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ECO-TRANSPORTATION CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

AND MORE!


SEPTEMBER 2012

CONTENTS

D E PA R T M E N T S

PUBLISHER Kevin McKinney

05 05 06 09 21 22 25 25 28 29 29 30

kmckinney@IndianaLivingGreen.com

EDITORIAL EDITOR Jim Poyser jpoyser@IndianaLivingGreen.com EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Jennifer Troemner (Indianapolis) CONTRIBUTORS The ApocaDocs, Katelyn Coyne, Lynn Jenkins, Rita Kohn, Joe Lee, Angela Leisure, Lori Lovely, James Lowe, Bowden Quinn, Betsy Sheldon, Renee Sweany INTERNS Jordan Martich (Ball State), Olivia McPherson (Hanover), Bethany Tatham (IUPUI), Sarah Ward (IUSB), Joshua Watson (IUPUI), Renee Wellman (Carmel High School) COPY EDITOR Geoff Ooley

WEB DIGITAL PLATFORMS EDITOR Tristan Schmid tschmid@IndianaLivingGreen.com

Eco-transportation

For those of you who are still unable to astral project or don’t have access to that transporter you see in Star Trek, you have to get around somehow. Welcome to ILG’s comprehensive-as-possible guide to eco-transportation.

I.T. MANAGER T.J. Zmina tjzmina@IndianaLivingGreen.com

Gardening with Lynn Doom & Bloom Watts and Whatnot Eco-Transportation Advocates Green Biz September Events Green Reads Green Marketplace Ask Renee The PANIQuiz Life is an Egg by Joe Lee

SALES & MARKETING SALES ASSOCIATE Robert Barnes rbarnes@IndianaLivingGreen.com DIRECTOR OF SALES & MARKETING Mary Morgan mmorgan@IndianaLivingGreen.com MARKETING & PROMOTIONS COORDINATOR Lauren Guidotti lguidotti@IndianaLivingGreen.com

06 The Nature Conservancy sets the bar

22 Shoe’s smaller footprint Yama Sharifi has hit the ground running with his ANI (As Nature Intended) brand of all-vegan, ecofriendly barefoot shoe.

MARKETING & PROMOTIONS ASSISTANT Kate Bragg kbragg@IndianaLivingGreen.com

The Efroymson Conservation Center boasts 55 points out of a LEEDrequired 52 for platinum certification.

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Editor’s note: Yes, this is literally an editor’s note, from the editor, me, Jim Poyser. By the time this issue hits the stands I will be back from training in San Francisco with the Climate Reality Project. Unless I flunk, I will be part of their Leadership Corps, which means I will return to the Indianapolis area with a power point presentation about climate change that evolved out of Al Gore’s 2006 documentary, An Inconvenient Truth. I will endeavor to share this power point with as many of you as possible. If you’d like me to come to your school, your club, your organization — for free — email me at jpoyser@indianalivinggreen.com.

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doom & bloom with Jim Poyser

GARDENING WITH NATURE by Lynn Jenkins

There’s still time

The signs of fall are here, including shortening days, turning leaves, and cawing crows. Resident hummingbirds already left for their tropical home, and monarchs are gorging on nectar for their trip to Mexico. Did summer fly by because time quickens with age, or because I spent less time in my garden this year trying to keep cool inside? There is still time to enjoy the garden and much to do before winter sets in. • It’s not too late to plant garlic. Although it can be planted spring or fall, spring is often too wet and too busy. Plant the largest cloves about an inch deep and six inches apart in rows. Expect a little growth this fall, with harvest next summer.

Bikes build community cars destroy it A disturbing thing happened to me early in the summer. For a number of reasons too boring to go into, I had to drive to work. It’s a rarity. I drive to work, depending on the severity of weather, etc., maybe a dozen times a year. So I was driving in my neighborhood, cursing my fate that I was in a car instead of on my bike, when I spied ahead my friend Dante. He was standing on a street corner with a young boy beside him. They were taking a walk, I surmised, and kept pressing ahead, and as I passed them I saw between the two a rabbit on a leash. That’s right, Dante and his young companion were walking a rabbit. It was a good-sized rabbit, mostly white, with black spots here and there, and that red leash … wow, what an impressive scene! You do not witness that every day! So what did I do? Just kept driving. It really wasn’t until that night that I even thought about this. I wasn’t particularly in a hurry that morning. I wasn’t late for a meeting. I could have stopped. Stopped and pet the bunny. Found out what they were all doing there. That fly-on-by-mentality never happens on a bike. In fact, my life can be quite Mayberry-like, riding to and from my work errands — some days I can barely get to where I’m going; other days I can’t get home, depending on how many people are out and about on foot or on their own bikes. Bikes, you see, build community. Cars … well, cars destroy it. We have a lot of problems. We reached the 400 parts per million level of CO2 in the atmosphere; our air, water and soil are polluted; we have massive dead zones and islands of floating plastic; we

draw over 90 percent of our energy from coal; and we have pollution from cars. Transportation is probably the easiest to solve of all those problems. With the right incentives, we could get half the cars off the road tomorrow. I know we can do better. As I’ve said in these pages before, I sit at stoplights and watch folks drive by and 90 percent of the cars I see have one occupant. And that occupant is usually talking on the phone or texting. I can only imagine that there are plenty of you coming from the same general area, and going to the same general area, and there is a service in Indianapolis where you can actually exploit that for carpooling and bike buddies. It’s called Commuter Connect (formerly known as the Central Indiana Commuter Service) and the larger their database, the more people they can match up for transportation. Worried about needing that sudden ride? Your kid is sick at school or whatever? Commuter Connect gives out taxi vouchers when you have an emergency. But I’m getting too specific here, because ultimately, it’s a mindset. In the book, Cooler Smarter, the Union of Concerned Scientists says you can greatly reduce the amount of CO2 you produce by purchasing a fuel efficient vehicle. What about driving less? A lot less? Carpooling would do it. But the problem is that over the past 40 years, carpooling has fallen from 20 percent to 11 percent (in 2008). We should be moving the other way, doubling, not halving, or rideshares. So it’s a mindset, an attitude. A commitment. Carpool, vanpool, bicycle, bus … hey, telecommute, I am right now as I write this! There are so many options that aren’t you getting into your car alone and driving to work. Make some friends; build community; when possible, stop and smell the roses; stop and pet the bunny. ILG

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• Spinach, lettuce, kale and corn salad or mache can also be fall planted with success. The first frost usually hits Central Indiana in mid-October, but a hard freeze doesn’t come until late November. However after this year, who is willing to play weatherman? Just plant and cross your fingers! • Most lawns that were not irrigation-dependent survived the summer heat and drought. Nevertheless, now is the time to do some renovation. Your lawn is only as good as your grass seed. Purdue offers a great website to help homeowners determine which variety and blend is the best choice for their needs — agry.purdue.edu/turf/turfgrassSelectionTool/index.html. Another great resource is Paul Tukey’s book, The Organic Lawn Care Manual, available at SafeLawns.org. Consider reducing the size of your lawn. Shrubs and trees can add value and beauty to your yard and offer wildlife habitat as well. • Speaking of wildlife, don’t deadhead your flowers now. Leave those fading seedheads. Some plants will self-sow for next year and some become food for birds. • If you still don’t have a compost pile, fall is a perfect time to start one. I can’t imagine gardening without “garden gold” compost. It’s easy and there are many websites for info. Mastercomposter.com, composting101.com Lots to still do … get busy! Got a gardening question or a tip to share? Contact Lynn at Lynn@IndianaLivingGreen.com

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WATTS & WHATNOT

The Nature Conservancy sets the bar

Indiana’s best-kept secret is possibly in the next breath that you take. As of 2007, the state’s ecological outlook was declared bleak as Indiana received the scorn of multiple environmental reports. The most scathing came from Forbes magazine. After analyzing Indiana’s overall sustainability, the report returned startling results. Indiana ranked 49th. “Indiana received acrossthe-board low marks,” said the article. “It had the sixth highest carbon footprint of any state.” A macabre prediction punctuated the findings. “[Indiana suffers] from a mix of toxic waste, lots of pollution and consumption and no clear plans to do anything about it. Expect them to remain that way.” Forbes was mistaken. Not long after ink hit the pages in 2007, shovels turned over new earth in Indy. In 2009 The Nature Conservancy, a global conservation organization, partnered with the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to announce bold plans to open a building capable of achieving Indianapolis’ first ever LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certified platinum building. Dan Overbey, of Browning Day Mullins & Dierdorf Architects, is USBGC-Indiana chapter’s current chair for 2012 and well aware of the significance of the conservancy’s plan. “I think in the eyes of our peers or even in the building and design industry nationally, finally achieving a platinum project downtown demonstrates a renewal of our commitment,” he says, celebrating the conservancy’s recent completion. Known as the Efroymson Conservation Center, the building was completed in April of 2010. The structure is a modest 22,000 square feet atop a one-acre plot. What the center lacks in

size, however, it makes up for with architectural and design ingenuity, boasting 55 points out of a LEED-required 52 for platinum certification. The Nature Conservancy found creative paths to construct a sustainable project from development to occupation. Utilizing recycled brick and timber from the prior building on the plot, the project was able to cut construction costs while preventing the need for new material. The building’s reception desk, common area tables and garden benches were all crafted from the same timber source. Overbey seems pleased not only with the building’s ideals, but with the tangibles that are helping to make eco-friendly developments a cultural-given in Indiana. “When a project goes through LEED, they’re going beyond just promises of intent,” he says. “To get certified is both a symbol, your plaque on the wall … an outward expression that your team has reached these verified goals on the project, but more specifically it insures that the facility has achieved the goals that they’ve set towards accomplishing. It insures that the building is designed efficiently, that it uses resources as sparingly as possible, and that the interiors will be as healthy as possible.” Intelligent solutions help to answer the city’s desperate air, water and carbon footprint situations. Daylight-sensing artificially lit interiors significantly reduce the electrical requirements of the center. Rooftop gardens absorb water and carbon and help to emit oxygen, while water collection devices store almost all rainwater that falls on the building’s property. “Our ‘graywater’ system captures rainwater for non-consumption uses, such as landscape watering and flushing toilets,” the conservancy

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By James Lowe

states. “We estimate that we will save the city of Indianapolis $690,000 over 30 years by not having to process any of our storm water.” Overbey believes in the significance of what even one triumph can mean to the bigger picture. “This takes a step forward for the state of Indiana in general,” he says. “There are a lot of strategies that have been put in place very clearly. It’s a great project for teams to go see how strategies were executed.” Based on USGBC statistics, Indiana’s future is bright. Residential and commercial properties combined, as of January 2012, there were 420 LEED affiliated projects in Indiana, 26th best in the nation. Notable groups currently seeking certification include Indiana and Butler Universities, Indiana Public Schools, The Hoosier Lottery and multiple residential units and apartment complexes. More information can be found at usgbc.org. With The Nature Conservancy as a standard bearer, hope can build that the next round of sustainability statistics will be less ominous. “I think that the green building movement has a lot of momentum,” Overbey says. “What passes for a ‘certifiable green building’ today is going to become more and more mainstream. Five years from now it may be the case that green strategies are going to become common practice. I think the bar is just going to keep moving forward.” The Efroymson Conservation Center is available for open tours on Thursdays from 4-5 p.m. or by appointment. To become involved with The Nature Conservancy directly, individuals can sign up for membership or make donations. For more information call the center directly at 317-951-8818.


WATTS & WHATNOT

NEWS BRIEFS Single-stream recycling at IUPUI The IUPUI campus is taking a step in the green direction this fall. The Office of Sustainability received a grant from Keep America Beautiful and the Coca-Cola Foundation, which allowed them to purchase 305 single stream recycling bins. The bins will be placed in each housing unit on campus, which is home to 812 students. The hope is that this will increase recycling by eliminating the confusion around sorting and what can or cannot be recycled. The campus is also inaugurating a sustainability themed housing unit this fall. All of this is part of an initiative to create a sustainable environment for students. — Josh Watson

IPL’s renewable energy progress Indianapolis Power & Light (IPL) is becoming a leader in solar power by recently awarding Sunrise Energy Venture the chance to supply solar power at three 10 megawatt sites in the IPL service area. IPL would purchase the power generated at the Sunrise sites for 15 years after approval by the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission. IPL is attempting to diversify their resources by using wind, bio-mass and solar photovoltaic (PV). IPL is also working on a 60-acre 10 megawatt solar project in the Indianapolis International

Airport. If this happens, by 2013 IPL could possibly lead Midwest utilities by supplying more solar power generated in their service area. IPL has more than 470, 000 residential, commercial and industrial customers in Indianapolis who will all benefit from the use of solar power. — Sarah Ward

Generation X on climate change

Generation X may not be the stereotypical slackers of those ’90s cult classic movies, but here’s one issue they have trouble caring about: climate change. The generation that was once poked fun at in pop culture for being underachieving slackers has grown into an educated, wired and scientifically literate generation. But recordbreaking heat waves, epic droughts and killer tornadoes haven’t sounded the climate change alarm for these adults, aged 32 to 52, according to a University of Michigan report released in July. With careers, families and kids, Gen X just has bigger concerns, the long-term survey found. They are only slightly more interested in climate change than their parents’ generation – even though more than half of those surveyed believed climate change is a real problem, the study found. “They’re busy and they don’t sit around evenings studying the carbon budget,” said University of Michigan political scientist and study author Jon D. Miller. — The Daily Climate

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ECO-TRANSPORTATION CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

For those of you who are still unable to astral project or don’t have access to transporter, you have to get around somehow. Welcome to ILG’s comprehensive-as-possible guide to ecotransportation. Send additional suggestions for alternative modes of travel to us at jpoyser@ indianalivinggreen.com. Happy travels! — ILG STAFF

The green mile per gallon According to the Environmental Protection Agency, two-thirds of carbon monoxide emissions come from transportation sources – in particular, motor vehicles. At least half the ozone pollution comes from cars, buses, trucks and off-highway vehicles including construction equipment and boats. Of all the activities the average person does on a daily basis, driving a motor vehicle is typically the most polluting. In central Indiana, alternatives to driving, such as bicycling and riding the bus, are not always practical. Nevertheless, some choices can reduce pollution and emissions. For example, a natural gas vehicle can reduce CO2 emissions up to 30 percent and toxic pollutants by up to 90 percent. An electric vehicle can reduce emissions by 35-60 percent. Rising fuel prices, growing environmental concerns and higher fuel economy standards are influencing public demand for gas-guzzler alternatives. But although more manufacturers are producing vehicles to answer that demand,

they face challenges to sell them, in part because of their higher cost. To offset the higher sticker price, the federal government has offered an income tax credit of $2,500 to $7,500 for natural gas, electric and plugin hybrid electric vehicles purchased in or after 2010. The credit amount varies, based on the capacity of the battery used to fuel the vehicle. President Obama’s proposed Fiscal Year 2013 budget includes a new provision for hybrid and electric car tax credits that would broaden the range of eligible cars and eliminate caps on the number of rebates awarded. It’s part of the president’s plan to put one million electric and hybrid vehicles on the road by 2015. While the plan would increase the rebate to $10,000, the tax credit shifts from the consumer to the dealer, although certainly the intent is for the dealer to pass along any savings. To sweeten the deal, some states have begun offering additional tax rebates. California recently initiated a $1,500 rebate when a qualifying “green” vehicle is purchased. But are the tax credits enough to encourage CONTINUED ON PG. 10

Transportation: Some essential facts Indiana is 36,418 square miles, including over 95,000 total miles of road, 1,100 miles of interstate highways, placing us sixth in the nation for total road density and ninth for interstate highway density. (SOURCE: INDOT Major Moves)

Metric Tons of Co2 from transportation per capita • U.S. average 6.9 tons • Indiana average 8.6 tons (SOURCE: t4america.org/statefacts/indiana/)

One person switching to public transit can reduce daily carbon emissions by 20 pounds, or more than 4,800 pounds in a year. Public transit means less driving and decreased air pollution. Substandard air quality means possible restrictions on economic growth and puts federal transportation funding at risk. About 60 percent of Central Indiana’s ozone pollution comes from motor vehicles. (SOURCE: Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization)

Over 5 percent of the metro Indianapolis area households do not have an automobile. (SOURCE: Brookings Institution)

Transportation is the second largest household expense

— after housing — for Midwest U.S. residents who spend over 16 cents of every dollar on transportation. (SOURCE: Consumer Expenditure Survey, US Bureau of Labor Statistics)

FY 2012 Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) expenditures • 97 percent of Indiana transportation funds spent on roads • 3 percent spent on public transit, rail, intermodal operating • $20,000 for passenger rail and high speed rail (State of Illinois spends 1,400 times this amount — $28 million) (SOURCE: Hoosier Environmental Council)

An economic study done for the Midwest Regional Rail System found that investment in high speed passenger rail in Indiana would create over 4,500 new jobs, and provide $86 million in extra household income. Total user benefits for Indiana are estimated to be $2.3 billion to $3.5 billion. (SOURCE: INDOT) Transit saves money — a two-person household can save as much as $10,000 a year by using transit. (SOURCE: American Public Transportation Association)

Current U.S. public transit usage reduces gasoline consumption by 4.2 billion gallons a year. (SOURCE: American Public Transportation Association)

Forty-two percent of U.S. oil imports come from OPEC countries, many of whom are unfriendly to the U.S. (SOURCE: U.S. Department of Energy) ILG

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ECO-TRANSPORTATION THE GREEN MILE PER GALLON CONTINED

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The average household income for the allelectric Nissan Leaf buyers is $140,000.

the average driver to buy a hybrid or electric car? Industry experts speculate that the rebate isn’t benefitting the market segment it could best serve because it isn’t enough to encourage them to purchase the more expensive alternative-fuel vehicles. Of the 12.8 million cars and trucks sold in 2011, only 7,671 Volts and 9,674 Leafs were purchased. According to General Motors, the average Chevy Volt hybrid buyer makes $175,000 a year. The average household income for the all-electric Nissan Leaf buyers is $140,000. With a wide selection of options that includes two new Prius models, a family-sized clean diesel from Volkswagen, an award-winning hybrid from Chevrolet, the most successful electric car from Nissan and the most affordable one from Mitsubishi, manufacturers hope to lure more drivers to where the “grass is greener.”

KV Racing team test-drives Volt

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KV Racing Technology team test drove the Chevy Volt.

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The Mitsubishi i-MiEV gets a gas mileage equivalent of 126 (city).

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The Toyota Prius C sports gas mileage of 53 (city) and 46 (hwy).

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During the month of May and slightly beyond, Chevrolet loaned four Chevy Volts to the Chevrolet-powered KV Racing Technology team. At least one team member wishes he was still driving one. Charlie Guilinger, machinist with the team since 2004, regularly drove a two-tone silver and grey Volt back and forth to work for several weeks. He even took it out of town a couple times, including to the race in Milwaukee. “It’s peppy,” he reports. Sitting low in the sporty four-door hatchback reminded him of driving a Corvette or Camaro, he says. “It feels like a sports car, where you’re hugged in the seat.” The quiet Volt doesn’t sound like a sports car, but Guilinger says he didn’t realize how quiet it was while he was driving on the freeway because the air conditioner and the XM satellite radio masked the silence. Well-designed ergonomics, with many of the controls on the steering wheel and programmable memory for two different drivers’ preferences, made Guilinger’s drive time comfortable. Although he says he would swap the positions of the fan speed and temperature control, his only complaint was that some of the buttons are too sensitive. “It’s easy to accidentally turn on the seat heaters.” Not only is the Volt peppy, it’s also pretty good on fuel mileage. Driving at an average speed of 75 mph on a typical trip to Cincinnati, Guilinger estimates his own car’s fuel mileage at 20 mpg. In comparison, the Volt achieved 45-50 mpg on his journey this summer. In-town fuel mileage was even better. During Guilinger’s 10-mile drive to work, the Volt ran on electricity only. The Volt, GM’s advanced hybrid car, operates solely on battery power for about 40 miles until a gas-powered generator kicks in to keep the engine running. Because of the short commute, he didn’t even need to charge it while he was at work. In addition, he soon discovered that switch///

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ing the air conditioner from comfort level to economy mode extended the charge. “It really saved gas,” he says. “I spent more money washing it than putting gas in it.” Bells and whistles include tire pressure sensors, XM satellite and a DVD player that works in park only. The drawback is the $40,000 price tag. “I would lease it, not buy it,” Guilinger says. “That way, you get the best out of battery life.” The battery has a five- to seven-year life if properly cared for. A 4x6 menu screen indicates how much battery life is left before the car needs recharging. In fact, Guilinger says, that was the reason the team got the cars. “Chevy wanted us to drive them to keep the batteries charged.” Guilinger wouldn’t mind keeping the battery charged a little longer. “I wish I still had it,” he says. He isn’t the only test driver to give it a great review. The 2011 Chevrolet Volt was the first electric car to be chosen as the Green Car of the Year at the Los Angeles Auto Show, sponsored by the Green Car Journal.

Driving electric vehicles One of the persistent drawbacks detracting from the appeal of electric cars has centered on the battery: how long it lasts, how long it needs to recharge and how far it will take the car. The Nissan Leaf, the most successful allelectric car ever built, can go 62-138 miles on a charge, which is farther than many of its competitors. Hybrids, of course, can extend that distance by switching to gasoline power, but lose the electric advantage when they do. For all-electric cars, range is related to recharging. Currently, electric vehicles use lithium-ion batteries, which are heavy and rarely go further than 100 miles before requiring recharging. That could soon change. Backed by General Motors, Envia Systems has developed a new process that creates more energy density, which could extend an electric car’s range to 300 miles per charge. Similarly, IBM is working to develop battery technology that would take electric cars as far as 500 miles on a single charge. Also in development is technology that will allow batteries to store energy produced by solar or wind power. Until new technology is widely available, the challenge for electric car drivers is the limited availability and visibility of charging stations. Earlier this year, Murphy USA, the retail arm of Murphy Oil Corporation, opened Indiana’s first Electric Vehicle Charging Station in Greenwood. Another Level 3 Quick Charger, this one in collaboration with Eaton Corporation, followed shortly after in Plainfield. Both provide a full charge in 10-30 minutes. Recharging isn’t the only concern with batteries. Expected life and lifetime cost are issues. The Sierra Club crunched some hypothetical numbers to estimate fuel savings. Recharging an electric vehicle that is driven 12,000 miles a year at the current electricity rate of $0.12 per


THE GREEN MILE PER GALLON kilowatt hour will cost $389 annually. Savings on gasoline at $3 per gallon at 30 mpg will amount to roughly $1,200, resulting in a 68 percent net reduction in fuel costs. Drivers may feel good about themselves because their electric cars don’t consume fossil fuels. However, recharging the battery can impose an equally significant ecological impact, depending on the source of the electricity. A mixture of atomic, coal-fired and hydroelectric power contributes three times more pollution than the Li-ion battery alone, according to Science Daily. Furthermore, “if the electricity is generated exclusively by coal-fired power stations, the ecobalance worsens by another 13 percent. If, on the other hand, the power is purely hydroelectric, then this figure improves by no less than 40 percent.” A recent study published in the scientific journal Environmental Science & Technology contends that the Li-ion battery imposes only a moderate environmental burden, due to manufacture, maintenance and disposal. Half of that occurs during the refining and manufacturing of the raw materials, copper and aluminum. Production of the lithium accounts for only 2.3 percent of the total.

“Lithium-ion rechargeable batteries are not as bad as previously assumed,” states Dominic Notter, coauthor of the study. To offset the cost of battery replacement, Chevrolet has offered Volt customers an eight year/100,000 mile warranty for its lithium-ion battery. When batteries do need replacing, the recycle rate of lithium-ion batteries is comparable to traditional lead-acid batteries, thanks to valuable metal content such as cobalt and nickel. To boost recycling capability, the U.S. Department of Energy recently awarded $9.5 million for a new lithium-ion recycling facility. In addition, Toyota is working on an expanded recycling initiative for these batteries and a Belgian company has plans to recycle electric vehicle battery pack material to produce an alloy that can be refined into cobalt, nickel and other metals, as well as special grades of concrete. But even before batteries get to recycling centers, they can often be put to other uses because they retain up to 80 percent of their charge. A common use is to support intermittent sources of electricity, typically from wind or solar power, to stabilize the grid. — LORI LOVELY

Car comparisons Chevrolet Volt

Nissan Leaf

• Extended-range electric hybrid compact hatchback • Base Price: $39,995 - or $32,495 after federal tax credit • Gas Mileage Equivalent: 95 city, 93 hwy, 94 combined (electric only); 35 city, 40 hwy, 37 combined (gas only)

• All-electric compact hatchback • Base Price: $36,050 for SV trim; $28,550 after federal tax credit • Gas Mileage Equivalent: 106 city, 92 hwy, 99 combined

Toyota Prius C • Gas-electric hybrid subcompact hatchback • Base Price: $19,710 • Gas Mileage: 53 city, 46 hwy, 50 combined

Toyota Prius V • Gasoline-electric hybrid wagon • Base Price: $27,160 • Gas Mileage: 44 city, 40 hwy, 42 combined

Volkswagen Passat TDI • Diesel sedan • Base Price: $27,895 • Gas Mileage: 30 city, 40 hwy, 34 combined

Mitsubishi i-MiEV • Electric compact hatchback • Base Price: $29,975 for ES trim; $22,475 after federal tax credit • Gas Mileage Equivalent: 126 city, 99 hwy, 112 combined

See indianalivinggreen.com for lots more information about each of these models. — LORI LOVELY ILG

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ECO-TRANSPORTATION

CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

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photos by angela leisure

(left) Mackenzie Malone says she chooses to ride the vanpool because gas prices are so high. She saves 30 miles round trip; $120/month in gas. She usually plays Draw Something on her phone or talks to other riders. (right) Driver Jeff Jones had this to say: “Vanpool drivers average about 50 miles round trip. Let’s say the van averages 10 persons riding full time for a year. That equates to approximately 132,000 miles per year not driven, saving: personal energy costs, individual wear-and-tear on vehicles plus less highway traffic and emissions — helping to provide a greener community.”

Become a vanpool fan For people who have to travel a considerable distance to get to work, vanpooling is a viable alternative mode of transportation. Lori Kaplan, manager for Commuter Connect’s vanpooling initiative, says that one major goal of vanpooling is “to improve air quality in Central Indiana.” She adds that the objectives are both practical and eco-friendly. Because these vans hold up to 15 people, “over 150 [single passenger] vehicles have been removed” — per van — from Indiana roads. That amounts to some 1,000 tons of carbon dioxide not being emitted into the atmosphere annually. • Each rider is issued five vouchers per year to use for a cab in case they become ill or have an emergency at home and need to get back. This also covers one stop (like picking up a sick child from school). • There are 14 vanpools, totaling approximately 165 riders. • Locations can be found here: cirta.us/commuterconnect.

Other alternative transit options: IndyGo: Over the years, IndyGo has gotten a bad rap: Too few bus routes, late arrivals are just a few of the complaints. Still, this is our main public transportation option in the city of Indianapolis, so it deserves our attention. The Super Bowl, for example, inspired many to ride the bus — many for the first time. Given the increased attention, IndyGo can only improve. See more: indygo.net. Some recent news from IndyGo: • Ridership is up this year by 12.4 percent

• IndyGo will receive 10 million dollars of State of Good Repair dollars for bus replacement. Some 25 buses will be replaced.

transportation systems, buildings, parks and open space. Physical activity, as they put it, “has been engineered out of many parts of American life.” Health By Design wants that to change by advocating for improvement of our built environments to encourage exercise and connection to the community. Their Urban Planning Scholar Series brings experts to Indy to discuss the impact of urban design on health and the environment. Make plans now to attend their Nov. 13 and 14 Striding Toward Healthy Communities conference, held in downtown Indianapolis. See more: healthbydesignonline.org.

• IndyGo has a total of 23 electric-diesel hybrid buses.  Megabus: Adding new routes all the time, this bus service transports people to and from major cities throughout the East, South and Midwest. Other than some spotty Wi-Fi service, there’s little to criticize about this transportation option. In fact, it’s a great ride, either a peaceful alternative to driving, or a raucous and fun community, with a party-like feel. Easy to schedule and the fares are cheap, SUPER cheap if you plan far enough ahead. See more: us.megabus.com. Greyhound: The Grandmother of Bus Travel, Greyhound is the largest intercity bus company in North America. See more: greyhound.com. Amtrak: When you think of Amtrak, you think of trains, but they offer bus transit as well. Check out Amtrak.com for information on their 30+ train routes in Canada and the U.S. Zipcar: Zipcar is a car sharing network started in Cambridge, Mass., which is driven by a team searching for workable solutions to the problems which come along with transportation, such as congestion and pollution. As of March, there were 18 Zipcars on five Indiana campuses. Members can utilize the cars by the hour or the day, and usage runs around $8 per hour. This is a sustainable alternative for those who do not own cars or do not make frequent car trips. It is estimated that users of Zipcar dispense one-third fewer miles than those who own cars. See more: zipcar.com/registration. Health by Design: This local organization promotes communities where physical activity is an intrinsic part of neighborhoods, ILG

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Indy Connect: Indy Connect in an ambitious plan to bolster transportation throughout central Indiana. According to their website, the initiative has the potential to “revitalize and enhance neighborhoods and help the region compete for talent and economic investment.” The organization’s goal is to, “connect people to people and people to places” and in doing so increase job opportunities and improve air quality. Their plan calls for several improvements to Indianapolis’ lacking mass transportation system, including rail, roadways, rapid transit buses, bikes, and pedestrian walkways. Indianapolis is the 23rd largest metropolis in the country but its transportation system does not even rank in the top 100. Indy spends less than a third of what neighboring cities spend on bus systems. If the Indy Connect initiative were implemented, the improved transportation system would make it easier to live in the areas outlying Indianapolis, but work downtown (particularly attractive for individuals living in Carmel, Fishers, and Greenwood who deal with vehicle congestion daily). See more: indyconnect.org.

SEPTEMBER 2012

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ECO-TRANSPORTATION

CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

To pedal… or not to pedal: electric bikes When it comes to cycling, technology is offering more possibilities for a range of needs. Case in point — electric bikes. Powered by an electric motor wired to a rechargeable 24 or 36 volt battery, these bikes allow users the freedom to pedal or not to pedal. For those who dream of joining the cycling revolution but are deterred by bad knees, health problems, low mobility, long distances, hills or the inconvenience of perspiration on your morning commute, electric bicycles might just be the answer. There are numerous brands available, including bicycles that come ready-made electric and conversion kits that can be implemented on conventional bikes. As with most new-fangled technology, these bikes can get pretty pricey, ranging from $800 to $2,000, but the satisfaction of staying ahead of the curve is priceless. Topping out at 20 mph, these bikes don’t require licenses or IDs and are an ideal way to make commuting or the cycling hobby a feasible option.

• National Moto

5206 N. College Ave., Indianapolis, IN 317-698-2418

National Moto, located south of Broad Ripple, is leading the trend of electric bikes, offering Pedego models. Pedego bikes offer style and functionality for cyclists who want the best of both worlds when it comes to exercising and commuting. These pedal-assisted bicycles do just that: assist cyclists with electrical energy as they pedal. National Moto owner Matty Bennett explains, “People love them because they’re still six-speed bicycles that offer a little help.” Since he started stocking Pedego electric bikes, Bennett has seen an enthusiastic response in his shop. “I’ve had people come from out-of-state, all around, to come and test ride a Pedego, if they don’t have a store that’s local. It’s just amazing that people are coming from so many different areas. They all say, ‘Gosh, my local bike shop doesn’t have anything like this.’ ” But waving the electric bicycle banner hasn’t been enough to convert non-believers. “We still have people who come in and say they just don’t get it, they think its cheating,” says Bennett. “But that’s all hearsay. We pretty much look at it as, [the battery power] is always there if you need it. ... It gets people who thought that bikes were long gone from their repertoire, out there.”

• Bicycle Garage Indy

4340 82nd St., Indianapolis, IN 317-842-4140

National Moto isn’t the only horse in the electric bike race. Bicycle Garage Indy stocks

National Moto’s Brendan Fox, left, and Matty Bennett.

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photo by mark lee

two different brands: Giant Twist Freedom Deluxe and Izip. Sales associate Abby Wells explained the features of each. “The Giant Twist appears like a standard hybrid bike, with batteries on two sides of a back rack. Those take six to eight hours to charge. When you’re running, you can select which battery you want to use. While the Izips have a whole assortment of appearances and options, including an internal torque option so instead of having a power assist, you can actually turn the power on and not pedal, while some of our Izip models have an external battery.” Offering many advantages, Wells explains that these electric bikes keep users from struggling. “You don’t have to get off your bike to finish the hills,” says Wells. “Also, for people who are out riding with friends or family members that are faster than they are, it allows them to stay at that speed to a certain degree.”

• Mass Ave Bikes

643 Massachusetts Ave., Indianapolis, IN 317-622-7988

One downtown Indianapolis bike shop, Mass Ave Bikes, offers an entirely different electric option for cyclists, though they are still figuring out the details of which product lines to sell. Currently, they’re looking into a line of conversion kits called Bionx. Conversion kits come with a motor wheel, battery, charger, consol/throttle and battery mount, all of which can be affixed to a conventional bike to give it a little extra oomph. “If somebody has a decent level quality bicycle, with nicer components than an entry-level ILG

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or mid-level electric bike might come stocked with, it makes sense to put a nice high quality conversion kit on that bicycle,” says Mass Ave Bike’s Aaron Corey. “We want to repurpose a quality traditional bicycle with quality electrics to make it a quality electric bicycle.” Though they are not yet equipped for conversions, Corey says the shop should be ready for the electric bike business in less than three months. For now, Mass Ave Bikes offers repair services to any brand of electric bike. “We’re not at all brand-specific in our service. It doesn’t even have to be a bicycle, we do personal mobility devices, wheelchairs, strollers, anything with wheels we service,” explains Corey.

• Valley Bikes

6102 Ashway Court, Indianapolis, IN 317-582-5539

Valley Bikes, on Indianapolis’ West side, offers yet another option to electric bicycle seekers. “We specialize in recumbent bikes and trikes,” says owner Mike McDowell. “And we do conversions. I usually use Sun trikes, imported here from Taiwan. They’ve been around for a long time and are really reliable.” In addition, this specialty bike shop works closely with Indiana Rehabilitation Hospital, in an attempt to turn cycling into a therapy of sorts. “We tend to be able to give back to people who have had strokes or other issues,” explains McDowell. “We give them back bicycling, which they thought they’d never be able to do again.”

SEPTEMBER 2012

— KATELYN COYNE

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ECO-TRANSPORTATION CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

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photo by mark lee

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Speed City features the Vetrix.

Is two better than four?

That’s amore

It’s not always true that two wheels are better than four when it comes to eco-friendly options. If a scooter has a two-stroke engine, it can legally emit 5.7 times more CO than a car — nearly 24 times more unburned hydrocarbons and More NOx (nitrogen oxide), according to a U.S. News report. According to Green Living Ideas, scooters can emit as much particulate matter – and three times as much carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons – as large diesel trucks. Because they have no fuel injection or catalytic converters, harmful compounds are emitted. In addition, two-stroke engines are also noisy and shortlived, adding to their environmental impact. However, even a scooter with a two-stroke engine can be “greener” than a typical SUV due to the amount of resources consumed in production and the amount of energy used to operate. Scooters achieve incredible fuel efficiency, easily reaching 60-80 mpg. They may emit more pollution, but they produce less greenhouse gas. Luckily, most American scooters have four-stroke engines, which are more fuel efficient, quieter, more reliable and run significantly cleaner. For all those gains, however, there is a performance loss, although scooters with direct fuel injection can offset that loss of power and also provide increased fuel efficiency.

Synonymous with the word scooter, Vespa, manufactured by Piaggio, set the gold standard for the industry — in sales, in racing and in film. Chic, with its enclosing unibody; innovative, with its protective flat footboard; and aerodynamically stable, with its prominent front fairing; the classic Italian scooter inspires images of sharply dressed professionals zipping down the Via Veneto. Since its return to the U.S. in 2000 after an absence of 15 years due to new emissions legislation targeting two-stroke engines, the “wasp” has a firm hold on 20 percent of the market and a new lease on life with a four-stroke engine. Available with an Eco-Smart fuel-injected engine since 2011, the 150cc models use 15 percent less fuel than earlier versions. Achieving an average of 85 mpg, these efficient scooters also provide a smoother ride without sacrificing performance or speed.

Fuel sources Some scooters run on alternative fuels such as propane (liquid petroleum), which costs less and creates less pollution, but American availability is currently limited. The “greenest” source of fuel is electricity. Electric scooters are near-silent, low-maintenance, fuel-efficient rides. The purchase price is considerably higher, but with electricity costs about one-


tenth of gasoline, the payback period is quick. The downside is that the battery pack won’t take you much farther than 30-50 miles before it needs recharging … which takes time. X-treme and Razor are two of the more popular electric scooter manufacturers, with models ranging from skateboards to pocket bikes.

Countdown to zero Resembling a motorcycle more than a motor scooter, the Vectrix ZEV is the only highwaylegal, fully electric, zero-emissions vehicle for sale in the U.S. Featuring a built-in rechargeable battery, a patented regenerative deceleration system, called DaaRT, and Brembo disc brakes, it quietly accelerates from 0 to 50 in 6.8 seconds. The DaaRT systems recovers energy and extends battery life by enabling acceleration and braking to be controlled by one hand using the bi-directional throttle. There are no gears or clutch. One of the scooter’s most attractive features is its onboard charging capability that provides up to 68 miles of travel. Currently available from British Motor Cars, the Vectrix ZEV has a smaller carbon footprint and an impressive return on investment — particularly in California, where the government is offering anti-pollution incentives that give the buyer a $1,500 rebate. Minimal maintenance and lower insurance rates also make it an attractive option.

The Vespa, also on sale at Speed City.

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photo by mark lee

Scooter futures Combining the best of both fuel sources, Piaggio is currently in the prototype phase of development of a gas-electric hybrid scooter: the HyS. Its hybrid drivetrain increases power by 25 percent while decreasing fuel consumption by 20 percent. Also in development, the Piaggio MP3

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is a plug-in hybrid that fully recharges in three hours and gets 170 miles to the gallon of gasoline. Until those are available, Piaggio offers several gasoline-powered four-stroke models. So do the math: two (wheels) plus four (cylinders) equals a fuel-efficient, eco-friendly mode of transportation. — LORI LOVELY

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ECO-TRANSPORTATION

CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

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submitted photo

Making Indiana greener: Eric Stallsmith’s AGreenerIndiana.com

good results from that. I also like to work to involve the people interested in the environment and the outdoor recreation community being closer on the same page.

Eric Stallsmith, the creator of the almost 5-year-old AGreenerIndiana.com, focuses on helping nature lovers connect, share thoughts and resources. The website links to outdoor recreation sites to aid Hoosiers in planning trips throughout Indiana. He says, as a sort of mission statement, “I see outdoor recreation tourism and being greener as being strongly related groups of people and interests. Once you canoe a river for the first time and see a heron or eagle, you naturally become greener.

ILG: On the AGI website it says that Indiana is ranked 49th in Environmental Wellness. What do you think the state’s biggest challenge is in this regard?

ILG: When did you become interested in the idea of living green? Eric Stallsmith: Even in high school I could see that it is costly to pollute. In college I learned that in economic terms it is possible for somebody to pollute for free and then the cost of that pollution is borne by everybody ... the people other than the polluter are the ones paying that cost. I then understood that Indiana could save money by being greener. If it is cheaper to stop the pollution than it is for people to pay that cost, then you make money by stopping the pollution. ILG: What has been your favorite experience so far in working toward green living? Stallsmith: I think it is very rewarding to remind people that just doing one small thing helps. It is also rewarding to hear of instances where two AGI members can meet and share info, and then something 18

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Eric Stallsmith of AGreenerIndiana.com

Stallsmith: I think that once the state recognizes that being greener is a money saver and not a money coster, then we can overcome our biggest challenge, which is will to improve. Is the cleanup of Fukushima in Japan gonna be cheap? Is the cleanup of these ash ponds gonna be cheap? How expensive is it if it bursts? Is it cheaper to head off a superfund site or clean one up? The ability to calculate costs properly is the biggest challenge. ILG: With all the time you spend outdoors, does this make you more concerned for the environment or do you remain hopeful about turning things around in terms of pollution and waste? Stallsmith: I think there will be successes and failures, but in general I think that humans will continue to diminish the natural world’s pristineness indefinitely. We will be doing good to just slow down the pace of diminishment. I also think that if you just focus on the good things that you can do to improve that is all the individual can really do. The system as a whole is outside of the control of the average guy. — OLIVIA MCPHERSON

Check out Stallsmith’s page at agreenerindiana.com


ECO-TRANSPORTATION CARS | VAN POOLS | EBIKES | SCOOTERS | NATURAL TRANSPORTATION

Forgotten modalities of transportation Given the modern world’s surfeit of marvelous and beguiling options regarding transportation, it is nevertheless incumbent upon us here at Indiana Living Green, to remind our dear readers of long-forgotten modalities of movement, namely walking, skipping and crawling. — JIM POYSER

a1

a2 ^ ^

photos by angela leisure model: kurt carlson

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b1

c1

b2

c2

a1: Notice the biomechanics of this gait, the hip-torque (see side view), rigid upper body, and slack but alert arms. a2: Side view: Classic structural dynamic “triangle,” subject demonstrates “heel-to-toe” method of bipedal transportation. b1: Front view. b2: Skipping requires much more “pumping” action than does walking. Subject’s slack arms have turned into pistons of power, equaling 5.704 joules of action. c1: Front view of crawling; note subject’s hair may obstruct his view. c2: Side view.

a. Walking

b. Skipping

c. Crawling

Here our subject is engaged in the movement that was once charmingly referred to as walking or “strolling.” Several parts of the human anatomy are engaged in this procedure, and great concentration is necessary to keep the body upright and functioning.

So-called “skipping” may be equated by some to be tantamount to an energized form of walking modality, but it is in fact more complex by factor of many. Thus, the need for intense concentration and the possibility for grave injury increase commensurately. We here at ILG, by displaying these photos, do not in any way, sanction or encourage the use of such a dangerous motion, and are hereby cautioned by our team of lawyers to make this clear.

Here, the safest of our three “old school” modalities of movement, takes the human back, perhaps, to their earliest stages of development. The crawling human is crouched over the earth, and stability is achieved by all four limbs working in safe and coordinated concert. Progress is slow but sure, but the possibility of injury is minimal.

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SEPTEMBER 2012

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sierra club by Bowden Quinn

Cherish

the White River

Indianapolis is one of the largest cities in the world without a commercial port nearby. The West Fork of the White River, too shallow for shipping, wasn’t a factor in the growth of the city. The founders of Indiana selected the site for its central location, as instructed by the state legislature. Because of the lack of river commerce, population growth was slow until the National Road (now U.S. Route 40) and rail lines arrived. As a result, the river that winds through the city has long been an afterthought. Various attempts have been made to use it for economic gain, but for the most part it has simply provided an aesthetic backdrop. Unfortunately, like rivers everywhere, the people along its banks have also used it as a means of waste disposal. This has had an unfortunate impact on water quality. The river is often unsafe for swimming because of high bacteria counts. Other pollutants—specifically mercury and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)— have contaminated the fish, making some of them unsafe to eat. Pollution sources include urban and agricultural runoff, sewer overflows and failing septic systems, and coalfired power plants. According to retired biologist John Winters, whose history of the West Fork is available on the excellent website of the Friends of the White River (friendsofwhiteriver. org), before settlement the fish in the river “were so abundant that accounts of the success of early fishermen sound like tall tales to modern-day anglers.” Changes to the river along with the pollution we add to it have greatly diminished that abundance. The greatest assault on the river occurred in December 1999 when employees of Guide Corp, an auto parts manufacturer in Anderson, released a chemical into that city’s sewer system. It went through the sewage treatment plant and into the river, killing an estimated 4.6 million fish, mostly between Ander-

son and northern Marion County. Guide eventually agreed to pay $14 million in compensation. That event aroused public and governmental concern for the river. The Department of Natural Resources restocked the water with fish. New boat launches and other amenities were built. Last year the DNR found 57 species of fish in the stretch between Anderson and Indianapolis, the most since the toxic release. There has long been a core of people who have worked to restore and protect the river. The Friends of the White River, established in 1985, organizes cleanups every year. The Upper White River Watershed Alliance provides education on the impacts of fertilizer, pet waste and runoff. For the most part, however, the river is still a neglected resource in Indianapolis. To try to remedy that, last year the Indianapolis Museum of Art sponsored a public art event called FLOW: Can You See the River? Under the direction of artist Mary Miss, large red balls (simulating map markers) and mirrors were erected at key locations next to the river throughout the city. In September, organizations are sponsoring a month-long White River Festival under the leadership of the Upper White River Watershed Alliance. The festival highlights the many reasons the river is important to us: its history, its role in binding together the communities in its watershed, its recreational and aesthetic values. Festival activities also focus on threats to the river, which serves as a public drinking water supply. We have a long way to go before we’ll have wholesome rivers again in Indiana, but progress is being made. Cities like Indianapolis are starting to address their sewer and septic problems, PCB levels in fish are diminishing, coal is in decline. We should all take the opportunity offered by the festival to learn more about the river and water quality, and redouble our efforts to hasten the day when we can safely swim in our rivers and eat the fish from them.

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MINIMUM Threshold Marketing is teaming up with Energizing Indiana. We are looking for hard-workers to promote Environmental Consciousness while helping utility customers save s. money on their bills. ob! This is not a sales job! All candidates must have reliable transportation and be able to pass a background check and drug test. Part Time positionss also available

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Energizing Indiana is a united effort by the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission, participating utilities, and consumer organizations to offer comprehensive energy efficiency programs that bring savings to communities across the state. With programs for homes, schools, businesses and commercial facilities, Energizing Indiana provides the education and tools you need to improve efficiency and conserve energy.

ILG

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GREEN BIZ

^ ^ submitted photo

Yama Sharifi of As Natured Intended

Shoe’s smaller footprint

By Betsy Sheldon

By Betsy Sheldon Chuck and Marie Damler of Natural Valley Recycled Granite

^ ^ submitted photo

Rock-solid recycling:

diverting granite waste from landfills

When it comes to building and home decor, you can’t get much better than granite, long the material of choice for high-end remodels and building projects, from kitchen and bathroom countertops to tiled flooring and fireplace surrounds. But Earth-friendly? Not so much. Sure, granite doesn’t contain fossilfuel synthetics, but mining, manufacturing and distributing the material guzzles petroleum. Then there’s the waste. Some sources claim that as much as 85 percent of excavated granite ends up in the landfill by the time the final product — be it countertop or fireplace mantle — has been installed. It all adds up to one supersized environmental footprint. Chuck and Marie Damler aim to downsize that impact through their business, Natural Valley Recycled Granite. The Brownsburg couple collects granite scraps from Indiana fabricators and turns them into uniform bricks and tiles that can be used for kitchen backsplashes, patio and garden pavers, fire pits, walls, columns and more to create striking upscale looks for a shockingly modest cost. The couple learned of RecyclingGranite.com, another Indiana-born business launched by St. John native Julie Rizzo in 2008. With her efforts and those of some 40 licensees nationwide, Rizzo’s stone-cutting process is reported to have so far saved more than 5 million tons of scrap 22

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By Betsy Sheldon

granite from landfills and earned LEED points for builders incorporating it in their projects. “Julie started a brand-new industry — that really intrigued us,” says Marie Damler. “We have a lot of land, lots of tractors and a forklift, and thought we had the stuff to make a go of it.” As a licensee, the couple buys scraps from Indiana fabricators, cuts them into smooth-sided pieces — from 4 to 10 inches — leaving the visible edge rough, and sells them to homeowners, contractors and builders. Not only the designer look of the product, but the price — from $8 to $10 per square foot — appeal. Doing business since August 2011, the Damlers admit that it’s taken a while to introduce consumers to the concept. But they report a growing traction, particularly through virtual marketing channels such as craigslist.com. “It’s all new to us,” says Marie. “But a respect for reduce, reuse, and recycle is not. We recycle everything, even horse manure.” A visit to the Damlers’ Brownsburg ranch will turn up bags of manure for garden compost — and an opportunity to browse through the on-site recycled granite showroom. For more: naturalvalleyrecycledgranite. com, and for more about the burgeoning industry, visit recycledgranite.com.

SEPTEMBER 2012

A couple generations after Earth Shoes, the contemporary spin on healthy footwear is minimalist. A new herd of barefoot runners extols the virtues of sole on soil, and most major brands have introduced a “barefoot” shoe, constructed with thin material that protects the wearer from sharp rocks, fresh chewing gum and other pavement hazards, yet allows the foot to interact with a walking surface in a way that nature intended. So it’s only fitting that Yama Sharifi has hit the ground running with his ANI (As Nature Intended) brand of allvegan, eco-friendly barefoot shoe. After raising nearly $10,000 more than his goal in a twomonth funding campaign through Kickstarter, the young entrepreneur is poised to produce his unique line of barefoot wear. As a student at North Central High School, Sharifi began sketching designs for a shoe that permitted the feel of a walk on the beach — minus the pain from sharp coral or pop tabs. Oh, and he wanted a vegan, natural and recyclable product. He’s realist enough to know that the most comfortable, socially conscious shoe won’t get a leg up if it isn’t visually appealing and fashion-forward. His energies led to the 100-percent organic canvas shoe, solid black or with red, green, or blue accents — sleek, clean, timeless yet fashionably au-courant. Astute design and cutting-edge technology produce a membrane-thin outer rubber sole and a flat bed that enables the foot to find its own natural form and position. Sharifi, who describes himself as an entrepreneur-designer who wants to make a difference, runs his business based on personal values that include environmental consciousness, humane treatment of animals, and philanthropic drive. As he gears up to start the manufacturing process, he’s already exploring partnerships with several charitable organizations. “But no matter which causes ANI chooses to support,” Sharifi affirms, “we will give back to charity.” Once the shoe is available, customers will be able to order online at anishoes.com, but Sharifi hopes to be in stores — not just in hometown Indy but locations throughout the world — soon. He plans to pursue retailers from large chains to local independents. Meantime, Sharifi has another Kickstarter capital campaign scheduled — in which fans can purchase a pair from the ANI white line, a new line that Sharifi promises will be even more beautiful than the first. For more information visit anishoes.com or kickstarter.com.

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15

9 a.m. – 5 p.m. at Minnetrista

Living Lightly is a FREE resource fair aimed at educating East Central Indiana about practical ways to live more sustainably, saving money and resources for themselves and future generations.

www.livinglightlyfair.org


SEPTEMBER EVENTS HOOSIER CHAPTER ART SHOW

JOHNNY APPLESEED FESTIVAL

ROCKY RIPPLE ART FESTIVAL

Sept. 1- Oct. 31 The Hoosier Chapter Art Show will be the first photography and art show of the Sierra Club’s Indiana Chapter. There will be plenty of opportunities to swing by and see which art created by Sierra Club members is the coolest, and there is a people’s choice award to be won. Artwork will show the participants’ zeal for Indiana and will be based on Advocacy, Nature, Wildlife, or another closely related category of the artist’s choice. The event will be held at the Indiana Interchurch Center, 1100 W. 42nd St. in Indianapolis. hoosier.chapter@sierraclub

Sept. 15. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. and Sept. 16. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Come out into beautiful apple country and enjoy homemade crafts, food, live entertainment, and history lessons to celebrate the spirit of “Johnny Appleseed.” What other chance would one have to relish the memory of such an iconic yet nearly obsolete figure? This is fun designed for the whole family! Even the kids will have a blast learning about this special piece of Hoosier history. The free, 38th annual event will be held at 1502 Harry Baals Drive, Fort Wayne. johnnyappleseedfest.com/

GOING LOCAL WEEK

BARTLETT’S BUCKIN GOOD BEER FEST – A BENEFIT FOR SAVE THE DUNES

Sept. 29 The Rocky Ripple Community Association will hold its 13th annual Art Festival in Hohlt Park, 840 W. 53rd St., Indianapolis. There is free admission to this familyoriented art and music festival. Last year, the festival featured over 75 booths. There will be six bands at the 2012 festival, including Andra Faye and the Rays, The Cosmic Preachers, Seismic Souls, CW and the Working Class Trio, HyRyder, and Day Job Blues. Other entertainment will include Judy Hannah and the Midwest BellyDancing Superstars. The children’s activity area will allow children to participate in many activities, such as sand sculpture, hula hooping, art, face painting, science experiments and hair spraying. Festival visitors are encouraged to ride their bikes to the festival; use the free, secure Park & Pedal bicycle parking. There will be full-scale recycling at the festival and all surplus food will be composted. rockyripple.org/Rocky_Ripple_Festival.html

Sept. 2-8 All Hoosiers are invited to participate in Going Local Week 2012, organized by Indy’s Going Local group and the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. Support local farmers’ markets, local wineries, local breweries, eat healthy, and go to sleep full with a peaceful economic conscience. As the Going Local website explains: “By consciously choosing locally grown and produced foods you’ll enjoy fresher and more varieties of food, get in touch with the seasonality of the Indiana food shed, protect the environment, and help support the local Indiana economy.” With all these great reasons, it would be hard to not participate. goinglocal-info.com

SCIENCE FAIR: SCIENCE OF FLOW Sept. 7. 6-8 p.m. This public art project held in the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis, will center on the White River and how people connect to it, both individually and as a city. Hydrologists will be present to explain techniques and tools they use to explore the water quality and aquatic life. Combining art and science, visitors can gain new understanding about the river. Data collected from the water will be explained by biologists from the United States Geological Survey. imamuseum.org/special-event/science-fairscience-flow-hands

SYMPHONY ON THE PRAIRIE Sept. 7. 8 p.m. Always an enjoyable time, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra will be performing Big Bad VooDoo Daddy at Symphony on the Prairie, 13400 Allisonville Road, Fishers. Tickets will be $22 in advance and $27 at the door, and can be found at Marsh, O’Malia’s and ISO locations. Also, tickets for the 1859 Balloon Voyage will be available. The balloon will suspend you above the concert as you listen to the sounds of the symphony float through the evening air! Let the Symphony on the Prairie escort you out of summer and into those much anticipated cooler fall nights. connerprairie.org/Plan-Your-Visit/SpecialEvents/Marsh-Symphony-on-the-Prairie.aspx

Sept. 16. 1-4 p.m. Beer lovers mark your calendars for this year’s Bartlett’s Buckin Good Beer Fest! It will be held at Bartlett’s Gourmet Grill & Tavern, 131 E. Dunes Hwy 12, Beverly Shores. Over 50 craft beers will be available for tasting, as well as craft cocktails from Rogue Spirits. Great food will be provided by Bartlett’s and Bistro 157 and lemonade will be available for kids. Tickets will be available for purchase in advance at Bartlett’s this fall. Prices will be $25 in advance or $40 at the door. A portion of the proceeds support Save the Dunes, which was founded in 1952 and is one of the oldest conservation efforts organizations in the U.S. savedunes.org/monthly/index. php?uid=befab66c4cd1

BIKE BUCKET WORKSHOP Sept. 20. 6-8 p.m. This practical event being hosted at Keep Indianapolis Beautiful, 1029 Fletcher Ave., #100, Indianapolis, will focus on making Bike Buckets by re-using four-gallon square buckets (better known for holding kitty litter) to attach to the rack on your bicycle. Now Mr. Whiskers can have a hand (or paw) in sustainable living, and a potential place to sit as you cruise around on your bike. All material, hardware, tools and instructions will be provided (feel free to bring your own buckets if you have them or we can provide them). For address and more info about this workshop visit: indianalivinggreen.com/event/bike-bucket-workshop

IUPUI REGATTA Sept. 22. 10:30 a.m. No matter what you’re into, this event probably has something to catch your eye! This half-mile canoe race will feature more than 90 teams of paddlers going toe to toe in their canoes down the canal. There will also be local food to try, bands from Indy, and art to check out, making this a kind of best-of-Indy sampling! The super cool downtown Creation Café will be hosting, also serving as a vantage point to watch the racers battle it out. The race, started in 2009, is quickly becoming a “can’t-miss” tradition! alumni.iupui.edu/regatta

GREEN READS

WILDFLOWERS AND FERNS S OF INDIANA FORESTS: A FIELD GUIDE Michael A. Homoya Indiana University Press | $22.95

e We’re obsessed with the local. Local food, local beer, local arts and crafts … and the modern cry is to “shop local.” We’re all for that here at ILG, but truly, what’s more local than the very land we inhabit? You’re in luck. IU Press’ field guide to wildflowers and ferns is a handy and beautiful book that you can take anywhere to identify the local lovelies of our Indiana landscape. Author Michael Homoya knows his stuff: he’s been a botanist/plant ecologist with the DNR for over 30 years. And his easy-to-digest guide covers wildflowers and ferns, for sure, but also shrubs, trees, grasses and sedges. Glossy photos detail each gorgeous (Michigan lily) or foreboding (poison ivy) organism, and the guide is color-coded so you can thumb directly to the plant in question. For those of you who really love your plants, this book offers a plethora of baby names, such as Lopseed, Squawroot and Bladdernut. Oh wait, I meant to say those are great band names! How about Buttonbush for your little daughter or son? Or Betony or Buckwheat or Lobelia? Ok, maybe you don’t want to name your band or baby any of these beautiful words, but safe to say, this guide is replete with poetry. The poetry of terminology and the poetry of nature. Get it today; nearly 500 pages of living local! — JIM POYSER

ILG

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PAID ADVERTORIAL

The automobile industry is finally waking up to the needs and wants of consumers who have grown tired of the steady rise in gas prices. Fuel-efficient vehicles are finding a comfortable peak in technological advancement, affordability and ecological care. The average new automobile in America receives approximately 23.1 miles per gallon in July 2012, according to TrueCar.com. Compare this to 13.75 miles per gallon in the ‘70s. The Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards passed through Congress in 1975, doubling our miles per gallon to 27.5. Since then, we’ve come a long way in our understanding what fuel costs, both financially and environmentally. The miles per gallon average hit 16.9 in 1991. Less than a decade later, the first mass-manufactured hybrids become available to American consumers. The Energy Act of 2007 promised that we would make the move to an average of 35 miles per gallon by 2020. In the past few years, we’ve seen all-electric engine vehicles come to dealerships nationwide. Major manufacturers have invested deeply in a new future for transportation energy, a step

which will take us away from high gas prices, excessive pollution, and disastrous carbon emissions. “For years, consumers have been wanting more fuel-efficient vehicles, while not completely giving up what they enjoy about their current vehicles -- like horsepower and vehicle features. It seems that manufacturers have listened, and now have the technologies to deliver,” says Lorne Hayden, Mitsubishi General Sales Manager at Ray Skillman Auto Mall. The all-electric 2012 Mitsubishi i-MiEV earned a 112 mpg-equivalent rating this year, which sets us off well from the standards of our past. The sleek four-person vehicle uses lithium-ion batteries to burn electrons instead of hydrocarbons. Owners can plug in rather than fill up using three levels of charging. At Level One, 100 percent charge can be reached in 22 hours; Level Two achieves 100 percent in 7 hours; and Level Three charges to 80 percent in 30 minutes. On a full charge, the i-MiEV gets a combined 62-mile range for city and highway, and 16-kilowatt hours under the hood.

Mitsubishi constructed their first electric car in 1970. They spent years refining the engine technology, increasing motor efficiency and eventually adopting the use of lithium-ion batteries. Finally, the i-MiEV operating system that regulates the flow of energy throughout the car came to life. The i-MiEV has three distinct modes of driving to maximize the vehicle’s efficiency and a metered status for the driver to utilize. Regenerative brakes turn stopping motion back into energy. The i-MiEV is estimated to save $9,850 in fuel cost savings over the first five years; drivers also receive a $7,500 federal rebate. Beyond breaking your dependence on oil, think of the money that will be saved with no oil changes, less maintenance, fewer parts to repair or replace and cheaper, cleaner energy being used. Even the signals are equipped with ultra-efficient LED lights. Add to that the lack of noise pollution emanating from the electric engine and you realize that the i-MiEV truly is a zero emission vehicle. It’s high-tech, affordable gadgetry that’s designed around people instead of bulk engines.


PAID ADVERTORIAL Indianapolis residents can find a vast selection of electric and fuelefficient vehicles at Ray Skillman Westside Auto Mall at 5155 W. Pike Plaza Road, 46254. Customers looking to compare cars can get up close to Kia, Hyundai, Mazda, Mitsubishi, and Suzuki models, as well as over 300 pre-owned vehicles, all in one convenient location. Car buyers are able to test drive competing makes and models one right after another, then pull them sideby-side to compare. This auto mall concept was designed to benefit the customer by providing a convenient and practical way to shop for

cars. The family-owned dealership has a reputable service record for its business in the community, and is known for being honest, upfront and supporting customers long after the sale or service. Employees are informed on the newest technology and its ecological mindfulness. The Auto Mall also features four service departments and a collision center, all on-site. Hyundai, Kia and Mitsubishi all offer 100,000 mile warranties on new vehicles with Ray Skillman. Ray Skillman is committed to providing more energy efficient vehicles. At least 20 percent of their new car inventory gets over 40 mpg and 45 percent gets over 35 mpg. Around 75 percent of their new car inventory gets over 30 mpg. That’s over 100 new cars in inventory that get 40 miles per gallon or better! Each brand has premium vehicles for customers seeking a more conservative fuel economy. The 2012 North American Car of the Year Hyundai Elantra receives 40 miles per gallon; the 2012 Kia Rio achieves 40 miles per gallon; and the 2012 Mazda 3 gets 40 miles per gallon. Mazda’s SkyActiv technology has

changed the way that engines combust to create fuel-efficient vehicles with intelligent designs. Ray Skillman’s auto dealerships have expanded widely since the one store Skillman had in the 1980s. Through the years, they have built a strong reputation with the community and have been recognized and awarded for outstanding service and customer satisfaction. They’ve given back to the community by donating to neighboring schools and supporting band and sports programs that have been affected by budget decreases. The Ray Skillman Westside Auto Mall is proud to offer vehicles which will change the shape of the automotive industry in the years ahead. If you are interested in learning more about the new electric i-MiEV or receiving a truly unique car buying experience, be sure to check out Ray Skillman Westside Auto Mall. Ray Skillman Westside Auto Mall is located at 5155 W. Pike Plaza Road, in Indianapolis, Indiana. For more information, give them a call at (317) 293-8060 or see rayskillmanautomall.com


GREEN MARKETPLACE To advertise in Green Marketplace, contact Robert Barnes at 317-808-4611 or RBarnes@IndianaLivingGreen.com

Homemade & Fair Trade Heartland Family Farm

Organic Foods

1949 Sunny Acres Drive Bedford, IN Chemical free, custom grown heirloom and European fruits and vegetables for professional chefs. Produce of exceptional quality and flavor for the home Supporting locally grown and chef. CSA shares available - produced foods for over 15 summer/winter. years! Opening Saturday May 5 for the 2012 season. Offering retail sales of cloth dialocalharvest.org/heartland-fampers and accessories, gift sets, ily-farm-M9428 Find us at brfm.org baby slings, and natural parenting Organic cotton sheets, towels, products. We provide one-on-one kitchen linens. Also recycled Farmers’ Markets diaper consultations, local workglass and paper items. Excelshops, and on-line gift registries. lent place for green wedding registry. Brands include Coyuecologicalbabies.com chi, Green Glass, In2Green, bambu and more!

Endangered Species Chocolate chocolatebar.com

MAKING INDIANAPOLIS A BETTER PLACE TO RIDE A BICYCLE. DONATE Help Support our cause JOIN Become a member Volunteer Be a part of the action

Endangered Species Chocolate is committed to providing premium, ethically traded, all-natural and organic chocolate bars. 10% of net profits are donated theindycog.com/membership to support species, habitat and humanity. Indulge in a cause.

honeysucklehome.com

Pets Pet Esoteric Healing with Lynne Hirschman. Remote 30-minute sessions allow your pet to receive treatment without Buy Fresh, Buy Local leaving home. Since 1998. Starting on May 1st Open Saturday from 8:00 am Call 317-205-9020. to Noon 11501 East Washington Street

Unique atmosphere, vendors and producers North United Methodist Church 38th and Meridian Thursdays 4:00 to 6:30 p.m. Opens June 2 Olry Photography Eco-Friendly Wedding, Engagement & Event Photographers Proud to be certified members of Greener Photography’s Leadership Circle

Health & Wellness

Celadon Road with Amy Smith town.cumberland.in.us Selling organic, eco-friendly, and fair trade personal and home care products. Shop, host, or sell. binfordfarmersmarket.com 62nd and Binford Boulevard (Hawthorne Plaza) Saturdays: April-Oct and holidays, 8am to 1pm

PT. 317-205-9020.

Products & Services

Saturday, September 15, 2012 7:30am-12:00pm $8/person Start: Monon Community Center East Parking Lot. For more information: www.carmelclayparks.com

olryphotography.com

myceladonroad.com/17906 Relief from Chronic Pain Manual Therapies including craniosacral work. Serving clients since 1985. Lynne Hirschman, MS,

Gardening Services

Convenient parking and lots of variety! Reface, don’t replace! ECONOMICAL AND ECOFRIENDLY! Our environmentally friendly countertop resurfacing system gives you a whole new look using your existing countertops. Call 317-431-5198 to schedule your free in-home estimate.

Local Farms

Every Tuesday from 4pm-7pm, May 22- September 25, at the intersection of South Meridian Carpet Cleaners - Carpet and McCarty, across the street Cleaning Indianapolis/Metro from Shapiro’s Delicatessen 4 Rooms only $79 Natural Solutions-Safer Cleaning. Angie’s List award winner 2011 ecocountertopsusa.com Call us Today! 317-538-0020

An Indy Food Co-op store, Pogue’s Run Grocer is a fullservice natural and organic grocery featuring affordable, fresh, healthy, and locally-produced products. poguesrungrocer.org

Community

Spotts Garden Service Organic. Sustainable. Earth first. We design, install, and maintain beautiful, earth-friendly gardens. Love your garden. We do. SpottsGardens.com 317-356-8808

ecocarpetcleaningllc.com

Community Supported Agriculture Local Fruit, Produce and Eggs Make a change to 100% local farm produce this season Certified Naturally Grown! FarmIndy.com csa@farmindy.com 317.373.4081

Living Lightly Fair a free resource fair for sustainable lifestyles Minnetrista Cultural Center, Muncie, IN September 15, 2012 | 9am-5pm Featuring musician Jennie DeSpecializing in attic and founda- Voe from 3:30-4:45 pm tion insulation and solar electric For more information: energy systems. livinglightlyfair.org Call today for a free estimate 317-797-3500 myenergyoutfitter.com Energy Outfitter has the home performance experts to improve the comfort and reduce the energy waste in your home.

Geist Farmers’ Market Come visit us starting May 3rd Thursday 2:30 - 6:30 p.m. Holy Cross Lutheran Church 8115 Oaklandon Rd. geistfarmersmarket.com

ApocaPoetry Contest

In honor of the Year of the Apocalypse, Indiana Living Green, along with the Writers’ Center of Indiana (indianawriters.org), is announcing a poetry contest. Not just any poetry contest, but a contest with a theme: the Apocalypse, ya know, 12/21/12. Here’s the deal. You must write your poem in the style of James Whitcomb Riley. That’s right, the Hoosier Poet himself. Write in the dialect, keep to the form and 28

Litterally Divine Toffee and Truffles Natural chocolates made with organic and locally sourced ingredients. Found at Traders Point Creamery Green Market litterallydivinetoffTTee.com

INDIANALIVINGGREEN.COM

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rhyme about the Apocalypse, with an Indiana angle. Send your submissions (limit two) to apocapoetrycontest@indianalivinggreen.com. The winner gets $250. We will print any we think are decent or hilarious. Deadline: Oct. 1, 2012; we’ll announce — and print — the winner (and many of the nonwinners) in December, of course, just in time for The Endtimes.

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Contact

Add Robert your ad a logo Barnes for as 317-808-4611 for little as $ $ Place

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or RBarnes@

IndianaLivingGreen.com


THE PANIQuiz The ApocaDocs’ Pre-Apocalypse News & Info Quiz (PANIQuiz) tests your knowledge of current environmental news. Brought to you by the ApocaDocs, Michael Jensen and Jim Poyser. Check your results (at the bottom), then see apocadocs.com to find out more.

1. In terms of the amount of news coverage, how much coverage does ocean acidification receive vs. the Kardashians? a. Who are the Kardashians? b. The Kardashians get 10 times more coverage. c. The Kardashians get 25 times more coverage. d. The Kardashians get 40 times more coverage. e. What is ocean acidification?

2. A new poll indicates Americans no longer think global warming is a top threat. What is? a. Polls b. Water and air pollution c. EPA shutting down NASCAR d. Al Gore’s lavish lifestyle e. Ocean acidification

3. How many heat records were broken the first week of July in the United States? a. 1000 b. 2000 c. 4000 d. None e. Too many to count

4. What does new research on fracking conclude about fluids and the Marcellus Shale? a. Fluids are slippery when wet. b. Fluids always taste like chicken! c. Fluids can remain stable, ensuring safe drinking water. d. Fluids can migrate into drinking water supplies. e. Fluids can catch on fire.

5. What did a recent study of Generation X reveal?

6. What did the FDA ban regarding babies? a. Crying b. Disposable diapers c. Their noxious poop d. Flame retardants in their pjs e. BPA in their bottles and sippy cups

7. In addition to hellish heat, what other extreme weather event are Americans facing? a. Raucous rainstorms b. Terrible tornadoes c. Hellish hail d. Tsilly tsunamis e. Sneaky snowstorms

8. What did three separate satellites observe, regarding Greenland? a. Nearly its entire ice cover, melting. b. People ordering pizza. c. People getting naked. d. Cannibal caribou. e. Nearly the entire country, on fire.

9. How are illegal pot growers a threat to wildlife? a. They compete with wildlife for forest food (when they have the munchies). b. They try and tame the wildlife into pets. c. They use pesticides. d. The pot smoke makes wildlife docile and easy to catch. e. They take potshots at wildlife for fun.

10. In Copenhagen, what is available to be checked out, just like books from a library? a. Environmentalists b. eBooks c. Solar panels d. Energy efficient appliances e. Bikes

a. They’re VERY worried about climate change. b. They burn fewer carbons than Generation Y. c. They’re not worried about climate change. d. They still do drugs — but only to escape realities like climate change. e. They don’t self-identify as a generation.

ASK

RENEE

Got a question for Renee? askrenee@indianalivinggreen.com

Q:

As I was bathing my son last night and thinking about how thirsty my outdoor plants are, I wondered if I could use his bath water to water the bushes? Clearly it would take some effort to haul it out of the house to the plants, but hey, what is a little effort to conserve some water! : ) We don’t use a whole lot of baby soap, but was wondering if there were either better options for soap or if the water was a little soapy what it would do to the plants. I remember my mom telling me as a kid that soap would kill the grass so I am hesitant to try it without getting some information. Thanks! Clean Kids and thirsty plants Dear clean kids and thirsty plants, The old proverb “Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater” traditionally means: Do not discard something valuable in your eagerness to get rid of some useless thing associated with it. It sounds to me, Clean Kids, like you also see the value in the bathwater! So, I did this once — plugged the drain in the tub while I showered then lugged buckets of used water down to my plants. It wasn’t terribly difficult and it made me feel good about my water conservation efforts. That said, it’s not a practice that I continued. If you use biodegradable soaps at bath time, I’d say it’s ok to re-use the water on your bushes. I’m not so sure I’d use it on my vegetable garden, but who knows, maybe you’ll come up with some new hybrid lavender tomato! My favorite brand of biodegradable soap is Dr. Bronner’s because you can buy it in bulk (read: you can refill reusable bottles at stores like Georgetown Market, Pogue’s Run Grocer or The Good Earth) and it has multiple uses. I have even used Dr. Bronner’s castile soap to brush my teeth and clean toilets. There are plenty of other biodegradable soap brands out there and you can find them at almost any store these days. My current bath time water conservation and other green efforts include: • Using a low-flow shower head • Using a shut off valve to stop the flow of water while lathering • Keeping my showers to a seven (or so) minute routine • Using bar soap instead of shower gel — no excessive plastic packaging! • Using shampoo from a reusable bottle, refilled at Georgetown Market or Pogue’s Run Grocer • Using a Preserve razor with a replaceable blades Piece out, clean and green SIGN UP for the Ask Renee newsletter at indianalivinggreen.com. ILG

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Correct Answers: 1. (d): The Kardashians get 40 times more coverage. (Media Matters); 2. (b): Water and air pollution. (Washington Post); 3. (b): 2,000; (Alternet); 4. (d): Fluids can migrate into drinking water supplies. (ProPublica); 5. (c): They’re not worried about climate change. (Daily Climate); 6. (e): BPA in their bottles and sippy cups. (Associated Press); 7. (c) Hellish hail (InsideClimate News); 8. (a): Nearly its entire ice cover, melting. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center); 9. (c): They use pesticides. (Porterville Recorder); 10. (e): Bikes. (New York Times)


ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION ASSOCIATION OFINDIANA

ANNUAL CONFERENCE ENVIRONMENTAL LITERACY Creating Stewards for a Sustainable Indiana

OCTOBER 5-7

JAMESON CAMP INDIANAPOLIS VISITWWWEEAIORG FORMOREINFORMATION

Eating well, living well and feeling good... half-hour weekly radio program.

SAT. 11:30AM & WED. 5:00PM

Look for the October issue of ILG on stands Sept. 24

AnotherDayofLiving.com

Spirits

Our October “spirits” cover package includes features on Green Congregations, Green Burial and Indiana-made alcohol.

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Indiana Living Green - September 2012