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THISWEEK MAILING ADDRESS: 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208 TELEPHONE: Main Switchboard (317)254-2400 FAX: (317)254-2405 WEB: www.nuvo.net MAY 29 - JUNE 5, 2013

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We are embarking on an adventure of epic proportions: a 24-hour scavenger hunt organized by Know No Stranger. By Beverly Braden

Vol. 24 Issue 10 issue #1107

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EDITOR & PUBLISHER KEVIN MCKINNEY // KMCKINNEY@NUVO.NET EDITORIAL // EDITORS@NUVO.NET MANAGING EDITOR/CITYGUIDES EDITOR JIM POYSER // JPOYSER@NUVO.NET NEWS EDITOR REBECCA TOWNSEND // RTOWNSEND@NUVO.NET ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR SCOTT SHOGER // SSHOGER@NUVO.NET MUSIC EDITOR KATHERINE COPLEN // KCOPLEN@NUVO.NET CALENDAR CALLIE KENNINGTON // CALENDAR@NUVO.NET FILM EDITOR ED JOHNSON-OTT COPY EDITOR GEOFF OOLEY CONTRIBUTING EDITORS STEVE HAMMER, DAVID HOPPE CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS WAYNE BERTSCH CONTRIBUTING WRITERS TOM ALDRIDGE, MARC ALLAN, JOSEFA BEYER, WADE COGGESHALL, SUSAN WATT GRADE, ANDY JACOBS JR., SCOTT HALL, RITA KOHN, LORI LOVELY, SUSAN NEVILLE, PAUL F. P. POGUE, ANDREW ROBERTS, CHUCK SHEPHERD, MATTHEW SOCEY, JULIANNA THIBODEAUX EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS JORDAN MARTICH, JENNIFER TROEMNER EDITORIAL INTERNS KATELYN BREDEN, HANNAH LEYVA, MATTHEW LOUDEN, JOEY MEGAN HARRIS, DAVID CEROLA ART & PRODUCTION // PRODUCTION@NUVO.NET PRODUCTION MANAGER/ART DIRECTOR DAVE WINDISCH // DWINDISCH@NUVO.NET SENIOR DESIGNER ASHA PATEL GRAPHIC DESIGNER WILL MCCARTY, ERICA WRIGHT ADVERTISING/MARKETING/PROMOTIONS ADVERTISING@NUVO.NET // NUVO.NET/ADVERTISING DIRECTOR OF SALES & MARKETING MARY MORGAN // MMORGAN@NUVO.NET // 808-4614 MARKETING & EVENTS MANAGER LAUREN GUIDOTTI // LGUIDOTTI@NUVO.NET // 808-4618 EVENTS & PROMOTIONS COORDINATOR KATLIN BRAGG // KBRAGG@NUVO.NET // 808-4608 MEDIA CONSULTANT NATHAN DYNAK // NDYNAK@NUVO.NET // 808-4612 MEDIA CONSULTANT HEATHER LEITCH // HLEITCH@NUVO.NET // 808-4611 MEDIA CONSULTANT DARRELL MITCHEL // DMITHCELL@NUVO.NET // 808-4613 ACCOUNTS MANAGER DAVID SEARLE // DSEARLE@NUVO.NET // 808-4607 ACCOUNTS MANAGER KELLY PARDEKOOPER // KPARDEK@NUVO.NET // 808-4616 ADMINISTRATION // ADMINISTRATION@NUVO.NET BUSINESS MANAGER KATHY FLAHAVIN // KFLAHAVIN@NUVO.NET CONTRACTS SUSIE FORTUNE // SFORTUNE@NUVO.NET IT MANAGER T.J. ZMINA // TJZMINA@NUVO.NET DISTRIBUTION MANAGER KATHY FLAHAVIN // KFLAHAVIN@NUVO.NET COURIER DICK POWELL DISTRIBUTION MEL BAIRD, LAWRENCE CASEY, JR., BOB COVERT, MIKE FLOYD, MIKE FREIJE, STEVE REYES, HAROLD SMITH, BOB SOOTS, RON WHITSIT DISTRIBUTION SUPPORT SUSIE FORTUNE, CHRISTA PHELPS, DICK POWELL HARRISON ULLMANN (1935-2000) EDITOR (1993-2000)

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CIRCLE CITY PRIDE In 1988 Indy Pride “came out of the closet” with their Celebration on the Circle. Twenty-five years after that momentous day, Indy Pride will honor the milestone during its annual festival, June 1-9 in Downtown Indianapolis. This year’s theme – Celebrating 25 Years Out of the Closet. By Chris Bavender

A guide to farmers’ market shopping, from reselling to growing practices By Katy Carter

WE ARE HEX BREAKS THE SPELL MUSIC, 19 It’s early on a Tuesday evening and I’m sitting at a booth near the front door of The Red Key Tavern, waiting for Jilly Weiss, singer of Indy’s oncepromising We Are Hex. By Jordan Martich

NEWS ... 07 ARTS ..... 12 MUSIC ...19

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HOOSIER VETS FACE LONG CLAIM WAITS According to analysis by the Center for Investigative Reporting, more than 9,000 veterans had waited for more than a year for disability benefits to be processed by the Indy VA as of May 13, 2013. By Rebecca Townsend

REVIEW: THE SOUND OF MUSIC

REVIEW: STAR WARS

There’s a lot of heart and soul in this fine, Beef & Boards production of an old favorite. By Rita Kohn

The Indiana State Museum’s traveling exhibit is a hell of a thing on the hard science front. By Paul F.P. Pogue

WE ‘EFFED UP! It happens sometimes, we apologize, carry on ... In our Summer Guide, our information regarding The Original Farmers’ Market, which is located at the Indianapolis City Market, was incorrect. The market runs every Wednesday, rain or shine, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., but it does NOT run on Saturday (our mistake). We also mistakenly stated that the market is affiliated with the Indy Winter Farmers’ Market. While this is not directly true, the markets are nevertheless siblings-in-arms in providing Indy with great, healthy, locally sourced foods. Note The Original Farmers’ Market will run through Oct. 30.

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LESLEY WEIDENBENER EDITORS@NUVO.NET Veteran Indiana Statehouse reporter Lesley Weidenbener is managing editor of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news service powered by Franklin College journalism students and faculty.

egislative leaders have dozens of issues set for consideration in interim study committees before the 2014 session, setting lawmakers up for a busy summer – well, maybe. In recent years it seems that study committees have started later and later in the year and thus provided lawmakers with less and less time to really examine the UPCOMING LEGISLATIVE SUMMER STUDY COMMITTEES issue before them. That’s meant stuffing meeting agendas AMONG DOZENS OF SUBJECTS ON STUDY with long lists of issues. Sometimes the AGENDAS: quantity of topics considered has seemed • MASS TRANSIT more important than the quality of the • ISTEP PROBLEMS actual discussion. • INDIANAPOLIS LAND BANK It’s unfortunate. • SEX CRIME AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DATA Issues often go to study committees • REDUCED INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR because the questions seem too tough to AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS tackle in the deadline-driven atmosphere of • COMMON CORE ACADEMIC STANDARDS a legislative session. Study committee topics MEETING DATES HAVE YET TO BE SET. CHECK are often complicated and controversial. IN.GOV/LEGISLATIVE UNDER INTERIM STUDY The goal is — or should be — to conCOMMITTEES FOR UPDATES. duct a thorough and fair study of an issue so the group can make thoughtful recommendations for lawmakers to consider tackle far less controversial but still imporwhen they return to the Statehouse for a tant issues and do so in a way that comlegislative session. mands respect from lawmakers. But sometimes, that’s just not the case. The Commission on Courts is one such The testimony at study committee meetings group. It considers requests from local is too often just a replay of information that courts to add judges and magistrates and was considered months before during sesuses caseload studies and other data to sion. Some groups do little “studying” and, decide which requests to endorse and frankly, lawmakers often don’t have the staff which ones to reject. to do anything more in depth. The group’s recommendations often These kinds of cursory glances do little to make it into law. advance legislative knowledge of issues. It would be great for Hoosiers if all comOf course, that’s not always the case. Some committees do exceptional work on difficult issues and make recomCursory glances do little to advance mendations that improve the legislative knowledge of issues. legislative process. Take the work of the Department of Child Services Interim Study Committee, which made recmittees took their jobs so seriously — espeommendations for the 2013 session. cially this year as lawmakers examine some While that group – led by majority important issues. Republicans — faced some criticism from They’re slated to take on problems with its Democratic members, it mostly worked ISTEP, the state’s standardized testing in a bipartisan way to uncover problems program, and consider whether to keep with the state’s child abuse hotline. implementing Common Core, a set of curThe group took testimony from dozens riculum standards meant to unify educaof people, including state officials, casetion across states. workers and parents. It demanded — and Committees will be considering mass received — information from state agentransit for Central Indiana, how to pay for cies. And its members asked tough queschanges to the state’s felony sentencing laws, tions that not only revealed troubles with and whether every school should be required the existing system but uncovered ways to have a staff person onsite with a gun. to fix those problems. Fortunately, legislative leaders have Then this year, the General Assembly went given study committees freedom this year to work on the issues, passing into law most to meet more often, even though that costs of the recommendations the group made. more. It’s a smart move. These issues are There are also study committees that too important to short change. „ NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // VOICES 5


15 Annual th

Join us June 7 at the Indiana Landmarks Center as we celebrate the work of Indy visionaries with a performance by Time For Three. INDIANAPOLIS CULTURAL TRAIL: A LEGACY OF GENE AND MARILYN GLICK, Brian Payne | ESKENAZI HEALTH, Matthew Gutwein INDY READS, Travis DiNicola | INDY URBAN ACRES, Tyler Gough JOYFUL NOISE, Kiely Holden, Karl Hofstetter, Reagan (the mascot), David Woodruff, Corey Barnes, Shawn Woolfolk, Brendan O’Donnell PEOPLE FOR URBAN PROGRESS, Jessica & Michael Bricker | LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT HONOREE: JUDY O’BANNON

: 6 - 6:45 p.m.;

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: 6:45 - 7:15 p.m.

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: 7:15 - 8:30 p.m.

Free Admission | RSVP by Thursday, May 31 and automatically be entered to win door prizes! LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT HONOREE: JUDY O’BANNON Mrs. O’Bannon is perhaps best known for her role as First Lady of Indiana (1997-2003), but much of her life has been dedicated to community engagement. A graduate of IU with a degree in social work, she was selected as a Rockefeller Theological Scholar, and was the first woman to attend the Louisville Presbyterian Theological Society. In addition, she holds nine honorary degrees. Mrs. O’Bannon is actively involved in media entities, as Chairman of The O’Bannon Publishing Company (Corydon Democrat and Clarion newspapers) and as host and producer of the WFYI TV public television series Communities Building Community as well as her television series, Judy O’Bannon’s Foreign Exchange. We are honored to shine a light on this extraordinary life lived in service to others.


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The U.S. Supreme Court is the latest legal authority to reject the State of Indiana’s attempt to deny Medicaid funding to Planned Parenthood of Indiana. On Tuesday, the nation’s highest court denied the state’s request to review an appeals court ruling that affirmed U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt’s injunction blocking the law’s implementation. Since this case involves no contested facts, only a legal question, Ken Falk, the ACLU’s legal director — who was part of the legal team defending Planned Parenthood in this matter — said he hopes that Pratt’s court will soon issue a final judgment in this matter. Though the state will still be able to deny certain block grant funds under the ruling, “we’re very happy” with the outcome of the case, Falk said, noting that the consequences of this case extended far beyond Planned Parenthood. “Our overarching concern was not just for Planned Parenthood and Medicaid but the ability of individuals to protect their rights [to choose their preferred health care provider] given to them by federal law.” Planned Parenthood estimates that Medicaid subsidizes preventative health care — such as wellness exams, birth control and cancer screenings — to an estimated 9,300 people. Under state and federal law, Medicaid money may not fund abortions except in cases of rape or incest, or when the woman’s life is threatened. Anti-abortion advocates argue that Medicaid funds provide indirect subsidy of abortions by offsetting overhead expense.

PHOTO BY MARK LEE

Miryah Lazaropolis works full-time hours on minimum wage, but has trouble meeting the bare-bones needs of her family.

RAISING THE MINIMUM WAGE Debunking the top five myths about the effect of Indiana’s base-line wage increases BY MA TT L A WSO N A ND F R A N Q U IG L E Y EDITORS@NUVO . N ET

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iryah Lazaropolis is in a tough situation. When she fell behind on the rent on her Eastside home, she and her twin 3-year-old boys were evicted. Fortunately, Lazaropolis’ parents are letting her and the kids stay with them for a while. But she owes money from the eviction and overdue utility bills, and the stillunpaid hospital fees for the twins’ birth add up to nearly $20,000. Lazaropolis tries to push the worry about the unpaid debts behind her. But some money problems are more immediate. On the day we spoke with her, Lazaropolis had no gas in her car and no way to buy some much-needed baby wipes — despite her job at Walmart stocking and straightening racks of clothes. Lazaropolis is paid only $7.40 per hour, and, even with a full-time schedule, her paycheck does not come close to meeting even the bare-bones needs of her family. “I am constantly worrying about how to make

ends meet,” she said. “It is a struggle, a terrible struggle.” Surveys show that an increase in the current federal minimum wage of $7.25 per hour is a popular idea across all demographic groups, save perhaps Walmart executives. But there are a few folks who make arguments against raising the minimum wage. Not coincidentally, those arguments are usually put forth by the heads of corporations that pay low wages to Lazaropolis and workers like her. This is not a new phenomenon. The National Association of Manufacturers in 1938 opposed the proposal to create the first-ever federal minimum wage (25 cents an hour) because it “constitutes a step in the direction of communism, bolshevism, fascism, and Nazism.” Like the claims of the National Association of Manufacturers in 1938, the Chicken Little arguments against a 2013 minimum wage increase are just plain wrong. So here, as a public service — and a service to Miryah Lazaropolis — is a formal quashing of the top five myths about increasing the minimum wage. (The online version of this article includes hyperlinks to sources):

Raising the Minimum Wage is a “Job Killer.”

In his State of the Union speech in February, President Barack Obama proposed an increase in the minimum wage to $9 per hour. Obama had not even left the building before Fox News featured an interview with Nina Easton, a senior editor and columnist at Fortune magazine, who said that a minimum wage increase would be a “job killer.” As a Congressman, Mike Pence took to the House floor in 2007 to argue against raising the minimum wage to $7.25 per hour, claiming it was “one of the most anti-minority and anti-poor laws that we could bring into this Congress.” There is a certain Econ 101 attractiveness to their argument: If we raise the price of something, in this case labor, employers will buy less of it. Except the data show differently. Minimum wage increases are one of the most studied subjects in economics, and the evidence shows time and again that raising the minimum wage does not cause job loss. Studies comparing neighboring communities across state borders, where one state raised the minimum wage and S E E , W A G E , O N P A G E 09

“While the State has been trying to score political points and wasting taxpayer dollars, we’ve been standing up for the Hoosiers who count on us every day,” Betty Cockrum, PPIN’s president and chief executive, said in a news release following the Supreme Court’s announcement. “We look forward to the day the preliminary injunction in this case becomes permanent.” Attorney General Greg Zoeller’s Office , which is charged with defending laws passed by the General Assembly, also weighed in. “We respect the federal courts’ rulings in this matter and will confer with our state agency clients regarding any remaining legal avenues, including the separate administrative appeal of the state’s Medicaid plan,” Zoeller said in a news release. Zoeller noted that while the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has yet to rule on Indiana’s appeal, CMMS rejected Indiana’s initial attempt to amend its Medicaid plan to prevent federal funding from supporting health care providers that provide abortions. The parties in this lawsuit are likely to meet in court again soon — next time over a law passed by the 2013 General Assembly and signed by Gov. Mike Pence that requires clinics dispensing abortion-inducing drugs — a process which does not require surgical oversight or attention — to meet the same physical requirements as clinics performing surgeries. — REBECCA TOWNSEND

THOUGHT BITE The mean people in Congress who have taken shots at the president have missed — and have hit themselves. — ANDY JACOBS, JR NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13-06.05.13 // NEWS 7


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WAGE , FROM PAGE 07 one did not (including a comparison of Indiana and Illinois, where the minimum wage is $8.25 per hour), show no loss of jobs in the communities with the higher wage mandate. Even in times of high unemployment, the job loss argument has proven to be untrue. A recent survey by the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business showed that only 16 percent of economists polled were opposed to Obama’s proposed raise of the minimum wage. Both The Economist and Bloomberg News have recently endorsed a minimum wage hike. Public opinion polling shows a strong majority of voters support an increase — even among Republicans. In fact, a minimum wage increase could PHOTO BY MARK LEE Miryah Lazaropolis works full-time hours at Walmart - one of the top three low-wage employers. boost the economy. Consumer spending accounts for 70 percent of U.S. economic activity, and low-wage workers like for example, have not had an increase in Lazaropolis take their raises and spend them their minimum wage of $2.13 per hour in in the community, creating higher demand more than 20 years. Not surprisingly, waitand more jobs. The Economic Policy ers and waitresses are far more likely to be While over 140 living wage ordinances Institute estimates that the pending Fair paid below the poverty line, even when tips or laws have passed nationwide, Indiana Minimum Wage Act of 2013 — which calls are included. remains a tough place to argue for workfor a minimum wage increase to $10.10 per The people filling these low-wage jobs ers’ rights. In fact, the Indiana General hour by July 2015 — would deliver an estiare older and better-educated than the steAssembly in 2011 passed a law banning mated $51.5 billion to affected workers and reotype of a high school student working local communities from adopting minigenerate as many as 140,000 new jobs. part-time for extra cash. Nearly 90 percent mum wage laws at amounts higher than of the workers who would benefit from a the state level. In the 2013 legislative sesminimum wage hike are age 20 or older, and sion, House Democrats failed to advance a the median age for those filling the roles in proposal to raise the state minimum wage. the fast-growing home health care field is nearly 40. Over 40 Two false premises underlie this myth. The percent of the workers affected first is that a minimum wage increase would “It is terrible trying to live on less have its biggest effect on small businesses. Not have some college education and most work full-time. Nearly true. A study by the National Employment than $8 per hour.” a quarter of all U.S. children Law Project showed that two-thirds of lowhave a parent who would benefit wage workers are employed at large corpora— MIRYAH LAZAROPOLIS, A MOTHER RAISING from a minimum wage increase. tions, with Walmart, Yum Brands (Taco Bell, TWIN 3-YEAR-OLD BOYS ON MINIMUM WAGE Under current law, a full-time KFC, etc.) and McDonald’s coming in as the minimum wage worker only top 3 low-wage employers. makes $15,000 per year. But the The second false premise is that employeffects of a minimum wage increase to $9 per ers would be harmed by a minimum wage Still, former state Rep. John Day, hour would pull a three-person family supincrease. Corporate profits are at their highD-Indianapolis, said he believes that, in the ported by a minimum wage worker above est percentage of gross domestic product in long-term, the effort to raise Hoosier wages the federal poverty line. It would also help history, leading to companies hoarding vast will realize success. Historically, Indiana’s address the significant gender gap in wages, sums of cash — often overseas. Bolstered by minimum wage was set lower than the as women represent nearly two-thirds of a cheap workforce, most of the top low-wage federal level (not all workers are subject minimum wage workers. employers also showed profits in recent to federal wage laws), so Day proposed an years, and paid their chief executives, on increase. Year after year, the Chamber of average, nearly $10 million per year. Commerce and other business interests This trend is bad for small businesses, opposed the idea, and Day’s bill stalled. according to Holly Sklar, director of Business Finally, in 2007, Indiana law was amended for a Fair Minimum Wage. “The biggest Periodic minimum wage increases over the to mirror the federal wage. “There was a problem for Main Street businesses is years have created the illusion of a climbing good coalition in support of better wages,” lack of customer demand,” Sklar said in a wage floor. But the real purchasing power of Day said. “I had a Republican co-sponsor news release advocating a minimum wage the current minimum wage of $7.25 per hour and we pulled together church and labor increase. “Corporate profits are at their highis lower than it has been in past decades. The and community groups to testify and advoest since 1950, as a percentage of national minimum wage of $1.60 per hour in 1968, cate for the change.” income, while the share going to employees for example, would have a value of about A similar coalition is now in the works as is near its low point. We can’t build a strong $10.56 today. The smart way to remedy that local advocates aim to launch a campaign economy on a falling wage floor.” problem, and to keep from revisiting the that mimics the efforts in states like Illinois. minimum wage debate every few years, is to Likewise, they are pressing Indiana’s conindex the wage to inflation, as is already done gressional delegation to take a stand for with Social Security benefits. workers like Lazaropolis by signing the Fair Judged by another measure, the current Minimum Wage Act of 2013. minimum wage is even further behind the Lazaropolis would like to see that, too. As an underpaid working mother, times. The productivity of the U.S. work“It is terrible trying to live on less than $8 Lazaropolis is no outlier. An estimated 15 force has increased substantially in recent per hour,” she said. “You just can’t.” „ million workers would be set to receive a decades, but wages have not kept up. The pay raise under Obama’s proposal. U.S. job Center on Economic and Policy Research growth in recent years has been dominated Matt Lawson is a student in the Health estimates that the minimum wage would by lower-paying jobs, as manufacturing and Human Rights Clinic at Indiana be a whopping $21.72 per hour if it had jobs dry up and are replaced by jobs in University Robert H. McKinney School of been indexed to worker productivity. retail or food service. Tipped employees, Law. Fran Quigley teaches in the Clinic.

Raising the Minimum Wage is a Non-Starter in Indiana.

Raising the Minimum Wage Hurts Small Businesses.

We Have Already Raised the Minimum Wage Enough.

Raising the Minimum Wage Will only Affect Teenagers with Part-time Jobs.

GET INVOLVED Focus on Food Growing Places Indy launches a summer-long “lunch and learn series” on various aspects of food systems from 1-2 p.m. on Wednesdays through Aug. 7. Wednesday, May 29, 1-2 p.m., The Platform at City Market, 202 E. Market St. FREE. Pacers / Fever Tune in on Thursday, May 30, at 8:30 p.m. to see the Pacers in their NBA Eastern Conference finals battle against Heat in Miami. Then indulge your passion for live action on Friday by checking out the Indiana Fever in their season opener Downtown on May 31. Friday, May 31, Bankers Life Fieldhouse, 125 S. Pennsylvania St., 7 p.m. Prices vary. Recycle Fest Sponsored in part by our sister pub, Indiana Living Green, this festival launches the Indy Parks Summer Concert series, while emphasizing the importance of stewardship. Saturday, June 1, McCalister Amphitheatre, Garfield Park, 2432 Conservatory Drive, noon-10 p.m. $15. Beyond Coal Participants will endeavor to spell out “Beyond Coal” in an effort to convey their desire that IPL retire its Harding Street Coal Plant. See indiana. sierraclub.org/ for more info. Sat., June 1, 11:45 a.m., FREE. Pet Pride Read our cover story this week, but note Monday’s main event is Pet Pride, featuring a Red Carpet Fashion contest for pets, plus adoption opportunities from local animal shelters. Monday, June 3, Garfield Park, 2524 Conservatory Road, 6 p.m. FREE. LOOKING AHEAD TO NEXT WEEK: 2013 NUVO Cultural Vision Awards Join us at the Indiana Landmarks Center in a celebration of the individuals and organizations that have brought innovation and excellence into our community. RSVP at cva.nuvo.net Friday, June 7, Indiana Landmarks Center, 1201 Central Ave., 6 p.m., FREE.

N NUVO.NET Lawmakers Summer Study by Sandie Love Pence: Federal media shield law is needed by Lesley Weidenbener Food ethics with clergy farmer and Purdue prof by Hannah Leyva State looks to private firms on I-69 section by Lesley Weidenbener Hoosier vets face some of longest claim waits by Rebecca Townsend

VOICES • The Politics of Scandal by Abdul-Hakim Shabazz • A Wrigley Field pilgrimage by David Hoppe • Still the greatest spectacle in racing by Cam Savage NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13-06.05.13 // NEWS 9


Circle City IN Pride Festival 25 years out of the closet BY C H R IS B A VE ND E R • EDI TO RS @ N U V O . N E T

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t was 1988 … the year Nike unveiled its “Just Do It’” campaign, pop sensation Milli Vanilli was exposed as just two good-looking guys who lip-synched all their songs and Indy Pride “came out of the closet” with their Celebration on the Circle. Twenty-five years later, Indy Pride will honor the milestone during its annual festival, June 1-9 in Downtown Indianapolis. This year’s theme – Celebrating 25 Years Out of the Closet. “The very first Pride event was actually a few years before that — in 1981—and it was a dinner at the old Essex House Hotel which has since been demolished,” said Stephanie

Swanson, 2013 co-chair of the Circle City IN Pride Festival along with Chris Morehead. “A lot of those attending that year actually wore masks so no one would know who they were.” For the next seven years, various Pride events moved around the city until Monument Circle ultimately became “home” to the festival in 1988. For three years, the celebration continued on the Circle before moving to University Park from 19921994. After a brief move to the Canal, the festival returned to University Park. Since then, the festival has moved to the American Legion Mall, and it has only continued to grow.

“A spirit of togetherness”

“We are very lucky that we never felt that was the only route we could take. Anthonie grew up in the New York City area and I lived in Chicago. It was always second nature for us to be okay with who we are, and that’s due in large part to the acceptance of our families,” said Strader. “We know, however, that isn’t always the case in Indiana and the Midwest. So the festival is very important for those who do not have a good support system. Even if it’s just once a year where they can come here and have a place to feel comfortable.” And, that is just what the Circle City IN Pride Festival is all about – a place everyone can come and be comfortable in their own skin and find a variety of activities. This year, festival-goers will find a vast array of entertainment on the DeKuyper Main Stage, including international superstars Detox – stars of the current season of Ru Paul’s Drag Race – and Grammy Award winning singer and actress, Mya. The IndyMojo 2nd Stage will feature great local talent and DJs.

“Each year as this festival grows, we still strive to maintain a sense of family and community. You can expect the same focus on this being an event for the whole family,” said Swanson. “We have added more free features for convenience, like a trolley for transport to and from the festival and a Pedal and Park area. You can expect more sponsors and vendors — diverse, unique and happy to be part of this celebration. You can expect more people — all walks of life celebrating our common bond and uniting in the spirit of togetherness.” It’s a spirit of togetherness that 44-year-old Tobin Strader and his partner, Anthonie Lardiere, 40, want to impart to their 6 and 9-year-old sons. “It speaks to the changing face of the gay community and American family – you see straight families and gay families at Pride because it is a fun day. There are more kid friendly events so you can take the entire family,” Strader said. “I think it is definitely important that people see it isn’t a stereotypical event. Several years ago it was so small and difficult to get people to participate, but now you have people from around Indiana and outside the state coming to our festival.” Strader feels the festival is important in helping young men and women who might be struggling with their sexuality and how to tell their families. However, he said, some still go to great lengths to keep it from their loved ones – even going so far as to get married and have kids because they believe they have no other options. 10

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The party of the year IndyMojo president, Jason King, said it’s an honor to be asked to again produce the entertainment for the 2nd Stage. IndyMojo is an Indianapolis based Jam/EDM/Festival music blog, radio station and event promoter. “After our first experience in 2011 as a media sponsor, I was kicking myself and wondering why we hadn’t been a part of this from the beginning,” King said. “And, of course, there is the whole underlying aspect that, as an organization, we feel love is love no matter what.

PHOTO BY MARK LEE

Festival potentates Stephanie Swanson and Shere Brooks.

PHOTOS BY JASON NELLIS

This year’s emcees include: (from left to right) Halle Pino, Lola Palooza and Knayte St. James.

This is our generation’s civil rights movement and it’s important to me as an owner – and to our staff – to be a part of that and help represent that to the best of our ability.” Music on the 2nd stage starts at 12:15 p.m. on June 8 and continues the rest of the day. A drag show will also be a part of the lineup, all of which was selected by Indy Pride organizers. “Pride festival is for everyone – not just the gay community – but for everyone,” King said. “It’s the party of the year, and that’s why we are there.” One of the featured DJs on the 2nd stage will be Jack Shepler aka Jackola, who is a member of the Indy Pride board and on the festival’s entertainment committee. Shepler is set to take the stage at 1 p.m. His company, Ayokay, also handles the majority of the graphic design for the festival, and designed, developed and maintains its websites. “I’ll be playing a combination of underground house as well as favorites amongst the Pride audience. We have a great and diverse lineup throughout the day, so attendees are sure to hear something they love,” Shepler said. Shepler loves the festival for all that it stands for.

“Pride to me is many things: a celebration of our history, a celebration of both diversity and unity, and of course a great excuse to have a good time. Let’s face it: gays know how to throw a party,” Shepler said. “Not only that, it’s 100 percent run by volunteers, which means all of the money raised is filtered back into great causes, such as Step-Up Inc, The Damien Center, Indiana Youth Group and even initiatives set for Indy Pride’s future.” New events this year include the LGBT Film Fest Night at the Movies on June 5. “We will feature a fun film from 1988 for outdoor viewing on Mass Ave.,” Swanson noted. “We have also added a new partnership with the Cabaret at the Columbia Club to present Pride Night at the Cabaret featuring Ana Gasteyer on June 7. We are extremely excited about both events!” This year, the Arts Garden downtown will feature an art/history exhibit for the event. “It will be a mixture of historical pieces and art displays that will honor the spirit and history of Pride in Indianapolis,” explained Swanson. “Mike Barclay of the Herron School of Art is curating the exhibit that will run the entire month of June. This will be an amazing kick off to the entire week of events that create an array of highlights.”


Circle City IN Pride FESTIVAL EVENTS

PHOTOS BY MARK LEE

Images from last year’s festivities.

“You can expect more people — all walks of life celebrating our common bond and uniting in the spirit of togetherness.” — STEPHANIE SWANSON, 2013 CO-CHAIR

The biggest parade in town The biggest highlight is the annual Cadillac Barbie Pride Parade June 8. The parade, which starts at 10 a.m. at the corner of Mass and College Ave., continues to get bigger and better each year, according to co-chair Shere Brooks, who shares duties with HR Jung. In 10 years, it has grown from a handful of vehicles and people to a two-hour production in 2012 – making it bigger than even the Indy 500 parade – both in the number of floats and those lining the streets. “I love to say that, and people find it amusing, but it’s true. We have a rule that we will take you even on the day of the parade because we like being known as the biggest parade in the city. The Indy 500 parade caps out at 75, but we continue to grow,” Brooks said. “Word of mouth is key when it comes to adding participants, or someone will see the parade one year and think their group should be involved and so it goes.” Social media has also played a large part in getting the word out. “That has made a huge difference in advertising this parade and getting people involved,” she explained. “When you have people photographing a group and instantly posting them and tagging Indy Pride and someone replying in two seconds from another state – it’s just amazing. I spend hours going through pictures to see what has been posted.” Many of those pictures are taken and posted by volunteers. “It takes a lot of volunteers and it’s always a struggle to find the help to do this. We will grow 20-30 more between now and then. They don’t get much for it – a few trinkets, a t-shirt, a lunch voucher,” Brooks said. “We ask them to come out on a hot day and it always rains – usually when we are setting up – but we always have fun and you meet some of the most amazing people. In fact, two of the best friends I have, I met through volunteering with the parade.” This year, parade attendees will see it all. “We always have our local standbys like the area gay bars, the politicians and the floats. But, what I like to see are the smaller groups,” said Brooks, who has been involved with orga-

nizing the parade for six years. “The lady who makes jewelry, the kids and the church groups – they are some of our biggest numbers. Take for example, Broadway United Methodist, who has been with us a long time. You see all age groups and whole families.” A defining moment for Brooks came last year as she watched the American and the LGBT flag going down the street side by side. “And, then here came the police officers and I see our friend, Steve, in full uniform, holding his partner’s hand in public,” she said. “For me, that said it all.” It is that acceptance that keeps Brooks – who would like to see the city become more involved and the event garner more press coverage – a part of the parade. “I want more people to see it is all a big family. I am not gay, but they treat me like family,” she said. “I like trying to expose that this is every day life – people with the same concerns and worries – and that everyone wants to be part of something and be accepted.”

A message of acceptance Strader believes it’s a message his sons need to grow up with. “It’s okay to be yourself. Your life should be filled with all sorts of people and we should celebrate everyone’s differences and we should celebrate the different facets of society,” Strader said. “It’s the same reason I take them to Irish Fest and Italian Fest or any of the different cultural festivals, so they can grow up knowing that they are part of a larger community.” Jason King wants his 2-year-old son to grow up embracing this community the way he does. “I want him to look back on my time just like I look back on my dad’s time with Martin Luther King Jr. and civil rights and know that his dad is on the right side of the battle,” he said. “We all share the same values.” Randy Milender has attended the festival the last 18 years. He realized he was gay when he was 5-years-old and singing “Diamonds Are a Girls Best Friend” on the Thanksgiving Day dinner table. He officially came out to his family in 1980 at the age of 24. “It was relatively easy,” Milender said. “It was the disco era and straight people were going to gay bars.”

He believes attitudes now are even more positive. “Because I think people are more educated and have more experience knowing someone gay. And, with girls, everyone wants a gay friend. We will tell you if your ass is too big in that dress,” he said. “The message of ‘family’ has also been extended to samesex and based on values that are beyond the norm. The ‘Old School’ crowd (Coby Palmer & the Bag Ladies) have been friends for years and [they’re] a big draw. They have spent countless hours raising money for The Damien Center and various organizations when it wasn’t acceptable or fashionable.”

Putting Indy Pride on the map Festival numbers continue to climb. Attendance in 2002 was 6,000; 2003 saw 10,000 people, while last year’s Indy Pride festival saw nearly 80,000 people – a number Swanson expects to exceed this year if the weather holds. “We continue to add more layers of entertainment features, diverse events, guest services, community involvement and logistical refinement,” Swanson explained. If Swanson has anything to say about it, the festival will only continue to thrive. “We will definitely outgrow the space. That’s a bittersweet thought because the current location is so perfect for our event,” she said. “If we stay true to the vision of a destination event, Circle City IN Pride will be on par to be one of the biggest and best Pride celebrations in the US”., Swanson said. But one thing will never change – the overarching message. “I think the message has been that our community stands strong together. Over the years the “Pride Pioneers” have worked together to make these celebrations possible. A lot of people donate their time and energy to build this event,” Swanson said. “It shows a tremendous ability to work with other members of the LGBT community, the greater Indianapolis Community, our ally partners and countless volunteers to bring this event to the mainstream. In the end, this is a microcosm for how the world should operate.” „

MAY 31- JUNE 22 iPride: Indy Pride 25th Anniversary Exhibition Indianapolis ArtsGarden JUNE 1 – 2nd ANNUAL RAINBOW 5K RUN/WALK Starting Line at 2145 N. Talbott Street All Ages Event • $30 Registration • Starts at 7 a.m. JUNE 2 – COMMUNITY PICNIC Garfield Park – 12 p.m. Corporate Shelter, 2524 Conservatory Rd. All Ages Event • FREE Admission JUNE 2 – BAT N’ ROUGE Garfield Park – 2 p.m. All Ages Event • FREE Admission JUNE 2 – PRIDE SKATE rollercave.com, Rollercave – 6:30 p.m. -9 p.m. 8734 E 21st St., All Ages Event / *$12 Admission + Skate Rental JUNE 3 – 3RD ANNUAL PET PRIDE Garfield Park – 6 p.m., Shelters 3 & 4, 2524 Conservatory Rd., All Ages Event • FREE Admission JUNE 4 – PRIDE OF INDY BAND CONCERT Old Firehouse Lawn – 7 p.m., Corner of Mass. Ave., College Ave. & St. Clair, All Ages Event, FREE Admission JUNE 5 – LGBT FILM FEST NIGHT AT THE MOVIES Old Firehouse Lawn – Showtime: 8 p.m. Corner of Mass. Ave., College Ave. & St. Clair All Ages Event JUNE 6 – GIRL PRIDE talbottstreet.com, Talbott Street – Doors 9 p.m., 2145 N. Talbott St., 21+ Event • $10 Advance, $12 Door JUNE 6 – BAG LADIES LOUD & PROUD gregsindianapolis.com, Greg’s - Doors 8 p.m. Showtime 9 p.m., 231 E. 16th St., 21+ Event $5 Suggested Donation JUNE 7 – PRIDE NIGHT AT THE CABARET The Cabaret at The Columbia Club – Showtime 8 p.m., 121 Monument Circle, All Ages Event *$55, $65, $75 Admission *Indy Pride members receive $5 off ticket price JUNE 8 – CADILLAC BARBIE PRIDE PARADE Downtown Indianapolis – Starts at 10 a.m. Corner of Mass Ave and College Ave. to the Indianapolis Public Library, All Ages Event NO COVER JUNE 8 – CIRCLE CITY IN PRIDE FESTIVAL American Legion Mall – Gates at 11 a.m. St. Clair to Michigan between Meridian and Pennsylvania, All Ages Event Suggested $5 Donation

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // COVER STORY 11


PERFORMANCES

Tomas Kubinek Prague-born vaudeville/circus/performance artist Kubinek one-man show “involves some acrobatics, some improvisation, some audience interaction, and the star balancing a glass of wine of his forehead while doing a somersault, whistling and playing the ukulele,” according to a Boston Globe feature. Tarkington Theater at The Center for the Performing Arts; June 1, 8 p.m. and June 2, 3 p.m.; $18-38 at thecenterfortheperformingarts.org Indy Convergence: Open Lab Performance The two-week workshop for artists Indy-based and beyond — designed to “capture the special alchemy that comes out of exploring talents collaboratively for long enough to bring ideas to life, but short enough to keep from losing sight of the fleeting nature of live performance” — winds up Saturday with an informal performance featuring 5-10 minute pieces created in 10 days. Participants include two Los Angeles-based artists: multidisciplinary artist Kendra Ware (who taught a Butoh workshop during the Convergence) and actor, puppeteer and aerialist Christina Feinberg (returning for a second year). Head to nuvo.net for more coverage. Wheeler Arts Community Theater, June 1, 7 p.m., free, indyconvergence.org Intimate Opera: Selections from the AIDS Quilt Songbook Created in 1993 to augment the AIDS Quilt (or NAMES) project to memorialize those lost to the virus, the AIDS Quilt Songbook was defined by its founders as “a never-ending work whose meaning and spirit is renewed and redefined with every addition.” Intimate Opera will present songs from the Songbook along with a few other tunes by gay composers Saturday at IndyFringe. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to the Damien Center. IndyFringe Theatre, June 1, 8 p.m., $10 at intimateopera.org The Screwtape Letters A theatrical adaptation of C.S. Lewis’s novel about a world in which God is the “Enemy,” the Devil is known as “Our Father below” and a guy named Screwtape is Satan’s ace psychiatrist returns to Indy. Clowes Memorial Hall, June 1, 4 and 8 p.m., $39-59 at screwtapeonstage.com Broadway Across America: West Side Story Dear kindly Sergeant Krupke, you gotta understand; it’s just our bringin’ up-key that gets us out of hand. Our mothers all are junkies, our fathers all are drunks. Golly Moses, natcherly we’re punks! Clowes Memorial Hall, June 4-9, times vary, $25-80 at broadwayinindianapolis.com

N NUVO.NET/ARTS Visit nuvo.net/arts for complete event listhings, reviews and more. 12 // ARTS // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

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Time for Three premieres concerto inspired by Chicago’s Second City B Y CH A N TA L I N CA N D EL A EDITORS@NUVO.NET

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ime for Three, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra’s Ensemble in Residence, has presented world premieres before. Chris Brubeck and Jennifer Higdon have written concerti for the adventurous, youthful ensemble, comprised of violinists Zach DePue (also the ISO’s concertmaster), Nick Kendall, and double bassist Ranaan Meyer. But this week’s world premiere of Games and Challenges: Something Wonderful Right Away, written for Time for Three by distinguished Pulitizer Prize winning composer William Bolcom, presented challenges heretofore unencountered to the trio. “I have always wanted to combine theatrical improvisation in to a musical setting, but without any verbal cues at all,” said Bolcom, professor emeritus of composition at the University of Michigan. Theatrical improvisation? In a musical setting? The idea of that took Time for Three back a bit. “We went up to Ann Arbor, to spend some time with Dr. Bolcom, to talk about the work. We all were kind of like ‘What?’ ‘Huh?’ when he explained his ideas. He must have said to us ten times that day, ‘Trust me! Just trust me!’” DePue said, laughing. After that meeting however, things began settling in; DePue recalled Meyer saying after the meeting, “He’s brilliant!” Bolcom’s nine movement work was inspired by a few different experiences from the composer’s life. One touchstone was his close involvement with Chicago’s Second City improv troupe in the early ‘60s, for which he improvised music before and during skits at the behest of Second City founder Paul Sills. And another formative experience came during his time studying under French composer Darius Milhaud at the Paris Conservatoire, along with fellow student Andre Hadju, a Hungarian émigré. Later on, Hadju would go on to write works that centered around directed musical improvisation. For instance, he would write a short phrase of music, and then encourage the player to either go on in a similar fashion, or leave it. This was similar to something Second City Troupe was doing with their audience — asking for two or three words, and then building a scene upon those. Bolcom had long been thinking

CONCERT

URBANSKI CONDUCTS GERSHWIN AND BOLCOM

WHEN: MAY 31 AND JUNE 1, 8 P.M. WHERE: HILBERT CIRCLE THEATRE TICKETS: $20-80 AT INDIANAPOLISSYMPHONY.ORG Time for Three is, from left, Nick Kendall, Ranaan Meyer and Zach DePue. PHOTO BY VANESSA BRICEÑO-SCHERZER

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Pulitzer-winning composer William Bolcom wrote Games and Challenges for Time for Three.

about how to combine these experiences, of mixing together theater, music, and improvisation. “I had to figure a way to do it non-verbally, however,” he said. And that was no small feat. “This was one of the most difficult pieces I’ve ever worked on. It took a lot of plain brainstorming, and a lot of trial and error.” But in Time for Three, he found a group that he described as “eager to try things out.” “It’s like nothing we have ever done,”

DePue said of the work, which stretched out so much that the original opening piece for this weekend’s concerts, Leonard Bernstein’s Overture to Candide to be bumped from the Friday and Saturday night shows (the Thursday morning coffee program omits the Bolcom piece, but includes the Bernstein). DePue described a few movements to me, one centered around sports, and another royal dignitaries; even ISO Music Director Krzysztof Urbanski has his own part to play in the movements, and not just as the man waving the baton. DePue and Bolcom said the audience is encouraged to participate: “They won’t be able to help but be engaged with the work,” DePue said. How would describe this piece to an uninitiated listener? He said “I’d ask them if they’d ever seen Saturday Night Live. It’s kind of like that, but only without talking, and with music.” „


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A surprise birthday party for Ben’s teenage twins lifted the tense mood.

A nap is enjoyed by this contestant midway through the hunt.

INDY’S CRAZIEST 24 HOURS EVER

A blow-by-blow account of Know No Stranger’s state-wide scavenger hunt B Y BEVER L Y B R A D E N EDITORS@NU VO . N ET

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t was to be an adventure of epic proportions. A 24-hour scavenger hunt organized by Know No Stranger, a collective dedicated to making Indianapolis a fun place to live. Our team was comprised of my teenage twins, Matt and Madison, and Molly, a newly licensed driver. Here are a few excerpts from the journal I kept during the race.

MIDNIGHT Downtown

A surprise birthday party for the twins with a hundred new friends - lifts the tense mood for a minute but is followed by a complete breakdown in communication. We are stressed. A late night visit to the Marion County Processing Center to get a pic in a jail cell for 40 pts or a pic with an officer acting like a Velociraptor (15 pts) leaves us empty handed. It seems the cops all value their jobs. After much needed rest for some we decide it is best to get our tired driver off the city streets and head down to Versailles, Ky. to bring back a board game (200 pts) then head to Spaulding bakery in Lexington for donuts (240 pts). 10:31 A.M. Lexington, KY

We have the game and the donuts! Traveling this far was a bold strategy but Madison and I have discovered a newfound appreciation for one another and Molly has only had one anxiety attack.

10 A.M.

We have no team name or uniforms. Madison is sick with a virus, our car is unreliable and I’m kinda kicking around the idea of siphoning gas from one car to another... CARPE DIEM!

Rule one is simple: Teams must stay together for the duration. The Hunt will be scored by points. Categories include: ITEMS, PHOTOGRAPHS, INFORMATION, PUZZLES, MINI GAMES, SPONTANEOUS AND MISCELLANEOUS. No one could do all of these. Using member’s talents and interest, each team decides what they will do and how far they will go to earn points. The INFORMATION category includes hundreds of questions that can be answered by Google and visiting treasured places in Indy. There are over 200 options in the ITEMS category. The list includes things like a Chuck E Cheese token (15 pts), roadkill (38 pts), a 7-foot tall person (40 pts), typewriter ribbon (7 pts), and a KNS tattoo (150 pts). We are warned that The Animauls, cos-

MAY 19

5:30 A.M.

MAY 18

4 P.M. City Market

members from three teams come together, stand in a circle with fingertips touching, and play a game then we all melt back into the city and go our own ways. 20 pts.

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Members of Know No Stranger enjoy doughnuts imported from Kentucky.

tumed creatures sent to deter our progress, will be roaming the city. Animauls can steal lists and detain us for up to five minutes. We cannot strike them but we can defend ourselves against them with water balloons. With our hands over our hearts all players take a solemn oath to have fun, not get angry with our teammates and to work for the betterment of Indianapolis. 5:30 P.M.

Road Rally from the PUZZLES section (70 pts). Starting at City Market the rally has encrypted directions like: Go South on the road with four of the same vowels, turn right at Swansy’s hand, and find the Tasty Ones. Keeping an open mind and watching carefully for clues, they appear in the urban landscape just like magic.

9:30 P.M. Steak N Shake-Eastside

Treasured moments of calm after much chaos. Breaking the oath five minutes after leaving the meeting… we have argued. We didn’t bring the dog Molly saved just before leaving and that’s best, considering our bickering; the dog probably would have jumped from our car and joined the Animauls. We have broken some major traffic laws, sure, but we have laughed, danced and acted like Velociraptors all over the city. 11 P.M. Monument Circle

A MINI GAMES romp in the rain with KNS and other players is memorable and beautiful. Very much like a flash mob,

3:50 P.M. Garfield Park

We broke through the finish line to the sound of “Chariots of Fire” as people cheered and tossed streamers in celebration. Finishing The Hunt was no small feat and the volunteers who made it happen relished that and made the end worthy of the trials. We received the creativity bonus for the birthday party but more importantly, met new friends, learned a lot, spent time together, did strange, new things and as we wandered this fine city and reached out to strangers, people laughed with us, were happy to help, and excited about what we were doing. Team Everything Rhymes with Orange took home the unique trophy and prize money but Indianapolis was the true winner. Get your team ready for the next HUNT coming in May 2014. Check out knownostranger.com/home or follow them on Facebook for more info. „ NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // ARTS 13


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Kon-Tiki The true story of Norwegian explorer Thor Heyerdahl, who crossed the Pacific in a balsa wood raft. In English. (PG-13) Stories We Tell Documentarian Sarah Polley asks the same questions of different members of an extended family, eliciting forking storylines aplenty, in a feature that’s won several top Canadian film awards. (PG-13) Now You See Me The FBI vs. the world’s greatest illusionists. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman. (PG-13) After Earth Will and Jaden Smith are marooned on a postApocalyptic Earth. M. Night Shyamalan directs. (PG-13) Great White Shark 3D An IMAX production filmed in South Africa, New Zealand, Mexico and California. At Downtown Indy IMAX. (NR)

CONTINUING Fast & Furious 6 t The Fast & Furious franchise is theatrical product that has found its winning formula. Mix outlandish car chases with fight scenes so over-the-top they look like action figures being banged together rather than humans duking it out. Keep up the WWE-style banter between the crowdpleasing ensemble cast and have them yammer too much about how the crew is really a “family.” And add one new face per movie. This time Michelle Rodriguez returns to the franchise after being killed – we thought – in an earlier installment. (PG-13) —Ed Johnson-Ott SUBMITTED PHOTO

Zac Effron and Dennis Quaid model Farm & Fleet’s summer 2012 collection in At Any Price.

UNLIKABLE MIDWESTERNERS

Nervy melodrama At Any Price considers the people that power Big Ag BY ED JO H NS O N- O T T E JOHNSONOTT@ N U VO . N ET

Editor’s note: Shortly before NUVO went to press we were advised that At Any Price’s opening would be pushed back a week to June 7.

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ould you buy some geneticallyengineered seeds from this man? The drama At Any Price is set in a contemporary American farming community and incorporates contemporary issues, though the emphasis is far more on people than issues. New York filmmaker Ramin Bahrani (Man Push Cart, Chop Shop, Goodbye Solo) deserves credit for presenting members of the agricultural community as regular folks. Too often, such groups are depicted either as rubes or as icons for quilt-ready Americana. Bahrani and co-screenwriter Elizabeth Newton’s screenplay is an interesting piece of work. They mix naturalistic situations with abrupt melodramatic moments that are dealt with in a surprisingly matterof-fact way. I’ve had some time to mull

FILM

AT ANY PRICE

R AT E D: R IN W IDE R ELEA S E t

over their approach and I’m still not sure whether I like it or not. I do know that an incident about two-thirds of the way through the movie turns the whole production on its head and spins the film towards a Midwest Shakespearean finale. The story is set in southern Iowa, where farmer Henry Whipple (Dennis Quaid) sells genetically-modified super seeds to other farmers. Henry has been at the top at his game for quite some time, but now rival farmer/salesman Jim Johnson (Clancy Brown, in fine form) has become more successful. Henry is growing desperate and, as played by Quaid, he is a man apparently unfamiliar with the expression, “never let them see you sweat.” The man tries way too hard — read: veins straining, eyes bugging out, glad-to-see-you hand-pumping. Pity Dennis Quaid. Given the role of a desperate character, how much desperation can an actor show in front of outsiders without turning the character into a caricature? I wish Quaid had dialed Henry’s pub-

lic behavior down a few notches, because I had trouble believing this guy could sell anything to anybody. Better he should act like Jim Johnson in public and save the extreme expressions for his alone time. Hey, but this Henry’s not that kind of guy. His wife Irene (Kim Dickens, in a wellmeasured performance) keeps her cool, despite Henry’s not-terribly secret affair with fun girl Heather Graham. Henry and Irene have two sons. The eldest – their golden boy – stays away all the time, sending postcards updating them on his latest adventures. The younger boy, Dean (Zac Efron), is a sullen kid with a bad temper and a burning desire to become a race car driver. Dean has a charming girlfriend named Cadence (Maika Monroe), but she’s not enough to keep him from seething over … what? His tension with his pop? His jealousy over his parents’ high regard of his brother? Concern that he might not have the best abs in Iowa? Your guess is as good as mine. The film boasts a nice scene between Cadence and Henry – notable because there appears to be actual interaction between a normally self-absorbed Whipple man and another human being. At Any Cost is a nervy ‘70s-style movie that doesn’t mind taking risks and showcasing unlikable people. „

The Hangover III i We create our own realities. In my world, there was only one movie called The Matrix and only one called The Hangover. I invite you to join me in my world and pretend this ugly exercise never happened. (R) —Ed Johnson-Ott

FILM EVENTS First: The Story of the London 2012 Olympic Games The “only film about the 2012 Olympic Games supported by the International Olympic Committee” focuses on a dozen first-time Olympians, including U.S. swimmer Missy Franklin and Australian BMX rider Caroline Buchanan. Various theaters (via Fathom satellite network), May 30, 7:30 p.m. Style Wars Samuel E Vazquez, an Indy-based artist who was active in the New York graffiti world in the ‘80s, will introduce Style Wars, a 1983 doc that was essentially the first to document graffiti culture. Followed by a graffiti demonstration (with prize giveaways) in the Alliance Sculpture Court. Part of Final Fridays. The Toby at Indianapolis Museum of Art, May 31, 7 p.m., $9 public, $5 member Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy People seem to like me because I am polite and I am rarely late. I like to eat ice cream and I really enjoy a nice pair of slacks. Keystone Art Cinema, May 31 and June 1, midnight

N NUVO.NET/ARTS Complete movie listings available at NUVO.NET NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13-06.05.13 // ARTS 15


FOOD

BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

As more breweries open it is essential to increase the number of retail outlets selling cans and bottles — and bars, taverns and restaurants pouring pints. Among the heartening examples of growth is Kroger’s at Lake Circle Drive with its festive display headlined as “Indiana Brewed” featuring beers from Barley Island, Flat 12, Four Horsemen, Oaken Barrel, Triton and Upland. A conversation with some Kroger staff afforded an opportunity to highlight the qualities of craft beer and to match a brand to personal taste. This kind of one-on-one is even more likely to happen at Union Jack Pub in Broad Ripple, with its expanding craft beer list including Cutter’s Half Court IPA, Triton’s Fieldhouse Wheat, Bier’s Rye Pale, Bier’s DFG IPA, Fountain Square’s Working Man’s Pilsner, Sun King’s Bitchin’ Camaro. Brew Bracket brings a new audience to craft with entertaining tasting and voting events. Pale Ale is the featured style on June 15 at the Indiana State Fairgrounds/Exposition ($35 regular, $45 VIP at eventbrite.com). Pale ales joined the ranks of beer styles at the turn of the 18th century when the roasting process allowed for malts to be dried with coke, allowing for a change from the dark roasts (think stouts and porters). The traditional styles of pale ale include Ambers, American Pale Ale, Biere de Garde, Blonde, Burton Pale Ale, English Bitter, Irish Red ale and India Pale Ale (IPA). Strong pale ales include American Strong Ale, Strong Ale and Scotch ale. Pale ales tend to lean to a hoppier content, thus were early on referred to as “bitters.”

EVENTS History on Tap Ever wonder what the residents of 1836 Prairietown do at night? They drink. How else to while away the time until the coming of electricity and effective prophylactics? And anachronistically enough they drink local craft beer, made circa 2013 at local breweries like Flat 12 and Thr3e Wise Men. History on Tap, will feature beer tastings, a panel discussion with local brewers, a craft brewing demo by Tuxedo Park Brewers and sunset flights on the 1859 Balloon Voyage (weather permitting and for an extra $10). Conner Prairie, May 31, 6:30 p.m., $35 (designated driver $10) at connerprairie.org Vintage Indiana Wine and Food Festival 200-plus award winning Indiana wines, including Butler Winery & Vineyards, Thomas Family Winery and Windy Knoll Winery. Delicious food from Bazbeaux, Chef Dan’s, The Flying Cupcake and more. Talks and tastings led by chefs and winemakers. Live music by Cari Ray, Jennie DeVoe and Josh Gracin. That’s about the size of it. Military Park, June 1, 11 a.m., $22-25 at vintageindiana.com House of Blues Gospel Brunch It’s the second time around for a non-denominational, all-you-can-eat-and-hear buffet featuring cornbread muffins, biscuits and gravy, omelet and pancake stations, mimosas, all served up to the Lord’s soundtrack. Old National Centre, June 2, 12 p.m., $31.50 (child and senior discounts available) Indy Veg Society Dine Out This month’s meeting place is Sesame, where they’ll sub seitan for the protein in any dish. Sesame (1413 W. 86th St.), June 4, 6:30 p.m., RSVP via Facebook or indyherbivores@indyvegsociety.org

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A guide to farmer’s market shopping, from reselling to growing practices

BY K A TY CA RTER EDITORS@NUVO.NET

I

t’s a Saturday morning in June. You sleep in a bit, check the weather and ponder your options for the weekend. The heat is yet bearable, and a good cup of coffee is calling your name — so it seems the best way to start your day is to grab a hat and sandals, tuck a reusable shopping bag under your arm and head to your nearest farmer’s market. You’ve been wanting to eat more locally, and is there a more pleasant way to spend a weekend morning (or weekday lunch) than strolling among the quaint tabletop bounty of central Indiana farms? Or to try another scenario, perhaps you are much more intentional when it comes to being a locovore. You want your produce both local and sustainably-grown. Chemicalfree when possible. The farmer’s market is a weekly venture, just another stop on your list of errands. You might even plan your meals around the seasonal produce. No matter the shoe that fits — if you visit a farmer’s market, a few simple questions could go a long way. 1) Did you grow this (or did you make this, in the case of value-added products like prepared foods)?

Think the answer to this question is a given? Think again. Some area markets allow resellers, or vendors who could be selling everything from their next door neighbor’s asparagus (she has plenty to spare, but doesn’t farm enough to be a vendor herself) — to produce that’s purchased at wholesale auction and possibly shipped in from outof-state (sometimes, the very same provider who supplies your local chain grocery store). “Unless customers are asking questions, there’s the illusion that everything

PHOTO BY MARK LEE

Kids are welcome — but not available for purchase at markets like the Noblesville Farmers’ Market, shown here.

at market is local,” said Maria Smietana, former market manager of the Trader’s Point Creamery Green Market, and now manager of the new Farm to Fork Market at Normandy Farms. Maria has adopted strict no-reselling policies at both markets she’s been affiliated with, requiring vendors to sign affidavits to that effect. But not all markets adopt this policy, with understandable reasons. From a market manager’s perspective, allowing resellers is a way of diversifying offerings at market. For instance, growing berries in Indiana can be challenging for many small farmers, so bringing berries in from larger farms is a good way to provide a broader range of produce.

LOCAL MARKETS Binford Farmers’ Market Allows limited reselling: some vendors sell items produced by friends or family. No reselling from auction or wholesale. Saturdays, 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 62nd Street and Binford Blvd. Broad Ripple Farmers’ Market Allows limited reselling at the discretion of the market manager — but only from an Indiana farm (or farm within 100 miles of Indianapolis). Vendors are required to label the resold produce with the name and location of the farm.

“We allow limited reselling to provide our customers with a wide variety of local produce — items that would otherwise not be available (or available in sufficient quantities) at our market,” explains Barbara Wilder, market manager at the Broad Ripple Farmer’s Market. “The best example is strawberries. Berry producers often have a fairly short season, and when their fruit is in season, they are often too busy with U-pick and getting product to their established customers to staff farmers markets.” But when products being resold are purchased at wholesale auction, there’s a downside for producer-only vendors: It establishes an unfair price structure,

While not an exhaustive list of the Indianapolis metropolitan area farmer’s markets, you might find your favorite market’s reselling policies below.

Saturdays, 8 a.m.-noon 1115 Broad Ripple Ave. Carmel Farmers’ Market Vendors must grow 50 percent of what they sell at market. Vendors may then sell from other producers, but may not resell items purchased at auction or wholesale. Saturdays, 8 a.m.-11:30 a.m. 5 Center Green, Carmel Farm to Fork Market at Normandy Farms Strict no-reseller policy, enforced by affidavits signed by vendors. Fridays, 4-7 p.m.

7802 Marsh Road Noblesville Farmers’ Market Allows resellers. Requires that non-local produce be marked as such (e.g., “Texas tomatoes”). Saturdays, 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. SR 32 and SR 19, Noblesville Old Town Greenwood Farmers’ Market Does not allow resellers, and all produce must be grown in Indiana. Saturdays, 8 a.m.-noon 525 North Madison Ave, Greenwood

Original Farmers’ Market Vendors must grow at least 80% of what they sell at market. Out-of-state goods are not permitted without approval of market manager. If goods from other farms are sold, vendor must provide in writing the farm information to consumers. No product can be purchased at auction or wholesale. Wednesdays, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. 222 E. Market St. Trader’s Point Creamery Green Market No resellers allowed. Farmers from outside Indiana (southern

Michigan) allowed at market for items such as berries and fruits. Fridays (May-Oct.), 5 p.m.-8 p.m.; Saturdays (Nov.-April), 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. 9101 Moore Road, Zionsville Zionsville Farmers’ Market Allows limited reselling at the discretion of the market manager, and working toward a no reseller policy. Items resold are from neighboring farms, not auction or wholesale. Saturdays, 8-11 a.m. S. Main and W. Hawthorne streets, Zionsville


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In addition to produce, plants and herbs can be found at local markets like the Noblesville Farmers’ Market.

undercutting prices on locally plentiful products like melons and tomatoes. If the small farmer is left with a table-full of produce at the end of the day, it makes it difficult for her to stay in business. So if supporting a small producer farm is important to you, don’t be afraid to ask.

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2) Can you tell me about your growing practices?

Just because something is sold at the farmer’s market doesn’t mean it was grown using sustainable or chemical-free farming practices. There are currently only two area markets that allow either only organically-grown produce (Farm to Fork Market at Normandy Farms) or actively seek out organic/sustainable growers (Indy Winter Farmer’s Market). “I am happy when people ask questions — I want them to ask questions. I don’t feel like there’s anything that I can’t tell my customers about the food that I’m selling,” says Farm to Fork’s Smietana, adding that educating the customer is part of being at market. Of course, some crops are much more difficult to grow organically (in Indiana) than others, such as fruits and berries, which have a hard time with the humidity and bugs. But heat-loving crops like tomatoes can be grown quite successfully without the use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers. So if your goal as a market patron is to avoid chemicals, look for vendors that advertise “chemical-free,” or check with your vendor.

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3) What’s the best way to store/cook/grow this?

If your vendor grew the produce you’re buying, he or she can likely offer a wealth of knowledge about everything from how to grow that food in your own backyard to favorite ways of cooking it. Don’t be shy if you walk past a table and don’t recognize a vegetable. Farmers are usually more than willing to chat, assuming there isn’t a hot and angry crowd of customers in line behind you (getting to market early is the best way to buy some conversation time). And don’t assume that the farmers will pass judgment on your relative lack of vegetable knowledge. “I was 23 years old before I ate kale,” says Genesis McKiernan-Allen, co-owner with her husband Eli Robb of Full Hand Farm. ”If you’re taking the time to come to a market and shop, you should ask questions,” she explains, adding that the only question she tires of answering is whether she picked vegetables that morning. “I have to be at market at 7, which means I left the house at 6, which means I loaded up at 5, so no — I didn’t get up at 3 a.m. to pick produce,” she laughs. „

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The Tour de Tire is sponsored by the Mass Ave Merchants Association. Special thanks to Bicycle Garage Indy and Mass Ave Bikes for donating used bicycle tires and inner tubes for our 24 tire sculptures.

Global Gift’s Tire Feathered Owl was named the Judge’s Winner, while 45 Degrees’ Blue Martini won the People’s Choice Award at the 12th Annual Tour de Tire.


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We Are Hex

WE ARE HEX BREAKS THE SPELL New 7’’, new shows, renewed energy

I

t’s early on a Tuesday evening and I’m sitting at a booth near the front door of The Red Key Tavern, waiting for Jilly Weiss, singer of Indy’s once-promising We Are Hex. I’m imagining that the set up for this interview is almost exactly the same as it was two years ago –– almost to the date –– when NUVO’s Scott Shoger interviewed Weiss and drummer Brandon Beaver in this Broad Ripple neighborhood bar. In 2011, the band seemed bound for bigger and better things –– they’d just recorded a 7’’ with Jack White’s Third Man Records, which delivered the group to the ears of a larger audience and attracted attention from big industry players, like booking agents and marketing professionals. Pieces on the group remarked on their momentum; interviews had members commenting “quitting isn’t an option.” But sadly, at the end of August 2011 they announced an indefinite hiatus, halting just before a string of dates on the West Coast and a September plan to record with Tim Green, producer for Melvins, in San Francisco. The exact reasons were unclear –– a combination of a guitarist’s depature, health problems and then, disastrously, a robbery. The Hex Haus –– the band’s infamous practice space, recording studio and living space –– was robbed, shutting down whatever rumors of a comeback still lingered. We Are Hex went radio silent. Back to the present. A silhouetted figure appears in the doorway, dressed in black with a large, shady hat. Weiss speaks hesitantly as we begin talking, perhaps experiencing a sort of dejá vu. Many were disappointed with the band’s fade from the scene in the midst of so many exciting opportunities. Their recent success playing at LUNA on Record Store Day and a string of regional shows indicates that

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the reconstructed band is twice as fervent. “We had one practice where we played the old songs and it felt like maybe we missed a week of practice, but it didn’t feel like two years,” Weiss says. Looking back from their recent return, whatever happened, the hiatus is exactly what was needed on a lot of levels. The evidence of their new material’s raw potency is contained in the tracks on the new 7’’. Reinvigorated and emboldened, Weiss croons in the title track of Lewd Nudie Animals, “I never wrote a love song and I won’t start soon.” We Are Hex is set to release the Lewd Nudie Animals 7’’ on June 1 at White Rabbit Cabaret. Weiss can hardly contain her excitement at having included two of her favorite bands on the release show bill, Day Creeper and Kam Kama. “I’m really inspired when the bands are really awesome; I guess some people want the bands to be not as good as them,” she says. “I play better when the other bands are inspiring.” During the period of inactivity, Beavers was free to start Fountain Square noise-punks Ancient Slang, one of the most talented new arrivals to the scene. Guitarist Matt Hagan had left before the hiatus and been temporarily replaced. Weiss explains that Hagan needed to go on a soul journey, although her voice is tinged by a mixture of concern and amusement at the possibility that his journey had led him to what might be a cult. “[He joined] this hippie community in

Tennessee,” she explains. “We didn’t hear from him for a while and I have my suspicions… it might have been a cult.” The Hex Haus is no more, but the band –– including Hagan, who’s back on guitar, and Trevor Wathen on bass –– has been practicing and working towards a full-length, a process that seems way past due creatively. And they’re working quickly. The two songs on their upcoming Jon Spencer-produced 7’’ were written immediately after reuniting. “The song is my favorite when it’s taking shape and it’s not structured yet. It still has freedom or unpredictability,” says Weiss. “That’s why I like playing that live.” Their style of noisy rock defies sub-genre labels, focusing instead on that insatiable live energy which ignited their devoted fan base in the first place. This is a group of artists, demonstrated in the wild onstage persona of Weiss and the cultish aesthetics they surround themselves with –– cow skulls, black magic and all things pentagrammed. A darkness, part constructed, part intuitive, fills the aura of We Are Hex. Similarities drawn to Joy Division, The Cure and Bauhaus do their sound no justice: this is music you need to experience for yourself, preferably live. They’ve also been booked to play on June 28 with psych-rockers Burnt Ones on Musical Family Tree’s Listen Local series at Broad Ripple Park. With the support of music industry giants like Jack White and Jon Spencer, they’re set for a rise once again. “I definitely feel like we’re starting where we left off, but maybe we have a little more material to draw from. More ideas. More riffs. More lines,” Weiss says. „

They Might Be Giants have been around for over thirty years, so when they say “We’re going to try something a little more like the old days,” you’d be forgiven for asking, well, which old days exactly? On their most recent release, Nanobots, they’ve reached all the way to the oldest of the old, presenting with a more frantic pace (25 songs in 45 minutes) and darker edge reminiscent of their 1986 self-titled debut and 1992’s Apollo 18. In describing the lead-up to this album, John Flansburgh starts all the way back when they started recording music for ad, television and children’s projects to put his headspace into context. He describes an almost paradoxical feeling of renewed freedom that came with working for clients on things like television projects. “We found ourselves doing a lot more studio work than we used to. I mean, we really became kind of like studio creatures, which kind of liberated us in a way, got us back to our home-recording roots.” Before the contract work, as the band’s popularity rose, they found that “professional obligations kept [them] away from the studio more and more.” So, simply sitting down in a studio to fulfill a contract felt like a return to the days of “writing songs and goofing off and doing creative works for the joy of it.” Of course, it wasn’t exactly the same. “When you’re writing music for a car commercial, there’s no mistaking that you’re working for a client. “It never dawned on us that we might be a little bit burned out from doing just too much recorded work; we had never reached that breaking point.” Flansburgh admits they might have gotten close, though. “As we started [2011’s] Join Us, there were a tremendous amount of false starts and weird failed sessions. At some point it kind of dawned on us that we needed a little more time.” Eventually they found their way back. “Join Us ended with this crazy crescendo of productivity, and from that point on, we’ve been really kind of revitalized in our rock pursuit.” They carried the revitalized furor into this year’s Nanobots. “I think there’s something psychedelic about the way you experience a short song, a lot of the short songs on Nanobots are very produced so they’re almost like jingles for some really crazy idea.” Part of this approach, which he acknowledges partially calls back to the “Fingertips” suite on 1992’s Apollo 18, arises from an attempt to destabilize the way the average listener will hear the album. “It’s kind of an interesting way to create an album that can’t be taken for granted. One of the things about putting on an album, it’s very easy to just be kind of lulled into a set of assumptions, and I think the short songs actually help to open things up.” –– TAYLOR PETERS They Might Be Giants Thursday, May 30, The Vogue, 5279 N. College Ave., 8 p.m., prices vary, 21+

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RETHINKING GIL SCOTT-HERON’S STRUGGLE “When a wise elder dies, a great library has been burnt to the ground.”

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO

I

was reminded of this West African proverb when I first heard about the death of Gil Scott-Heron exactly two years ago. Although he passed away at age 62, it wasn’t a great shock: Scott-Heron had publicly struggled with addiction issues for years and disclosed his HIV positive status in 2008. But for those of us who followed his work, the announcement hit hard. Maybe it was because he was on the verge of a major comeback, having freshly released his first new album in sixteen years. But there was also a sense that a particularly unique flame of knowledge had been permanently extinguished. He’s best known for his 1974 anthem “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,” a heady blend of spoken word and funk that laid the foundation for hip-hop music. The track epitomizes ScottHeron’s potent ability to critique societal ills. I spoke with Rasul Mowatt, a professor at IU Bloomington’s School of Public Health, who suggested we take a deeper look at ScottHeron’s activism and the roots of his debilitating addiction struggles. Mowatt will perform at an event celebrating Gil Scott-Heron tonight at the Jazz Kitchen. A host of other musicians, singers and spoken word artists will join him.

NUVO: Gil Scott-Heron didn’t create many songs for the dancefloor. What’s your approach to spinning at this event? MOWATT: My job as the DJ is to create a vibe or feel. So what I’m going to do is to try to recreate the feel of his era and reference other musicians like the Last Poets who were dealing with similar issues. These musicians weren’t making songs like people do now, they were involved in what was happening and their music reflected that. NUVO: What do you think Gil Scott-Heron’s legacy is? MOWATT: I think it’s important that we view him as more than a musician. We should see him in the same vein as Fela, Bob Marley or Bob Dylan. They were journalists without a newspaper. They were all about using music as a vehicle for social commentary. They used music to bring that commentary to life. Gil Scott-Heron should be viewed in the same way. If we only view him as a performing artist we get caught up

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JAZZ KITCHEN, 5377 N. COLLEGE AVE. WEDNESDAY, MAY 30, 7:30 P.M., $ 10, 21 +

NUVO: Why was it important to you to be involved with this tribute? RASUL MOWATT: I think it’s important for those of us in the arts to recognize those who made an impact on the way we think about culture and society and Gil Scott-Heron is one of those individuals. When he died in 2011 he was not as well known as he was in the midpoint of his life, but his body of work is still having an impact on people today. Whether he was playing in a blues, jazz or R&B style, the lyrical content was always squarely focused on mainstream society’s relationship to race and poverty. That meant a lot to me personally. Even if you enjoy a wide range of music, there may not be a lot of artists that relate to where you’re at politically.

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Gil Scott-Heron

in the music of his social commentary and lose sight of the actual message. It’s easy to be political in your content as an artist. But it’s different to be actually engaged in doing things that relate to what your commenting about. He was speaking not only from observation, but his involvement in the issues of his day. I think that’s something artists need to connect to. Some artists may attempt to imitate him; they may sample his music to evoke his presence. But very rarely do you see artists imitate him in his actual involvement in important issues. It’s time for us to look at his conflict. His body was worn out from years of drug abuse, but we need look at his drug addiction as a byproduct of his connection to and concern for the issues he was dealing with. This event is timely in that sense, as the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) just came out this week. In DSM-5, they finally begin to have a discussion dealing with the effects of racism, which fall squarely within general anxiety disorder but can also be linked to some effects of post traumatic stress disorder. He was suffering mentally from issues of racism, as the DSM-5 now recognizes. „ > > Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net

A monthly Saturday marketplace showcasing local vintage & antique dealers side-by-side with contemporary craft & food vendors.

Applications can be obtained on the website or by calling 317-431-0118.

Be A Shopper Parking is free & plentiful! Rain or Shine.

Saturday, June 1st 9a.m. to 4 p.m. | Admission $5

An Artisanal Flea Market The Glendale Towne Center 6101 N. Keystone Ave., Indianapolis, Indiana

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Fishers 842-8010 Main Event on 96th | 8932 E. 96th St.

05.31 Swagdaddy 06.01 Russ Baum & Huck Finn

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FUNDRAISER Raise Hell for Scott Spitz The cycling and running communities are pulling together to fundraise for Indy resident and ultra runner Scott Spitz, who is battling a case of stomach cancer. Join riders on a bike ride from Broad Ripple to Tomlinson Tap Room, where all proceeds from an organized beer sale will go to Spitz. Then, venture over to Indy’s Jukebox, where Coffinworm, Conjurer and Boddicker will perform. The show is $8, with contributions going towards Spitz’ daily living costs. T-shirt sales, an online auction and other various activities are being planned, with more information available online. Log on to NUVO.net to read more. Various locations 5:30 p.m., donations accepted, all-ages (bike ride), 21+ (show at Indy’s Jukebox) POP Of Monsters and Men Iceland pop group Of Monsters and Men write songs in English because “[English] a lot of sharp corners. Icelandic is [puffing out cheeks] a very wrooooooagh language – lots of errrrrresssooo and brooooguuuh! That’s why it’s so good for metal.” They’re loud for a folk-rock band, adding layers and layers of gang vocals, xylophone, drums, horns, accordions and more. This show will definitely sell out –– pick up your tickets fast. White River State Park, 801 W. Washington St. 7 p.m., prices vary, all-ages ROCK They Might Be Giants The two Johns (Linnell and Flansburgh, both singers) behind They Might Be Giants make music for adults and wee ones. And

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their music for adults often sounds like children’s music, and vice versa. They’ve sold over 4 million records, and will sell more after 2013 release Nanobots. The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 7 p.m., $23, 21+ COUNTRY Tim McGraw McGraw’s packed a dozen albums of pop country into the last 20 years. He’s also set off on more than a dozen tours. See his latest next Thursday at Klipsch, with supporting artists Brantley Gilbert and Love and Theft. Come out early for a special early show featuring Scott Greeson and Trouble with Monday. Klipsch Music Center, 12880 E. 146th St., 7 p.m., prices vary, all-ages FOLK Frank Schweikhardt A bit more from our talk with Frank from last week: “I just quit my job. I’ve been driving tour buses coast to coast the past few years. The biggest band I drove was The Flaming Lips. The last band I was out with was this reggae band from Hawaii. [But] I just quit this job, and now I”m looking to tour this summer, this August. Beyond that, I’m looking to go do something overseas.” Those dates start next Thursday, with a show featuring other Bloomington-Indy musicians Chad Serhal and Laura K. Balke. White Rabbit Cabaret, 1116 E. Prospect St., 9 p.m., $5, 21+ Anais Mitchell, Jefferson Hamer, Do317 Lounge, 21+ Geoff Union, Players Pub (Bloomington), 21+ Indiana Boys, Bill Monroe Memorial Music Park, all-ages

Elenowen, Biergarten, Rathskeller, 21+ Dana DeStefano and Dollparts, The Action, Swig, Beale St. Live, 21+ Marky C, The Mousetrap, 21+ Phyllis, Melody Inn, 21+ Phoebe and The Mojo Makers, Slippery Noodle, 21+

FRIDAY PUNK The Menzingers, Fake Problems, The Restorations, Buttonhoof Raucous pop punk band The Menzingers will perform with Fake Problems, The Restorations and Buttonhoof. The Menzingers released On The Impossible Past almost a year and a half ago now, and not enough damn people are talking about it. It’s a perfectly crafted piece of pop punk from a band that’s shown, again and again, that they deserve to play in the big leagues. The Scranton, Penn.-based band writes about the waitresses that’ve done them wrong and the small mistakes they’ve made and all manner of other everyday people problems –– and they make it sound profound, gosh darn it. Hoosier Dome, 1627 Prospect St., May 31, 7 p.m., all-ages HIP-HOP Local Night Mos Def had to cancel, but bookers at the Vogue are stacking the night with a collection of local hip-hop impresarios, including Nyzzy Nyce, SLFSH, Grey Granite, ATFU, The ProForms, Kool’s Bazaar, DJ Metrognome and DJ Indiana Jones. This event is now FREE. The Vogue, 5279 N. College Ave. 9 p.m., free, 21+ Captain Midnight Band, Funky Junk, Mousetrap, 21+ New Augusta Bluegrass Band, Hearthstone Coffee House and Pub (Fishers), all-ages


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The Flying Toasters, Biergarten at the Rathskeller, 21+ Hawk and Dove, Steven and The Savvy, Ryan Puett, Fletcher Place Arts and Books Cory Williams Album Release Show, Radio Radio, 21+ Souldies with Tony and The Smokes, Stroble, Dapper Dagger, Melody Inn, 21+ Gene Deer Blues Band, W.T. Feaster Band, Slippery Noodle, 21+

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Woodstove Flapjacks

THURSDAY – SATURDAY STRINGBAND John Hartford Memorial Festival This festival was brought forth to remember and celebrate the life of John Hartford, a musician, father and friend. John Hootze, a longtime friend of the belated Hartford, chooses which bands play the festival, most of which knew Hartford themselves. Others are local or regional bands, all of which fall into stringband genre, which encompasses everything bluegrass, newgrass, old-time and folk. Some bands are repeating favorites, and one, The Woodstove Flapjacks, has played the festival all three years. “(Hartford) was a very eclectic individual. His life cannot be easily summed up and his musical preferences were very diverse,” said Woodstove member Travis Easte

“I was close friends of John as a teenager in St. Louis. I use to go to the Opry with him and I jammed with him as he would practice,” said Hootze. “He was at my house or me at his just about every other week or so back in the ‘50s. I just thought that there were a lot of people today that never heard of him or his music and that maybe putting on a festival to honor him might get some new generations to learn about him.” This year’s event offers 10 headlining artists, including Great American Taxi, Larry Keel & Natural Bridge, The Rumpke Mountain Boys and many more. Log on to NUVO.net to read our interview with Hootze and to scan the full lineup. –– CHELSEA HUGUNIN Bill Monroe Memorial Music Park and Campground, 5163 SR 135 N (Bloomington), times vary, prices vary, all-ages

SATURDAY ROCK We Are Hex 7’’ Release Show Day Creeper and Kam Kama will perform at this revival show for top Indy rockers We Are Hex. They’re back together after an extended absence and we thought we’d never see them again. Happily, they’re releasing a brand new 7’’. White Rabbit Cabaret, 1116 Prospect St., 8 p.m., $8, 21+ FEST Recycle Fest A day celebrating the biggest of the three green R’s – recycle. All sorts of environmentally responsible initiatives will take over Garfield Park, including a recycled fashion event from Pattern. But the main feature is the music: local bands will take over the stage all day playing half originals and

half “recycled” (read: covers) tracks. Enjoy Darwin Deez, The Main Squeeze, KO, New Old Cavalry, Hotfox, The Pro Letarians, Rodeo Ruby Love, Blue Moon Revue and The Bonesetters. Bring your blankets. Garfield Park, 2345 Pagoda Drive Noon, $15, 21+ Bonesetters. The Midnight Ghost Train, Beale St., 21+ Otis Taylor, Cana Commons (Muncie), all-ages Moonshine Mason and The Rot Gut Gang, Latitude 39, all-ages Native Sun, Young General, Mousetrap, 21+ Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band, Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians and Western Art, all-ages Owen Thomas, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages Eyes on Fire Album Release, Birdy’s, 21+

TUESDAY UKELELE Jake Shimabukuro Shimabukuro is a virtuoso of the ukelele –– but he wasn’t always a star. It took a well-timed YouTube video of Shimabukuro playing “While My Guitar Gently Weeps,” to catapult him into stardom. Palladium at Centre for the Performing Arts, 355 City Center Dr., 7:30 p.m., prices vary, all-ages

SUNDAY M.I.S.S. Masquerade and Lingerie Showcase, Silver Centre Event Hall, all-ages Woomblies Rock Orchestra, Biergarten at the Rathskeller, 21+ The Lost Boys Tour, Irving Theatre, all-ages

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Jake Shimabukuro

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // MUSIC 23


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SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Kominas

FRIDAY WORLD The Kominas Pakistani-American punk trio, The Kominas, has found themselves in a bit of an awkward spotlight. Not only are they a Muslim punk band – a term seemingly contradictory to many – but they are the Muslim punk band. Born in various places across the globe, but all raised in the United States, the members found themselves immersed in punk culture as youths. “I played in punks bands in high school,” said drummer Abdullah Saeed. “And I loved older bands like The Business, The Addicts, Dead Kennedys and The Exploited. And I hated pop punk.” With the release of the film Taqwacore: The Birth of Punk Islam, in 2009, The Kominas were thrust into the mainstream.

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Despite retaining a relatively small following, the film highlighted their unique position as being both Muslim and punk. Despite all the press, the band was leery of the angle many music writers were taking in their coverage of The Kominas. Many writers tried to play up the differences between Islam and punk rock but the band wasn’t buying it. “I really don’t like dichotomies,” said Basim Usmani, who plays bass. “It’s not really one [ideology] versus the other. We’re not trying expand the horizons of Islam. Islam has traveled a lot farther than our music. Feminism, drugs, etc.: these things were all addressed and represented in the Qur’an itself.” “It’s no longer about merging two disparate ideologies,” said Saeed. “It’s about our musical and cultural roots turning us into unusual musicians and bringing us together. That’s

exactly the problem with the term ‘Muslim Punk,’ ” said Saeed. “It’s confusing. There’s nothing wrong with singing your faith, but we don’t do that.” “Christian Rock is about spreading Christianity,” said Usmani. “Muslim Punk is about taking two things that could possibly alienate you and making something universal out of it.” There’s a host of activities happening Friday at the Indianapolis Museum of Art for their monthly Final Friday event, including film screenings, a behind-the-scenes look at the Ai Wei Wei exhibit and an interactive graffiti tutorial. –– NICK SELM IMA Galleries, 6:30 p.m., FREE, all-ages


SOUNDCHECK

BEYOND INDY CHICAGO Alkaline Trio, Bayside, Off With Their Heads, Metro Smart Bar, May 30 Night Besd, SPACE, May 30 Robyn Hitchcock, City Winery Chicago, May 30 Dead Confederate, Lincoln Hall, May 30 Devendra Banhart, Park West, May 31 Charlie Mars, City Winery Chicago, May 31 Huey Lewis and The News, Four Winds Casino, May 31 SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Casualties

SATURDAY-SUNDAY PUNK Punks Don’t Give A Fest The annual Punks Don’t Give A Fest festival takes a giant leap forward this year, after three years of substantial growth. While the previous two installments of the festival featured almost entirely local acts, this year’s lineup shines with the addition of street punk demigods, The Casualties. The Casualties have been an institution in modern punk since their inception in 1990. Their sound harkens back to the glory days of ‘80s hardcore punk. These days, Casualties fandom has become a right of passage for many young punks. Clearly, considering the sonic nature of the other 28 bands playing PDGAF this year, The Casualties are in their rightful place headlining the festival. Playing with a slightly new configuration, Midtown hardcore phenomenon Pissartist, is clearly the local favorite on the bill.

Ariel Pink’s Haunted Graffiti, Empty Bottle, June 1 The Rolling Stones, United Center, June 3

Representing the local metal scene are heavyweights Kata Sarka and Boddicker. Both bands feature brutal imagery, heavy tunes and an overabundance of the color black. In addition to a score of Pirad bands, like Iafrate and Subatomic, there are a few old-timer groups –– namely Gay Black Republican –– playing sets at this year’s festival. Essentially, it doesn’t matter if you go to all-ages punk shows at the Hoosier Dome or frequently find yourself yourself stumbling around Punk Rock Night at the Melody Inn. Punks Don’t Give a Fest is for all. And at $20 for the whole weekend, even the crustiest of punks should be able to enjoy the festivities. So dust off your old leather jacket or ask your mom to help you sew some patches on your hoodie and come mosh at the Hoosier Dome this weekend. –– NICK SELM Hoosier Dome, 1627 Prospect St. 5 p.m., $20, all-ages

N NUVO.NET/MUSIC

BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

Sharon Van Etten, Millenium Park, June 3 The Wanted, Aragon Ballroom, June 3 Fleetwood Mac, Allstate Arena, June 14 Dawes, Cairo Gant, Pritzker Pavilion, Millennium Park, July 11 Bon Jovi, Soldier Field, July 12

LOUISVILLE Ice Cube, Headliners, June 2 Earth, Wind and Fire, Whitney Hall, June 16 Billy Idol, Horseshoe Southern Indiana, June 22

CINCINNATI Melvins, The Ballroom, May 29 Bad Veins, Sanctuary, June 1 The Lumineers, Riverbend Music Center, June 4 Charlie Mars, Molly Malone’s Irish Pub, June 6 We Were Promised Jetpacks, Fountain Square, June 7 Dropkick Murphys, Bogart’s, June 7 The Composure, Blind Bob’s, June 8 Killswitch Engage, Bogart’s, June 17

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD

Government in Action

• “Consider all the ways we’re taxed,” wrote Maryland’s community Gazette in April -- when we’re born, die, earn income, spend it, own property, sell it, attend entertainment venues, operate vehicles and pass wealth along after death, among others. Maryland has now added a tax on rain. To reduce stormwater runoff into the Chesapeake Bay, the Environmental Plus, taxing impervious surfaces Protection Agency assessed the state $14.8 billion, which the state will collect starting store. Among the most popular products in July by taxing “impervious surfaces” -The Department of Agriculture reportare strap-on cloth diapers for the occaed recently that in four of America’s any land area in its 10 largest counties that sions when owners bring their darlings largest cities -- New York, Miami, Los cannot directly absorb rainwater, such as indoors, i.e., cuddle their “lap chickens.” roofs, driveways, patios and sidewalks. Angeles and Denver -- nearly one home Also popular are “saddles” for roosters, out of 100 keeps chickens either for a • The Washington Post reported in April to spare hens mating injuries -- owing fresh egg supply or as pets, giving rise that the federal government is due to to roosters’ brutal horniness, sometimes spend $890,000 this year to safeguard ... to chicken services such as Backyard costing hens most or all of their back Poultry magazine, MyPetChicken.com nothing. The amount is the total fees for feathers from a single encounter. and Julie Baker’s Pampered Poultry maintaining more than 13,000 short-term bank accounts the government owns but which have no money in them and never again will. Closing the accounts is easier said than done, according to the watchdog Citizens Against Government Waste, because the accounts each housed separate government grants, and Congress has required that, before the accounts are closed, the grants must be formally audited -- something bureaucrats are rarely motivated to do, at least within the 180 days set by law (though there is no penalty for missing the deadline). • It’s good to be the county administrator of Alameda County, Calif. (on San Francisco Bay, south of Oakland). The San Francisco Chronicle revealed in March that somehow, Susan Muranishi negotiated a contract that

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pays her $301,000 a year, plus “equity pay” of $24,000 a year so that she makes at least 10 percent more than the next highest paid official, plus “longevity” pay of $54,000 a year, plus a car allowance -- and that she will be paid that total amount per year as her pension for life (in addition to a private pension of $46,000 a year that the county purchased for her). • The Way Washington Works: (1) Congress established a National Helium Reserve in 1925 in the era of “zeppelin” balloons, but most consider it no longer useful (most, that is, ranging from President Reagan to the Democratic congressman who in 1996 called it one program that, if we cannot undo it, “we cannot undo anything”). The House of Representatives recently voted 394-1 to continue funding it because of “fears” of a shortage that might affect MRI machines and, of course, party balloons. (2) In rare (these days) bipartisan action, congressional military “experts” of both parties are about to force the Army to continue building Abrams tanks -- when the Army said it doesn’t want them and can’t use them. The tank manufacturers, of course, have convinced Congress that it needs the contracts, no matter what the Army says (according to an April Associated Press analysis).

Great Art! • The Jewish Museum in Berlin is currently staging what has become popularly known as the “Jew in the Box” exhibit to teach visitors about Judaism -- simply featuring one knowledgeable Jewish person who sits in a chair in a glass box for two hours a day and answers questions from the curious. Both supporters (“We Germans have many insecurities when it comes to Jews”) and critics (“Why don’t they give him a banana and a glass of water (and) turn up the heat?”) are plentiful. • The weather in Hong Kong on April 25 wreaked havoc on American artist Paul McCarthy’s outdoor, 50-foot-tall piece of “inflatable art” in the West Kowloon Cultural District. “Complex Pile” (a model of an arrangement of excrement) got punctured, which mostly pleased McCarthy’s critics since his recent work, reported the South China Morning Post, has often centered around bodily functions.

Police Report • News of the Weird has reported several times on the astonishing control that inmates have at certain prisons in Latin American countries, with drug cartel leaders often enjoying lives nearly as pleasurable as their lives on the outside. However, according to an April federal indictment, similar problems have plagued the City Detention Center in Baltimore, where members of the “Black Guerrilla Family” operated with impunity. Between 2010 and 2012, corruption was such that 13 female guards have now been charged, including four women who bore the children of the gang’s imprisoned leader, Tavon White. Cellphones, drugs and Grey Goose vodka were among the smuggled-in contraband, and the indictment charges that murders were ordered from inside. (Baltimore City Paper had reported 14 stories in 2009 and 2010 on the gang-related corruption at the center, but apparently state and federal officials had failed to be alarmed.) S E E , N E W S O F T H E W E I R D , O N P A G E 30 NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 29


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TO ADVERTISE:

Phone: (317) 254-2400 | Fax: (317) 479-2036 E-mail: classifieds@nuvo.net | www.nuvo.net/classifieds Mail: Nuvo Classifieds 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200 Indianapolis, Indiana 46208

All ads are prepaid in full by Monday at 5 P.M. Nuvo gladly accepts Cash, Money Order, & All Major Credit Cards.

POLICIES: Advertiser warrants that all goods or services advertised in NUVO are permissible under applicable local, state and federal la ws. Advertisers and hired advertising agencies are liable for all content (including text, representation and illustration) of advertisements and are res ponsible, without limitation, for any and all claims made thereof against NUVO, its officers or employees. Classified ad space is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion.

EMPLOYMENT

PROFESSIONAL

CNO Services, LLC is seek’g to hire an Actuary in Carmel, IN to organize, direct & analyze actuarial research & audits. Pos req a Bachelor’s Restaurant | Healthcare deg (or FDE) in Math, Stat, IT, Econo or rel fld of study & either Salon/Spa | General (1) ASA designation & 5 yrs To advertise in Employment, exp in job offr’d or rel occ, or (2) Call Kelly @ 808-4616 FSA designation & 3 yrs exp. Mail resume Maureen C. Lynch, ATTENTION HIRING: CNO Services, LLC, 11825 N. No experience needed. National Pennsylvania Street, Carmel, IN companies hiring employees to 46032. Ref.#UK0413. assemble products at home. No selling. $500 weekly potential. Info: RESTAURANT 1-985-646-1700 Dept. IN-3210

NUVO and Indiana Living Green are growing once again! Would you like to join our growing team of talented and passionate professionals who are building a conscious and sustainable media enterprise in Indianapolis? Don’t want a desk job? Are you energetic? Want flexible hours? Are you a self-starter? Want to be active all day using your marketing and sales skills while being in contact with customers and implementing our point of purchase strategies? Have a knack for mechanical things and like to be physically active? Do you enjoy people and the opportunity to supervise a diverse group of independent contractors? Then you will love being our Distribution Manager. 25 hours per week with flextime except Wednesdays, our distribution day. Supervision of 15 drivers on 20 routes handling 40,000 weekly papers through 1,100+ stops throughout Indianapolis. We also have two additional free titles that are monthly and quarterly.

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Must have a reliable vehicle and a good familiarity with the Indianapolis community. Please reply if you have a strong appreciation for NUVO and Indiana Living Green. We look forward to talking to you. Please send cover letter and resume to kflahavin@nuvo.net. No phone calls please.

Tired of corporate greed & social injustice?

• Frequent Flyers: (1) Chicago police have arrested Ms. Shermain Miles, 51, at least 396 times since 1978, under 83 different aliases, for crimes ranging from theft (92 times) to prostitution and robbery. According to the Chicago Sun-Times, she is a virtuoso at playing “the system” to delay her proceedings and avoid jail time. (2) Alvin Cote, 59, passed away in February of poor health in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, following a “career” of 843 public-intoxication arrests. • Somewhat Backwards DUI: Danielle Parker was hospitalized and awaiting DUI charges after a crash near Gaston, N.C., in March, even though she had been in the 30 CLASSIFIEDS // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // 100% RECYCLED P APER // NUVO

C Complete l t Classifieds listings available at NUVO.NET

REAL ESTATE Homes for sale | Rentals Mortgage Services | Roommates To advertise in Real Estate, Call Kelly @ 808-4616 MINUTES TO THE CIRCLE! Victorian, 2BD 2BA, hardwoods, lots of woodwork, walk-in closet, big kitchen & master bath. 10’ Available June 1st! ceilings. All appliances included. College students, IUPUI, Ivy $895/mo. 317-523-7652 Tech, Butler. Carriage House Deluxe. 2 Full Bathrooms, All PHOENIX II housing in Utilities Included, Off-Street Subsidized Parking, Security System, W/D, downtown Old Northside historic Neighborhood waitlist is open and AWESOME! MUST SEE! $950/ accepting applications. mo. 317-413-3302 317-730-0930 HISTORIC DOWNTOWN Small Studio. 212 E. 10th St. RENTALS NORTH Clean. A/C. *FALL CREEK VILLAGE* Free parking. $450mo. 3515 N. Pennsylvania, 46205, Call after 10am 443-5554 Equal Housing LOVE DOWNTOWN? Opportunity, Section 8 62 years old or older. Roomy 1920’s Studio near IUPUI Rent based on income. & Canal. Dining area with built2BR & 1BRs available. ins, huge W/I closet. Heat paid. Call 925-5558 for information. Shows Nicely! Large! Views! ***CURRENTLY Brand New Carpet! $475 and up. NO WAITING LIST*** Won’t last long! PIKE TOWNSHIP Leave message 722-7115. Crooked Crk Subdiv Quiet Setting 4011 Westover Dr. 2BR/1BA AC APPL W/D $695 plus deposit 803-736-7188 or 317-937-6858

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NEWS OF THE WEIRD CONTINUED FROM PAGE 29

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passenger seat of the car. She had handled the wheel momentarily because Brittany Reinhardt, 19, in the driver’s seat, was busy texting. (Reinhardt, apparently sober, was charged with “aiding and abetting” a DUI.)

The Weirdo-American Community • The biggest news out of Newtown, Conn., recently -- not involving the tragic shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School -- came when local environmental officials announced on April 29 that they were investigating the finding of “200 to 300 one-gallon plastic jugs” filled with urine in a home “in a state of disrepair.” No charges were filed against the homeowner, but officials sought to assure neighbors and users of the property

that no health hazard was present. (The average person, reported the Connecticut Post, produces about six cups of urine a day.)

Strange Old World • Mr. Datta Phuge perhaps overly personifies India’s national obsession with the beauty of gold. For special occasions, he outfits his “knuckles, neck and wrists” with golden “signet rings, chunky bracelets and a medallion,” wrote BBC News in April after Phuge had also purchased a crinkly gold tailored shirt made for him for about $250,000. The 7-pound shirt (from Rankar Jewellers in the city of Pune) has a velvet lining to keep it from irritating his skin, and he must, of course, always travel with a bodyguard.

Readers’ Choice • (1) Stan Worby, 39, made headlines internationally in February when, dressed as Batman, he hauled fugitive Daniel Frayne, 27, into a Bradford, England, police station. It turns out he was just helping his friend Daniel turn himself in (on an outstanding arrest warrant). In a separate incident in April, the two “friends” were arrested together and charged with burglarizing a garage in Bradford. (2) In a confessional in the

April GQ magazine, the sportswriter Buzz Bissinger (creator of TV’s Friday Night Lights) admitted that his later-in-life fame had enabled a narcissism that caused him to impulsively buy 81 leather jackets in a three-year period, plus 75 pairs of boots, 41 pairs of leather pants, 32 pairs of upscale jeans, 10 evening jackets and 115 pairs of leather gloves, among other extravagances and aberrations. Thanks This Week to Hal Dunham, Thomas Wyman, David Henshaw, and Thomas Goodey, and to the News of the Weird Senior Advisors (Jenny T. Beatty, Paul Di Filippo, Ginger Katz, Joe Littrell, Matt Mirapaul, Paul Music, Karl Olson, and Jim Sweeney) and Board of Editorial Advisors (Tom Barker, Paul Blumstein, Harry Farkas, Sam Gaines, Herb Jue, Emory Kimbrough, Scott Langill, Steve Miller, Christopher Nalty, Mark Neunder, Bob Pert, Larry Ellis Reed, Rob Snyder, Stephen Taylor, Bruce Townley, and Jerry Whittle).

©2013 CHUCK SHEPHERD DISTRIBUTED BY UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE Send your Weird News to Chuck Shepherd, P.O. Box 18737, Tampa FL 33679 or WeirdNews@earthlink.net or go to www.NewsoftheWeird.com.


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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY © 2013 BY ROB BRESZNY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Back in the 1920s, the governor of Texas was determined to forbid the teaching of foreign languages in public schools. To bolster her case, she called on the Bible. “If English was good enough for Jesus Christ,” she said, “it’s good enough for us.” She was dead serious. I suspect you may soon have to deal with that kind of garbled thinking, Aries. And it may be impossible to simply ignore it, since the people wielding it may have some influence on your life. So what’s the best way to deal with it? Here’s what I advise: Be amused. Quell your rage. Stay calm. And methodically gather the cool, clear evidence about what is really true.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Reverence is one of the most useful emotions. When you respectfully acknowledge the sublime beauty of something greater than yourself, you do yourself a big favor. You generate authentic humility and sincere gratitude, which are healthy for your body as well as your soul. Please note that reverence is not solely the province of religious people. A biologist may venerate the scientific method. An atheist might experience a devout sense of awe toward geniuses who have bequeathed to us their brilliant ideas. What about you, Libra? What excites your reverence? Now is an excellent time to explore the deeper mysteries of this altered state of consciousness.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A few weeks ago, the principal at a school in Bellingham, Washington announced that classes would be canceled the next day. What was his rationale? A big storm, a bomb threat, or an outbreak of sickness? None of the above. He decided to give students and teachers the day off so they could enjoy the beautiful weather that had arrived. I encourage you to make a similar move in the coming days, Taurus. Take an extended Joy Break -maybe several of them. Grant yourself permission to sneak away and indulge in spontaneous celebrations. Be creative as you capitalize profoundly on the gifts that life is offering you.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When explorer Ernest Shackleton was planning his expedition to Antarctica in 1914, he placed this ad in London newspapers: “Wanted: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, return doubtful. Honor and recognition in case of success.” Would you respond to a come-on like that if you saw it today? I hope not. It’s true that your sense of adventure is ratcheting up. And I suspect you’re itching for intense engagement with the good kind of darkness that in the past has inspired so much smoldering wisdom. But I believe you can satisfy those yearnings without putting yourself at risk or suffering severe deprivation.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Japan it’s not rude to slurp while you eat your ramen noodles out of a bowl. That’s what the Lonely Planet travel guide told me. In fact, some Japanese hosts expect you to make sounds with your mouth; they take it as a sign that you’re enjoying your meal. In that spirit, Gemini, and in accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be as uninhibited as you dare this week -- not just when you’re slurping your noodles, but in every situation where you’ve got to express yourself uninhibitedly in order to experience the full potential of the pleasurable opportunities. As one noodle-slurper testified: “How can you possibly get the full flavor if you don’t slurp?”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’d rather not sing than sing quiet,” said the vivacious chanteuse Janis Joplin. Her attitude reminds me a little of Salvador Dali’s. He said, “It is never difficult to paint. It is either easy or impossible.” I suspect you Sagittarians may soon be in either-or states like those. You will want to give everything you’ve got, or else nothing at all. You will either be in the zone, flowing along in a smooth and natural groove, or else totally stuck. Luckily, I suspect that giving it all and being in the zone will predominate.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s a thought from philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein: “A person will be imprisoned in a room with a door that’s unlocked and opens inwards as long as it does not occur to him to pull rather than push that door.” I’d like to suggest that his description fits you right now, Cancerian. What are you going to do about it? Tell me I’m wrong? Reflexively agree with me? I’ve got a better idea. Without either accepting or rejecting my proposal, simply adopt a neutral, open-minded attitude and experiment with the possibility. See what happens if you try to pull the door open. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you have been waiting for the right moment to perfect your party skills, I suspect this might be it. Is there anything you can do to lower your inhibitions? Would you at least temporarily consider slipping into a chronic state of fun? Are you prepared to commit yourself to extra amounts of exuberant dancing, ebullient storytelling, and unpredictable playtime? According to my reading of the astrological omens, the cosmos is nudging you in the direction of rabble-rousing revelry. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Where exactly are your power spots, Virgo? Your bed, perhaps, where you rejuvenate and reinvent yourself every night? A place in nature where you feel at peace and at home in the world? A certain building where you consistently make good decisions and initiate effective action? Wherever your power spots are, I advise you to give them extra focus. They are on the verge of serving you even better than they usually do, and you should take steps to ensure that happens. I also advise you to be on the lookout for a new power spot. It’s available.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1948, Nelson Mandela began his fight to end the system of apartheid in his native South Africa. Eventually he was arrested for dissident activities and sentenced to life imprisonment. He remained in jail until 1990, when his government bowed to international pressure and freed him. By 1994, apartheid collapsed. Mandela was elected president of his country and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Fastforward to 2008. Mandela was still considered a terrorist by the United States, and had to get special permission to enter the country. Yikes! You probably don’t have an antiquated rule or obsolescent habit that’s as horrendous as that, Capricorn. But it’s past time for you to dissolve your attachment to any outdated attachments, even if they’re only mildly repressive and harmful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As a renowned artist, photographer, and fashion designer, Karl Lagerfeld has overflowed with creative expression for 50 years. His imagination is weird and fantastic, yet highly practical. He has produced a profusion of flamboyant stuff. “I’m very down to earth,” he has said, “just not this earth.” Let’s make that your mantra for the coming weeks, Aquarius: You, too, will be very down to earth in your own unique way. You’ll follow your quirky intuition, but always with the intent of channeling it constructively. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the following passage, French novelist Georges Perec invites us to renew the way we look upon things that are familiar to us. “What we need to question,” he says, “is bricks, concrete, glass, our table manners, our utensils, our tools, the way we spend our time, our rhythms. To question that which seems to have ceased forever to astonish us.” A meditation like this could nourish and even thrill you, Pisces. I suggest you boost your ability to be sincerely amazed by the small wonders and obvious marvels that you sometimes take for granted.

Homework: Name one of your least useful attitudes: a belief or perspective you know you should live without, but which you haven’t had the courage to banish. Freewillastrology.com NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 05.29.13 - 06.05.13 // CLASSIFIEDS 31


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Indy Pride: 25 years out of the closet