Curry directs with an eye toward human frailties writ large for a fast-paced, almost frenetic depiction of a household turned topsyturvey as “small” turns into huge and “intimate” morphs into lavish. It’s a laugh-a-minute with on-themark ensemble acting as eight characters take turns skewering the plan for “a simple wedding.” Tailoring the script to be set in Indiana with allusions the audience enjoys - “I just drove around and around 465,” laments the lovably ‘do-the-right-thing’ Ben Tebbe as Buckley after a spat with Lisa Ermel as the ‘caughtbetween pleasing everyone bride-to-be’ Kay. Kristin Lennox is the determined Mother of the Bride “This is what every girl dreams of” - or is it what every mother of the girl dreams of? Joseph Mervis is impeccably in-your-face as the kid brother; Deb Wims as the impervious secretary of 22-years pits efficiency against padding the invitation list. Ivory McKay and Sandra Belles pair off as the suave and sturdy counterparts of wedding planner. Jeff Stockberger is at the center of the storm as Stanley, “The Father,” who runs the gamut from ballistic over the idea of his baby girl marrying a complete stranger to - oops, that’s a spoiler. Come see for yourself. Beef and Boards Dinner Theatre, through Sept. 29, tickets and prices vary, beefandboards.com Evening with the Stars, presented by Indianapolis City Ballet t Sixteen pieces representing a wide variety of classical (Sleeping Beauty) and newly emerging ballet choreography (Rest Beloved), along with modern dance ( New York State of Mind ) and a bit of tomfoolery ( Two Boys in a Fight) wowed the audience who came to witness dancers from worldwide across the USA showcase their best talent—and there’s a lot of it. Robert Hess and Jane Fortune devote themselves to bringing the best and brightest to this now fifth-annual event to inspire and engage. Returning artists have their fan groups in the audience. Longest and loudest applause was given for virtuosity across all genres. Sept. 7 at Old National Centre — RITA KOHN Melissa Hamilton and Eric Underwood perform at the Evening with the Stars. SUBMITTED PHOTO

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Civic Theatre’s Pippin (left) is presented in in space-age 3-D. (Above) Raymond Leppard is the guest-of-honor for UIndy’s Sept. 16 season opener.

THIS WEEK IN THEATRE

PERFORMANCES

Having refueled after Fringe and summer stock, our city’s theaters get back in full swing this week

Civic Theatre: Pippin A week-and-a-half remains to catch Civic’s season opener, Pippin, a greatest Broadway hit of the ‘70s that’s being presented in 3-D this time around. It occurs to us that live theatre is typically presented in 3-D, so we’re curious as to how it can get any more 3-D. The Civic season rolls on with The 1940’s Radio Hour (from Oct. 25), Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Dec.), Steel Magnolias (Feb.) and a supersecret mystery show (from April 25). Tarkington Theatre at the Center for the Performing Arts (Carmel), through Sept. 21, tickets and times vary, civictheatre.org RuPaul’s Drag Race Battle of the Seasons Featuring all your favorites from television’s RuPaul’s Drag Race. The fabulous Sharon Needles! The bodacious Alaska Thunderfuck! The in-recovery William Detox! The splendiferous Manila Luzon! And the ever-so-dangerous Pandora Boxx. Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, Sept. 13, 8 p.m., $25 advance, $30 door EclecticPond Theatre Company: Romeo & Juliet EclecticPond has this Shakespeare-onspeed thing down (or whatever stimulants they went for back in the Elizabethan era). Just off a Fringe run that had them doing extremely truncated versions of five of Shakespeare’s least often performed plays, the Irvington-based troupe will give itself a little more time to present an hour-long version of Romeo and Juliet. But that’s not the only trick: actors will play a different role every night.

Irvington Lodge, Sept. 13-15, 20-21, 27-29, $15 adult, $10 children at door (discounts available), eclecticpond.org Actors Theatre of Indiana: Always...Patsy Cline Twenty-seven, count ‘em, tunes that Cline made famous are in the book to Always...Patsy Cline, from “Crazy” to “I Fall to Pieces,” “Sweet Dreams” to “Walking After Midnight.” The season opener to an Actors Theatre of Indiana season that continues with The Odd Couple (Nov.), Forever Plaid (Feb.) and I Love a Piano (April). Studio Theater at the Center for the Performing Arts (Carmel), Sept. 13-29, times and tickets vary, actorstheatreofindiana.org Thaw Intending to give birth naturally, two women find safety in the comfort of a cabin. But as the temperature drops, the situation becomes ever more unbearable. A play exploring the drama in domesticity. Written by Chris Wright and featuring White, Amy Hayes and Ronn Jonstone. IndyFringe Basile Theatre, Sept. 13-14, 20-21, 8 p.m., $15 adult, $10 student and senior, indyfringe.org Nunsense A-Men! This time around, the nuns have penises. Theatre on the Square, Sept. 13-Oct. 12, times and tickets vary, tots.org Indianapolis Symphonic Choir: Mood Indigo The Indy Symphonic Choir kicks off its 77th season this weekend with an

Sharon Needles from RuPaul’s Drag Race SUBMITTED PHOTO

evening of jazz and American Songbook classics, including “Stardust,” “You’ll Never Walk Alone” and “The Very Thought of You.” Performances will be presented cabaret-style and feature the 24-voice Indianapolis Symphonic Choir Chamber Singers, conducted by assistant artistic director Michael Davis and accompanied by a three-piece jazz combo, as well as guitar-voice duo Tom and Sandy Doyle. Alas, the rather intimate event, with seating limited to 130 per show, has already sold out. Indiana Landmarks Center, Sept. 15, 5 and 8 p.m. UIndy Faculty Artist Concert Series: Opening Gala Maestro Raymond Leppard, ISO conductor laureate and UIndy artist-in-residence, will preside over UIndy’s festival orchestra and choral ensembles in a gala opening to the school’s concert series. On the program is the music of J.S. Bach, Mozart and Grieg. And because this is the faculty concert series, featured salaried perform-

ers will include violinist Austin Hartman, oboeist Pamela French and soprano Kathleen Hacker. That is most certainly not all: Leppard will also take time to discuss his career and latest exploits in an on-stage conversation with Professor Paul Kransnovsky. This begins a run of 18 free concerts to be held Monday evenings through the school year. Christel DeHaan Fine Arts Center, Sept. 16, 7:30 p.m., free The Crucible The IRT kicks off its 2013-14 season with Miller’s classic, an age-old tale of fear of the other that can be easily read as an allegory of ‘50s witchhunts. Michael Donald Edwards directs. Indiana Repertory Theatre, Sept. 17-Oct. 12, times and tickets vary, irtlive.com The It’s Not Too Late Show Erstwhile NUVO managing editor and now-while Earth Charter Indiana head Jim Poyser is the prime mover behind a weekly comedy quiz show about climate change premiering this week and slated for the third Thursday of each following month until the Apocalypse. There will be prizes for those with an understanding of or familiarity with environmental news and basic science and faster random access memory than their cohorts. Plus live music, monologues and surprises. Starring Poyser, with help from Indy Reads dude Travis DiNicola, Butler Theatre dude William Fisher, multitalented dudette Karen Irwin and current NUVO dude Will McCarty. IndyFringe Basile Theatre, Sept. 17, 6 p.m. (and every third Thursday of the month), $5


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OPENING Drinking Buddies r There are limits to realism in film. And we’re not just talking phenomenology here (how can something be real if we see it on a screen?) Chicago filmmaker Joe Swanberg’s films have sometimes just been a little tough to sit through, with their long conversations about relationships, and long, awkward sex scenes. And for a while, there was new one every few months. Drinking Buddies is Swanberg’s first “commercial” effort, and it nicely combines Swanberg’s penchant for realism (it’s filmed, in part, in Chicago’s Revolution Brewery) with some old-school Hollywood tropes (romantic comedy relationship shuffling). It stars Olivia Wilde (Thirteen on House M.D.), Jake Johnson (Nick on New Girl), Anna Kendrick (Up in the Air ), Ron Livingston ( Office Space) and, in an uncredited role, SNL vet (and Wilde’s husband) Jason Sudeikis. It’s all improvised, and he’s working with a cast that can whip up great lines on the spot: “They have a girl who plays the cello. I think that’s ironic, but I can’t tell anymore” (Livingston’s character on a band he’s recording) and “It’s like swallowing a burnt condom fill of gas” (Sudeikis on a particularly intense liqueur). — SCOTT SHOGER R, Opens Friday at IMAX Indiana State Museum Short Term 12 Grace (Brie Larson, The Spectacular Now) is a supervisor at a facility for at-risk teenagers. She’s good at her job and in love with a colleague (John Gallagher Jr.) but things get tricky when a new client shows up (Kaitlyn Dever). The Atlantic calls it “nothing short of extraordinary, a compact masterpiece of storytelling that brims equally with ambition and humility.” Winner of the Grand Jury Award and Audience Award at SXSW 2013. R, Opens Friday at Keystone Art Insidious Chapter 2 Leigh Whannell, a writer for the Saw franchise, treats us to another chapter in his big ‘ol tome of insidiousness. PG-13, Opens Thursday in wide release The Family A Mafia comedy directed by Luc Besson ( The Fifth Element, Nikita) and starring Robert de Niro, Michelle Pfeiffer and Tommy Lee Jones. R, Opens Thursday in wide release

FILM EVENTS Lady Terminator (1989) A Indonesian Psychotronic classic that finds an American anthropologist transforming into a killing machine armed with eye lasers and vagina dentata. IU Cinema (Bloomington), Sept. 13, midnight, $3, cinema.indiana.edu Ava DuVernay This Sunday, IU Cinema opens a mini-fest of work by or distributed by DuVernay, a 2012 Sundance Best Director winner who founded the African American Film Festival Releasing Movement (AFFRM) to achieve wider distribution for black independent filmmakers. Storm Saulter’s 2010 film Better Mus’ Come, the first film distributed by AFFRM, looks at political violence in ‘70s Jamaica. Duvernay’s 2008 documentary This Is the Life documents the ‘90s Los Angeles hip-hop scene. IU Cinema (Bloomington), Sept. 15, Better Mus Come 3 p.m., This Is the Life 6:30 p.m.; both FREE but ticketed

N NUVO.NET/FILM Visit nuvo.net/film for complete movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes 22 // ARTS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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HALF-ASSED AND FORGETTABLE

Why make a sloppy, broad comedy based on Jane Austen’s books? BY ED J O H N S O N -O TT EJOH N S O N O T T @ N U V O . N E T

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ustenland takes place at a British estate where Jane Austen aficionados pay big money for an immersive Austen experience. Guests get to step into the land of Pride and Prejudice and similar Austen books to enjoy a pretend romance in a roleplaying live-action costume drama. Sounds like a good setting for a comedy, but wait. Imagine a half-assed version of such an attraction, where the actors hired to make the environment seem real have limited acting skills and a propensity to break character. That’s the place Jane (predictably plucky Keri Russell), whose home is covered with Austen memorabilia (including a lifesize cardboard standup figure of Colin Firth as Mr. Darcy), spends her lifetime savings to visit. She gets the Copper package instead of the more lavish Platinum package, and Austenland proprietor Mrs. Wattlesbrook (Jane Seymour) treats her the way the Titanic crew treated the folks in steerage. And so a clever special-interest facility is morphed into an unprofessional, stuffy tourist trap for Austen geeks. Wouldn’t it have better to have the staff be good at their jobs, allowing the façade to be fully established before it frays? I mean, The Truman Show wouldn’t have been much of a movie had the faux citizens started breaking character immediately. But Austenland is no Truman Show. Or Westworld. It’s a sloppy, broad comedy that isn’t nearly as amusing as it should be, made harder to watch by several miscast actors in highly visible places. There are moments that work, but you have to sit through a lot of bad

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Keri Russell, right, and Jennifer Coolidge shoot at stuff in Austenland. REVIEW

AUSTENLAND

R A T E D: P G- 1 3 NOW P LA Y I NG A T : K EY S T O NE A RT i

community theater to get to them. The highlight of the film is the performance of Jennifer Coolidge as a rich, vulgar American who is visiting primarily because she thinks she’ll look sexy in the period dresses. Coolidge is best known for playing Stifler’s Mom in American Pie. Over the years she has become fleshier, while continuing to present herself as the most voluptuous woman in the world. I reflexively cringe when I see Coolidge pop up in a movie or a sitcom – she’s so aggres-

sively gauche – but she often wins me over because of her willingness to do anything for a laugh. Coolidge is to Austenland what Rodney Dangerfield is to Caddyshack. Not even faintly as funny, of course. In fact, she’s often downright embarrassing. Still, her desperate turn is the highlight. If you’re an Austen fan looking forward to a refined spoof of Austen-mania done in the refined style of Austen’s works, I hope you read the previous paragraph. Director Jerusha Hess co-wrote the screenplay with Shannon Hale, based on her well-received 2007 novel of the same name, but the film lacks the sophistication I expected based on the concept. Austenland plays like a failed Saturday Night Live sketch that refuses to end. So there you go. Austenland isn’t offensively bad. It’s just a quickly forgettable disappointment. „

NOW PLAYING the Mood for Love), who spent the last five years working on the production after rolling around the idea for much longer. PG-13, In wide release

The Grandmaster e A gorgeous, ornate visual feast. The tone is reserved, melancholy; the martial arts scenes pure poetry, every frame meticulously composed. The stars are charismatic actors Tony Leung (Lust, Caution, In the Mood for Love ) and Zhang Ziyi (Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, Memoirs of a Geisha ). The movie comes from gifted filmmaker Wong Kar-wai (Chungking Express, Days of Being Wild, In

The Spectacular Now e A marvelously acted coming-of-age flick with interesting, nuanced characters that feel genuine. This summer’s charming The Way, Way Back showed the painful process of growing up by following a miserable kid on a seaside vacation. The Spectacular Now has less plot and more close-ups (many of them unearned, but the offense is minor) as it uses its canvas as a character study. R, At Keystone Art

In a World … r Lake Bell ( Children’s Hospital) writes, directs and stars in a screwball comedy about a woman struggling to break into the mostly male world of voiceover announcing, which puts her in competition with her father (Fred Melamed), a giant in the field. The cast includes Rob Corddry ( The Daily Show ), Michaela Watkins ( Enlightenment), Ken Marino ( Burning Love), Nick Offerman (Ron Swanson from Parks and Recreation) and other hip names. The goings-on get sitcommy, but the romantic comedy is funny. R, At Keystone Art

Riddick y Vin Diesel first appeared as the brooding action antihero Riddick in the 2000 sci-fi flick Pitch Black. Following the bloated 2004 sequel The Chronicles of Riddick , Diesel returns to the role (after lobbying for installment three for years) and takes a stripped down, back to basics approach. Think Assault on Precinct 13 on a scorched planet with lots of alien predators and you’ll sort of get the idea. While far from memorable, it’s entertaining enough throwaway fare. Diesel’s pan-racial hulkwith-a-soft-voice persona helps out a lot. R, In wide release and IMAX — ED JOHNSON-OTT


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‘I’M A PORNOGRAPHER’ B Y SCO TT SH O G E R SSHOGER@NU VO . N ET

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ndiana University Cinema — which we oh-so-cleverly called Cinémathèque Hoosiere a few years back to play off its now-realized goal of becoming the state’s best repertory/art theater — is heading into another semester’s worth of guests both big and small (experimental nitratelover Bill Morrison and the ever-droll Bobcat Goldthwait to name two), minifests and midnight movies. This week brings Danish filmmaker Nicolas Winding Refn (Drive, Only God Forgives, Bronson) to the Bloomington theater, where he’ll participate in a conversation about the scuzzy exploitation director Andy Milligan and attend screenings of two of his own films. Milligan started off life making “very personal Nouvelle Vague-inspired dramas” (per Refn) such as a short film set in a gay bathhouse (Vapors, 1965) and a feature about a hippie couple (Nightbirds, 1970) before devoting himself entirely to “terrible” (again Refn) genre filmmaking with titles like Gutter Trash (1969), Torture Dungeon (1970) and Fleshpot

SPEAKER

NICOLAS WINDING REFN: ART AS AN ACT OF VIOLENCE

WHERE: IU CINEMA (BLOOMINGTON) WHEN: SEPT. 13 — CONVERSATION BETWEEN REFN AND ANDY MILLIGAN BIOGRAPHER JIMMY MCDONOUGH ON MILLIGAN’S FILMS (3 P.M.); ONLY GOD FORGIVES (6:30 P.M.); BRONSON (9:30 P.M.); REFN WILL BE PRESENT FOR SEPT. 13 SCREENINGS ONLY SEPT. 14: DRIVE (3 P.M.), ONLY GOD FORGIVES (6:30 P.M.), VALHALLA RISING (9:30 P.M.) MORE INFO: CINEMA.INDIANA.EDU (TICKETS REQUIRED FOR ALL FILMS)

on 42nd Street (1973). Refn began collecting Milligan’s films and memorabilia after learning more about his life via a particularly sordid biography by Jimmy McDonough, who spent time with Milligan before his death from AIDS complications in 1991. Refn’s latest film, Only God Forgives, is garnering mixed reviews; characteristic is this quote from the San Francisco Chronicle’s Mick LaSalle: “Refn’s nerve is admirable, even if his film often borders on

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Drive director Nicolas Winding Refn on violence, ‘positive penetration’ and ‘terrible’ grindhouse filmmaker Andy Milligan unwatchable.” His previous three films — the Ryan Gosling-starring Drive; Bronson, about a psychopathic boxer who takes on the nom-de-ring Charles Bronson; and Valhalla Rising, about a Norse warrior who joins a Christian crusade circa 1000 AD Nicolas Winding — make up the rest of IU Refn Cinema’s mini-retrospective. He spoke to us last week from a New York City hotel room. NUVO: Why Milligan, in particular? There are other grindhouse directors with identifiable styles. Other queer directors, say Kenneth Anger, who really put themselves into their work. NICOLAS WINDING REFN: If I could get to buy Anger’s negatives, I would buy them, but he’s not selling. Clearly, Andy Milligan is a terrible filmmaker; there’s no point in trying to justify him as a great cineaste. You can say that Vapors is a quite well-made film, but otherwise, they’re usually just deranged; they are valueless. And for me,

there’s no money in [collecting him]; it’s all charity and money out the window. But what I find interesting about Andy Milligan is this: filmmaking continues to become more and more about creating a set of boxes that you check off that then would create what you’d describe as a perfect product. And though that may be great, it’s also the enemy of creativity, and it’s sometimes more interesting looking at filmmakers that make films not because they had the opportunity or because of talent, but because it was their only way to express themselves. It’s similar to certain bands or musicians where they certainly are not great musicians, but the desire behind the music itself is more interesting than the actual music, because of the need of expression. NUVO: Did you identify with that need to create when you were starting out? REFN: No. When I started out, I was young. I got success at a very early age. For a number of years, it clouded my mind because on one side of me, I liked the pure act of expression and not worrying so much about the final S E E , P O R N O G R A P H E R , O N P A G E 24

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PORNOGRAPHER , FROM PAGE 23 product in terms of whether it was in good or bad taste. But I came from a family that very much valued high art, so I felt that I had to make what I call important films. But it wasn’t until I really started with the Pusher trilogy, ending with II and III, and going into Bronson — and especially with Valhalla Rising, Drive and Only God Forgives — that the act of becoming a fetishized filmmaker really liberated me. And I just said that ‘I’m a pornographer.’ I make films about what arouses me; whether it’s in good or bad taste, it doesn’t matter because to me it’s very satisfying. So I no longer made films hoping that the audience would regard them as great cinema, because you can never win that battle. NUVO: You’re coming to Bloomington for a mini-retrospective at a place that’s devoted to the study of film. So given what you just said, what’s it like inserting your films into that world that’s focused on film as art? REFN: I love the fact that I’m coming there to this wonderful university — and I have tremendous respect for Jon Ricker; I think he’s very visionary — to talk about Andy. And not about the filmmaking process — which a lot of these places spend so much time on — but about the act of creating. The biggest kick was actually going to the Lumiere Film Festival in Cannes to show Vapors and Nightbirds, where you had the French elitists of cinema who had never heard of Andy Milligan. It was a packed screening because an undiscovered filmmaker the French cinema elite didn’t know about was shocking to them. And it was hilarious. NUVO: So if you’re creating violent pornography, as you put it, do you have any concerns about the moral implications of your work? REFN: The ability to create and the accessibility of having it produced always brings with it a moral, how shall we say...You carry a certain responsibility, but at the same time you can’t censor yourself because of that. I don’t believe art can make people violent. I don’t. But I do believe certain art forms can show people how to behave violently, which is very, very different. And when people then have access to things that are very destructive, like you have in this country, it’s a very dangerous cocktail. NUVO: So how do you deal with that observation? I can see one person saying — and I’m not saying this is the only legitimate choice — that I’m not going to create something violent because I don’t want to give people behavioral cues. REFN: I think that the world would be a sadder place if we did that. NUVO: Your visit to IU Cinema carries the subtitle ‘Cinema as an Act of Violence,’ a phrase you’ve used to describe your approach in earlier interviews. Can you unpack that phrase? REFN: You can say it like this. Sometimes art and war are very similar, and that’s what’s frightening. But what the difference essentially comes to is that war destroys and art inspires. But they’re both the most powerful mediums in terms of a social and politi24 // ARTS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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Although Refn says he doesn’t “like guys” because “they’re kind of boring,” his films often feature strong male protagonists, such as Ryan Gosling in Drive (top) and Mads Mikkelsen in Valhalla Rising (second). Refn has supported the re-release of several films by U.S. exploitation director Andy Milligan, including the vampire flick The Body Beneath (third) and his 1965 short Vapors.

cal view. Both ingredients can change the world, but where war destroys, art inspires. NUVO: And is art always about attacking — can it be a collaborative process? REFN: Of course, it can be anything you want it to be. Art’s an act of violence, but not in a destructive way, purely as a positive penetration. An experience of anything can be a very violating moment, but when art, literature or music penetrates your mind, it is a violation in a sense because it goes past our normal lives — or how we want to live our normal lives — and goes into our moral dilemmas and essentially enters our subconscious. And can change us, sometimes without us even knowing it. NUVO: Do you ever watch the audience during screenings of your own films to get a sense of that penetration? REFN: Oh, no, never. I never watch my films with anyone. I would be too frightened. „


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BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

Brewing is just one part of the craft beer equation. Selling, buying, enjoying and talking about a local, fresh and consistently well-made artisan product are the others. Trader Joe’s at 2902 W. 86th St. has a continually growing selection of Indiana craft brews. A conversation with beverage manager Adam Hall is punctuated by his enthusiasm for connecting customers with Indiana craft, even though the chain has its own beer brand and there’s a wide choice of others. Six-packs of Cutters, Flat 12, Fountain Square, New Albanian, Three Floyds, Triton and Upland were being carried home the day I stopped in. Adam and his associates, Steve (newly arrived from California, so welcome him to Indy) and Brett, are eager to answer any questions about what style to enjoy with the rest of the foods in your basket. Twenty Tap, as you’ve surmised, is more like 40-plus taps, and now owner/ brewer Kevin Matalucci is about to fire up a 3.5 bbl nano-brewing system to establish his own brand. Watch for the tapping event. I stopped by Matalucci’s home base Sept. 5 for the 25th anniversary celebration of Chicagobased Goose Island. Starting at the top of their tenbeer extravaganza, brewer Mark Weinert’s Imperial Stout Bourbon County Cherry Rye is a deceptively easy-drinking “massive beer.” Three other Imperial Stouts, five Belgian’s and an Oktoberfest were on tap. Goose Island particularly invited homebrewers to chat with their brewers. Many took up the suggestion. Thr3e Wise Men just tapped their newest seasonal beer, Antonius 1742 Oktoberfest, named for Scott Wise’s great-great-great-grandfather, Antonius Weiss. This 2013 Indiana State Fair Brewers Cup Gold medal winner, brewed by Keely Thomlinson and Omar Castrellon, has a amber color, an off-white head and a malty, caramel taste with a pleasing effervescence. Great Crescent Brewery’s new color-coded canning line is appearing on shelves. You’ll find 2013 Indiana Brewers Cup Silver winner Dark Lager (red), 2013 Brewers Cup Bronze medal Aurora Lager (yellow), Coconut Porter (tan), India Pale Ale (green) and Blonde Ale (blue).

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Sun King Oktoberfest If it was called Octoberfest then it totally wouldn’t make any sense to hold in at the beginning of September. But because it’s Oktoberfest, with a ‘k,’ well that’s totally OK, because we’re pretty sure they still follow the Julian calendar over there, and it’s probably next year right now. Featuring fresh beer, live music by Alpine Express, wiener dog races and a special appearance by Der Pretzel Wagon. Georgia Street, Sept. 12, 5-10 p.m., FREE, 21+ Girls’ Pint Out Hop Swap! Here are the rules: You’re going to need to bring an item made with hops, beer or out of beer containers (cans, bottles, caps). This item can be edible, but it cannot be especially dear to you, because you are going to have to swap it. Flat12 will provide hops if you’d like. Do not bring straight-up beer. Flat12 has enough of that to go around. It’s open to the public (you don’t even have to identify yourself as a lady on an everyday basis), but you’ll want to register at hopswap.eventbrite.com. Flat12 Bierwerks, Sept. 12, 5-8 p.m., FREE

N NUVO.NET/FOOD Visit nuvo.net/food for complete restaurant listings, reviews and more. 26 // ARTS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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PHOTOS BY MARK A. LEE

1913 Restaurant’s Local Indiana Board features a variety of Smoking Goose meats and cheeses (top). The restaurant’s burgers (below is the BBQ option) come straight from Fischer Farms.

FARM-TO-FORK FOIBLES

1913 Restaurant’s food is remarkable, but glacial service can’t be excused BY N EI L CH A RL ES NC H A R L E S @ N U V O . N E T

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WHERE: OMNI SEVERIN HOTEL, 40 WEST JACKSON PLACE MORE INFO: 634-6664, OMNIHOTELS.COM DAILY: 6 A.M.-2 P.M., 5-10 P.M. ATMOSPHERE FOOD t t SERVICE y

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hen a friend suggested that we have a leisurely lunch at 1913 Restaurant, a new-ish farm-to-fork establishment in the heart of the Warehouse District, I had no idea just how leisurely things would become. After ascertaining that the bar wasn’t due to open for another couple of hours, my plan to enjoy a pre-prohibition cocktail or two was summarily nixed, and we were obliged to settle for a glass of unidentified wine. Bread arrived 20 minutes later, followed at precisely the one hour mark by our starters, hastily pursued by the main courses and a premature bill. The total time for lunch was close to two hours — easily time for three martinis, had they been available. It was the same story when I visited three months later: no cocktails, incredibly slow delivery combined with essentially inept, albeit affable and well-meaning, service. On both occasions, we were practically the only diners in the room at a peak hour for downtown lunch. Big city business folk can’t afford the luxury of a two-hour lunch, especially one without suitable refreshments, so perhaps the word has already made the rounds of 1913’s potentially biggest client base. It’s a shame they can’t get their act together service-wise, because the food is, for the most part, pretty good. It takes guts for a vast hotel chain like the Omni to open a restau-

1913 RESTAURANT

rant specializing in locally sourced ingredients, not just on the food menu, but on the intriguing-looking cocktail list. Sourcing from Gunthorp, Viking and Capriole, to name a few, 1913 puts seasonal Midwestern fare front and center, drawing upon early 20thcentury recipes (hence the name) and treating them with a somewhat lighter hand. Appetizers include a strikingly good Indiana Onion Pie ($10), the rich custard perfectly set inside an elegant and perilously short pastry case, the kind of dish which tells you that someone in the kitchen knows their way around patisserie. Another potential hit is the Local Indiana Board ($15), consisting of various cheeses and pickles with meats from Smoking Goose. One might imagine this to be a nobrainer, but in spite of its generosity the platter was marred by brie curling at the edges from neglect, some pickles which looked suspiciously commercial in origin,

and a couple of sweet compotes, one of which, allegedly made from mint, reminded me in flavor of Colgate toothpaste. Main courses at lunch consist mostly of burgers and sandwiches, expertly prepared and full of meaty, pasture-raised flavor. Particularly impressive were the BBQ Burger (ambitiously priced at $15) and the Fischer Farm steak sandwich for $14. The latter was fork tender and deeply flavored but not terribly well trimmed. My only real quibble about the main courses is their sheer size. At ten ounces, the burger was too much to finish at lunch, as was the steak sandwich, which begs the question: Why are we needlessly wasting so much of these fine, grass-fed animals when we could simply be serving smaller portions and conserving resources? Farm-tofork dining is as much about the animal as it is about the privileged few who are able to enjoy the end product. It’s a luxury we should all enjoy responsibly. „


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PHOTO BY MARK A. LEE

Beautiful tajines decorate the counter at Saffron Café. This ceramic pot consisting of a base with low sides and a large cone-shaped cover is also brought to customer’s tables when a stew by the same name is ordered.

BROAD RIPPLE 830 Broad Ripple Ave. 253-6060

DOWNTOWN 207 N. Delaware St. 634-6060

POST-FEST CHILL-OUT ZONES They will not be equipped with cooling fans, like the Chill-Out Zones TM that might actually be a part of Indy Irish Fest, the Sister Cities Fest, the Wheelhouse Fest or Indy Jazz Fest. But these Chill-Out Zones — not trademarked — are excellent places to unwind after a day of hurling, tango, glowsticking or head-bobbing on the off-beat (because that’s when you’re supposed to bob). We’re sticking around downtown — we have to stop somewhere — all are within walking distance of Military Park or City Market (or both). BARcelona Tapas Restaurant If you’re not pronouncing the “c” and “s” with a lisp, you are doing it wrong and the ghost of King Ferdinand will impale you with a lanza. Still one of the only places in town for a nigh-authentic tapas experience, best accompanied by a pitcher of sangria, a Catalonian lager or glass of Rioja. The décor and ambience are old-world: vibrant, clattery, ceramic-tiled, and brightlycolored. Start with a few cold plates, then move on to the hot, before enjoying a vat ‘o’ paella, made here with authentic rice from Valencia (and that’s Valen-thee-a). 201 N. Delaware St., 638-8272, barcelonatapas.com Bourbon Street Distillery One of the few remaining remnants of Indiana Avenue in its heyday, Bourbon Street recalls the Ave. via both its French Quarter architecture and its constant buzz. Plenty of drink specials and menu favorites such as the pulled pork sandwich, fish n’ chips, and cajun burger, plus ample indoor and outdoor seating for comfortable socializing and people watching make this a muststop for downtown goers (and on your way back downtown if you’re leaving Indy Irish Fest). 361 Indiana Ave., 636-3316, bourbonstreetdistillery.com Downtown Olly’s A few things to emphasize for post-fest goers about Downtown Olly’s — it’s open 24 hours on weekends, has really good break-

fast and isn’t Steak and Shake or Peppy’s Grill. Because sometimes you only need so much grease. It’s a sports bar with a twist — drag shows on the weekend and a partly gay clientele that could totally kick your ass in a game of flag football after you cheer on those strapping young men in blue. 822 N. Illinois St., 636-5597, downtownollys.com The Libertine Not your father’s cocktail bar — everything here is measured, from the agreeable volume of the music to the meticulous proportions of the drinks prepared by stylishly-clad mixologists. The drinks are second to none, easily as imaginative as almost any to be found in major cities, the ingredients exclusively from small producers: Cocchi and Dolin Vermouth, Blue Coat gin, Death’s Door vodka. The food menu is short and expertly executed. Owned by longtime local restauranteur Neil Brown, it’s exactly the kind of place that deserves support from anyone who puts value on independence, local produce and creativity. 38 E. Washington St., 6313333, libertineindy.com Saffron Café Known for its expert blending of aromas and flavors, Saffron offers a wide variety of delicious North African cuisine, including two speciality dishes: a Kafta Sandwich, finger rolls of finely ground, deep-

ly seasoned and char-grilled beef served on an open-face pita; and the Couscous Royale, a medley of vegetables served over couscous and steamed in a clay pot. Drink it all down with a sweet green tea with mint. A recommended stop after Sister Cities Fest if you’re not quite ready to come back to the States. 621 Fort Wayne Ave., 9170131, saffroncafe-indy.com Tastings Wine Bar & Bistro Over 100 bottles are available on any given night from Tastings, which allows drinkers to move from between innovative tastings stations, sampling small amounts of choice wines from around the world. Food offerings are tailored to different types of wine. Located at the downtown Conrad Hilton, the price tag can get steep, but it doesn’t have to. Even a small budget can yield delicious results. 50 West Washington St., 4232400, awineexperience.com Tavern on South Located in a vintage brick building to the west of Lucas Oil Stadium, Tavern on South blends its neighborhood’s working-class roots with an upscale whiff of spiff. It’s developed its own genre of sandwiches, at which it really excels. Try the “Tavern Smoked” Bison Burger or the Tavern Tenderloin Sliders: you won’t be disappointed. 423 W. South St., 602-3115, tavernonsouth.com

nuvo.net NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // ARTS 27


IN TOWN SIGUR ROS AT WHITE RIVER Icelandic post-rock trio Sigur Ros returns from a brief hiatus with masterful new album Kveikur, another cascading, cinematic entry in the band’s thunderous discography. The band, which now records as a three-piece after the departure of longtime keyboardist Kjartan Sveinsson, will perform in Indy on Tuesday at White River State Park. We called founding member and bassist Georg Holm before this week’s show to talk about the new album (and its accompanying creepy cover art).

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On the joy of making Kveikur “Where to start? [laughs] I guess this whole record was really fun to make, I have to say. I really enjoyed the whole process of making this record. It was just the three of us having un. I have to admit that I think this is one of the most fun albums that we’ve ever made. The whole process has been great.” On Kevikur’s dark art “We like to be as much involved as we possibly can. Actually, when we were doing the cover art for this album, we were on tour so it was a bit harder to be 100 percent involved the whole time. But we kind of knew that we wanted it to be a little bit darker. Striking. It had to be something completely different than what we’ve ever done before, because we felt the record deserved it. It deserved to be different than the other records. It should be not just another Sigur Ros record. I think we felt like it wasn’t – it was something different for us. We wanted it to be darker, as in literally darker. Black and white or something like that. We had the idea of a face, something human. We had gone through all kinds of different ideas, even a skull. But, we saw that photo. That exact photo. And we all just pointed at it and said, ‘We want that.’ It was exactly the right photo right there, in front of us. We maniuplated it slightly, but it’s very much like the original.“ On writing vocals last “When we write the music, Jonsi [singer] is usually just singing something. He just babbles, basically [the band refers to the babbled language as Hopelandic]. That’s how he figures out the vocal line should be in the song. It’s usually the last thing in the process of making the record. We just listen to the songs and brainstorm — we just all write something down. Things that comes to our mind when we listen to the song. It doesn’t have to be exact words for lyrics – it can just be what we feel the song is about. We visualize something in our heads when we listen. Maybe we feel like, ‘Oh this is a cold song. There is a wintery feel to it.’ It could be something like that. And we work from there. And the funny thing is, when we start writing down those things, a lot of times we find we’ll be writing the same stuff down, sometimes even the same words. We’ve figured it out that we’re hearing the music in the same way and we are all feeling the music in the same way. — KATHERINE COPLEN Sigur Ros with Julianna Barwick Tuesday, Sept. 17, Farm Bureau Insurance Lawn at White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St., 7 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

N NUVO.NET/MUSIC Visit nuvo.net/music for complete event listings, reviews and more.

INTERVIEWS: • Ryan Key of Yellowcard by Katherine Coplen • Miles Zuniga of Fastball by Katherine Coplen 28 MUSIC // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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No Age

10,000 OBJECTS, TWO DUDES

No Age takes new LP “An Object” from first idea to final pallet B Y K A TH ERI N E CO P L EN KCOPLEN@NUVO.NET

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o Age is a band with scruples. They’re strict vegans. They play all-ages shows whenever they can. They dig the co-op lifestyle. They’re idealists. So I wasn’t surprised when I read that they made An Object themselves. Even super popular noise rockers signed to Sub Pop can still be DIY until they die. They’ve been intimately involved with the tactile parts of their music releases before, of course, with hand-signed letterpress covers and a variety of specialty EPs. But they touched every part of this album – from the first notes to the final plastic wrap. And now they’re on tour across the country, handing over their handmade Object to fans at their merch tables. No Age was leaving Denver and driving to Kansas City when I called up drummer/vocalist Dean Spunt. (“Very flat,” Spunt observed.) They’ll be in Bloomington this Sunday. NUVO: You’ve played in Bloomington before, correct? DEAN ALLEN SPUNT: Yup! I like Bloomington. There’s a really good co-op there, a health food store [Bloomingfoods]. There’s SC Distribution. I like those guys. There’s a quarry. The quarry from Breaking Away! It’s a good little town there. We played a house party, a little art center space. NUVO: You’ll play at the Waldron Arts Center, an all-ages venue. I know you guys

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NO AGE WITH RANKIE AND THE WITCH FINGERS

W H E N : SUNDAY, SEPT. 15, 7 P.M. W H E R E : WALDRON ARTS CENTER, 122 S. WALNUT ST., BLOOMINGTON T I C K E T S : $15, ALL-AGES

try to play most of your shows at all-ages spaces. What percentage of venues on an average tour are all-ages? SPUNT: Probably 95 percent. 98 percent. Most shows are all-ages. In New York, you can’t do all-ages, unless you play a really underground show, which we usually try to do. I think they’re 16+, sometimes. Sometimes there’s a mixup and somewhere in Europe there’s a mixup where a show is 40+. But we’re not into age. The idea of ageism. Or age as an issue, either way. Up or down. We’re down for all age groups. NUVO: Can you sketch out the beginnings of making An Object to folding the final round of packaging? SPUNT: We decided it was time to start working on another record after Everything in Between came out in 2010. We started writing some songs and wrote about two songs, then went to go record in a studio in Austin, Texas and tried to record a record. But we didn’t do very well, because we didn’t have any songs. The vibe wasn’t right. I think some of the crystals we brought were off. Maybe from the wrong cut of the stone.

So we went back home, regrouped, went in the studio again with no songs and tried to just construct these songs from past experiences or certain types of thoughts of feelings that we’ve had towards musical context. We managed to record a record. At the same time, I was thinking about manufacturing the record on our own, via Sub Pop, to see what it would be like to make 10,000 objects in a time when 10,000 objects is on one hand a lot, since you can get music for free, anywhere. It’s also not a lot, because there’s hundreds of thousands of pairs of socks being made by someone in China, you know. So we packaged it, designed it, got it cut, die cut the labels, die cut the covers, printed them, made the inserts, inserted them. 10,000 records. Stamped them, signed them, wrapped them up in plastic, put them in a pallet, got them on a truck, drove them to the pressing plant, shipped them out. And now we have An Object, out on Sub Pop. NUVO: Because of your intense tactile relationship with this album, do you feel closer to these songs than you do to others? SPUNT: Maybe! I definitely like the record a lot. I don’t know if it’s making it physically that makes me feel like that or if it’s just a really good record. But man-handling all that paper made us very aware of the music and the time put into producing and manufacturing things. It’s a lot to think about for us and it might change the relationship for the listener, if they know that story and allow it to affect the way they listen to the record. Maybe it seems more personal. „


• TICKETS

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SATURDAY, SEPT. 28TH • 1 - 9PM “German Tradition Meets Craft Beer Culture”

• LOCAL BAVARIAN-STYLE BEER served in 16 oz. or in 1-liter commemorative Oktoberfest stein for small additional charge

• LIVE MUSIC featuring The Chardon Polka Band • INDIANAPOLIS’ FINEST FOOD TRUCKS including Der Prezel Wagen, Cutie Pies Pizza, Big Ron’s Bistro, Taste of the Caribbean, Little Eataly, Nicey Treat, and the Flying Cupcake

HISTORIC MILITARY PARK AT WHITE RIVER


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PIANIST EDDIE PALMIERI AT JAZZ FEST

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ummarizing Eddie Palmieri’s career in the space of one column is about as easy as eating a whole watermelon in a single bite. So I’ll provide a brief introduction and jump straight into my recent conversation with the music legend. Palmieri’s daring harmonic experiments on the piano have established his reputation one as o e of o the t e greatest soloists so o sts in the t e history storyof o

Latin jazz. In addition to his dazzling virtuosity, Palmieri is also an extraordinary musical innovator. His early work with his group La Perfecta laid the foundation for salsa music, while his album Harlem River Drive essentially invented the genre of Latin funk. Palmieri’s talent and musical achievements place him in an elite group of living American musicians. Palmieri’s name can be mentioned comfortably alongside Bob Dylan’s or Stevie Wonder’s as an influential force in the development of American music. At 76, Palmieri is the most quick-witted and entertaining musician I’ve ever interviewed, cracking jokes and reciting arcane historical facts at every turn. It seems the maestro is still on top of his game, a good indication that his upcoming performance at Jazz Fest should not be missed. NUVO: It’s an honor to speak to you. How are you and what are you working on currently?

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Eddie Palmieri

30 MUSIC // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

EDDIE PALMIERI: I’m better than ever! It’s a beautiful day in New York. I was in Europe earlier this year. We started the tour in Paris, France with our big band. Then we took the Latin jazz septet to Germany, Spain, Switzerland and even went as far as Serbia. It was an incredible tour and I’ll be bringing my Latin jazz septet to Indianapolis for Jazz Fest.

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

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EDDIE PALMIERI LATIN JAZZ BAND

WHEN: TUESDAY, SEPT. 17, 8 P.M. W H E R E : INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART TERRACE, 4000 MICHIGAN ROAD TICKETS: PRICES VARY, ALL-AGES

Right now I’m now preparing for a big concert here in New York at Lehman College. I’m putting together a whole new presentation utilizing the batá drums. The batá drum is the most primitive of all African drums and it’s the source of all those rhythmic patterns that have excited the world. NUVO: You used the batá drum on your 1979 album Lucumí, Macumba, Voodoo which combined funk and disco with Afro-Latin percussion to tell a story about Santería and other forms of African religion in the Americas. PALMIERI: It didn’t have so much to do with the religion. I know a little about that. Naturally

I’ve researched it and I think pretty soon I’ll be able turn my critics into hamsters with all the voodoo I learned in Santería. [laughs] Seriously, that album was all about the drum and the rhythmical patterns that the batá players used for all the deities like Shango or Yemanja. This was all done in camouflage. When they brought the captive Africans into Cuba, they used the Catholic religion to camouflage their traditional beliefs. For instance they disguised Shango as Santa Barbara. They came up with incredible rhythmic patterns for all those deities to tell their stories. Those Santería music patterns eventually evolved into dance music in the ‘20s and ‘30s and the Santería groups eventually became orchestras. The greatest dance bands the world has ever known in our genre came out of Cuba. Then Cuba influenced the United States through New York in the ‘40s and ‘50s with artists like Machito, the master Tito Puente and the two great singers Tito Rodríguez and Vicentico Valdés. I played with Vicentico Valdés and Tito Rodríguez. I made a record with Tito Rodríguez in 1959 called Live at the Palladium. It was a tremendous album. It was danceable, but it was also Latin jazz.

SEE PALMIERI, ON PAGE

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>> Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net


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NUVO: Your band La Perfecta changed Latin music with its heavy trombone sound. Music historians also say you were laying the foundation for what would later become salsa music. PALMIERI: First, I must say the term salsa is a misnomer. The best quote on that comes from Tito Puente. He said “Salsa is what I put on my spaghetti, baby.” The reason I point that out is because these rhythmical patterns have their proper names. They all come from the mother rhumba. There was a lot of judgment placed on that word rhumba; it became synonymous with lower class people and women of the night. Yet this is the music that set the world dancing. Through their suffering, they brought happiness to the world, which is quite extraordinary. NUVO: I have to ask about your 1971 album Harlem River Drive. I consider it one the best soul albums ever made, but it was a big departure from the Latin sound you were famous for. PALMIERI: It started with the lyrics written by Calvin Cash, who was a friend of mine. I’d been wanting to record a crossover album and Ronnie Cuber who was working in Aretha Franklin’s band connected me with all these R&B musicians like Cornell Dupree and Bernard Purdie. The album came out on the Roulette label. I was signed to a subsidiary of Roulette called Tico Records, but I asked the label owner Morris Levy to release the album on Roulette. Roulette had put out a lot of hits by artists like Tommy James and the Shondells. I wanted to crossover, but it turned out the album’s biggest fans were the Weathermen [laughs]. You know the political group who were rebelling against the government? They embraced it when they heard the lyrics on numbers like “Idle Hands,” which are still relevant now and will be forever. The next thing we know the FBI and CIA are knocking on Morris Levy’s door asking about the album. Morris called me and said “Mr. Palmieri, don’t record that shit anymore.” That was the second time I attracted the attention of the FBI. The first time was for my album Mambo Con Conga is Mozambique. It was about the first Cubans coming over to the U.S. and I was accused of being a communist. [laughs] NUVO: Did you have any idea Harlem River Drive would be so influential? I’ve read that War was very influenced by that album and it certainly set a direction for Latin funk in general. PALMIERI: I had a feeling when we were recording it. At the time I was taking aking g classes clas cl asses in political economy, which is a theory theor ory y based on the studies of Henry George George ge who ran for Mayor of New Yorkk in in the the 1800s. He wrote a great book called Progress and Poverty. When Calvin Clash came to me with his lyrics, I knew it was quite complimentary to these studies — I was learning about this life and Calvin had lived it. We were asking “why is there immense poverty next to immense wealth?” Poverty keeps getting worse, not only in the United Stated but all 32 MUSIC // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

NEWS

over the world. “Idle Hands” talks about the super rich who are in control. There’s a great quote by Oliver Goldsmith. He said, “Law grinds the poor, and rich men rule the law.” “Idle Hands” tells the story of how this happens and it’s a hell of a statement. It became quite clear to us that we had something special. NUVO: You went on to record two amazing live albums at Sing Sing Prison with the Harlem River Drive band. How did that come about and do you have any particular stand-out memories of that experience? PALMIERI: Well Calvin Clash was locked up in Sing Sing at the time. So we would go there to visit him. I remember before we started playing that show the A&R man from Tico Joe Cain, who was an Italian guy, came up to me and said “Eddie, 80 percent of the audience out there are black.” I said “Joe, open the curtain,” and we blew the place apart. I played a lot of prisons in those years. I played Lewisburg when they brought in the people from Watergate. I played women’s prisons. I played a prison in Colombia in South America. When I played Rikers Island they had a musical director at the prison. This guy was a friend of Dizzy Gillespie’s and when I played Rikers, Dizzy came along as my master of ceremonies. When we came onto stage Dizzy says, “Before I bring on my Latin soul brother Eddie Palmieri, I want to ask him a question. Eddie, have you ever played for such a captive audience?” He brought the place down. [laughs] NUVO: You’ve seen Latin music go through many changes during your career. What do you think of the current state of Latin music? PALMIERI: It’s in an abysmal state. There is no Latin music anymore; you only have Latin pop. What they call salsa is a disaster. They took away the excitement of the dance orchestra. I suggest if you go out dancing with your partner today, bring pillows because they’ll put you to sleep on the dance floor. You’ll be bored to death. They took away the tension and resistance, which is what gives you the excitement. Sex and danger are the exciters - the reaction of the human being is love and fear. All of these things should be inside the arrangements. You need a high degree of orgasm in the music. You need a high musical climax to create energy. It builds the momentum when the piano player takes a solo and passes it to the conga, bongo and timbales. That doesn’t exist anymore. There are no more solos, except maybe a young guy singing who makes you want to pull the plug on the whole band. „


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WEDNESDAY LEGEND Calvin Johnson Is there a cooler dude than Calvin Johnson? The K Records founder and Cool Rays, Beat Happening, Dub Narcotic Sound System and Beat Happening member is a pivotal character of the indie music movement. He’s on tour now and holds the honor of opening up General Public Collective, a brand new collaborative arts space in Fountain Square (in the old Joe’s Cycles storefront). The artistrun space will hold exhibitions and performances, alongside the silk screen press, darkroom, studios and more. General Public Collective, 1060 Virginia Ave., 8 p.m., FREE (donations accepted), all-ages MEMORIAL Annual America Remembers The Rathskeller honors Americans lost on 9/11 with this jam-packed music event. Jeff Owens, My Yellow Rickshaw, The Woomblies, Zanna Doo, Benita Dibartoli, Brenda Williams and Maria Diebolt will all perform, in between a live auction, balloon release, guest speaker sessions and a candlelight vigil. All proceeds benefit the Indianapolis Metropolitan Firefighters Bereavement Fund and Hoosier Burn Camp. Biergarten at the Rathskeller, 401 E. Michigan St. 4 p.m., $5, 21+ POP Walk the Moon This Cincy indie rock band returns to Indy for another show at Deluxe. Check their poppy hooks on tracks like “Anna Sun” and “Tightrope.” Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St. 7:30 p.m., $20, all-ages

‘90S Fastball, 650 North, The Easthills Here’s the question I posed to Fastball singer/guitarist Miles Zuniga. Where does the band put ‘90s radio megahit “The Way” in their setlist? He heaved a big sigh before answering. “Predictably, at the end. Near the end. There’s no doubt it’s a moneyshot, as it were. And to play it first, although it would be hilarious – and I’ve thought of doing that before, just playing it first and then being done with it – wouldn’t be good showbiz. You’ve gotta play it towards the end. We don’t put it at the very end, but we know people are waiting for it and want to hear it. If you play it too early, it’s kind of a drag, you know. … I think we’re a really, really great live act and many people are surprised, who haven’t seen us, how good we are. I just let the music do that talking.” Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St. 8 p.m., $13 advance, $15 at door, 21+ Field Report, Treetop Flyers, DO317 Lounge, 21+

THURSDAY JAZZ Allen Toussaint Toussaint kicks off Indy Jazz Fest at the brand new Schrott Center. He’s a fabulous choice by the Fest for an opener; he’s a composer, producer and performer of most famously of New Orleans R&B. But his newest, The Bright Mississippi , released in 2009, is his second jazz album. It’s a mix of modern and traditional jazz songs and styles, and critically adored. This show is accompanied by an exhibit of photographs by Mark Sheldon. Schrott Center for the Arts, 610 W. 46th St., 8 pm., $42, all-ages

MONSTERS GWAR, Hatebreed We present an abbreviated portion of Taylor Peters’ excellent piece “Lessons From My First GWAR Show,” available in full on NUVO.net. Prepare thyself. 1. No matter how much time you spend trying to find a spot that’s out of the range of GWAR’s many blood cannons, you’ll probably underestimate. I didn’t count the number of times that GWAR shot fake blood into the audience, though I’m positive it was at least ten, and probably more. At one point they decided to cut through the drama of acting out a beheading or a disembowelment as a precursor to jets of fake blood, and instead they just wheeled out a cannon whose sole purpose, it seems, was to emit a concentration of fake blood into the audience. 2. A high level of acting skill is not necessary with a liberal helping of fake blood and a heavy-metal backing track. At several points in the evening, one character would simply wave his giant sword in the direction of another character, at which point that character would simply stop what he was doing and remove a layer of fake skin in order to simulate a wound. Casting directors of the world, take note. 3. GWAR are a great unifier in the heavy-metal world. Under few other circumstances would it make as much sense for a traditional death-metal band like Ghoul and a metalcore band like Every Time I Die to be playing together. In addition to this, I saw nearly every stripe of metal-head imaginable at this concert, and they all seemed either to be having the time of their life or to be frustrated that they were more soaked in fake blood than they would have liked. Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave. 8 p.m., $25, 21+

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FRIDAY EDM Wheel House Fest Turn on back to page 10 for more on Wheel House Fest, a jam-packed night of dance in Opti Park. Cross your fingers for more excellent events in Broad Ripple Park and Opti Park next year – 2013’s been huge. Opti Park, 780 E. 66th St. 5 p.m., prices vary, all-ages THROWBACK Pokey LaFarge A word about Pokey from Arts Editor Scott Shoger from a Bloomington show in 2010: “LaFarge does justice to his heroes, the now somewhat-obscure figures in the world of hillbilly, mountain and old-time music that made most of their recordings before WWII, and mostly during in a prime period that fell after advent of electronic recording in the mid to late ‘20s and before the Depression made it less than economically beneficial for labels such as Okeh to churn out niche old-time or “race” 78s. And it’s almost all about the recordings for 20-something artists like LaFarge — folks like Mike and Pete Seeger had the opportunity to meet some of the musicians who made those recordings when they were re-discovered in the ‘50s and ‘60s, but this generation has only the records to learn from. So, did your average old-time musician have quite the strident, nasal tenor that LaFarge has adopted, or is that simply the style of singing, adapted to less than responsive microphones, that comes down to us from history, forever altered by the means by which it reaches us? … Regardless, LaFarge and his band sound authentic — and look the part too, down to LaFarge’s slicked-back hair and suspenders and the washboard player’s feathered fedora. His band even plans to release a 78 next year, which follows on their 7-inch now available on Jack White’s Third Man Records (recorded under “interesting” conditions, LaFarge explained from the stage, because White’s music couldn’t be more different from his band’s). But all these accoutrements

would be moot if his band couldn’t play — and they sure can. LaFarge and Co. ably offered up both upbeat dance band numbers (notably “Right Key, Wrong Keyhole”) and surprisingly nuanced, dynamic and playful readings of slower tunes, including “Chitlin’ Cookin’ Time in Cheatham County,” the A-side to that Third Man 7-inch.” Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 8 p.m., $15 advance, $17 at door, all-ages JAZZ Ramsey Lewis This legendary Chicagoan pianist is the highlight of Friday’s Jazz Fest-ivities. Madame Walker Theatre, 617 Indiana Ave., 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages Daniella Cotton, Black Voodoo, Rathskeller Biergarten, 21+ It’s Just a Name, Prime G, The Red Streak, Get Lost, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Nancy Moore, Chef Joseph’s, all-ages

SATURDAY ROOTS The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band Well good goddamn, The Rev’s back already with a show at Garfield Park. This is a bit of an early one at the park – pack your bug spray y’all. Garfield Park MacAllister Amphitheater, 2432 Conservatory Dr., 7 p.m., $10 advance, $15 at door, all-ages ROOTS The Wood Brothers Roots lovers, if you’ve seen the Rev already this year, venture on up to the Vogue to catch Nashville Americana bros Chris and Oliver (Wood, natch). They’ve got a brand new album out on October first; titled The Muse, the Woods’ newest is a collection of drum-less tracks on Zac Brown’s Southern Ground imprint. The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 7 p.m., $18, 21+

ROCK Yellowcard Remember 2003? We were watching The OC, capturing Saddam Hussein. Tigers were attacking Roy in Vegas and we still believed Lance Armstrong was really just that good (after his fifth Tour de France win). And we were listening to Yellowcard’s Ocean Avenue, the perfect, pop punk, major label debut by the California dreamers. And you can relive all that glory again with this year’s all-acoustic release of Avenue, celebrating its 10th anniversary with a complementing tour. I spoke with lead singer Ryan Key, who told me this “isn’t a gimmick,” just something that felt right. “We talked about doing a tour last year, a 10 year anniversary tour last year,” Key says. “We talked about that first, and the idea evolved from there to do a record. So, it wasn’t really about remaking the record to get album sales. We’re not going to – it’s not what happens anymore. It wasn’t a gimmick in that way; we thought that [after doing the record] people would know that’s what we’re doing [at the shows]. We’ve been touring so hard, and don’t want to give people the same show they’ve seen five times. And for fans who were a part of the record 10 years ago, with the exception of a few of the songs, you’ve heard all the songs electric, many times. Hanging out in an acoustic setting like that is a very special thing for the fans and the band. You can almost have a conversation with the crowd without a microphone.” Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St. 8 p.m., $23, all-ages ROCK Mission of Burma These Boston-based rockers have spent a career’s worth of time apart, spanning from 1983 to 2002. But they’ve made up for lost time, recording four albums since rejoining forces, and have had their hit “That’s When I Reach For My Revolver” covered by artists of all sorts. Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect, 9 p.m., $20, all-ages 1st Annual Night for Our Heroes, Sabbatical, all-ages The Meister Winds, Warren Branch Library, all-ages Endiana, Jason Brown, Rathskeller Biergarten, 21+ In Dying Arms, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Cozette Myers, Chef Joseph’s, all-ages

SUNDAY POP Michael Buble This new dad and easy pop star has got a lot on his plate after the recent birth of his first child. One night will be spent in Indy, as he stops by the


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MONDAY

Bankers Life Fieldhouse as part of his 40-city U.S. tour. It’s the follow-up to his adored Crazy Love Tour, which sold out in 80 American stops. Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S Pennsylvania St, 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

ROCK Imagine Dragons A whirlwind of worldwide fame has hit these Las Vegas alternative rockers. They’ll stop by The Lawn at White River State Park on Monday with alt-rock associates, Neighbourhood. The Lawn at White River State Park, 801 West Washington St. 7 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

NOISE No Age with Rankie and The Witch Fingers Flip back to page 28 to read our interview with No Age’s Dean Spunk, who will join tour mates for an all-ages show at the Waldron in Bloomington. Before I got off the phone, Spunk and bandmate Randy Randall quizzed me on Bloomie resident John Mellencamp’s sons’ unusual names (one of them’s Speck Wildhorse, if you’re wondering) – so they’re preparing for a Bloomington show. Waldron Arts Center, 122 S. Walnut St. (Bloomington) 7 p.m., $15, all-ages Chicago with the ISO, Lawn at White River, all-ages Benefit Concert or Ronald McDonald House of Indiana. Guitarworks (Greenwood), all-ages Indiana boys Album Release Concert, Brown County Playhouse, all-ages Afrolatino, Indianapolis Public Library, all-ages Heartland USA Dance 20th Anniversary Gala, Scottish Rite Cathedral, all-ages Corduroy Mavericks, Metro, 21+ Rumours: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac, Rathskeller Biergarten, 21+ The World Is a Beautiful Place & I Am No Longer Afraid to Die, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Brian Nova, Steve Allee Trio, Stan Hills, Jazz Kitchen, 21+

Bueselli-Wallarab Jazz Orchestra, Zach Lapidus Trio, Indiana Landmarks Center, all-ages

TUESDAY ROCK Queens of the Stone Age Queens of the Stone Age are stopping by cities across the country following the release of their sixth studio album (and first since 2007) titled …Like Clockwork. They’re sure to include mid-2000s hits like “No One Knows,” while adding a slew of new material to the setlist. Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St. 7:30 p.m., prices vary, all-ages Sigur Ros with Julianna Barwick, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ The Blue Side, Lawn at White River, all-ages The Flatliners Album Release, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Eddie Palmieri’s Latin Jazz Band, IMA, all-ages

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WARMfest

FESTIVAL FORECAST INDIANA Wheel House Festival Sept. 13 - 14 Opti Park Indy’s first major EDM mini-fest is Wheel House, which is presented by a collection of Indy’s finest EDM promoters. This is seriously big, guys. Paul Oakenfold, Flosstradamus and Key N Krates will headline, along with a pack of others. The biggest news? This event is all-ages. Sister Cities Sept. 14 Asthmatic Kitty artist Helado Negro returns to Indianapolis for the internationally flavored Sister Cities Festival. Sample a variety of foods, watch traditional dance performances and sign up for different cultural clubs at this Georgia Street festival. Jazz Fest Sept. 12 - Sept 21 Various locations Our beloved Jazz Fest returns, with Ravi Coltrane, Allen Toussaint and Ramsey Lewis in tow. Get your tickets now!

ILLINOIS Riot Fest , Chicago Sept. 13 - Sept. 15 Holy balls. The Chicago version of this fest features a large-scale reunion by The Replacements, along with headlining sets from Fall Out Boy, Blink 182, Pixies, Public Enemy, Danzig, Joan Jett and so many more.

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TECHNOLOGY ARCHITECT ExactTarget, Inc. is seeking a full-time Technology Architect in Indianapolis, IN to develop solutions, recommend best practices, manage multiple client engagements, domain specific advisory and subject matter expert, identify project issues/ risks and present alternatives, create project documentation, deliver training and enablement to clients and execute test plans. Contact Todd Richardson, Senior Vice President, 20 North Meridian St., Ste. 200, Indianapolis, IN 46204 or recruiting@exacttarget.com

SALON/SPA Salon Booth Space Available Castleton. Private or shared. New equipment. 6520 E. 82nd Street. Call 317-577-4995 x106.

RESTAURANT BAR

NUVO.NET N C Complete l t Classifieds listings available at NUVO.NET

DRIVERS

GENERAL

DRIVERS NEEDED

Moving company seeking dependable drivers for Full and Part-time positions or weekends only.

Necessary requirements: -Valid Chauffer’s license or higher -DOT physical form -Hard working -Reliable -Enjoy good pay

Call 317-716-5529

or email Benjamin at benjamin@1mastermovers.com FRONT OF THE HOUSE team members needed. Day and Night shift. Must apply in person between 2pm-4pm. Shula’s Steakhouse, 50 South Capitol Ave. DATSA PIZZA Now hiring Cooks and Servers. No Experience. Free Parking. Please apply within: 907 N. Pennsylvania between 2-4pm

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PART TIME

PERMANENT PART-TIME WORK GENERAL WAREHOUSE

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HEALTH CARE HHA/PCA NEEDED Home Health Agency hiring for in-home care employee. Apply in person. 5226 Southeast Street. suite A9. Indianapolis, IN 46227. Via fax: 317-405-9045 or email attentivehome@gmail.com

REAL ESTATE Homes for sale | Rentals Mortgage Services | Roommates To advertise in Real Estate, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

RENTALS DOWNTOWN LOVE DOWNTOWN? Roomy 1920’s Studio near IUPUI & Canal. Dining area with builtins, huge W/I closet. Heat paid. Shows Nicely! Large! Views! Brand New Carpet! $465/month ($450 for smaller unit available too). Won’t last long! Leave message 722-7115.

RENTALS NORTH BROAD RIPPLE 5149 N. College. 3bdrm, 1ba. Bsmt, AC, Appliances, . hrwd flrs. $825/mo + Dep. 803-7367188 317-937-6858

RENTALS

THE GRANVILLE & THE WINDEMERE 1BR & 2BR/1BA Apartments in the heart of BR Village. Great Dining, Entertainment & Shopping at your doorstep. On-site laundries & free storage. RENTS RANGE FROM $575-$625 WTR-SWR & HEAT PAID.

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ROOMMATES

Immediate Job Openings! Elwood Staffing is in need of associates for their NE Branch.

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WE ARE LOOKING FOR :

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Various Shifts Available Pay rates range from $8.00 - $15.00 an hour Must be willing to submit to a pre employment drug screen & background check

DRIVERS

Looking for experienced CDL class A company drivers and owner operators to haul dry freights over all 48 states. REQUIREMENTS: • Must Have a Class A CDL with

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new 2013 trailers, every 15 days pay, direct deposit

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• Earn great perks including a discounted gym and pool membership! Scan this ly app • Apply to become a Facilitator at code to ! ne li n o CarmelClayParks.com/employment.

1235 Central Park Dr. East 317.573.5240 carmelclayparks.com 38 CLASSIFIEDS // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

APPLY ONLINE AT:

elwoodstaffing.com The better people, people.

9520 Uptown Drive, Indpls

( Located just off 96th Street Behind Bob Evans)

317-849-5800

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PLEASE CONTACT US BY PHONE @ 317-408-3211 OR APPLY ONLINE @ WWW.HKTRANSPORTINC.COM


BODY/MIND/SPIRIT Certified Massage Therapists Yoga | Chiropractors | Counseling To advertise in Body/Mind/Spirit, Call Marta @ 808-4615

GOT PAIN OR STRESS? Rapid and dramatic results from a highly trained, caring professional with 14 years experience. www.connective-therapy.com: Chad A. Wright, ACBT, COTA, CBCT 317-372-9176

LECTURE/EVENTS

PRO MASSAGE Top Quality, Swedish, Deep Tissue Massage in Quiet Home Studio. Near Downtown. From Certified Therapist. Paul 317-362-5333

PYRAMID PYRAMI MID D OF ENLIGHTENMENT ENLIGHT TENMENT

Advertisers running in the CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY section have graduated from a massage therapy school associated with one EMPEROR MASSAGE Stimulus Rates InCall $38/60min, of four organizations: $60/95min (applys to 1st visit only). Call for details to discover International Massage American Massage Therapy and experience this incredible Association (imagroup.com) Association (amtamassage.org) Japanese massage. Northside, avail. 24/7 317-431-5105 International Myomassethics Association of Bodywork BACK TO SCHOOL SPECIAL Federation (888-IMF-4454) and Massage Professionals Mom, the Kids are Back in School (abmp.com) ... So Relax with 1hr Swedish or Deep Tissue Massage. Additionally, one can not be a member of these four organizations State Certified, Male Therapist but instead, take the test AND/OR have passed the National Board of $40/hr Call Rex Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork exam (ncbtmb.com). For Mobile Appointments. 765-481-9192

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R U STRESSED? Breaking your back at work or gym? Jack tackles it! Light or Relax the Body, Calm the Mind, deep sports massage. Aft/Eve. Renew the Spirit. Theraeutic massage by certified Jack, 645-5020. WILL TRAVEL therapist with over 9 years experience. IN/OUT calls available. Near southside location. Call Bill 317-374-8507 www.indymassage4u.com

MARKETPLACE Services | Misc. for Sale Musicians B-Board | Pets To advertise in Marketplace, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

LEGAL SERVICES

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LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, an experienced Traffic Law Attorney,I can help you with: Hardship Licenses-No Insurance SuspensionsHabitual Traffic Violators-Relief from Lifetime SuspensionsDUI-Driving While Suspended & All Moving Traffic Violations! Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law FREE CONSULTATIONS www.indytrafficattorney.com 317-686-7219

CASH FOR CARS We buy cars, trucks, vans, runable or not or wrecked. ADOPTION Open 24/7. 317-709-1715. PREGNANT? ADOPTION CAN FREE HAUL AWAY BE YOUR FRESH START! ON JUNK CARS. Let Amanda, Carol or Brandy PAYING $325 meet you for lunch and talk about And Up For Complete your options. Their Broad Ripple Cars! FREE TOWING! agency offers free support, living Call Us Direct Today expenses and a friendly voice 24 At 317-662-2527 hrs/day. YOU choose the family from happy, carefully-screened couples. Pictures, letters, visits & open adoptions available. Listen to our birth mothers’ stories at www.adoptionsupportcenter.com 317-255-5916 The Adoption Support Center

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RESEARCH

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY © 2013 BY ROB BRESZNY

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A good story should make you laugh, and a moment later break your heart,” wrote Chuck Palahniuk in his book Stranger Than Fiction. David Hulse, CMSTT From what I can tell, Aries, the sequence is the reverse for Sept 16-18, 7-9pm you. In your story, the disruption has already happened. Next comes the part where you laugh. It may be a sarMon: Using the Science of Sound donic chuckle at first, as you become aware of the illuTherapy for Personal sions you had been under before the jolt exposed them. Transformation Eventually I expect you will be giggling and gleeful, eterTues: Using Sound Ratios for Personal Power! nally grateful for the tricky luck that freed you to pursue a Wed: Activate YOUR Codes with DNA/ more complete version of your fondest dream. RNA/PinealGland Tuning Forks! For Registration/Info: TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Taurus musician David Byrne was asked by an interviewer to compose a 317-899-7590 www.pyramid-of-enlightenment.com seven-word autobiography. In response, he came up with ten words: “unfinished, unprocessed, uncertain, unknown, unadorned, underarms, underpants, unfrozen, unsettled, unfussy.” The coming days would be an excellent time for you to carry out similar assignments. I’d love to see you express the essential truth about yourself in bold and playful ways. I will also be happy if you make it clear that even though you’re a work-inprogress, you have a succinct understanding of what you need and who you are becoming. WELCOMES PIONEER OF SOUND THERAPY

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The French word sillage means “wake,” like the trail created behind a boat as it zips through water. In English, it refers to the fragrance that remains in the air after a person wearing perfume or cologne passes by. For our purposes, we will expand the definition to include any influences and impressions left behind by a powerful presence who has exited the scene. In my astrological opinion, Gemini, sillage is a key theme for you to monitor in the coming days. Be alert for it. Study it. It will be a source of information that helps you make good decisions. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Cataglottism” is a rarely used English word that has the same meaning as French kissing -- engaging in liberal use of the tongue as you make out. But I don’t recommend that you incorporate such an inelegant, guttural term into your vocabulary. Imagine yourself thinking, while in the midst of French kissing, that what you’re doing is “cataglottism.” Your pleasure would probably be diminished. This truth applies in a broader sense, too. The language you use to frame your experience has a dramatic impact on how it all unfolds. The coming week will be an excellent time to experiment with this principle. See if you can increase your levels of joy and grace by describing what’s happening to you with beautiful and positive words. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): This is Correct Your First Impressions Week. It’s a perfect time for you to reevaluate any of your beliefs that are based on mistaken facts or superficial perceptions. Are you open to the possibility that you might have jumped to unwarranted conclusions? Are you willing to question certainties that hardened in you after just a brief exposure to complicated processes? During Correct Your First Impressions Week, humble examination of your fixed prejudices is one of the greatest gifts you can give yourself. P.S. This is a good time to re-connect with a person you have unjustly judged as unworthy of you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This is a good time to free yourself from a curse that an immature soul placed on you once upon a time. I’m not talking about a literal spell cast by a master of the dark arts. Rather, I’m referring to an abusive accusation that was heaped on you, perhaps inadvertently, by a careless person whose own pain made them stupid. As I evaluate the astrological omens, I conclude that you now have the power to dissolve this curse all by yourself. You don’t need a wizard or a witch to handle it for you. Follow your intuition for clues on how to proceed. Here’s a suggestion to stimulate your imagination: Visualize the curse as a dark purple rose. See yourself hurling it into a vat of molten gold.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The current chapter of your life story may not be quite as epic as I think it is, so my advice may sound melodramatic. Still, what I’m going to tell you is something we all need to hear from time to time. And I’m pretty sure this is one of those moments for you. It comes from writer Charles Bukowski: “Nobody can save you but yourself. You will be put again and again into nearly impossible situations. They will attempt again and again through subterfuge, guise, and force to make you submit, quit and/or die quietly inside. But don’t, don’t, don’t. It’s a war not easily won, but if anything is worth winning then this is it. Nobody can save you but yourself, and you’re worth saving.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The cosmos hereby grants you poetic license to be brazen in your craving for the best and brightest experiences ... to be uninhibited in feeding your obsessions and making them work for you ... to be shameless as you pursue exactly and only what you really, really want more than anything else. This is a limited time offer, although it may be extended if you pounce eagerly and take full advantage. For best results, suspend your pursuit of trivial wishes and purge yourself of your bitchy complaints about life. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): At the last minute, Elsa Oliver impulsively canceled her vacation to New York. She had a hunch that something exciting would happen if instead she stayed at her home in England. A few hours later, she got a message inviting her to be a contestant on the UK television show Who Wants To Be a Millionaire? In the days and weeks that followed, she won the equivalent of $100,000. I’m not predicting anything quite as dramatic for you, Sagittarius. But I do suspect that good luck is lurking in unexpected places, and to gather it in you may have to trust your intuition, stay alert for late-breaking shifts in fate, and be willing to alter your plans. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The only thing standing between you and your goal,” writes American author Jordan Belfort, “is the bullshit story you keep telling yourself as to why you can’t achieve it.” I don’t entirely agree with that idea. There may be other obstacles over which you have little control. But the bullshit story is often more than half the problem. So that’s the bad news, Capricorn. The good news is that right now is a magic moment in your destiny when you have more power than usual to free yourself of your own personal bullshit story. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Is the truth a clear, bright, shiny treasure, like a big diamond glittering in the sunlight? Does it have an objective existence that’s independent of our feelings about it? Or is the truth a fuzzy, convoluted thing that resembles a stream of smoke snaking through an underground cavern? Does it have a different meaning for every mind that seeks to grasp it? The answer, of course, is: both. Sometimes the truth is a glittering diamond and at other times it’s a stream of smoke. But for you right now, Aquarius, the truth is the latter. You must have a high tolerance for ambiguity as you cultivate your relationship with it. It’s more likely to reveal its secrets if you maintain a flexible and cagey frame of mind. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s a good time to indulge in wide-open, high-flying, anything-goes fantasies about love -- IF, that is . . . IF you also do something practical to help those fantasies come true. So I encourage you to dream about revolutionizing your relationship with romance and intimacy -- as long as you also make specific adjustments in your own attitudes and behavior that will make the revolution more likely. Two more tips: 1. Free yourself from dogmatic beliefs you might have about love’s possibilities. 2. Work to increase your capacity for lusty trust and trusty lust.

Homework: What’s the part of yourself that is least evolved and needs most transformation? Testify at Freewillastrology.com. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 09.11.13 - 09.18.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 39


LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, the original Indy Traffic Attorney, I can help you with: Hardship Licenses Probationary Licenses No Insurance Suspensions Habitual Traffic Violator Charges and Suspensions Lifetime Suspensions Uninsured Accident Suspensions Operating While Intoxicated Charges and Suspensions BMV Suspensions, Hearings, and Appeals Court Imposed Suspensions All Moving Traffic Violations and Suspensions

Free Consultations Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law www.indytrafficattorney.com

317-686-7219

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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - September 11, 2013  

Wheel House: EDM in the park - Plus: Jazz Fest, Irish Fest, Sister Cities, Beech Grove Fall Festival

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