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THISWEEK

BOOKS, ‘TOONS & URBAN DECAY VISUAL ARTS PG. 16

COVER PAGE 10

We take a look at new work at Indy Indie, Gallery 924, the Stutz, the Harrison and iMOCA. By Dan Grossman

UP ON THE ROOF FOOD PG. 20

Our annual bicycle race brings top competitors from around the country — along with a lot of family friendly fun and games. Story by Robert Annis

BLACK CROWES BACK ON MUSIC PG. 26 An interview with drummer Steve Gorman as he dishes on their reunion and their new live album. By Katherine Coplen

NEWS ... 06 ARTS ..... 14 MUSIC .. 26

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WHAT’S ONLINE THAT’S NOT IN PRINT?

BEI BEI SHUAI CASE ENDS

DON’T RAISE THE MINIMUM WAGE

Two years in the making, the case of Bei Bei Shuai - a woman who survived a suicide attempt while pregnant but later lost the baby and was subsequently charged with feticide - came to a close late Friday afternoon.

I recently saw a story about fast-food workers who were demanding $15 an hour. At first I thought it was an Onion headline and then I realized they weren’t joking. By Abdul

WTF? Letters to the editor should be sent to: editors@nuvo.net or leave a comment on nuvo.net, Facebook and Twitter. They should be typed and not exceed 300 words. Editors reserve the right to edit for length, etc. Please include a daytime phone number for verification.

I Actually Like AJ Feeney Ruiz

The food at Fountain Square’s Rooftop Garden Restaurant is nearly as good as the view. By M. S .J. Cline

MASS AVE CRITERIUM

Vol. 24 Issue 19 issue #1117

TAMIKA CATCHINGS’ COMMUNITY LEGACY

I took some offense to the letter to the editor criticizing AJ Feeney Ruiz in your last issue. Does it make him that unusual that he has a degree but doesn’t work in his field? I mean who does? Who actually CAN for that matter? Is it really a cause for derision that he is a pro-LGBT Republican? It seems to me that the real root of the criticism was that NUVO has a confessed Republican writing for the rag. Which is exactly what I like about AJ. I welcome the idea of conservatives who are willing to objectively probe and challenge the party’s beliefs. Liberals don’t have a monopoly on gay rights, underemployment, or even “irony” or hipsterism. I also welcome the idea of some small degree of balance and open mindedness in the editorials in NUVO. (Funny story: the first two months I lived in Indy I thought Hammer was some brilliant reverse-Steven Colbert. Imagine my disappointment when I realized he actually believed the mindless old partisan refrains he parroted). Keep AJ around, if for no other reason than to appease us few moderate, open minded Republicans who read your magazine on a regular basis. — Ryan Spahr, Indianapolis

Tamika Catchings discuss about her involvement with Dribble to Stop Diabetes and what she does in the community. By David Gurecki

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VOICES FIXING DETROIT’S FINANCES THIS WEEK

VOICES

Officials contemplate art museum liquidation

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DAVID HOPPE DHOPPE@NUVO.NET

f you live in a city — any city — there are David Hoppe D plenty of questions worth asking about has been writing columns for h the financial crisis afflicting Detroit. NUVO since the mid-1990s. N For instance: FFind him online every week at How is it that the federal bailout of NUVO.NET/VOICES N Detroit’s auto industry could be such a success, yet fail to prevent a financial calamity that threatens the already tenuous well-being of senior citizens and public employees? of former and current public employees. While it is clear that Detroit has suffered Indeed, the only ones likely to benefit from from gross, even criminal, mismanagea sell-off would most likely be the banks ment over the years, not to mention such that have loaned Detroit money. demographic blows as white flight, to what Fortunately, it appears there are many extent has it also been used as a punchpeople in Detroit and elsewhere who are ing bag by rural and suburban interests in appropriately shocked by the idea of their Michigan’s state government, exacerbating museum effectively putting itself out of the city’s problems for the sake of political business. They realize this would be a black point-scoring? eye that, in the long run, would do nothAnd now that the city is on the ropes, does ing to encourage future investment in the this mean that it will necessarily become a city. It would, instead, only add insult to laboratory for the privatization of a whole spectrum of services Detroit was contemplating selling and resources traditionally considered part of the public trust? off its art treasures while a new This last question became a subject of national atten$650 million stadium is in the works tion after the idea was floated for the Detroit Red Wings. to sell off some or all of the collection held by the Detroit Institute of Arts, the city’s Detroit’s already injured civic self. municipally-owned art museum. But this situation has also underlined the Founded in 1883, and designed by Paul rhetorical deficit that continues to dog arts Cret, the same architect responsible for advocates when it comes to making their Indianapolis’ original Central Library buildcase in the media and with the public at ing, the DIA has an irreplaceable colleclarge. While museums and other landmark tion. In addition to one of the country’s top cultural institutions continue to be part of selections of American art, the museum also how any real city projects itself to the larger includes significant works by such masters world, these resources seem to be underas Rembrandt, Caravaggio, Pieter Bruegel stood and appreciated by an ever smaller, the Elder, Velazquez, Cezanne and Van albeit highly influential, slice of society. Gogh, not to mention a large-scale mural by This does not make what museums do less Diego Rivera. important, but it does make their continChristies, the international art auction ued well-being more precarious. house, appraised the DIA collection in Just how precarious became clear last June. Observers guess that were the colweek with the news that while Detroit was lection to be offered on the open market, contemplating selling off its art treasures, its various pieces would fetch billions of Michigan’s Republican governor, Rick dollars. The market value of the museum’s Snyder, approved a plan to build a new, most important pieces is bound to place $650 million stadium for the Detroit Red them beyond the reach of virtually any Wings hockey team — with half that money other public museum. This means that, in to be paid with public funds. the event of a sell-off, these works will most “This is part of investing in Detroit’s likely wind up in the hands of private colfuture,” said Gov. Snyder. lectors from around the world. This will be Detroit’s third publicly-funded This hasn’t kept some people from trystadium. The Lions got one, so did the Tigers. ing to force a choice between works of art Each time, of course, people were told the and hungry pensioners. How, they argue, new stadium would be a boon for the city. can the city justify sitting on a mountain What happens in Detroit will likely set of potential cash — in the form of art treaprecedents for cities across the country. sures — when retired city workers could Detroit is in a crisis, but this doesn’t see their retirement funds slashed. mean the city is going away. It just raises This argument sidesteps the sad fact another question: What kind of city will that the proceeds from such a sale would be left after the people trying to fix it not begin to address the on-going needs have moved on? „ 4 VOICES // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO


Benefitting Indy cog

Elite indiana state criterium Championships

Saturday, August 10 noon to 11 p.m

Start/finish line and registration are at

435 Mass Ave., downtown Indy to view the full race schedule, visit truesport.com Visit us at mac.nuvo.net •

follow us on facebook at Mass Ave Criterium

watch in the beer garden as racers compete at speeds reaching 40mph! Enter to win:

A Fat Tire Bike from New Belgium

Visit the beer garden to register for a chance V tto win the 2013 New Belgium Cruiser

Pre-register to Win:

A set of Zipp 404 Firecrest Wheels ($2,700)

August 10, 2013

ELITE INDIANA STATE CRITERIUM CHAMPIONSHIPS

• The Art Press and United State of Indiana will be screen printing commemorative shirts on site! • BGI Will conduct contests and challenges for your chance to win prizes! • A bigger and better beer garden with more seating, more shade and longer hours! • Don’t forget to bring your water bottle! Free water stations courtesy of Bottle Free Indy For racer questions: Mike Hanley, 317-549-5233 Enjoy volunteering? Please contact Kate Bragg at kbragg@nuvo.net or 317-808-4608

Racing will continue crowd giveaways under the lights!

all day long!

Courtesy of Mass Ave Merchants


WHAT HAPPENED? Assessing school assessments Legislative leaders announced Friday that an independent task force will review Indiana’s A-F grading system for schools in light of allegations that the state’s former education chief manipulated the formula to help a school he had touted. The General Assembly passed a law earlier this year ordering the State Board of Education to revamp the system. But House Speaker Brian Bosma, R-Indianapolis, and Senate President Pro Tem David Long, R-Fort Wayne, said Friday that enough questions have been raised about 2012 schools grades to warrant an independent look – in addition to the ongoing analysis by education officials. They’ve asked John Grew, executive director of state relations and policy analysis at Indiana University, and Bill Sheldrake, president and founder of Policy Analytics, to lead the task force. They are to report their findings by Labor Day. Mr. Clean targeting corruption Common Cause Indiana presented its Mr. Clean Award to U.S. Attorney Joe Hogsett on Thursday for his efforts to fight against government corruption. Hogsett is only the third person to receive the award since Common Cause created it in 2010. Roberta Schonemann, the organization’s governing board chair, said the group had hoped to present the award to a recipient yearly, but “legislative efforts to strengthen our ethics, campaign and transparency laws have stalled in recent years, so the award has been on hiatus.” Hogsett said the only way for public officials to maintain the public trust is to be transparent and ethical. “Our work is about thing and one thing only and that is doing the right thing. It doesn’t matter who you are or who you were, it doesn’t matter who you know or what personal politics you happen to hold,” Hogsett said. “If you violate the public’s trust, my commitment is to hold you fully accountable.” Common Core debate continues Superintendent of Public Instruction Glenda Ritz told lawmakers Monday that the education department will review the Common Core standards individually to determine if each would be best for Indiana. Earlier this year, the Indiana General Assembly voted to pause the implementation of Common Core so state officials could take a second look at the curriculum, which was created by state education groups and has been endorsed by President Barack Obama’s administration. In the first study committee meeting, members heard testimony about how Indiana’s standards compare to Common Core. The two upcoming meetings will focus on data related to assessments and the fiscal impact of the choice to either continue implementing or repeal the national standards. Indiana can choose to adopt the English Language Arts standards or the mathematics standards or both. The state board of education can add up to 15 percent in additional standards or qualifications, but states cannot revise the national education standards. Common Core opponent Sandra Stotsky, former senior associate commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Education, testified that adopting Common Core would be a “waste of money” because the national education standards need to be “completely revised, if not entirely abandoned.” Proponent Kathleen Porter-Magee, senior director of the high quality standards program at the Thomas B. Fordham Institute in Washington D.C., countered: “By choosing to leverage the Common Core and add to them the best of Indiana’s previous standards, you have the opportunity to create a set of standards that would rival the best of the world.” — THE STATEHOUSE FILE 6 NEWS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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THE EFFORT TO ENABLE MASS TRANSIT Plans continue, despite uncertain funding path B Y REBECCA TO W N S EN D RT O W N S E N D @ N U V O . N E T

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lanning for the IndyConnect plan to modernize the city’s transportation system continues, even as the policy changes necessary to enable the plan’s actualization remain enmeshed in the bureaucratic quagmire known as the Indiana General Assembly. At a Monday summer study committee meeting meant to help state legislators vet a plan to upgrade the city’s transportation system, Senate Finance Committee Chair Luke Kenley, R-Noblesville, continued to voice his longstanding skepticism that greater investment in mass transit systems could justify the cost. “Is anyone looking at subsidizing small vehicles (for carless residents),” Kenley said. “Environmental issues are not what they used to be with electric cars and all that.” The senator also indicated that he is not easily sold on arguments — as outlined by several mayors and Ron Gifford of the Central Indiana Corporate Partnership — that a more robust public transit system would support revitalization in depressed urban areas. “Are we better off spending money thinking transit will solve problems, or will lack of good schools and safety on streets and jobs in these areas still be an issue?” Kenley asked Gifford. “It’s a big cost item so it’s going to have to show some results,” Kenley added, noting his often-repeated position that road infrastructure is entirely supported by its users through gas taxes and various vehicle-related sales taxes and licensing fees. “Anyone that says transit will solve everything is a selling you a bill of goods,” Gifford said. “To say that a good transit system isn’t required to build healthier communities ... is also selling a bill of goods, in my opinion.” He drew lawmakers’ attention to two sets of statistics that highlight a problematic position for Indianapolis with respect to its ability to compete against other major cities for jobs and talent — as well to its ability to provide basic services to existing residents: 1) Only 61 percent of the jobs in this region can be accessed by public transit within a half-mile of the job site. Indianapolis ranks 73rd in the nation based on this accessibility metric. 2) Only 22 percent of public transit riders can get to their jobs within 90 minutes. On this score, the city ranks 62nd in U.S. Gifford also took issue with the contention that roads and highways are supported entirely with users fees, noting that cities

SUBMITTED BY INDY CONNECT

and counties frequently must supplement highway budgets for roads and bridges with general-fund tax dollars. In addition, both the state government and the municipal government of Indianapolis have sold or leased major assets — the toll road in northern Indiana and the city’s water utility, respectively — to subsidize ever-growing infrastructure costs.

Mayor Ballard steps to the plate, again Mayor Greg Ballard also testified Monday — repeating the case he has laid out to lawmakers for the past two sessions that improvements to the city’s transportation system are necessary for Indy’s future vitality. S E E , T R A N S I T , O N P A G E 08


Institute for Relationship Research, Indianapolis Do you drink alcohol? Are you in a romantic relationship? If you answered yes to both of these questions then you may be eligible to participate in a Purdue University study on the relationship between alcohol and behavior. Call the Purdue Institute for Relationship Research in Indianapolis at 317-222-4265, or go to http://sparc.psyc. purdue.edu to ďŹ nd out more about this study. If eligible, you will be compensated between $10 to $100. Must be 21 and over to participate.

BRAIN IMAGING STUDY

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EMAIL YPETLAB@IUPUI.EDU Center for Neuroimaging Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis, IN


GET INVOLVED

THIS WEEK

Indy Library Store Book sale Proceeds from discounted new and used books will support library programs and services through the Indianapolis Public Library Foundation. Sat., Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., Aug. 11, 12-4 p.m.; and Thu., Aug. 15, 2-7:30 p.m. Library Services Center, 2450 N. Meridian St. Indy Talks: Inspiring Youth to Give and Serve Giving Sum and the Youth Philanthropy Initiative of Indiana sponsor interactive service activities, story sharing by a panel of youth philanthropists, and available resources to enable greater civic engagement and volunteerism among youth and families. More info at indytalks.info. Sat., Aug. 10, 1-3 p.m., Carpe Diem School, 2240 N. Meridian St. Cystic Fibrosis fundraiser Join teams raising money for the Cycle for Life event to be held Sept. 12. The pre-race event involves cocktails, beer, wine, soda, and heavy appetizers. On-site babysitting services available. Email gfilippe@iupui.edu for ticket information. Sat, Aug. 10, 6 p.m., 4916 N. Park Avenue, Suggested donation $20+ The Life Stories Project A collaboration among the Indiana Historical Society, Storytelling Arts of Indiana, and WFYI, the storytelling project encourages people to come in and share family stories that “celebrate our commonalities and differences for a stronger, more vibrant community while leaving a legacy of stories for generations to come.” Volunteer interviewers will lead contributors through a one-hour recording session. Stories will be archived lifestoriesproject.net. Visit the website for more details and registration information. Sun., Aug. 11, Central Library, 40 E. St. Clair St. FREE CAFO watch conference Sponsored by the Socially Responsible Agricultural Project, the annual CAFO-watch conference is a grassroots effort to network about the environmental and health challenges associated the large-scale livestock farming. This year, organizers are encouraging participants to bring “show-and-tell” items that effectively communicate their CAFO concerns. Send $10 registration fee, which includes lunch, to organizer Barbara Sha Cox, P.O. Box 1572, Richmond, IN 47375. Saturday, Aug. 8, Mill Creek Civic Center, 17 Veterans Blvd., Chesterfield, $10.

THOUGHT BITE Indiana can be proud of Congressman Andre Carson who voted against punishing Snowden for exposing government snow job that put our military at unnecessary risk. — ANDY JACOBS, JR

NUVO.NET/NEWS N TTamika ik C Catchings’ community legacy . By David Gurecki IMPD update on shootings in Broad Ripple. By NUVO Editors Bennett resigns following grade altering flap. By The Statehouse File DCS to focus on child support, mental health and employee retention. By Olivia Covington

VOICES: • You won’t have Bennett to kick around anymore - By Abdul-Hakim Shabazz • Bennett & co. still don’t get it - By John Krull SLIDESHOWS: • Brickyard 400 festivities • Inter v. Chelsea • Colts training camp (all by TJ Foreman) 8 // NEWS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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TRANSIT , FROM PAGE 06 “It’s critical that working people have more time with their families, it’s critical that seniors have better mobility, it’s critical to attracting new residents and it’s critical to the future growth of our city and region,” Ballard said. He highlighted the city’s inability to fund significant upgrades given its current fiscal situation, noting Indianapolis faces an estimated $55 million budget shortfall in 2014. The funding to support the necessary improvements cannot be obtained unless the Marion County residents vote to support a dedicated tax — and, Ballard noted, the people don’t have the option of placing that question on their ballot without the General Assembly’s approval. “I am not asking for bailout. I am asking you to let us decide how to grow,” Ballard said. Ballard also had a response to Kenley’s concern that, should the voters elect to pass a 0.3 percent tax increase to pay for the system, it would present an undue burden on the city’s un- and under-employed. “The lower income people in the city of Indianapolis are dying for this,” Ballard said, sharing an anecdote of a woman who must take a day off work to enable the more than four-hour, roundtrip bus route she must navigate to visit her doctor. “This would be dedicated funding,” he added. “You can’t think of this as an expense – this is an investment so the city can grow its tax base, so future mayors don’t have a structural gap we’re facing right now. To grow the tax base, we must offer amenities people want — that includes transit. “I am asking you to trust the people of Indianapolis to decide for themselves.” Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard echoed this sentiment, arguing that a more robust regional transportation system is necessary to stem the snowballing costs associated with trying to support infrastructure to ever-expanding sprawl into the Indiana countryside and for Central Indiana cities to compete nationally — and internationally — for jobs and residents. “I seriously urge you to consider allowing people to vote it up or down,” Brainard said.

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INDY CONNECT FEEDBACK MEETINGS RED LINE WHEN: WED., AUG. 14, 6 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. W H E R E : T H E M O N O N C E N T E R , 123 4 C E N T R A L P A R K D R . E ., C A R M E L W H E N : T U E S ., A U G . 2 0 , 6 P . M . - 7 : 3 0 P . M . WHERE: GREENWOOD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 310 M E R I D I A N S T ., G R E E N W O O D * W H E N : T H U R S ., A U G . 2 2 * , 6 P . M . - 7 : 3 0 P . M . WHERE: NORTH UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 38 0 8 N . M E R I D I A N S T .

GREEN LINE * W H E N : W E D . , A U G . 7 *, 6 P . M . - 7 : 3 0 P . M . WHERE: NOBLESVILLE CITY HALL, 16 S. 10TH S T ., N O B L E S V I L L E

WE ARE CITY SUMMIT Organized by the Center for Urban Ecology at Butler University and The Kinetic Project, this month’s We Are City half-day summit is meant “to inspire heightened conversation about citybuilding in Indianapolis” with a mix of local and national speakers. For more information, see wearecity.us. W H E N : Thurs., Aug. 22, noon-5 p.m., Indiana Historical Society, 450 W. Ohio St.

also heard from Indiana Department of Transportation Chief of Staff Troy Woodruff, who briefed lawmakers on a statewide mobility study slated for release Wednesday. “We have no significant congestion in the state of Indiana,” Woodruff said. “The majority of problems are related to construction, weather and snow.” As for the bottlenecks on I-69 on the Northeastside of Indianapolis, Woodruff outlined the opportunities he sees for strategic elimination, such as diverting freight traffic from the metro area along connector highways that link I-69 to I-70 — and I-70 to I-65, and I-65 to State Road 37. “Trying to solve congestion by [For transportation watchexpanding lanes is like trying to lose ers keeping score at home, this is the same INDOT official weight by expanding your belt.” whose family — according to an analysis by The Indianapolis — RON GIFFORD, CENTRAL INDIANA Star — netted an 83 percent gain CORPORATE PARTNERSHIP on a land sale along the I-69 construction corridor.] “It seems to me we don’t think about anything else but conMayor John Ditslear of Noblesville also crete and highways,” Sen. Jean Breaux, offered anecdotes to illustrate his comD-Indianapolis, said to Woodruff. “Is that munity’s need for a more robust regional standard or are others more progressive in transit system. terms of taking more cars off the roads?” In community listening exercises held with Woodruff responded: “We are an execuresidents and businesses, Ditslear said he tive branch and we take our cues from the was surprised by the “resounding yes – there governor. And we feel we’re in line with his are transportation problems, they are growvision. As he says, ‘Roads bring jobs.’ “ ing and they have negative consequences.” Gifford offered a different take on combating congestion. “Trying to solve congestion by expanding lanes is like trying to lose weight by Along with the testimony the study comexpanding your belt,” he said. mittee solicited relating to mass transit, it

Concrete, continued

WHEN: THURS., AUG. 15, 6 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. WHERE: MARTIN UNIVERSITY - FINE ARTS R O O M , 217 1 A V O N D A L E P L A C E

BLUE LINE WHEN: THURS., AUG. 8,- 6 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. WHERE: GEORGE WASHINGTON COMMUNITY H I G H S C H O O L , 2215 W . W A S H I N G T O N S T .

~*

WHEN: TUES, AUG. 13, 6 P.M. - 7:30 P.M. WHERE: WASHINGTON SQUARE MALL, CENTER C O U R T , 10 20 2 E W A S H I N G T O N S T .

~ Spanish translation provided * Sign language interpreter

Meanwhile, out on the streets … As the legislators continue their deliberations, planning for an upgrade to the city’s transportation system that would double the number of buses, add bus rapid transit and potentially enable commuter rail from Noblesville to Downtown continues. The IndyConnect planning process, enabled with a $2 million federal grant and a $400,000 local match, has been like a funnel, starting with a wide-ranging vision process in 2010 and gradually tapering to a more specific plan, Ehren Bingaman of the Central Indiana Regional Transportation Authority explained in a recent interview. CIRTA partners with Indianapolis Metropolitan Planning Organization and IndyGo as members of IndyConnect working together to try to envision and build the best overall transit plan for the metro area. A series of nine public meetings is underway to share preliminary plans, gather feedback and gauge reaction to three rapid transit lines: The Red Line (from Carmel to Greenwood), The Green Line (from Noblesville to Downtown) and The Blue Line (from the airport across town along Washington). [See info box for details.]

IndyGo’s current funding In addition to user fees and federal grants, mass transit is currently supported by a line item in the state budget, which last year distributed $42.5 million to support transit systems statewide — $10.5 million of it to IndyGo, INDOT officials said. Still, IndyGo is cash-strapped, requiring management to be “very creative” in its bus replacement strategies, IndyGo President Mike Terry told legislators. For 2012, IndyGo’s operating budget was $65 million. Federal funds are generally used for capital expenditures, such as new buses, but are now being used to support operating costs. As a result, IndyGo buses that should retire at 12 years and have an average age of six now average 10 years old with some in the fleet dating back to the late ‘90s, Terry said. To help stretch its resources, the IndyGo team is buying used buses from Columbus, Ohio — a metro area with a transit budget almost twice the size of Indy’s. „


MASS AVE CRIT A race down the Ave BY ROBERT ANNIS • EDITORS@NUVO.NET

H

PHOTO BY MARK A. LEE

An image from last year’s competition.

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undreds of cyclists, including some of the Midwest’s top bike racers, will invade Downtown on Saturday for the Mass Ave Criterium. Joining them will be more than 5,000 fans and curious onlookers who will line the streets surrounding the free race, sponsored for the sixth year by, well, us! A massive beer garden courtesy of New Belgium Brewing Co. will help keep the good times flowing. “The party atmosphere coming down the homestretch is second to none,” said Speedway Wheelmen rider Erik Albers, who will compete in the Cat 3/4 race. The race doubles as the Indiana State Criterium Championship. State champions will be crowned in multiple categories, including a special police/ fire/EMS division. Hundreds of racers will compete for a share of $10,000 in cash and prizes. The .67-mile course is basically a triangle, connecting Massachusetts Avenue, Vermont and East streets. Good positioning in the corners will be essential for riders contending for a state title. With speeds exceeding a 25 mph average in some races, it will be difficult for racers dropped in the turns to work their way back to the pack. “The hardest part of the course is that first 90-degree turn,” Whitney Burdzilauskas said of the corner at Massachusetts and Vermont. “You’ve got that manhole cover there as well, and if it’s slippery, there could be a lot of wrecks.” The tight final turn at East and Massachusetts means riders will slow to 10 mph or so, then explode out of the corner at 30 mph or more. “It’s going to be a tough interval every lap,” said Declan Doyle, Bissell-ABG-Giant director. “There’s almost always a headwind they’ll have to deal with as well.” There’s a long straightaway down Massachusetts before the finish, so sprinters must have their timing down perfectly. If they go too soon, they might run out of gas before the finish line. To add additional excitement for fans and racers, this will be the first year the entire men’s elite race will be contested at night under 48,000 watts of light. But the real power will be on the road, with the area’s two powerhouse teams, Texas Roadhouse and Bissell-ABG-Giant, battling it out for the win during the Pro/1/2 race. Bissell’s Aaron Hubbell won the elite race last year, besting Texas Roadhouse riders John Grant and Chad Burdzilauskas at the line. But Texas Roadhouse has since reloaded with two elite-level talents – Adam Leibovitz and Colton Barrett – making a repeat victory for Bissell that much more difficult. Doyle said the rivalry between the two teams is good for local cycling. “Texas Roadhouse has always been the dominant team in the Midwest,” Doyle said. “But last year, we overtook them and that woke them up. They really stepped it up a notch this year by signing Adam, and that’s a good thing. “Their team is pretty old, except for Adam (and Barrett), while our team is relatively young. We’re the next generation, learning

every race. The talent’s there, it’s just a matter of learning to use it.” Hubbell is no longer with the team and won’t be racing Saturday, but Doyle said Bissell will bring eight or nine of those younger riders to contest the race, including Jon Jacob and Graham Dewart. “(Jacob) is coming around,” Doyle said. “He’s starting to get his confidence back after breaking his wrist last year. He’s probably the strongest rider in the race, but he’ll need a little luck to win. … With a guy like him, you can watch him all you want, but if he goes (off in a breakaway), the only thing you can do is go with him. “Graham is also riding really well right now,” Doyle said. “He won the pack sprint in the Indy Crit a few weeks ago.” Doyle said the team would mark Texas Roadhouse’s top two riders, Burdzilauskas and Leibovitz, who he said were “head and shoulders above the rest of the team.” “We’re going to keep Adam within arm’s length and hopefully frustrate them if it comes down to a sprint. Adam’s one of the 10 best criterium riders in the country right now, and while Colton’s good, I don’t think he’ll be in there toward the end of a long race. Ninety minutes is long for a crit, and if this cold front snaps and we get some warmer weather, the heat will definitely be a factor. It’s going to be survival of the fittest out there.” Of course, while on paper it looks like a twoteam race, there could be a few surprises out on the road, particularly if a rider like Panther Racing’s Ryan Knapp gets a lucky break or two. In the women’s elite race, Racing for Riley’s Melissa Moeller tabbed Marian University’s Allie Dragoo, Indie Bike’s Sierra Siebenlist, Midwest Devo’s Chloe Dygert and her teammate Bri Clark as the frontrunners for victory. “Allie made a solo break at the Indy Crit and snuck away for the win,” Moeller said. “She’s been on form all year, and helped Marian earn their newest national cycling title. Bri is the toughest and most aggressive cyclist in the field. She is never content to just sprint at the end, though she has the power for that. Instead she means to make everything a race, and she’ll be sure to throw in attacks – or have teammates to launch attacks. “Sierra is capable in just about every genre of cycling and has been racing a lot this summer. She won at Mass Ave just two years ago. She can stay with the best of them, so she’ll be in the top of the standings. Chloe has only been road racing for a couple months, but she has the power to sprint at the end or break away. If there is a break up the road, she probably even has the legs to bring it back herself.” Moeller suggested a potential dark-horse for victory might be another teammate, Sydney Hatten, who has been in California all summer doing an internship with Specialized Bicycles. No one knows what condition she’ll be in when Saturday arrives. Racing begins at noon with the Cat 5/Citizens race and lasts until 11 p.m. „


Free Mass Ave Criterium Saturday, Aug. 10 noon to 11 p.m. For complete schedule, see:

truesport.com/index.php/events/truesport_event/120

PHOTOS BY MICHELLE CRAIG

Ryan Shean: The Up-and-Comer Every year, there seems to be at least one local bike racer whose results take a massive leap forward. It was Ryan Shean’s chance to shine this season. The Team Upland racer won on Day 3 of the prestigious Joe Martin stage race in Arkansas, eventually coming in fifth overall against a stacked field. He followed up that triumph with a podium spot during the Tulsa Tough stage race

in Oklahoma, and has numerous podium and top-five finishes locally. Where are the results coming from? Shean credits his teammates, new coach Curtis Tolson and a new work schedule. “In December, we all got together to talk about our goals for this season and what we expected from one another,” Shean said. “Everyone progressed this year. It’s been fun being a part of that.” Shean and teammate Kyle Perry had a mini-training camp in North Carolina in April, putting in dozens of hours of training in the mountains. He was able to do that and fit in 40 races so far this year by finish-

ing grad school and parlaying the degree into a pharmacy job with a flexible schedule and supportive co-workers. (You can keep those Lance Armstrong/PED jokes to yourself, thank you.) His next target is a top finish at the Mass Ave Crit before he ends his season at the Gateway Cup in St. Louis later this month. “This will be my fourth time racing Mass Ave,” Shean said. “In years past, I’ve raced it after upgrading (race categories) and I’m just trying to hang on for dear life. … I want to do well at this race, not just do it. This is the race everyone wants to do well at. Everyone’s fit. Everyone comes to race.”

“You never know who’s going to be the big surprise of the day,” Shean said, recounting last year’s race when Bissel-NUVO’s Aaron Hubbell and Texas Roadhouse’s John Grant and Chad Burdzilauskas were marked by the pack early in the race, yet still managed to break away and nab the three podium spots. Shean acknowledged he’s gotten attention from other teams after his success this year, but reiterated his happiness on Team Upland, adding, “It’s a little early to be talking about next year. I’m staying focused on this year.” He has no aspirations of going professional, but wants to continue climbing the amateur ranks. „ NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // COVER STORY 11


PHOTO BY MICHELLE CRAIG

whitney and chad Burdzilauskas: The fastest couple in Indy It seems like every cyclist in Indy has a story about Chad and Whitney Burdzilauskas. In the bar after a ride, you might hear a rider brag he was able to hang at the back of the back of the pack while Chad pulled the group for miles at a breakneck speed. Nearby, another cyclist may boast about significantly increasing his power numbers after a month or two of being coached by Whitney, who’s a lightning-fast triathlete and cyclocross racer in her own right. The two met, appropriately enough, on the famous Butler training ride. “He teased me about being a triathlete,” said Whitney, who runs The Fitness Lab in Broad Ripple. “He had a lot of personality, but I never thought when we first met that we’d get married.” Whitney’s the first to laugh about their differences – she’s more of a health nut, while Chad is pretty popular with the local bartenders. “He’s the only one I know who can drink his weight in beer one night, then go out and win a bike race the 12

COVER STORY // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

next day,” Whitney said. “He tries to get me to be more indulgent, and I try to get him to be more structured and eat healthy. Beyond that, we don’t try to change each other. We accept each other for who we are.” Neither of the two is going into the Mass Ave Crit looking for a win. Rather, both are content playing a domestique role, helping their respective teammates reach the top step of the podium. “Chad’s goal is to help his younger teammates like Adam Lebovitz and Colton Barrett win races so they can get pro contracts,” Whitney said. “They’re coming into their prime, and Chad knows he isn’t getting any younger. His new role on the team is really on the development side. He doesn’t want to be that shining star anymore.” For Whitney, her main focus is actually 4,300 miles away, in Kona, Hawaii, for the Ironman world championships. Although she’s looking at Mass Ave as more training, she said she’s going to go all out to help her Nebo Ridge teammates. “When I show up for a race, I put everything into it,” Whitney said. After the Ironman, the two plan to stay in Hawaii for a bit, their first non-race vacation since they were married four years ago. They could use the rest. „


John & Corbin Schmitz: Father & Son Dynamic Duo

PHOTO BY MICHELLE CRAIG

Corbin (left) and his dad, John.

When it comes to crowd favorites, few local riders can match the fanfare surrounding John Schmitz, better known to his Team Indiebike teammates and the local cycling community as “Suitcase.” So when his son, Corbin, 16, started racing, it was only natural for the cheers to follow him, as well. John, who medaled at the Masters Track Nationals last week at the Major Taylor Velodrome, is looking to continue his strong season with a good result Saturday in the Pro/1/2 race. Corbin will toe the start line in the Juniors 15-18 race earlier in the day. So where did John’s nickname come from? “When I first started riding, I had this big bag on the back of my bike,” Schmitz said. “I didn’t know what I was doing, so every time someone would attack, I would chase him down. I went after everyone, so it became a big joke. Someone would take off, and they’d yell, ‘Go get him, Suitcase!’ And the nickname stuck.” As Corbin started racing, it was only natural that the smaller Schmitz got saddled with a luggage-themed nickname. During cyclocross season, the cheers for “Satchel” are among the loudest of the day. Corbin is fairly nonchalant about the attention. “All the people who know my dad cheer for me, too,” Corbin said. “It’s cool.” It helps that Corbin also happens to be

a terrific kid in his own right. Although they both share a talent on the bike, the two are dissimilar in most other ways – while his dad is boisterous and outgoing, Corbin is more laidback and quiet. Corbin has only been riding for a few years, but the Midwest Devo rider has established himself as a strong rider in his own right, podiuming at the recent Hyde Park Blast crit and dominating the Cat 4 and Juniors divisions in cyclocross last season. “He’s very coachable, but you do have to push him a little,” John said. “At the same time, I want to make sure he’s enjoying it.” Corbin hopes to attend Marian University when he graduates high school and join its elite cycling team. But he also has another goal in mind – beating his old man. “He’s been getting faster, and I haven’t been training enough this year because of work (and school),” Corbin said. “Last year, our cross times were pretty close, probably within 10 seconds of each other (in a few races). But he’s going to get older, and I’m just going to keep getting faster.” Although the two don’t get to ride together as much as they’d like – between different schedules and ability levels, it can be tough – they agree cycling has brought them closer together as father and son. “I probably wouldn’t talk to him much at all if it wasn’t for cycling,” Corbin said with a laugh. „

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PERFORMANCES Leslie Jordan: Show Pony Jordan, a tiny, fabulous Southern gent who made his Indy debut last year right around this time, must’ve found this city, and Talbott Street, hospitable. The Will & Grace vet (he won an Emmy for a guest role on the show) returns this weekend with a new monologue, Show Pony, that’s in part about his brief stint as a jockey. Talbott Street, Aug. 8 and 9, 8 p.m., $30 Love, Loss and What I Wore t A rich collection of monologues by sisters Nora and Delia Ephron — a sort of tapestry woven out of the things we’ve kept in our closets over the years. The production is simple: five women in black behind five music stands casually pull on and off clothing as they step in and out of a variety of characters. Each actress has her own stylish storytelling style, and the cast together creates beautiful and surprising moments. Particularly moving is Sara Reimen’s breast cancer monologue; a lacy C-cup bra awaits her character’s reconstructed bosom. But Love, Loss and What I Wore is tedious and haphazard at times, and tends to treat essential issues in a superficial way. And it tends to lose a sense of gravity as its piles of discarded apparel build up. — Katelyn Coyne Phoenix Theatre through Aug. 11

REVIEWS Indy Jazz Fest at the Prairie e Indy Jazz Fest, featuring the Indianapolis Jazz Band and Orchestra with guest artists, made itself at home as part of the Marsh Symphony on the Prairie on a balmy first Friday. This lovingly constructed program highlighting Indiana composers under the direction of Steve Allee and hosted by Tom Griswold started from the ‘20s with blues by pianist Leroy Carr and guitarist “Scrapper” Blackwell. A special treat was Allee’s arrangement of Carmichael’s “Georgia On My Mind,” first rendered by Everett Greene in his inimitable “silky-baritone voice” [Griswold] with a piano interlude played by Allee, followed by Cynthia Layne’s upbeat, fast-tempo float on the wind rendition. This well-received ISO debut served as a prelude to Indy Jazz Fest 2013, Sept. 12-21. — Rita Kohn Conner Prairie, Aug. 2-3 Dance Kaleidoscope: Classic Hits r A trio of David Hochoy’s recent works nicely filled the dance-friendly Tarkington stage last weekend. The playfully airborne Ancient Airs and Dances (2011) set on Respigi’s lilting music that we associate with Masterpiece Theatre, especially pleased on an August evening rich with billowy clouds. The oh-my climax came with Mariel Greenlee affecting the pose of a ship’s maidenhead and sailing off on the shoulders of DK’s male dancers. Steve Reich’s music began to assault human patience in what felt like an overlong rendition of Electric Counterpoint (2011). But with “Romeo and Juliet Fantasy” (2012) Hochoy imbued Tchaikovsky’s Overture with dramatic elements to portray the universality of star-crossed lovers. It’s one of Hochoy’s signature works, growing better through the dynamics of a new company of lithe dancers. — Rita Kohn The Tarkington, Aug. 2-3

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A VERY FUNNY ‘SHREW’

HART’s Shakespeare in the Park returns with a not-at-all-dark ‘Taming of the Shrew’ BY S CO TT S H O G ER SSHOGER@NUVO.NET

H

eartland Actors Repertory Theatre (HART) producing artistic director Diane Timmerman says it’s still up in the air whether its outdoor Shakespeare series should be called “Shakespeare in the Park” or “Shakespeare on the Canal” (as has been the case in recent years). HART’s performance space — a tiered outdoor seating area that faces the river — is Canaladjacent, but not really on the Canal, so people might get the idea that it’s, say, right next to the Eiteljorg. Whatever the name, HART will present The Taming of the Shrew in White River State Park twice this weekend, for free. It’s worth more than the price: HART’s an Equity company, so it’s made up of professional actors and technicians making something like a living wage, and it has to rent all its equipment, except for a sound system it purchased this year in an effort to address sound issues that bedeviled past productions. HART is able to make it work with the help of a couple usual suspects — the Indianapolis Foundation, a CICF affiliate, and the Lilly Endowment — and is reaching out this year to corporate sponsors in the hope of finding a more stable financial footing and expanding programming. In the near to distant future are plans to do Shakespeare in the Park in repertory and forge a partnership with Butler University, where Timmerman is chair of the theater department. We spoke with Timmerman on Monday afternoon as stage and audio equipment were rolling into the park. NUVO: How are you dealing with some of the more problematic aspects (misogyny, outdated gender norms, off-color jokes) of Taming of the Shrew? DIANE TIMMERMAN: I think our director, Michael Shelton, and Ryan Artzberger, who plays Petrucchio, and Lisa Ermel, who plays Kate, have come up with some really spectacular solutions to what we view as some of potential problems in this day and age. The play becomes more about two people learning how to be good to each other and less about the caricature that perhaps people think of when they hear the title Taming of the Shrew. If we don’t believe that this couple is a team and a great match, then everything about it would be awful. But in Ryan and Lisa’s hands, we immediately see that this couple was meant for each other, so we’re rooting for them during the play. And also, the play is just very funny. This is not a dark version of Taming of the Shrew.

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Left: Lisa Ermel (Kate) and Ryan Artzberger (Petruchio). Top; Lauren Briggeman (Bianca) and Tyler Ostrander (Lucentio). PHOTOS BY JULIE CURRY

NUVO: Why is it important that these productions be free?

them to sort of rise to the level of the work and glean what they can?

TIMMERMAN: It’s part of our mission. We know that for a lot of people this is the only Shakespeare they’ve ever seen, but for some people this is actually the only theater they’ve ever seen. It’s a wonderful opportunity to have families come to the show and see professionally produced theater for free in this beautiful outdoor setting that celebrates Indianapolis and the White River, as well as classical theater. It creates a wonderful atmosphere. We have people all the way from couples with candelabras and tablecloths, champagne and caviar, to families with buckets of Kentucky Fried Chicken.

TIMMERMAN: The reason that people don’t understand Shakespeare, whether it’s their first production or their twentieth, is because it’s not done well. No one is going to understand every single work of a Shakespeare play, unless they’re a scholar, because a lot of the words are out of use, a lot of the syntax is very difficult to follow. But if the director and actors are crystal clear on what it is they’re saying and doing, we get that as an audience. And Michael and the actors have done an excellent job making things crystal clear. I’ve directed it twice myself and seen it a couple of other times, and when I watch rehearsal, some of the jokes jump out at me in a way that I didn’t notice before. I believe this production finds all of the humor of the script, and not all productions do that. „

NUVO: Do you try to accommodate those newcomers unfamiliar with live theater in any way, or is it more a matter of allowing


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EVENTS Indy Island residency This year’s Indy Island resident, Rimas K. Simaitis, who took occupancy in late July, is interested in communication. With you, the visitor, via an on-shore radio, housed in a phone booth, that transmits signals to Indy Island via two floating satellite islands that were built in a such a way that you, the visitor, can see your message arrive at the island via vibrations and ripples in the water. And with the cosmos, via a radio telescope made out of a beach umbrella and an empty pineapple can. Simaitis will remain on the island through Aug. 31. Virginia B. Fairbanks Art and Nature Park: 100 Acres Herron fall kickoff Shape Shifters, a group exhibition “rich in the uncanny,” according to Katz, who co-curated with Robert Horvath. And still on display: A showcase for Commercial Artisan, a graphic design firm founded by Herron alumni James and Jon Sholly that’s been featured in Design Observer, Print, Eye, Communication Arts and been honored by the American Center for Design — and the Herron Alumni Show 2013, co-curated by Herron Gallery Director Paula Katz and alumnus Phil O’Malley, and featuring work in a range of media, including contributions by painter and CVA winner Lois Main Templeton and furniture designer Ruby Troup. Herron School of Art & Design, opens Aug. 9 GO Ahead & Play 20 pianos. 20 artists. 30-plus students. GO Ahead & Play, a public art project organized by the Women’s Fund of Central Indiana and powered by a crew of middle and high schoolers, challenged local artists to transform pianos into totally interactive artworks. The modified pianos will remain on the streets through Aug. 18. Head to womensfund.org for locations. Look for a yarn-bombed version on Monument Circle; a tribute to Indy jazz in Fountain Square; and a junglethemed, glow-painted slathered model at Concord Community Center. Various locations around Indianapolis

ON DISPLAY Seven Steeples: Nevada Buckley, Erin Trimble and Ash Windbigler e Walking into Two-Thirds, one feels like one of the hapless protagonists entering Leatherface’s home in The Texas Chainsaw Massacre; a voyeuristic attraction to unfamiliar things gives way to repulsion upon further inspection. Seven Steeples blends crafty and creepy elements with a heavy dose of nostalgia. The result is some“Close the Door!” thing that feels universal by Nevada Buckley yet slightly out of reach. The artists employ an inconography consisting of antlers, skulls, teeth, dolls, family portraits, and feathers. References to camping and hunting abound; three interactive, dwelling-like installations, one by each artist, are located in the center of the gallery, and many of the works are hung with yarn or twine. Hauntingly nostalgic, dark music by electronic duo Boards of Canada played during the opening proved an apt equivalent to feelings evoked by the artwork. I walked away reminded of the impermanence and ultimate failure of memory, with a sense that feelings will remain where images and details fade away. — Charles Fox Two-Thirds Studio through Aug. 23

N NUVO.NET/VISUAL Visit nuvo.net/visual for complete event listings, reviews and more. 16 // ARTS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

VISUAL

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THIS WEEK

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“Abject Birthday” by Caitlin Stephens

ARTS

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“Untitled” by M.W. LaFary

“Rush of Form” by William Denton Ray

BOOKS, CARTOONS AND URBAN DECAY FIRST FRIDAY, BY THE NUMBERS

Cartoons is Murda Bizness: Unsavory Cartoons by Caitlin Stephens and Rob Young e Caitlin Stephens and Rob Young live and work in close proximity to each other, literally and in terms of their interests and technique. They’re both Indy Indie resident artists and Herron graduates. And their typically sordid work often incorporates text and is sometimes structured by graphic novel-style panels. Stephens makes effective use of both panels and text in “The Woods,” which shows two pimply, green-skinned fast food workers wondering where a fellow employee has gone. The answer becomes evident in the last panel, which shows a deep forest running perpendicular to the fast food counter. The kicker is as strange and unexpected as a vivid dream. Another highlight is Young’s “First Kiss,” where a boy strangles a girl with his tongue. Indy Indie Artist Gallery through Aug. 29

A look at new work at Indy Indie, Gallery 924, the Stutz, the Harrison and iMOCA

more to do with her family of origin (than Mogutin’s family of choice) in a self-titled show that features the looping video “This is not about you.” Her videos focus on her sister, Pim, who has Down syndrome, in various activities and poses. There’s little interpretive scaffolding for the viewer to frame this work, so it necessarily becomes interactive. That is to say, it becomes about you, being as much about your reaction to the imagery as it is about the imagery itself. Indianapolis Museum of Contemporary Art through Sept. 21

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M.W. LaFary: Decline r In much of his photography, M.W. LaFary focuses on the decline visible in Indy’s urban core. LaFary isn’t the first Indy area-photographer to be attracted to the mess urban residents leave behind when they hightail it to the suburbs. But isn’t renewal just as much a part of Indy’s story as its decay? Is he teling just half the story? Maybe. Then again, his willingness to experiment — evident in his distorted, yellowish pho2

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“Sticks and Stoned” by Slava Mogutin tographs of the interior of a property at 2043 N. Delaware — makes this more than a purely didactic exercise. This film photographer achieved the aforementioned images with the help of a wide angle digital conversion lens. Gallery 924 through Aug. 30 Conjure r Any good artist is a conjurer, making you forget that you’re looking at art just for a moment and grabbing hold of your imagination. One work in this group show that grabbed me is a mixed media painting by William Denton Ray, “Rush of Form,” that shows a menagerie of fantastical creatures in claustrophobic proximity to each other, in various shades of gray and black, on a white canvas. Call it creature cubism. And Sofiya Inger’s “Painters Making the World” (acrylic on canvas) portrays what 3

“Heavy Downpour” by Stacey Holloway looks like a party of painters/conjurers whooping it up in a deep cave made over into a disco — or art gallery. Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery through Aug. 29 In the Name of Love by Slava Mogutin and SelfTitled by Ted Oonk r When the Russian expatriate artist Slava Mogutin photographs his partner, Brian Kenny, using traditional film, he often uses double exposure to achieve his effects. One of the most striking pieces in a new show at iMOCA is an image of Kenny in an American flag-styled Speedo swimsuit upon which is superimposed another image of Kenny, three times the size. The juxtaposition gives you a sense of how Mogutin’s American muse looms large. Dutch (female) artist Ted Oonk explores a type of love that has 4

Spineless t It’s another group show of local artists at the Harrison Gallery — the 6th annual book arts exhibit (created in concert with Herron), in fact. The promotional copy hints at the problem here by allowing that “the artist’s book is primarily a 20th-century form.” The irrefutable fact that we’re now in the 21st century doesn’t seem to rear its head much in this show (nor has it in its previous incarnations). Fortunately, artists can be utterly current with seemingly outmoded media. Take, for example, Stacey Holloway’s letterpress book, Gestures of the Unconscious. It’s a book with backbone as well as a spine. One of the illustrations, “Heavy Downpour,” portrays airplanes in place of raindrops. Thanks to 9/11, it has a 21st-century feel. Harrison Center for the Arts through Aug. 30 5

— Reviews by Dan Grossman


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OPENING Blackfish t Solid documentary about the care and treatment of orcas – killer whales – at sea parks, with the focus on one whale who has taken several lives while in captivity. Many staff members from various parks speak out on the intelligent animals held in captivity for the entertainment of others and the sometimes tragic consequences. The documentary format is routine, but the stories are compelling. (PG-13) — Ed Johnson-Ott We’re the Millers t In order to better his chances of getting a load of pot across the Mexican border, drug dealer David Burke (Jason Sudeikis) hires a “family,” including a stripper (Jennifer Aniston), a goofball (Will Poulter) and a homeless punk (Emma Roberts). The story in the R-rated comedy is tired, but the jokes are funny, if juvenile, and the cast is likeable. Serviceable late summer fare. (R) — Ed Johnson-Ott Elysium A big old post-Apocalyptic scifi extravaganza set in 2154, starring Matt Damon and Jodie Foster, and directed by Neill Blomkamp (District 9). Percy Jackson and the Sea of Monsters The first Percy Jackson (about a boy who discovers he’s the son of Poseidon) didn’t go over all that well with American audiences, but it ended up making $226 million (largely overseas), so here’s the sequel. Planes Like Cars, only with Planes.

CONTINUING Fruitvale Station e A heartbreaking, beautifully presented account of the last day in the life of Oscar Grant (Michael B. Jordan), who was shot and killed by police on New Year’s Day in 2009. Twenty-two-year-old Bay area resident Oscar is trying to start his life fresh after a stint in prison. But on New Years Eve everything explodes in a nightmarish miscarriage of police power. Powerful filmmaking — the fact that you know how it’s going to end just makes it even more devastating. One of the year’s best. (R) — Ed Johnson-Ott The Way, Way Back e The Way, Way Back is one of those refreshing treats that pop up too rarely during the summer. It manages to be charming even while depicting people behaving badly, seamlessly blending comedy, drama and those terribly awkward moments in-between. Credit the well-chosen cast — Duncan (Liam James), a quiet, glum 14-yearold boy doomed to spend a summer with his recently divorced mom, Pam (Toni Collette) her well-intentioned jerk of a boyfriend, Trent (Steve Carell) — and the writerdirector team of Nat Faxon and Jim Rash, who shared an Oscar with Alexander Payne for their screenplay for The Descendants. (PG-13) — Ed Johnson-Ott 2 Guns r Violent action flick about two undercover agents out for revenge after getting screwed over by their respective agencies. The story is overwritten, but Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg are in fine form and they make the convoluted machinations work. The two make a fine team as well – wouldn’t mind seeing a sequel. (R) — Ed Johnson-Ott

N NUVO.NET/FILM Visit nuvo.net/film for complete movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes. 18 // ARTS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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WHERE EVIL GOES UNPUNISHED

Indonesian mass murderers brag about their exploits in new documentary BY ED J O H N S O N - O TT EJOH N S O N O T T @ N U V O . N E T

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ome things have to be seen to be believed. The Act of Killing, a mindboggling documentary by 38-year-old Joshua Oppenheimer, will leave you reeling. Oppenheimer set out to make a straightforward documentary about the Indonesian mass murderers responsible for an astounding number of deaths in 1965, but encountered obstacles at every step. So he turned to the self-styled gangsters and offered them the chance to tell their own stories. The results are stunning and horrible and mesmerizing. You’ll see a grandfatherly type (he looks like Nelson Mandela) recreating his murders and showcasing his favorite techniques. You’ll see a cross-dressing gangster stuffed into an evening gown a la Divine performing in a psychedelic musical number. What you’ll see mostly are unrepentant assassins reminiscing about their crimes like old football players looking back at their glory days. What’s more, you’ll see the community around them celebrate the monsters. It’s a madhouse. A madhouse! And it doesn’t get sane, it doesn’t find moral clarity. It stays firmly, defiantly, right smack in the middle of Main Street in Crazy Town. There are many grimly funny moments in The Act of Killing, but make no mistake, this is a horror film where not only does evil go unpunished, it is celebrated. The gangsters, who pattern themselves after Marlon Brando and Al Pacino, are hot properties on the talk show circuit. They get approached in malls by people sensing a once in a lifetime photo op. Remember, these men killed thousands of human beings. Estimates of the slaughter run as high as 2.5 million. They killed savagely. Casually. In some cases, they cut off their victims’ heads. And here they are, decades later, enjoying the attention of their public as they recruit locals to act out the roles of victims in their obscene recreations.

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Documentarian Joshua Oppenheimer reenacted mass murders committed in Indonesia during the 1960s using some of the perpetrators of those murders as actors. OPENING

THE ACT OF KILLING

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Dancing girls enter a giant fish in a musical envisioned by an Indonesian mass murderer in The Act of Killing.

“History is written by the winners,” says one of the gangsters, “And we are the winners.” Maybe my moral outrage is misplaced. It astounds me – and deeply offends me – to see such atrocities treated with brazen indifference – hell, with pride! But is it any worse than the way Americans of European descent manage the memories of how their ancestors dealt with Native Americans or captive Africans? Our kinfolk destroyed one culture and made slaves of members of the other. Most of us simply don’t address those acts now – we

didn’t do it, it was our ancestors! – while a smaller group still celebrates the barbarism. I guess the brazen behavior of the Indonesians shouldn’t shock me all that much, but I was rattled nonetheless. As the grandfatherly Anwar Castro asserts, the word gangster means “free man.” I dunno. During an appearance on a TV news talk show, the host recounts the deadly exploits of her guests and offers an estimate of their body count. The impressed audience applauds. Ladies and gentlemen, you have got to see The Act of Killing to believe it. Maybe you’ll get on your moral high horse like I did. Maybe you’ll find the honesty refreshing. One thing’s for sure. You won’t see another documentary like this one. „

FILM EVENTS Calamity Jane Doris Day is Calamity Jane, who could shoot a very small thing off of another very small thing at a great distance better than any menfolk. Artcraft Theatre (Franklin), Aug. 9 and 10, 2 and 7:30 p.m., $5 (discounts available)

Summer Nights: Hoosiers Welcome to Indiana Basketball. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Aug. 9, 9:30 p.m., $10 public, $6 member 48-Hour Film Project Forty-three teams worked around the clock last weekend to put together a seven-minute film in

48 hours, starting on the night of Aug. 2 when each team was given a character, prop, line of dialogue and genre. The results will screen during a marathon session at the Toby starting from 4 p.m. and ending after 11 p.m. Winners will be announced at the end of the screening. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Aug. 10 from 4 p.m., $10 single screening, $22 all screenings


BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

Craft beer, the arts and sports are partnering as a matter of course, sometimes with special brews on tap. Here are a number of examples. p On Aug. 9 and 10,, Sun King will pour its Taming ming of the Brew during Heartland Actors Repertory Theatre’s production of Tamingg of the Shrew at Whitee River State Park. The free show starts at 8 p.m., with pre-show fun from 6:30 p.m. Also on Aug. 9, Upland’s Listen Local Show at Broad Ripple Park will feature music by Triptides, The Late Show and The Vulgar Boatmen. Gates opens 6 p.m and the pay-as-you-go show is at 7 p.m., with proceeds headed to the Indianapolis Parks Department. Fans attending events at Lucas Oil Stadium can now choose from Sun King’s regular line-up of 16 oz. cans at beer stands, cantinas, grills and popcorn locations throughout the venue and in Club Level bars. In addition, Sunlight Cream Ale, Wee Mac Scottish Ale and Osiris Pale Ale are on draft at two ‘Backyard Brews’ locations near sections 109 and 132 on the main concourse. The Official Beer of GenCon 2013 is Sun King’s Flagon Slayer, described as a “braggot style” blend of mead and beer that ranges from a “subtle to a distinctly identifiable honey and beer character.” A free tapping Aug. 14, 6 p.m. (the day before GenCon’s opening) will take place at Sun King’s Beer Garden. A portion of pint sales goes to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Indiana. Flat 12’s spicy, tart English-style pale ale Raga Raspberry is the official beer of 2013 IndyFringe Festival, Aug. 15-25. By law, Indiana craft beer is unavailable at the State Fair, but you can learn about brews, breweries and brewpubs at the Brewers of Indiana Guild booth in the DuPont Food Pavilion until Aug. 18. Stop by to chat with brewers and ambassadors of craft and spin the “wheel of craft” for fun prizes.

Five years of MAWS Jill Ditmire started Mass Ave Wine Shoppe (MAWS) five years ago, offering wine and beer that, according to Ditmire, “were, and still are, the unique, the weird and the affordable finds that no one else in town carries.” Food, then liquor followed. Throughout those years, new artists have been featured on the walls, beverage-related magazines and books have been part of the library and authors have appeared at featured programs.

New on Tap Thr3e Wise Men: Tasty Waves California Common Oaken Barrel: American Pale Wheat Rock Bottom: Summer Honey Ale Bier Brewery: Maibock

N NUVO.NET/FOOD Visit nuvo.net/food for complete restaurant listings, reviews and more. 20 // ARTS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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One corner of the Fountain Square Building’s patchwork deck is devoted to summer dining and a spectacular view.

UP ON THE ROOF

The food at Fountain Square’s Rooftop Garden, brought to you by End of the Line, is nearly as good as the view BY M . S . J . CL I N E EDITORS@NUVO.NET

W

ith the weather this summer lending itself to outdoor eating, it seemed like the perfect time to climb into the old elevators in the Fountain Square Building and dine al fresco on the roof beneath the setting sun. And it turns out that the Rooftop Garden Restaurant offers more than just a great view of the city. For the uninitiated, the building’s roof is covered by a patchwork deck the runs the entire expanse of the building. On the right night, with a gentle breeze, a collection of good people, and a sturdy pair of sunglasses, you’ll never want to leave. The Rooftop Garden Restaurant is a summer extension of the same building’s first floor gastro-pub, The End of the Line, and thus offers the same dinner menu. We started with an order of the fresh baked pretzel sticks ($7.50) accompanied by Havarti dill and Stout beer sauces. True to their word, the pretzel sticks were freshly baked and almost too hot to handle when they arrived — and they’re good enough to put The Rathskeller on notice. The only disappointments of the entire meal were the dipping sauces: The Stout beer was weak and the Havarti dill fell well short of its potential. For our main dishes we settled on half a rack of Carolina Style Baby Back Ribs ($13), the Gooey Spinach Melt ($10) and the Thai pizza ($10). A Gingham salad went along with the ribs, and its generously portioned mix of mixed greens, blueberries, strawberries, mandarin oranges (all fresh), toasted pecans, and real blue cheese finished off with a poppy seed vinaigrette was the second straight strong offering from the kitchen.

A slightly and intentionally burnt crust adds another dimension of taste to the Thai pizza. REVIEW

ROOFTOP GARDEN RESTAURANT

W H E R E : 1 1 0 5 S H ELB Y S T . , IND I A NA P O L I S H OU R S : T H U - S A T FR O M 6 P. M . (WEA TH ER P ER M I T T I N G ) , O P EN M EM O RI A L D A Y WEEKEND T H R O U GH LA B O R D A Y W EEKEND F OOD: e A T M OS P H E R E : q SERVICE: e F OR M OR E I NF O: 6 8 7 - 4 8 5 7, F O U NT A I NS Q U A R EI ND Y . C O M /P U BL I CH O U SE

The star of the meal was the Carolina Style Baby Back Ribs. Proponents of marinated and sauce-laden ribs may be converted by this dry-rubbed, slow-roasted, perfectly charred half-rack. The mustard style BBQ sauce — more mustard than BBQ — had a strong opening presence of Dijon, while a familiar tang of BBQ sauce brought home each meaty bite. The thin crust Thai pizza rewarded us for eschewing its Cajun counterpart. The

slightly and intentionally burnt crust added another level to the already intense combination of peanut and sweet chili sauces. Crisp matchstick carrots and peppers atop water chestnuts, ginger, green onions and sesame seeds all found different parts of the palate to stimulate. The Gooey Spinach Melt is precisely that, and worthy of a doggie bag due to its base of Texas toast-sized cuts of marbled rye. The spinach dip had a helpful crunch thanks to large chunks of water chestnut, and the alfalfa sprouts and diced tomatoes offered enough freshness to leave us mostly guilt free when attacking a fist-sized side order of no-frills, well-executed white cheddar mac and cheese. With the meal going so well and the view only getting better, we felt skipping dessert would be a disservice. Our honest, friendly server recommended the Lemon Bar ($6) as a personal favorite. We took his hint and added the House Made Cheesecake ($6) in the name of research. The Lemon Bar had a custard consistency making it lighter than most, and the homemade kiwi sauce on top could not have been better. The Cheesecake was likewise lighter than most of its gutbusting brethren, and while the wedge was generous in size, it proved easy to dismantle due to the lemon zest throughout, which helped curb the richness. A light caramel drizzle made a sweet addition to the bites that made its acquaintance. The prices seemed fair at the start, and better with each moment of the retreating sun. The service, while perhaps unique to our server and his tableside manner, is excellent. And the food deserves all kinds of superlatives, but suffice to say that it’s really damn good. „


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WHAT TO EAT DURING THE CRIT

August 17, 2013 A Celebration of Art and Community FREE EVENT: ADMISSION & PARKING 9 A.M. – 4 P.M. 100 Art, Craft & Farmers Market Vendors Entertainment • Food Trucks • Arts Activities • Kids Zone Indy’s Hometown Irish Band: Irish Airs - Playing at Noon Festival lines Saturn Street Cumberland Town Hall to Cumberland First Baptist Church 11501 E. Washington St. to 116 S. Muessing St. Hancock County Tourism Commission

CUMBERLANDFBC.ORG

PHOTO BY MARK A. LEE

Bru Burger Bar’s patio will offer a splendid view of the Mass Ave Crit course.

Even those who aren’t riding in the Mass Ave Crit (check out our cover story, pg. 10, for more info) are likely to work up an appetite during its many hours of racing and fun — it’s kind of like a contact high, a phantom need for extra calories. Here are some options, all on the 400 and 300 blocks of Mass Ave and either on the race course or very near to it. Check out our handy-dandy maps for even more options. 400 BLOCK OF MASS AVE Bru Burger Bar Excellent burgers and a first-rate beer list from the folks who brought us Mesh. Everything at Bru is prepared in-house, including the bread, ketchup and mayonnaise. The burgers are all made to order from a proprietary blend of hormonefree sirloin, chuck and brisket. The chicken is Amish-raised. Certainly you pay a little more for meat of this quality ($8 to $11 for a burger), but it’s worth every penny if you care about provenance. 410 Mass Ave., 635-4278, bruonmass.com Old Point Tavern The Old Point, where Julian Opie’s electronic go-go dancer does her thing at the corner of Mass Ave and Alabama, is a time-tested place to start the evening — or finish it off. Great chili and well-packed sandwiches made with topnotch ingredients have made this a Mass Ave institution. Sit outside and enjoy the good life whenever weather permits. 401 Mass Ave., 634-8943 The Rathskeller Indy’s premier biergarten pairs one of the best beers to meet draft form, the Spaten Optimator, with expertly done German food. A must-try: Brat n’ Kraut balls, a blend of juicy brats, sausage and beef, lightened by just the right amount of sour delivered via modest amounts of kraut, served with a 22 // ARTS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

brilliant beer-infused cream sauce. 401 E. Michigan St., 636-0396, rathskeller.com Chatterbox Jazz Club A live jazz staple for 25 years and one of the city’s smallest and hottest nightspots. A rarefied breed in Indy’s nightlife scene: thoroughly sophisticated, yet entirely proletarian. 435 Mass Ave., 636-0584, chatterboxjazz.com Hoaglin To Go Cafe and Marketplace Brunch is on the menu seven days a week, including omelets dressed with mushroom pate, hash browns sexed up as a wedge of layers and French toast in thick slabs of cakelike fruited bread. 448 Mass Ave., 423-0300, hoaglincatering.com 300 BLOCK OF MASS AVE The Ball & Biscuit Count on top-shelf, small-batch alcohol — try the Hamhattan, Silver Gin Fizz, Sidecar and Aviation, all classic cocktails with small twists — and a solid lineup of cheeses. As with any good speakeasy, there’s good contraband off the menu, if you know to ask. 331 Mass Ave., 636-0539, ballandbiscuit.com Bakersfield Tacos, Tequila and Whiskey A concept born in Cincy, now

imported to Indy that combines Mexican street food with the barrel liquors and country-pop of Bakersfield. The lineup typically consists of eight tacos — including the fan favorite fish (crispy Mahi) and Pastor (marinated pork and picked red onions) — two tortas, two salads and chips with dips, including vegetarian options. 334 Mass Ave., 635-6962, bakersfieldmassave.com Bazbeaux NUVO readers have never selected anything other than Bazbeaux as the city’s Best Pizza. Pour over a massive list of ingredients and craft your own masterpiece, or skip the work and choose one of the standard favorites like the Basilica, which drops tomato sauce for pesto, adds black olives and sundried tomatoes, and finishes off with feta cheese. 329 Mass Ave., 636-7662, bazbeaux.com MacNiven’s Restaurant A spot for great fish and chips, authentic neeps and tatties (turnips and potatoes), mince (well-braised beef) and one of the best burgers in the city — a huge, crisp disc you have to fold over to get on the bun. Also featuring an impressive selection of imported beers, including a wealth of Scottish beers (many of them on tap). 339 Mass Ave., 632-7268, macnivens.com


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INDY GRAPE GROWERS HAVING A ‘PRETTY DARN GOOD’ SUMMER T

he ideal growing conditions of 2013 have Indiana grape growers forgetting last year’s dry and scorching summer. Indiana wineries and independent vineyards are looking at the potential for a bumper crop of wine grapes. Indiana has nearly 600 acres of vineyard to support what will soon be 70 wineries. But most Hoosier wineries buy all or some of their fruit from inand out-of-state suppliers. Dennis Dunham Often Indiana vineyards are just 5, 10, or 15 acres and provides fruit for only a small portion of their production. Two of the state’s biggest wineries, not surprisingly, have the biggest vineyards. Oliver Winery has its beautiful 50-acre, Ted Huber Creekbend Vineyard just a few miles off Highway 37 near Bloomington. Ted Huber has the state’s largest winery-owned vineyard with

GRAPE SENSE

BY HOWARD HEWITT

nearly 70 acres producing grapes on long-held family property overlooking the Ohio River Valley close to Louisville. “Everything looks perfect and ideal at this point,” says Oliver’s Director of Winemaking Operations Dennis Dunham. “We’ve had a fair amount of rain pre-veraison [or before grapes began to ripen], but it’s not a big deal.” Dunham said the vineyard had issues last year in the hot weather. The lack of rain forced vineyard workers to cut clusters from the vines to encourage ripening of what remained. Huber said this year’s story is similar down south. “We’re probably 15-20 percent in veraison and the rest of the varieties are a week out,” Huber says. But like any Hoosier farmer, growers are never totally happy with the weather. “The problem we’re having now is excess vine growth,” Huber says. “So we have several different groups working

almost seven days a week doing shoot positioning, leaf pulling, cutting, getting rid of the massive canopy we’re seeing right now. It’s necessary so we go into veraison and can ripen fruit correctly.” But both men agree a bumper crop is starting to look certain. This year we have a bumper crop of leaves and shoots, and a full canopy absorbing the sunshine,” Huber says. “So if we get the fruit exposed to it and let mother nature take its course, we should be able to ripen everything.” Dunham says Creekbend is set to deliver the biggest normal crop winemakers can ever expect. But what does it all mean to Hoosier wine consumers? First, it means there are more Indiana grapes on th e open fruit market and the chance for some producers to buy locally. Second, great wine is made in vineyards and not by winemakers. A great crop should mean a great 2013 vintage. „ Howard W. Hewitt, Crawfordsville, Ind., writes every other week for 23 Midwestern newspapers. Read his wine blog at www.howardhewitt.net


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BLACK CROWES BACK ON

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Norah Jones at Radio Radio

CORY CHISEL, WILD ROVERS TOUR + A VERY SPECIAL GUEST AT RADIO RADIO

Drummer Steve Gorman dishes on reunion, new live album

SATURDAY, AUG. 3

e BY K A TH ERI N E C OP LE N K C O P L E N @ NUVO.NET

Cory Chisel’s tour has touted a very special guest at each date thus far. And, yes, we agree the indomitable, sultry-voiced Norah Jones is very special indeed. This show was a bit confusingly set up, as each of the four groups to take the stage were made up of the same musicians. Essentially, it was a four-part instrument and vocal shuffle, with Jones joining throughout three of the sets. Band number two (that is, the second iteration of the constant band) was The Candles, helmed by Jones’ bass player Josh Lattanzi, who differentiated themselves from the rootsy stage takeover with a ‘90s rock sound. Although Chisel’s stage banter left a bit to be desired, his was the most exciting portion of the night, especially when singer Adriel Denae and Jones took the stage for a delicate duet. Overall, it was a beautiful and surprising night, laced with Jones’ distinctive voice.

I

— KATHERINE COPLEN

THE NATIONAL AT MURAT THEATRE SUNDAY, AUG. 4

e Cincy-turned-Brooklyn rockers The National have a very special place in my heart. In fact, they’re one of the few bands that I almost feel too close to to accurately review. But trust me when I say their Trouble Will Find Me tour is the finest I’ve ever seen them. This setlist has a pack of new songs up front, with highlights from their previous albums scattered through (and a few surprises, like a crescendo-crazed “About Today” and a sentimental “Baby, We’ll Be Fine”). Trouble Will Find Me is their best outing yet — yes, trumping even Boxer — and hearing the group work out these songs live is a pleasure. I’m really loving the live visuals from this tour, which includes a filtered live feed of the stage as a backdrop. My only complaints? I wish the vocals from Matt Berninger had been a bit more clear, but with a voice like his — ultra deep, ultra mellow — I understand the mixing difficulty. I’ve always thought The National have some kind of supreme balance. Is it because it’s a band made of two sets of brothers, who are super-solid musically? I’m not sure. But I know that every time I see them, it’s a great night. — KATHERINE COPLEN

N NUVO.NET/MUSIC Visit nuvo.net/music for complete event listings, reviews and more.

REVIEW: • Steely Dan at Murat Theatre by Jeff Napier • Review: Wiz Khalifa at Klipsch by Seth Johnson • Jazz Fest lineup announcements 26 MUSIC // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Crowes singer Chris Robinson

spoke with Black Crowes drummer Steve Gorman the day he made a big announcement. No, nothing about drumming, or the band he’s played with for 20-some years. This was about his long-running sports show, Steve Gorman Sports, broadcast on Nashville radio station 102.5 FM. Was broadcast, at least, until this month. “I have things in the works,” Gorman says on the phone, about his decision to leave Nashville radio. “The show will be back this fall with a few changes, all much better for me and for the show.” He’s no stranger to big career shifts. After all, his Georgian rock band The Black Crowes have changed course significantly in the last 12 years, with two long hiatuses smack dab in the middle of their third decade of music-making. “In 2001 and in 2010, at the end of those tours, I would have told you, I don’t think the band’s coming back,” he says. “And I thought that even more so in 2010. I really didn’t think the band would come back.” But the Crowes, whose hit songs “She Talks To Angels” and “Remedy” are ever-present radio tracks, even 20 years later, are back and happier together than ever. “I’ve said this all year, and it still amazes me to hear it, but this is the best tour and best year the band has ever had as far as personal relationships,” Gorman says. “We’ve had more fun in 2013, and allowed each other to have fun, and been more respectful and appreciative of each other than any time in the band’s life, which is the greatest surprise of all.” That personal relationship reference is of course a nod to the often-strained, occasionally combative relationship of Crowes’ members and brothers Chris and Rich Robinson, which hit its height in the ’90s after the band’s explosion of popularity. Coincidentally, Gorman has memories of some of that tension right here in Indianapolis. “We always used to go to the Union Station where there was an indoor miniature golf course,” Gorman says. “We would go have family-fueled angry grudge matches of miniature golf. That’s what the ’ 90s in Indianapolis were for me.” After those matches, they’d have to eat, of course.

LIVE

THE BLACK CROWES WITH TEDESCHI TRUCKS BAND

WHEN: TUESDAY, AUG. 13, 6 P.M. WHERE: LAWN AT WHITE RIVER STATE PARK, 80 1 W . W A S H I N G T O N S T . TICKETS: PRICES VARY, ALL-AGES

“We used to hit St. Elmo’s or Steak ’n Shake, depending on our mood,” Gorman says, laughing when I tell him I wished I had served the Black Crowes when I was waitressing at Steak N’ Shake years ago. Their most recent release, 2013’s four-LP Wiser for the Time, is a fairly concise musical history lesson for the Crowes, through all their stops and starts. Recorded during a five-night run in New York City just before their 2010 hiatus, Wiser for the Time is 26 tracks of Southern rock goodness, a career retrospective for a band with an uncertain future. But does Gorman like it? “I don’t like live albums!” he says. “We listen down to stuff and we know when something’s good, but I rarely listen to Black Crowes records. In fact, I never do unless there’s a reason to. I love our records until they’re released. It’s like you have this secret, and it’s just yours. You’re still thinking about it and living in that world. But the second that record hits the stores, the minute you share it with the buying world, it’s not your record anymore. It’s everybody’s record.” But his feelings toward records — even live ones — doesn’t have much effect on his feelings toward touring, which he sees as something completely different. “We’ve never been a band that tours with the mindset of, ‘We’re on tour to promote an album.’ Even when that was the norm, 25 years ago. Our tour was to tour,” Gorman says. “That was our life; the point was to be a living, breathing, working band.” Really, it all comes back to wanting to just play the drums, which is all Gorman has wanted since he was a fourth grader playing “The Yellow Rose of Texas” on the glockenspiel. “There was a sixth grader who played a full drum kit,” Gorman says. “But that was only for sixth graders. And I was convinced I was going to be the only fourth grader to ever play the full kit. That, of course, didn’t come close to happening. So, in my first act of true rock and roll defiance, I walked from the band, because it wasn’t at all what I wanted. But I still took my drum and bells to school every Wednesday, because if I had told my parents I had quit after they bought those things for me, they would have killed me.” „


Saturday, August 10, 2013

ELITE INDIANA STATE CRITERIUM CHAMPIONSHIPS

Looking for fun this Friday?

Join us in preparation for the Mass Ave Crit!

AUGUST 9, 2013 • 6 -9PM Come grab a New Belgium Brew from Mass Ave Pub, Ralston’s Draft House, Old Point Tavern and Bru Burger from 6-9 pm and pick up your Cruise for the Crit punch card that once full, will be exchanged for a raffle ticket entering you into a drawing for a brand new New Belgium Cruiser from NUVO!

A winner will be drawn at 10 pm at Bru Burger Bar.


THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

GOING FOR THE (THREE) Iconic prog band Yes plays three albums per show B Y K A TH ER INE C O P L E N KCOPL EN@NU VO . N ET

August brings a variety of classic rock acts to Indy stages, including the prog wizards of Yes, who plan to play three albums straight through at their Monday show at the Murat. I spoke with drummer Alan White, who played on some of the 20th century’s most iconic albums (Imagine, All Things Must Pass, XYZ) before devoting his career to Yes. NUVO: How do you prepare for a show that is three albums long? ALAN WHITE: We played most of the material before in different years but we never actually played them in their entirety together or at the same time so it’s quite an adventure for us. The first time we played was Close to the Edge then was Going for the One then we usually take an intermission and we get The Yes Album … It comes with a lot of years and Yes music but playing the albums in their entireties is a lot of pleasure. NUVO: How did you settle on these three albums? WHITE: Pretty easy really. Close To The Edge is a very landmark album from the early ’70s from the band. That was a great album in

28 MUSIC // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

LIVE

YES

WHEN: MONDAY, AUG. 12 , 7 P.M. WHERE: MURAT THEATRE AT OLD NATIONAL CENTRE, 502 N. NEW JERSEY ST. TICKETS: PRICES VARY, ALL-AGES

progressive music. Then Going For The One of course was around ’76. It was just a different year, and then The Yes Album was the break— the kind of album the band had prior to those two and it had a lot of hit radio play — “Starship Trooper,” “Yours is No Disgrace” and those kinds of songs. [They have] given the audience a great show, expanding the life of Yes really over three albums. NUVO: You, like Journey, have taken on musicians from tribute bands — people who are devoted to and love your music [in Yes’ case, Benoit David and Jon Davison] — into your bands. What’s the process of integrating someone from a tribute band into the original band? WHITE: Actually some of the guys from tribute bands know the music more than we do. It’s pretty interesting. Jon Davison, the singer, was in a band called Roundabout, I believe,

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Yes

but he’s singing in a few bands. He’s singing in a band from Seattle, which is where I live, called Sky Cries Mary for a while. NUVO: I know you’ve written music for several Yes albums. What are a few of your favorite bits? A few of your favorite things to play on stage? WHITE: Actually, I wrote most of the main parts of “Machine Messiah” from Drama. There’s a song called “Mind Drive” on Keys to Ascension 2. I don’t know if you’re really familiar with that. I wrote the rhythm pattern and some of the chords for that. I enjoy people and I enjoy playing with different styles of music but also different styles

of people who play different styles of music. I kind of adapt most of the time to what people want as far as the rhythm section goes and basically with Yes, I didn’t play everything exactly the way that Bill Bruford played. I added some of my own flavor to it and made it work with my kind of attitude toward their music but obviously kept a lot of the structured parts together. Basically it’s been great. Working with Yes was a challenge anyway, and I’ve always enjoyed a challenge. Yes music is very much a challenge to transfigure every night. It’s no easy walk playing two or three albums with so many notes, time signatures and it’s interesting to keep your mind occupied, that’s for sure.” „


CALLING ALL ACTORS! Conner Prairie Interactive History Park is announcing auditions for actors and improvisers for its upcoming Halloween festival, Headless Horseman In celebration of the 30th Anniversary of this popular event, Conner Prairie will transform its grounds into “Conner Scairie”, a haunted land inhabited by comical, fun-loving monsters who are all competing to be named “Mayor of Conner Scairie”. AUDITIONS WILL BE HELD AUG 13 – 15, 2013 FROM 6PM-8PM TO CAST PAID PERFORMERS FOR THIS YEAR’S EVENT. For more information or to schedule an audition, visit connerprairie.org

mass ave criterium

Presented by

Elite indiana state Criterium Championships Championship Bicycling event

on facebook at Mass Ave Criterium

Sat. Sept. 7th 4-11:30pm High Point Orchard (On Old US Hwy. 421 North in Greensburg)

Music, Food, Wine & Craft Beer Tasting

august 10, 2013

MUSIC BY;

Visit us at mac.nuvo.net or follow us on facebook

mass ave criterium august 10, 2013

Championship Bicycling event

start/finish/registration 435 Mass Ave downtown Indy

crowd giveaways Racing will continue all day long! Courtesy of Mass Ave Merchants under the lights!

Kink Ador

The Jester Kings The Warrior Kings The Slinkys

artsingreensburg.org


THIS WEEK

Your Northside Destination for Daily Specials and Parties!

Free Texas Hold’em Poker Sunday – Thursday 7 pm and 9 pm

CASH PRIZES

Live Trivia Fri -

Friday & Saturday Night Karaoke at 10 pm to 3 am

8 pm

CASH & Prizes Smokers Sm S mokers mokers ers Welcome! W !

1772 E. 116th St., St C Carmell • 317 317-818-9980 818 9980 | N NIPPERS2.COM OM

ays at Open Sund ting NOON star 8th September ll! for footba

S

VOICES

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

A PLAYLIST FOR THE SOCCER FIELD

occer fever gripped Indy last week when 42,000 fans gathered at Lucas Oil Stadium to watch an exhibition match between two of the world’s top professional teams, Chelsea and Inter Milan. On Saturday, a more community-oriented set of games took place as hundreds of local amateur players converged at Northwestway Park to compete in the Mayor’s Latino Soccer Cup. While these two events may have been worlds apart in terms of size and scope, they shared a couple notable similarities. Both events generated a festive, international atmosphere reflective of the game’s global popularity, and both events benefitted from the presence of the Indy Eleven. The Indy Eleven organization has been working hard in preparation for their 2014 debut as Indiana’s new professional soccer team. I recently met with the Eleven’s director of community relations, Guy-Jo Gordon. I was pleased to hear Gordon’s vision for the team is deeply focused on inclusion. Gordon stressed the importance of making Indy’s international community a valued component of the team’s fan base. Gordon spoke optimistically about soccer’s vast global reach and its potential to unify Indy’s diverse population. So, in tribute to the Indy Eleven, and soccer’s international spirit of fellowship, I created this global soccer playlist. Soccer and music share a unique relationship unlike any other I’ve seen in sport. Chants and club themes are a crucial element of game day rituals and the heroic plays of the game’s stars are often mythologized in song. JORGE BEN “PONTA DE LANÇA AFRICANO (UMBABARAUMA)” Brazil’s Jorge Ben should be considered the poet laureate of soccer songwriting. Ben has written several classics about the sport, but “Umbabarauma” is his ultimate soccer anthem. The song’s simple lyrics give a play-by-play account of a mythical African soccer hero, mixing psychedelic funk and pounding Afro-Brazilian rhythms into a highly addictive musical masterpiece. MANU CHAO “LA VIDA TOMBOLA” It’s slightly ironic that one of the most beautiful and poignant songs about soccer was written about Argentina’s Diego Maradona, the game’s most polarizing player. In “La Vida Tombola” (“Life is a Lottery”), Chao dreams of channeling the intense passion that made Maradona one of soccer’s greats. “If I were Maradona, I’d live just like him. In front of any goal, I’d never make a mistake,” Chao sings. FRUKO Y ORQUESTA “LA PACHANGA DEL FUTBOL” Colombia salsa legend Fruko’s mid-’90s remake of Carlos Argentino’s 1964 classic Cuban-style pachanga. Fruko updates the lyrics by name-checking Carlos Valderrama and other stars of Colombia’s national team. FRANCO & LE T.P. O.K. JAZZ 1985 “F.C. 105 DU GABON” In 1985 Tabu Ley and Franco, two giants of Congolese music, recorded songs honoring an obscure Gabonese soccer team known as F.C. 105. Well, legend has it they were bribed by Gabon’s notoriously corrupt president Omar Bongo. During his 41-year rule, Bongo’s plundering of Gabon’s natural resources made him one of the world’s richest men. Despite the song’s uninspiring origins, Franco’s tribute has endured as a classic of Congolese music.

30 MUSIC // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

NEWS

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

PHOTO BY TJ FOREMAN

Inter Milan vs. Chelsea

MILTON NASCIMENTO “AQUI É O PAÍS DO FUTEBOL” A poetic meditation on Brazil’s obsession with soccer. “Brazil is empty on a Sunday afternoon. For those 90 minutes, Brazil is soccer,” Nascimento sings over a jazzy bossa nova beat. MARCOS VALLE “FLAMENGO ATÉ MORRER” I doubt there’s another sports team in the world with a library of tribute songs that rivals Rio de Janeiro’s Flamengo. “I’d skip a meal or work an extra day to make some money to see my team Flamengo,” Valle pens. TOOFAN “AFRICA HOYEE” The biennial African Cup of Nations tournament always generates an exciting crop of songs celebrating the game. This recent example from Toofan made stars out of the Togolese pop group. JACKSON DO PANDEIRO “O REI PELÉ” There’s no shortage of Brazilian tribute songs honoring Pelé, but forró legend Jackson do Pandeiro’s take on the greatest to ever play the game wins the lot. Pelé attempted a music career himself, recording with Brazilian superstars like Elis Regina and Sérgio Mendes. JORGE BEN “FIO MARAVILHA” Back to Flamengo again for this tribute to Rio fan favorite Fio Maravilha. Only in Brazil would you find lyrics like this, “He played with inspiration, with much love and emotion. Thirty-three minutes into the second half, he made the explosive goal. It was the goal from an angel.” „

>> Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net


Not your grandpa’s polka! A night of energetic music and great fun on the lawn.

Saturday, August 10th | at 7:00pm $15 Tickets in Advance | $20 Tickets Day-of Show | (Children 12 & Under Free)

To Purchase Tickets Visit mallowrun.com or Call 317-422-1556 6964 W. Whiteland Road, Bargersville, IN


SOUNDCHECK 5th Ann u al

Hillbilly Haiku Music Festival SUBMITTED PHOTO

Tedeschi Trucks Band

SUBMIT YOUR EVENT AT NUVO.NET/EVENT DENOTES EDITOR’S PICK

AUGUST 30TH 350 W. 11th Street, Bloomington FEATURING:

Houndmouth

WEDNESDAY JAZZ Billy Wooten, Vida Bole Afro Cuban Jazz Ensemble, Eagle Creek Park Marina, 7602 Walnut Point Drive Sparks the Rescue, Kings Foil, Emerson Theater, all-ages Depeche Mode Tribute Night, The Metro, 21+ Parmalee, Rachel Farley, Indiana State Fairgrounds

THURSDAY ALSO PLAYING:

JASON WILBUR

T.V. Mike & The Scarecrows Hillbilly Haiku tickets are on sale now for $10, $15 day of show. Tickets are for sale at all of our retail locations, including our Bloomington Brewpub, Bloomington West Side Tasting Room, 11th Street Tap House, Carmel Tap House and Indianapolis Tasting Room as well as on-line at: bctboxoffice.com

DOORS OPEN AT 5PM! BENEFITING

Sycamore Land Trust

32 MUSIC // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

PUNK Sonny Vincent Legendary N.Y.C. punk rocker Sonny Vincent played in The Testors in the ‘70s and Sonny Vincent and The Extreme in the ‘80s, but his list of collaborating musicians is way longer than those two. He’ll play with Indy punk rockers Ricky Rat Pack, Black Cat Rebellion and Brothers Gross. Indy’s Jukebox, 306 E. Prospect St. 8 p.m., 21+ ROCK Black Taxi Brooklyn rockers Black Taxi return to Indy for the nth time. AIYL (Attend If You Like) Franz Ferdinand, later Modest Mouse albums, Cake.

FRIDAY COUNTRY Miranda Lambert, Dierks Bentley Badass country girl Lambert is far from the Crazy Ex-Girlfriend days – in fact, she’s married to badass country guy Blake Shelton, although she’s on this tour with Dierks Bentley, who dabbles a bit more on the bluegrass side of pop country. Klipsch Music Center, 12880 E. 146th St. ROCK Listen Local The latest iteration in Musical Family Tree’s pay-what-youwant summer series highlights the most confusing Indiana band around. Or, shall we say, Indiana-butsometimes Florida band around. That’s right: the Vulgar Boatmen will take the stage at Broad Ripple Park, along with The Late Show and Triptides. Broad Ripple Park, 1550 Broad Ripple Ave. 7 p.m., free + donations, all-ages ROCK Kansas Carry on, you will always remember (this Kansas show) Carry on, none can equal the splendor (of Kansas) Now your life’s no longer empty (now that you’ve seen Kansas) Surely heaven waits for you (at the Palladium where Kansas plays Friday)

DO317 Lounge, 1043 Virginia Ave. Suite 215, 8:30 p.m., prices vary, 21+

Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, 355 City Center Dr.. 8 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

Cheap Thrill, Southport Bar and Grill, 21+ Jazz Renegades Dance Band, Garfield Park MacAllister Amphitheater, all-ages

JAZZ Pat Marino Trio Frank, Jazz Kitchen’s general manager and doorman extraordinaire is turning 60. To celebrate, Frank’s favorite guitar

player, Pat Martino, is appearing Aug. 9 and 10 at 8 and 10:30 p.m. For the past 19 years Frank’s singular style of greeting and seating and his signature attire have encapsulated the dignity and depth of the Jazz Kitchen experience. Martino, one of the most original of the jazz-based guitarists to emerge in the 1960s, has played with John Scofield, Red Holloway, Jimmy Smith, Jack McDuff and Jimmy McGriff. — RITA KOHN Jazz Kitchen, 5377 N. College Ave., times vary, prices vary, 21+ Volto, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages Pink Droyd, Vogue, 21+ Cage the Villain, Sidelines, 21+ Josh Catalano and The Dirty Thoughts, Melody Inn, 21+ Rio Shield Massacre, Your Strength, My Weakness, The Ghost Inside, Xibalba, Emerson Theater, all-ages Theory of a Deadman, Indiana State Fairgrounds, all-ages Cooked Books, The Bloody Mess, White Rabbit Cabaret, 21+

SATURDAY PARTIES Indy Hostel Folk Festival and 10th Anniversary Party Happy anniversary to the excellent Indy Hostel, which has hosted wonderful outdoor concerts all summer long to celebrate its 10th anniversary. This weekend’s the big party, with a lineup including The Spud Puppies and a children’s bike parade in the morning. Indy Hostel, 4903 Winthrop Ave. 10 a.m., $12 advance, $15 at door, all-ages POP John Mayer Singer, songwriter, tabloid fodder – John Mayer’s many things. Right now,


MAIN EVENT NEIGHBORHOOD PUB & GRILL

SOUNDCHECK

Fishers 842-8010 Main Event on 96th | 8932 E. 96th St.

08.09 Cosmic Situation 08.10 Island Party

MONDAY POKER | TUESDAY KARAOKE

THURSDAY OPEN STAGE WITH BULLET PROOF SOULBAND SUBMITTED PHOTO

MainEventon96th.com Indy West Side 298-4771 771 711 7038 Shore Terrace

we’re just happy that he’s well, following several vocal cord surgeries in the last few years. His new album, Paradise Valley, will come out next week.

MONDAY

Country Music Showdown, Indiana State Fairgrounds, all-ages

ROCK Styx Canadian singer Lawrence Gowan replaced lead singer Dennis DeYoung in the late ‘90s after opening for the iconic prog/musical theater act Styx. We spoke to Gowan last week about his thoughts on the band’s mythology: “There are obvious literary references in the music, and in the name. I always loved the name of the band. I thought, what a good name for a band. If you cross this river, you know you’re not coming back. i love that it speaks to mythology, and quite honestly, that plus the lyrics in songs like ‘Sing for the Day’ or ‘Fooling Yourself’ and ‘Come Sail Away’ gives us license to go over the top in terms of the epic adventure of what a Styx show is. We’re allowed to do that. We’re allowed to try and live up to the almost superhero level of performances and shows that to us just makes it more fun. I look at some bands whose music I might happen to really love, but because they came out in a different era, when sensibilities had altered somewhat, the kind of performance we give would seem completely out of place. The mythological proportions of the music that Styx performs allows us to personify that onstage.”

Aberdeen Project, Stacked Pickle, 21+

Indiana State Fairgrounds, 1202 E. 38th St., 7 p.m., free, all-ages

Klipsch Music Center, 12880 E. 146th St., 7:30 p.m., all-ages PUNK Gay Black Republican Album Release They were your favorite in 2011 and 2012, and now they’re back on top of our Best of Indy poll in 2013. Gay Black Republican may not contain any actual, homosexual African-Americans of a conservative persuasion, but they’re one of Indy’s favorite punk bands. They’re an occasional fixture at the Mel’s Punk Rock Night, as they should be (PRN curator Rich Barker’s in the band.) They’re releasing their newest self-titled LP Barker describes as, “politically charged with some tasteless explorations of other topics as well” at a show at the Mel Saturday. Melody Inn, 3826 N. Illinois St. 10 p.m., $6, 21+ The Todd Harrold Group, Watkins Park, all-ages

ROCK Yes You read our interview with drummer Alan White on page 28, but just as a refresher, they’re playing three entire albums at their Monday show (The Yes Album, Close To The Edge and Going For The One). There is no opening act, as there is literally no time for one. Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St. 7 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

WED 08|07

SAM ASH GENERATIONS SHOWCASE W/ BLACK MELTDOWN, SLAUGHTERHOUSE FIVE, AND SITUATION UNDER CONTROL

THUR 08|08

ALBUM COVER DOES VAN HALEN I, ZEPPELIN IV AND THE WHO

FRI 08|09

NO R E COV

Styx

WWW.BIRDYS LIVE.COM

NO R E COV

SAT 08|10 SUN 08|11 MON 08|12 TUE 08|13

WEDNESDAYS OPEN STAGE with The Blues Ambassadors at 9pm - 1am

MainEventIndy.com

MANNISH BOY TONE, FLATTED FIFTH, UNFORGETTABLE SUMMER JEFF RUBY W/ STAGOLEE & JEREMY VOGT THE DOUBLE ENTENDRE THE ARISTOCRATS, DOUG JOHNS

UPCOMING SHOWS MON 08|19

THE DAD HORSE EXPERIENCE W/ WEREWOLF WITH A SHOTGUN, TONY T

WED 08|21

PUNKSHOTS.COM PRESENTS THE DWARVES AND THE QUEERS W/ UP! SCUMBAG AND THE BROTHERS GROSS INDY IN-TUNE ANNIVERSARY SHOW W/ CHAINED FATE, HALF-LIFE, SHED, CLIPFALL, VESTIGES OF ECSTASY, AND BIZARRE NOIR

FRI 08|30

08.09 Naptown Revue 08.16 The Blues Mission

BATTLE OF BIRDY’S ROUND 1 W/ MS.WORLDWIDE,FAKEMATE THE YOUNG YEARS, AUDIODACITY, THE FUSEBOX AFFAIR AND TIM MESTRICH

Battle of Birdys 2013 Registration has begun! Sign up now at www.battleofbirdys.com 2131 E. 71st St. in North Broad Ripple 254-8971 / 254-8979 • Fax: 254-8973 GREAT LIVE ENTERTAINMENT 7 DAYS A WEEK! FOOD / POOL / GAMES / & MORE!

GET TICKETS AT BIRDY’S OR THROUGH TICKETMASTER

TUESDAY HIP-HOP Jarren Benton “The essence of giving a good show is not givin’ a fuck,” says Jarren Benton. I guess we can quibble over what exactly kind of fuck he is not giving, because it seems like he definitely DOES give a fuck about making good hiphop. The rapper, who is on Funk Volume, will play at the Emerson with Sirius Black, Meth Coast, GoldYard, Elz Jenkinz, Zachery Le’on, J3 and Zoso Conway. Emerson Theatre, 4630 E. 10th ST. 6 p.m., $13, all-ages

Irvington’s Own, Irving Theater, all-ages

SUNDAY Contemporary Christian Music Day, Indiana State Fairgrounds, all-ages The Flying Toasters, Indiana State Fairgrounds, all-ages 10,000 Maniacs, Biergarten at Rathskeller, 21+ Jeremy Vogt, Jeff Ruby, Stagolee, Bridy’s, 21+ Soulfly, Vogue, 21+

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Jarren Benton NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // MUSIC 33


SOUNDCHECK

FREE SPIRIT T

LOUNGE AND ND RESTAURANT NT

FESTIVAL FORECAST INDIANA WARM Fest, Aug 31-Sept. 2, Broad Ripple This Labor Day weekend Broad Ripple Park will host acts like Big Head Todd and the Monsters, Michael Franti and Spearhead and Mayer Hawthorne. Plenty of local acts will play the fest, which is one of the biggest in Indy ever.

FAMILY

DINING

Until 9pm Daily

HHome ome ooff tthe he CCOLDEST OLDEST BOMB BOMB in in Indy Indy EVERY FRIDAY & SATURDAY

Karaoke with Prizes

$3.99 Kid’s Menu

MONDAYS: Jason Downs THIRSTY THURSDAYS: with Radio FX FRI 08/09: Decline of Authority SAT 08/10: Wylde Lee Rhodes

and Chasing Sundown FRI 08/16: Harry Bean SAT 08/17: Big City Steal

MONDAY - FRIDAY 11AM - 4PM

1/3lb Cheeseburger & Fries only $3.49 DAILY DRINK & DINNER SPECIALS WEEKEND BRUNCH EVERY SATURDAY & SUNDAY

8110 N. Shadeland Ave. Indianapolis, IN

317-842-0200

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Black Taxi

DRINK & FOOD SPECIALS: MONDAY - WEDNESDAY:

Domestic Long Necks $1.50 TUESDAY: We Call It $2 WEDNESDAY: Well Drinks You Call It $3 THURSDAYS: You Call It $3 SUNDAYS: Karaoke, 1/2 Price Pizza & Domestic Beer Buckets $10

7411 Heathrow Way • Indianapolis IN

317. 856 .9980

ROCK Landing, Kam Kama, Skin Conditions This is the 15th anniversary tour for Landing, the prolific synth/psych group out of Connecticut. They’ll play with Kam Kama and Skin Conditions. DO317 Lounge, 1043 Virginia Ave. Suite 215, 8 p.m., $5, 21+ ROCK The Black Crowes, Tedeschi Trucks Band You read our interview with Steve Gorman on page 22, but here’s a bit from a chat with Susan Tedeschi of the Tedeschi Trucks Band: “We’re just kind of doing whatever feels good and just trying to make good music and I don’t even know really exactly how to describe some of this stuff. But it’s just — we’re in a good place. And making the record we had everybody in mind who we wanted to produce it and so Derek and Jim Scott producing it and Bobby Tis engineering it. It just — it went really easy and it was a lot of fun making the record. And that’s one of the hardest things I’ve found in my career is making records and having a good time doing it. Usually it’s kind of a stressful thing. But it’s been a lot of fun with this band. And the music — the songs — I love every song on the record this time whereas

in the past it’s not that I didn’t love all the songs but I’d sometimes fast forward through tunes. But now I don’t even really want to pass anything so that’s a good sign.” White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St. 6 p.m., prices vary, all-ages HIP-HOP Lil Wayne, T.I., 2 Chainz All three emcees are out of jail and ready to party. Seriously, we’re happy they’re out of jail. Klipsch Music Center, 12880 E. 146th St.,7:30 p.m. prices vary, all-ages Male Bondage, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Joe Nichols, Indiana State Fair, all-ages Redlight King, Big B, Icon For Hire, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages

N NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK

BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

34 MUSIC // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

ILLINOIS North Coast Music Festival, Aug. 30-Sept. 1, Chicago This Labor Day weekend, Union Park in Chicago will host a variety of names that will get you grooving like Big Gigantic, Afrojack and the WuTang Clan. More headliners are still to be announced as the date approaches. And the fun doesn’t stop when the festival closes because numerous after parties will be hosted at venues around the city.

OHIO Rootwire, Aug. 15-18, Logan, Ohio Hosted by the electronic rock band Papadosio, this festival mixes visual arts, music and workshops in Kaeppner’s Woods. Some musical acts include Dopapod, Jimkata, ESKMO and The Main Squeeze as well as multiple sets from Papadosio.

PENNSYLVANIA Made in America Festival Aug. 31 - Sept. 1, Philadelphia Yes, it’s a bit of a haul. Yes, it’s the same weekend as Warm Fest. But if you have a true love for the Queen B — that’s Beyonce — you’ll want to head to Jay Z’s Made in America Festival. Nine Inch Nails co-headlines.

— LACY BURSICK


Gentlemen’s Club

Downtown Indy’s *ONLY* Gentlemen’s Entertainment Facility Walking distance from All downtown hotels & attractions! 2 BLOCKS from Convention Center

WELCOME GENCON & MOTOGP FANS! GenCon Costume Contest with Prizes & Giveaways (call or click for details!)

Themed Drink Specials Thursday to Saturday

INDY’S BEST AMATEUR NIGHT! GRAND PRIZE $500! Call Or Click For Details! www.redgarterindy.com

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MASSAGE Therapy Company

RELAXING MASSAGE Advertisers running in the Relaxing Massage section are licensed to practice NON-SEXUAL MASSAGE as a health benefit, and have submitted their license for that purpose. Do not contact any advertisers in the Relaxing Massage section if you are seeking Adult entertainment.

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The Adult section is only for readers over the age of 18. Please be extremely careful to call the correct number including the area code when dialing numbers listed in the Adult section. Nuvo claims no responsibility for incorrectly dialed numbers.

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NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 37


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Phone: (317) 254-2400 | Fax: (317) 479-2036 E-mail: classifieds@nuvo.net | www.nuvo.net/classifieds Mail: Nuvo Classifieds 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200 Indianapolis, Indiana 46208

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POLICIES: Advertiser warrants that all goods or services advertised in NUVO are permissible under applicable local, state and federal la ws. Advertisers and hired advertising agencies are liable for all content (including text, representation and illustration) of advertisements and are res ponsible, without limitation, for any and all claims made thereof against NUVO, its officers or employees. Classified ad space is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion.

EMPLOYMENT

RESTAURANT BAR

Restaurant | Healthcare Salon/Spa | General To advertise in Employment, Call Kelly @ 808-4616 PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station.com (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) Tattoo Artist Seeking experienced Tattoo Artist, Midwest Tattoo Co, 466-1623.

CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

COMPUTER/ TECHNICAL Senior Business Systems Analyst Indecon Solutions, LLC / Indianapolis, IN. Req: Bachelor’s deg in Computer Science or rel field + 5 yrs of exp performing software development and/or business process analysis. Scope, assess, and implement products of the chosen solution expertise for single Business Unit multiproduct solutions within the client environment. Please send resume to: Indecon Solutions, LLC, HR – Job #SBA, 115 West Washington Street, Suite 1310 South, Indianapolis, IN 46204. No calls.

DRIVERS

DRIVERS NEEDED

PROFESSIONAL

Kitchen Staff needed for General Laboratory Supervisor Harry & Izzy’s Northside Provide oversight of operations We are looking for someone for complex lab tests. Associate with at least two years in Med Tech or similar field plus experience in a high volume 4yrs exp testing of Immunology, kitchen who is hard-working, Chem, Hematology, Microbio a team player and passionate in a lab setting, including 1yr about food and customer of transfusion medicine under service. The hours vary qualified laboratory director. including days, Work locations: Indianapolis, evenings, weekends and Mooresville, Carmel, IN. Risa Sundays is a must. Kinney, Dir of HR, Alverno If you would like to join our happy Provena Hospital Laboratories and hard-working team, please Inc., 2434 Interstate Plaza Dr, log onto HarryAndIzzys.com and Hammond, IN 46324. click the JOB OPPORTUNITIES link at the top of the site to apply.

SALON/SPA

HAIRDRESSERS & NATURAL NAIL TECH! Commission space available. Email resume to signofthetymes@gmail.com

Moving company seeking dependable drivers for Full and Part-time positions or weekends only.

Necessary requirements: -Valid Chauffer’s license or higher -DOT physical form -Hard working -Reliable -Enjoy good pay

Call 317-716-5529

or email Benjamin at Benjamin1@mastermovers.com

GENERAL

BOOTH RENT SPACE AVAILABLE Private and shared room. Stylist, NailTech, Esthetics or Massage. Private or Shared Spaces. Scaled rent. Northeast Side. FRONT OF THE HOUSE Call Suz 317-490-7894 team members needed. Day and Night shift. Must apply in person between 2pm-4pm. Shula’s Steakhouse, 50 South Capitol Ave. BARTENDERS & SERVERS - ALL SHIFTS Immediate openings. Apply in person, Weebles, 3725 N. Shadeland.

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PART TIME

PERMANENT PART-TIME WORK GENERAL WAREHOUSE

Apply online: www.fastenal.com click on the careers tab (for the website) Starting pay $9.50-$10.00 an hour

GENERAL

Tired of corporate greed & social injustice? Get paid to fight back!

Be a part of the solution! Citizens Action Coalition is hiring Full Time Community Organizers:

2pm-10:30pm, Mon-Fri | $325+ per week

Call (317) 205-3535 to schedule an interview

benefits & advancement opportunities | permanent & summer positions available 38 CLASSIFIEDS // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

NUVO.NET N C Complete l t Classifieds listings available at NUVO.NET

REAL ESTATE Homes for sale | Rentals Mortgage Services | Roommates To advertise in Real Estate, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

RENTALS DOWNTOWN BUTLER HOUSING 100% NEW Butler Tarkington 2 bedroom apartment close to campus above retail space. washer & dryer, ceramic tile, new and nice! www.butleraprtment.com text: 317.339.2842 or call 317-713-7123 or e-mail aaronreel@gmail.com today!

RENTALS NORTH BROAD RIPPLE 5149 N. College. 3bdrm, 1ba. Bsmt, AC, Appliances, . hrwd flrs. $825/mo + Dep. 803-736-7188 317-937-6858 PIKE TOWNSHIP Crooked Crk Subdiv. Newly renovated. 4011 Westover Dr. 2BR/1BA AC APPL W/D $725 plus deposit 803-736-7188 or 317-937-6858

RENTALS

ROOMMATES NEAR MASS AVE. Wireless internet included! Easy access. Utilities, laundry, included. Near Monon. From $300/mo. Deposit and references required. 317-636-6234 or 317-557-2595

OFFICE SPACE OFFICE/RETAIL SPACE FOR RENT Downtown street level office or retail space. 1,000 square feet. 1 free parking with each space. Some utilities paid. 333 East Ohio St. 636-5561

INVESTMENTS 20 ACRES FREE@ Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/ payment.$0 down, $198/month. Money back guarantee, no credit checks. Beautiful views, West Texas.1-800-843-7537 www.TexasLandBuys.com (AAN CAN)

THE GRANVILLE & THE WINDEMERE 1BR & 2BR/1BA Apartments in the heart of BR Village. Great Dining, Entertainment & Shopping at your doorstep. On-site laundries & free storage. RENTS RANGE FROM $575-$625 WTR-SWR & HEAT PAID.

1 & 2 BDRM HOUSES FOR RENT! From $395/month + deposit. Near East Indianapolis. 317-370-1779 3 BEDROOM HOUSE with fenced yard, hardwood floors, central AC. 1102 Newman. Best offer over $750. jwrpvacancies.blogspot.com 636-6234

THE MAPLE COURT Large 2BR RENTS RANGE FROM $650-$700 TENANT PAYS UTILITIES.

CALL 317-257-5770


BODY/MIND/SPIRIT Certified Massage Therapists Yoga | Chiropractors | Counseling To advertise in Body/Mind/Spirit, Call Marta @ 808-4615

PRO MASSAGE Top Quality, Swedish, Deep Tissue Massage in Quiet Home Studio. Near Downtown. From Certified Therapist. R U STRESSED? Breaking your back at work or Paul 317-362-5333 gym? Jack tackles it! Light or EMPEROR MASSAGE deep sports massage. Aft/Eve. Stimulus Rates InCall $38/60min, Jack, 645-5020. WILL TRAVEL $60/95min (applys to 1st visit only). Call for details to discover and experience this incredible CERTIFIED Japanese massage. MASSAGE Northside, avail. 24/7 317-431-5105 THERAPISTS

Advertisers running in the CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY section have graduated from a massage therapy school associated with one MASSAGE IN WESTFIELD of four organizations: By Licensed Therapist. $40/hr. Call Mike 317-867-5098 International Massage American Massage Therapy Association (imagroup.com) Association (amtamassage.org) Association of Bodywork and Massage Professionals (abmp.com)

International Myomassethics Federation (888-IMF-4454)

GOT PAIN OR STRESS? Rapid and dramatic results from a highly trained, caring professional with 14 years experience. www.connective-therapy.com: Chad A. Wright, ACBT, COTA, CBCT 317-372-9176

Additionally, one can not be a member of these four organizations but instead, take the test AND/OR have passed the National Board of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork exam (ncbtmb.com).

MARKETPLACE

PAYING $325 And Up For Complete Cars! FREE TOWING! Call Us Direct Today At 317-662-2527

Services | Misc. for Sale Musicians B-Board | Pets To advertise in Marketplace, Call Kelly @ 808-4616 Advertise your business or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN)

VIAGRA FOR CHEAP 317-507-8182

$ OPPORTUNITIES $

TURN-KEY SALON FOR RENT! Shop includes equipment and ELECTRONICS some staff. $3000/month OBO. REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! Private and shared spaces. A whole-home Satellite system Established for 10 years on installed at NO COST. Northeast side. Programming starting at $19.99/ Call Suz at 317-490-7894 mo. New Callers receive FREE HD/DVR upgrade! CALL: 1-877-342-0363 (AAN CAN)

DRUM LESSONS! Tutor with 34 years experience. All ages & levels welcome. First lesson free. Call Now: 317-918-9953

HOME IMPROVEMENT

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WANTED TO BUY DONATIONS WANTED for disabled vet. Used lawn mowers, small engines any kind. Running or not. 765-278-8932 or 317-728-1341

LEGAL SERVICES LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, an experienced Traffic Law Attorney,I can help you with: Hardship Licenses-No Insurance SuspensionsHabitual Traffic Violators-Relief from Lifetime SuspensionsDUI-Driving While Suspended & All Moving Traffic Violations! Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law FREE CONSULTATIONS www.indytrafficattorney.com 317-686-7219

ADOPTION PREGNANT? ADOPTION CAN BE YOUR FRESH START! Let Amanda, Kate or Abbie meet you for lunch and talk about your options. Their Broad Ripple agency offers free support, living expenses and a friendly voice 24 hrs/day. YOU choose the family from happy, carefully-screened couples. Pictures, letters, visits & open adoptions available. Listen to our birth mothers’ stories at www.adoptionsupportcenter.com 317-255-5916 The Adoption Support Center

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY © 2013 BY ROB BRESZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “You have to participate relentlessly in the manifestation of your own blessings,” says author Elizabeth Gilbert. I recommend that you experiment with this subversive idea, Aries. Just for a week, see what happens if you devote yourself to making yourself feel really good. I mean risk going to extremes as you pursue happiness with focused zeal. Try this: Draw up a list of experiences that you know will give you intense pleasure, and indulge in them all without apology. And please don’t fret about the possible consequences of getting crazed with joy. Be assured that the cosmos is providing you with more slack than usual. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I am not washed and beautiful, in control of a shining world in which everything fits,” writes Taurus author Annie Dillard, “but instead am wandering awed about on a splintered wreck I’ve come to care for, whose gnawed trees breathe a delicate air.” I recommend you try on her perspective for size. For now, just forget about scrambling after perfection. At least temporarily, surrender any longing you might have for smooth propriety. Be willing to live without neat containment and polite decorum. Instead, be easy and breezy. Feel a generous acceptance for the messy beauty you’re embedded in. Love your life exactly as it is, with all of its paradoxes and mysteries. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Studies show that when you’re driving a car, your safest speed is five miles per hour higher than the average rate of traffic. Faster than that, though, and the danger level rises. Traveling more slowly than everyone else on the road also increases your risk of having an accident. Applying these ideas metaphorically, I’d like to suggest you take a similar approach as you weave your way through life’s challenges in the coming week. Don’t dawdle and plod. Move a little swifter than everyone else, but don’t race along at a breakneck pace. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The key theme this week is relaxed intensification. Your assignment, should you choose to accept it, is to heighten and strengthen your devotion to things that are important to you -- but in ways that make you feel more serene and self-possessed. To accomplish this, you will have to ignore the conventional wisdom, which falsely asserts that going deeper and giving more of yourself require you to increase your stress levels. You do indeed have a great potential for going deeper and giving more of yourself, but only if you also become more at peace with yourself and more at home in the world. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Last year a young Nebraskan entrepreneur changed his name from Tyler Gold to Tyrannosaurus Rex Gold. He said it was a way of giving him greater name recognition as he worked to build his career. Do you have any interest in making a bold move like that, Leo? The coming weeks would be a good time for you to think about adding a new twist to your nickname or title or self-image. But I recommend something less sensationalistic and more in line with the qualities you’d actually like to cultivate in the future. I’m thinking of something like Laughing Tiger or Lucky Lion or Wily Wildcat. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): African-American jazz singer Billie Holiday was the great-granddaughter of a slave. By the time she was born in 1915, black people in the American South were no longer “owned” by white “masters,” but their predicament was still extreme. Racism was acute and debilitating. Here’s what Billie wrote in her autobiography: “You can be up to your boobies in white satin, with gardenias in your hair and no sugar cane for miles, but you can still be working on a plantation.” Nothing you experience is remotely as oppressive as what Billie experienced, Virgo. But I’m wondering if you might suffer from a milder version of it. Is any part of you oppressed and inhibited even though your outward circumstances are technically unconstrained? If so, now’s the time to push for more freedom.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): What resounding triumphs and subtle transformations have you accomplished since your last birthday? How have you grown and changed? Are there any ways you have dwindled or drooped? The next few weeks will be an excellent time to take inventory of these things. Your own evaluations will be most important, of course. You’ve got to be the ultimate judge of your own character. But you should also solicit the feedback of people you trust. They may be able to help you see clues you’ve missed. If, after weighing all the evidence, you decide you’re pleased with how your life has unfolded these past ten to eleven months, I suggest you celebrate your success. Throw yourself a party or buy yourself a reward or climb to the top of a mountain and unleash a victory cry. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Monmouth Park in New Jersey hosts regular horse races from May through November. During one such event in 2010, a horse named Thewifenoseeverything finished first, just ahead of another nag named Thewifedoesntknow. I suspect that there’ll be a comparable outcome in your life sometime soon. Revelation will trump secrecy. Whoever is hiding information will lose out to anyone who sees and expresses the truth. I advise you to bet on the option that’s forthcoming and communicative, not the one that’s furtive and withholding. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You have both a poetic and a cosmic license to stretch yourself further. It’s best not to go too far, of course. You should stop yourself before you obliterate all boundaries and break all taboos and smash all precedents. But you’ve certainly got the blessings of fate if you seek to disregard some boundaries and shatter some taboos and outgrow some precedents. While you’re at it, you might also want to shed a few pinched expectations and escape an irrelevant limitation or two. It’s time to get as big and brave and brazen as you dare. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When I was 19, a thug shot me in the butt with a shotgun at close range. To this day, my body contains the 43 pellets he pumped into me. They have caused some minor health problems, and I’m always queasy when I see a gun. But I don’t experience any routine suffering from the wound. Its original impact no longer plagues me. What’s your own personal equivalent of my trauma, Capricorn? A sickness that racked you when you were young? A difficult break-up with your first love? The death of someone you cared about? Whatever it was, I suspect you now have the power to reach a new level of freedom from that old pain. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Want to take full advantage of the sexy vibes that are swirling around in your vicinity? One thing you could do is whisper the following provocations in the ear of anyone who would respond well to a dose of boisterous magic: 1) “Corrupt me with your raw purity, baby; beguile me with your raucous honesty.” 2) “I finally figured out that one of the keys to eternal happiness is to be easily amused. Want me to show you how that works?” 3) “I dare you to quench my thirst for spiritual sensuality.” 4) “Let’s trade clothes and pretend we’re each other’s higher selves.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Some people put their faith in religion or science or political ideologies. English novelist J.G. Ballard placed his faith elsewhere: in the imagination. “I believe in the power of the imagination to remake the world,” he wrote, “to release the truth within us, to hold back the night, to transcend death, to charm motorways, to ingratiate ourselves with birds, to enlist the confidences of madmen.” As you make your adjustments and reconfigure your plans, Pisces, I suggest you put your faith where Ballard did. Your imagination is far more potent and dynamic than you realize -- especially right now.

Homework: Make a guess about where you’ll be and what you’ll be doing ten years from today. Testify at Freewillastrology.com. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 08.07.13 - 08.14.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 39


LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, the original Indy Traffic Attorney, I can help you with: Hardship Licenses Probationary Licenses No Insurance Suspensions Habitual Traffic Violator Charges and Suspensions Lifetime Suspensions Uninsured Accident Suspensions Operating While Intoxicated Charges and Suspensions BMV Suspensions, Hearings, and Appeals Court Imposed Suspensions All Moving Traffic Violations and Suspensions

Free Consultations Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law www.indytrafficattorney.com

317-686-7219

NUVO HOTLINE

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TO ADVERTISE ON HOTLINE CALL 254-2400

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CRIMINAL CONVICTION HOLDING YOU BACK?

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A new Indiana law allows the expungement of convictions for certain non-violent crimes, even some felonies.

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CALL TODAY TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY D. ALAN LADD ATTORNEY AT LAW 1-317-951-0087 1-888-951-0087 Over 30 years experience.

mass ave criterium

Elite indiana state Criterium Championships Championship Bicycling event

on facebook at Mass Ave Criterium

Located Kentucky & Raymond. No House Fees 241-2211

Artists, Craftsmen, Tradesmen Jeff Piper, 317-946-8365

august 10, 2013

Visit us at mac.nuvo.net or follow us on facebook

GENTLEMEN’S KLUB Female DANCERS needed.

VETERANS WANTED!

Presented by

mass ave criterium august 10, 2013

Championship Bicycling event

start/finish/registration 435 Mass Ave downtown Indy

crowd giveaways Racing will continue all day long! Courtesy of Mass Ave Merchants under the lights!


NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - August 7, 2013