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THISWEEK WTF?

Vol. 25 Issue 2 issue #1149

NUVO.NET

COVER PAGE 10

WHAT’S ONLINE THAT’S NOT IN PRINT? SLIDESHOW: BOURBON BOYLESQUE

WHAT YOU HAVE TO SAY ABOUT WHAT WE HAD TO SAY

Letters to the editor should be sent c/o NUVO Mail. They should be typed and not exceed 300 words. Editors reserve the right to edit for length, etc. Please include a daytime phone number for verification. Send email letters to: editors@nuvo.net or leave a comment on nuvo. net, Facebook and Twitter.

Play ball ... or maybe not In response to Dr. Lou Profeta’s INSANELY popular NUVO.net column “Your kid and my kid are not playing in the pros”, (a criticism of the tendency of some parents to push their kids to excel and specialize in a given sport) we received what can only be described as a buttload of comments. Here’s a sample:

VEGAN INDY

Yep - you can actually find vegan/vegetarian eats in Indy, and there are more options coming. By Scott Spitz • photos by Stacy Kagiwada

Yes, my children all play sports. However, I am that “mean” mom who absolutely refuses to let any of my kids do any travel sports. I have been demonized for this ... my refusal has morphed into “you don’t care about sport!” Quite the contrary, I value sports for what I believe they do for my kids; provide exercise, teach them teamwork, and as older kids sports keep them busy after school and not just hanging out on the streets. I feel the most important lesson sports teach to this generation is how to deal with losing and feeling disappointed. They certainly do not have this experience very much these days.

NEWS...... 06 ARTS........ 16 MUSIC......26

Why do I say no to travel sports? Family time and education. ... Call me old-fashioned, but Sundays are for family, and for me, church.

ASK RENEE VOICES PG. 5

—Gina Goffredo Donatien In our house, we have one child who plays hockey, and one who prefers to not participate in team sports. I would never say to my child who plays hockey, “odds are you will never be a pro”- if that’s his dream, that’s his dream and it’s not my job to kill it. As an adult, though, I must use my common sense and not behave or think like my child. [The problem the column addresses] will not be cured by us all agreeing that most kids won’t play professional sports. This will only be cured by a radical shift in what we see as important in our society - it starts with less buying and more talking, less consuming and more compassion, less aggrandizing of bad behavior like we see on television and in our government, and more celebrating the simple gifts of family and friends and helping each other. —Nicole Nicoliello McKeon

By Mark Lee

THE MILLER TIME PODCAST What’s wrong with the Blue & Yellow Menace lately? Our Pacers’ ‘sperts try to find the answers.

NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME ONE FILM PG. 22

ARYK CROWDER

OUR NOISE MUSIC PG. 28

Our favorite green answer-lady fields your questions.

It’s NOT a rollicking sex-o-rama.

A look at (and listen to) the new Indy Sound Map.

By Renee Sweany

By Ed Johnson-Ott

By Taylor Peters

A Q & A with the Chicago soul musician. By Justin Wesley

STUFF TO DO Events, restaurants, dance nights, open mics, club acts, DJs, concerts, exhibits, book signings, rap battles, cooking classes – if it’s happening, we list it. Check out the “Calendar” tab and defeat creeping boredom.

CAKE WARS VOICES PG. 4 A local bakery served up some icing on the hate. By Dough Whitinger

THE BEST OF THE SEX DOC SEX DOC PG. 35 The Greatest Hits from our online column “Ask the Sex Doc.” By Dr. Debby Herbenick and Sarah Murrell

STAFF EDITOR & PUBLISHER KEVIN MCKINNEY // KMCKINNEY@NUVO.NET

MAILING ADDRESS: 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208 TELEPHONE: Main Switchboard (317) 254-2400 FAX: (317)254-2405 WEB: www.nuvo.net

Miss Honey B’s Bourbon Boylesque played to a sold out crowd to help raise money for Indiana Equality Action and Marriage Equality.

EDITORIAL // EDITORS@NUVO.NET MANAGING EDITOR ED WENCK // EWENCK@NUVO.NET NEWS EDITOR REBECCA TOWNSEND // RTOWNSEND@NUVO.NET ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT EDITOR SCOTT SHOGER // SSHOGER@NUVO.NET MUSIC EDITOR KATHERINE COPLEN // KCOPLEN@NUVO.NET

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Copyright ©2014 by NUVO, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission, by any method whatsoever, is prohibited. ISSN #1086-461X

ADMINISTRATION // ADMINISTRATION@NUVO.NET BUSINESS MANAGER KATHY FLAHAVIN // KFLAHAVIN@NUVO.NET CONTRACTS SUSIE FORTUNE // SFORTUNE@NUVO.NET IT MANAGER T.J. ZMINA // TJZMINA@NUVO.NET DISTRIBUTION MANAGER MIKE FINDLAY // MFINDLAY@NUVO.NET

COURIER DICK POWELL DISTRIBUTION MEL BAIRD, LAWRENCE CASEY, JR., BOB COVERT, MIKE FLOYD, MIKE FREIJE, STEVE REYES, HAROLD SMITH, BOB SOOTS, RON WHITSIT DISTRIBUTION SUPPORT SUSIE FORTUNE, CHRISTA PHELPS, DICK POWELL HARRISON ULLMANN (1935-2000) EDITOR (1993-2000) ANDY JACOBS JR. (1932-2013) CONTRIBUTING (2003-2013)

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VOICES THIS WEEK

VOICES

THE BATTLE OF THE BUTTERCREAM A

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DOUG WHITINGER EDITORS@NUVO.NET Doug Whitinger is a native Hoosier and advocate for the LGBT community in Central Indiana.

cakes and wolf it down in a buttercream gay couple was recently denied binge, would they deny me based on the a wedding cake by a local bakery sins of gluttony? And again, how would that claimed making a cake to they know? celebrate a gay marriage violated its “Sir, before you walk out with that owners’ religious beliefs. A citywide cake, please complete this questionstatute is already in place prohibiting naire so we may determine the intended discrimination on the basis of sexual use and purpose of said cake.” What I orientation. Some local legal experts say do with the cake is not the baker’s busithe statute may not apply, while others ness. If I want to take it home and slathsay it depends on the facts of the case. er it on my naked torso while invoking Regardless of the legality of the situathe blessings of Paula Deen, I should be tion, it’s a shitty thing to do. able to. (But I won’t. Promise.) The couple moved on to another bakReligious liberty provides one the freeery willing to fulfill their request, but the initial rejection must have been humiliat- dom to practice faith openly, but it also ing. Their ceremony would be largely symbolic, provided that our great state denies What I do with the cake them the ability to define their union as marriage. Denying is not the baker’s business. them baked goods, which requires zero legal recognition, is icing on the hateful cake. protects one from being forced to follow By no means do I count myself a the beliefs of others. It entitles you to Biblical scholar, but it’s my understanddeny me a sermon in your church, not ing that when Jesus performed his mirservice in a public business. Perhaps if acle at a wedding of turning water into your deeply held religious beliefs prohibit wine he didn’t confirm the sexual orientation of each guest and he didn’t qualify you from serving a subsection of your fellow citizens you should reconsider whethhow the wine should be used. Rather he er or not to go into business at all. Or at made the wine to aid in the celebration least take some of the guesswork out of it. of the day. He also served he multitudes, State your intention to discriminate right among which were sinners of all styles, in your company name: Body of Christ with loaves of bread and fish. He didn’t Bakery, You’re Going To Hell And I’m condemn the multitudes for needing or Not Tire and Lube, No Infidels Tax Prep wanting the food. He simply provided or White Power Salon and Spa. Then you (as simply as one can perform miracles, wouldn’t have to deny anyone service. I suppose). That begs the question Your non-preferred clientele would know WWJD: Who Would Jesus Deny? they were not welcome in the first place. What would prevent me from going Allowing discrimination while hiding to a bakery and ordering a wedding behind religious texts sets a dangerous cake for my “sister and her totally male, totally straight fiancé,” then bringing the precedent. Where does it stop? Could an anti-gay doctor refuse to treat a gay cake to my own gay wedding? Would patient in a public hospital? Could this bakery deny an interracial couple, a Muslim firefighter refuse to fight a an atheist couple, a couple who had fire at a synagogue? Could a Catholic engaged in premarital sex? And more teacher refuse to teach a Protestant stuimportantly, how would they know dent in a public school? Of course they such things about their clientele? If could. But should they? n they knew I planned to buy one of their

4 VOICES // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO


THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

LIGHTS OUT, ARESENIC AND OLD WOOD A:

Eric, This year, like all others, a foot is 12 inches. As for exciting Earth Hour opportunities, check out One Earth, One Party at Indianapolis City Market benefitting Earth Charter Indiana. For those of you who are in the dark, Earth Hour is an annual event when millions of people around the world switch off their lights for one hour to celebrate their commitment to protecting the planet. This year it takes place on March 29, 8:30 - 9:30 p.m. local time. While the City of Indianapolis has not yet committed to joining the Earth Hour movement, you will find Carmel, Ind., on the list. I was also delighted to see the Indiana War Memorial, University of Notre Dame, and Girl Scout Troop #214 from St. Benedict School, Evansville listed. Other notable landmarks going dark to show their support are the Empire State Building, St. Louis Arch, and Seattle Space Needle. You can also Tweet other landmarks to encourage them to participate. I (@GreenIndy, #AskReneeIndy) added a few local businesses/ landmarks to my Tweets. Whether you’re a business owner, politician, rock star, philanthropist, parent, dog owner, bird watcher, or cycling enthusiast — and whether you’re at home, at a party, or working — you should flip the switch this Saturday night. LIGHTS OUT, RENEE

Q:

Hi Renee,  I am interested in building a raised garden bed in my backyard for veggies. I’ve been reading DIY articles about using cheap, reclaimed wood to make them; however,

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

ASK RENEE ASKRENEE@ INDIANALIVINGGREEN.COM SIGN UP for the AskRenee Newsletter at indianalivinggreen.com.

Q:

Renee, Are you going to catch us up on all the exciting opportunities coming up for Earth Hour?  Are there any in Indianapolis?  Seems like every year there are less and less. I hope you know what is afoot this year! THANKS, ERIC

ARTS

www.historicplainfield.com

BRINGING COMEDY TO INDY FOR 32 YEARS NEW PARKING GARAGE ACROSS STREET

N. COLLEGE AVE. BROAD RIPPLE 6281 317-255-4211

SPECIAL EVENTT

It’s time for a visit.

ERIK GRIFFIN MAR. 26-29

I know that we are not supposed to use treated lumber to prevent any contamination in the soil for the veggies. I’ve checked on Craigslist and have found beautiful reclaimed barn wood options, but I probably shouldn’t use that because they’re treated, right? Can you think of any places I can find affordable lumber to make my beds?  THANKS, LIZ

A:

You raise a good question, Liz. Before 2003 lumber was treated with a preservative containing arsenic, which you definitely didn’t want in your garden. Since then, treated lumber does not contain arsenic, but the new preservative does contain copper. That doesn’t sound as scary, but I’d still opt for a different material for a vegetable garden. Cedar is naturally resistant to rot and decay, and makes for a long lasting, preservativefree wood for raised garden beds. Look for non-treaded boards with certifications, like Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), to ensure environmentally responsible sourcing when selecting cedar. As for using reclaimed wood, I’m all for it. Old barn wood has a lot of character – and it just makes you feel cool. You’re right to question whether it’s been treated and I really can’t answer that — you’d have to ask the seller. Other interesting reclaimed, and most likely untreated, materials would be old palettes and box crates. Regardless of the wood you use, a liner can be used if you’re still concerned about what’s in your wood. Landscape fabric (look for one made with recycled materials) not only creates a barrier between your soil and the wood, it blocks any weeds that lurk below. Happy gardening! PIECE OUT, RENEE

SPECIAL EVENT Nomad Yarns 218 E. Main St. • 317-742-7456

KEVIN POLLAK

Sweetheart Cupcakes 212 E. Main St. • 317-203-5951 The Real Food Shoppe 208 E. Main St. • 317-203-4097 Gear Up Cyclery 124 W. Main St. • 317-203-5045 Clark’s Barber Shop 118 S. East St. • 317-839-0311 Buzz’s Pizza 10 S. East St. • 317-839-2000 Flowered Occasions 115 W. Main St. • 317-839-7331

MAY 8-10

DOWNTOWN

247 S. MERIDIAN ST. 317-631-3536

HENRY PHILLIPS MAR. 26-29

WEDNESDAY LADIES IN FREE THURSDAY COLLEGE ID NITE $5

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WHAT HAPPENED? Compete streets For more than 25 years, Mark Zunk has lived next to Butler University on West 46th Street. In December, he received notice from the Department of Public Works about proposed changes to the “Sunset Avenue Streetscape.” Not mentioned: The plans for West 46th Street included banning street parking, installing sidewalks on the north side of 46th Street and felling of mature trees in Zunk’s front yard. Half of the project’s $3 million cost is paid by DPW, the other half by Butler, Zunk found. He lamented that Butler’s interactions on the project were being overseen by Councilman Ben Hunter, who is chief of staff to Butler President Jim Danko. “I personally know Irvington residents who have been asking the city for improvements, including sidewalks, for years,” lamented Zunk, in reference to Hunter’s district. So far, efforts to save the trees have yielded no encouraging results. “No one can explain why the ‘complete streets’ ordinance mandates a sidewalk through my trees, but not through the yard of Butler President Jim Danko, who also lives adjacent to this project. The only answer I could get came from Rich Michal, Butler’s vice president of facilities, who said, ‘We decided against it.’” Butler officials were unable to comment by press time, but DPW slipped in a reply just before we went to print noting that the partnership is but one of many across the city — including Irvington — that aim to leverage greater purchasing power out of tax money. A Day in the Life of Domestic Violence Outreach Domestic violence remains a scourge across the state and nation. A new report issued by the National Network to End Domestic Violence offers a snapshot of one day in Indiana: In one 24hour period in Indiana, 1,708 victims received services, but 128 could not be helped because local services were unavailable. Domestic violence programs have noted an 18.5 percent nationwide referral increase, which professionals suggest is being driven by the Affordable Care Act’s new domestic violence data collection and reporting requirements. For info on how to contribute to local intervention and prevention efforts, visit icadvinc.org. Mandated health care deadline looms Local health care providers and community organizers have mobilized to connect as many consumers as possible into the healthcare. gov federal health insurance exchange ahead of the March 31 registration deadline. The next federal enrollment period opens in November. The maximum penalty is either $95 or 1 percent of the person’s 2014 taxable income. On Thursday, Eskenazi Health announced it will host another Enroll Indianapolis Day from 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Sat. March 29 at the Sidney & Lois Eskenazi Hospital, 720 Eskenazi Ave. (Free parking at the Eskenazi Health Parking Garage.) More than 64,000 Hoosiers are now enrolled in programs on the federal exchange, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. — REBECCA TOWNSEND 6 NEWS // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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ASSESSING INDIANA’S WATER SUPPLY AND DEMAND A conversation with Jack Wittman, the geoscientist leading a study of the state’s water needs and availability

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B Y R EBECCA TO W N S EN D RTOW N S E N D @ N U V O . N E T

fter hearing experts testify at a legislative summer study committee about the need for a comprehensive understanding of Indiana’s water supply and demand, the Indiana Chamber of Commerce decided to step up and get the job done.  The chamber last fall hired Jack Wittman, a hydrogeologist based in Bloomington, Ind., who has worked with water resource issues on a national scale, to survey Indiana’s available information to help various stakeholders understand the state of the state’s water resources. He is now a principal geoscientist with Intera, a national geo-engineering firm that specializes in environmental issues, water resources, and waste isolation. What follows are edited excerpts of a March 4 telephone interview with Wittman. 

RECENT STATEWIDE POPULATION GROWTH FROM HIGHEST TO LOWEST

NUVO: What inspired the effort to commission a survey of the state’s water resources?  JACK WITTMAN: A fog of uncertainty about what will happen. ...The survey will look at facts, conditions and geography; not just physical landscape, but growth of the economies and populations - they’re going to tell the story.  The last inventory, written by the Indiana Department of Natural Resources, “Indiana’s Water Resource,” was published in 1980.  NUVO: What sort of trend changes are you seeing?  WITTMAN:The state has many industrial users that are no longer here, but they weren’t everywhere — just in particular regions. So water use in those areas of the state is down, but other counties of the state are losing population as new irrigation is increasing use ... In one county, 43 million gallons a day in

A map of the state's population growth illustrates areas that may feel pressure on local water resources. COURTESY OF JACK WITTMAN

the middle of summer when there are 20,000 people.  NUVO: What can the data tell us about water use around Indy?  WITTMAN:If you looked around Marion County and mapped GDP to water use, there is a correlation, influenced by the size of yards and whether there is sod and automatic sprinkler systems.  NUVO: What are the supply and demand issues telling us?  WITTMAN:There are times where the use in counties exceeded or met the recharge back into the aquifer. What

policymakers have to decide is: How do we get the people using the water to alter their uses when there isn’t enough water? ... Maybe particular limits in dry years or, from now on in this area, be aware of and manage how we build new wells.  As a wet state, Indiana hasn’t had to grapple with resource allocation because no one needed to. I don’t think anyone didn’t do his or her job. It’s just that lately, things have gotten more difficult. This survey will help us take smart steps to anticipate the future and use the resources we have wisely.  S E E , W A T E R , O N P A G E 08


THIS WEEK

GET INVOLVED

VOICES

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CASH AVAILABLE FOR CREATIVE PLACEMAKING

The ambassador and the protest Israel Ambassador to the United States Ron Dermer will provide an update on Israel and the Middle East. RSVP at http://tinyurl.com/IsraelAmbassadorRonDermer. Outside, a group will meet at 9:45 a.m. for a peaceful protest against Israel’s treatment of Palestinians — and against U.S. foreign aid dollars that support Israeli military operations.

An upcoming Creative Placemaking workshop aims to help the city's artists, nature buffs, designers and planners work together to build awareness of and appreciation for Indy's rivers and creeks. A mixture of national and local speakers is set to discuss concepts of creative placemaking with the goal of boosting Reconnecting to Our Waterways projects around the city. The workshop, which is to be held from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. on April 19 at the Eiteljorg, is free and includes lunch and parking.

Thurs., March 27 11:30 a.m. IUPUI Library, Lilly Auditorium, 775 W. Michigan St. Turn the power off and your groove on! The One Earth/One Party coincides with the Earth Hour annual global electric shut down. The local party celebrates love of nature and  Earth Charter Indiana executive director (and former NUVO managing editor) Jim Poyser’s birthday. The dancing is sure to be superfly with music by DJ Kyle Long, Sphie Holman and The Threshold Choir, among others. The evening’s proceeds support Earth Charter.

Indeed, ROW is eager to ignite innovative collaboration as it is stewarding a three-year $1.35 million Kresge Foundation grant to support creative-placemaking projects along our city’s waterways. Round one proposals for Kresge funding are due May 1 and must be made through the ROW waterway committee overseeing the targeted watershed.

Sat., March 29, 7 p.m.-1 a.m. City Market, West Wing, 222 E. Market St. (Suggested donation, $10) Are you covered? The Indianapolis Public Library is hosting a series of question and answer educational outreach sessions on the Affordable Care Act. Drop in for one-on-one consultations. Upcoming sessions: Mar 27, 1-5 p.m., East 38th Street Branch; Mar 28, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Pike Branch; Mar 29, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Wayne Branch and Eagle Branch; Mar 29 1 p.m.- 4p.m., Southport Branch. Nature vs. Nurture / Male vs. Female Activist and performance artist Julia Serano. Tues., April 1, 5:30 p.m. Butler University, Pharmacy Building, Room 156, 4600 Sunset Ave. FREE.

THOUGHT BITE ARCHIVE Tax and spend can be pretty bad, but borrow and squander (e.g. credit card wars) is the zenith of all fiscal zilch. (From the week of Aug. 20, 2003) – ANDY JACOBS JR.

NUVO.NET/NEWS Awaiting a transportation funding fix by Jacob Rund Marriage tax debate in auditor campaign by The Statehouse File

VOICES • Road funding study key for Indiana’s future - by Lesley Weidenbener

GALLERIES • Legend Awards 2014 - by Mark A. Lee • Marriage Equality Celebration 2014 - by Mark A. Lee 8 NEWS // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

WATER , FROM PAGE 06 NUVO: So what will you be able to tell us?  WITTMAN:One of the things I’ll be doing is making a Sustainability Index using maps of aquifers to estimate the amount of recharge back into the counties. I can already tell you that there are counties where recharge — the volume of water flowing into the aquifers — is matched by the amount of water pumped out. Longterm if counties are going to grow, they’re going to have to figure out ways to manage their water so they can be sustainable. There are places in the middle of the state where that is going to be important. One of my recommendations will be to have all users talking about how to avoid stepping on each others’ toes. That’s how it works in real life: “We’re over here and we need this much.” “We were thinking about a well here ... “ If those people aren’t even in the room, you don’t know what the future need may be. Those communities are economically linked. The real question is: Where are they located with relation to each other and when do they each need water? NUVO: What’s the projected outcome of all this work?  WITTMAN: One important outcome is a broad estimate of how much water we may need in the future. There’s a process part of what has to happen as well. There’s also measurement stuff with gauging and monitoring. We have some — but not nearly enough — data about water levels and flows. More measurement doesn’t faze a

COURTESY OF INDIANA DEPARTMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES

place like Saskatchewan [which has much more robust monitoring than Indiana] ... The world is awakened on this topic; to compete for business and grow ourselves, we need to know more about where we are limited and how to address that need.  NUVO: The fact that Las Vegas recycles its waste water to drink is fascinating. The fact that the farmers in Imperial Valley this year did not get a water allotment is fascinating — and terrifying.  WITTMAN:The West over the next few decades is going to lose some of its appeal to some kinds of economic growth. Water has become more important in terms of locating facilities and communities. I think the Midwest has to be ready for that.  Indiana is one of the states that could take advantage of the fact that it has, at the state scale, plenty of water. We have an immature approach [to water management], but not deficient in the way we sort out how to handle these problems. So that’s the next phase; getting all these folks in the same room ... I’m kind of excited about it.  There is a huge opening in the world for Eastern water policy ... it hasn’t happened yet and it is going to. Up until this point, we didn’t have one because we had so much water we didn’t need policy. It’s always been wet, so what’s the worry? There weren’t that many people. But when you add a half million more people to Central Indiana in the next 20 years, you’ve got to sort this out. There are just too many users and not enough planning. n

At a recent ROW meeting at Old City Hall, members of the ROW collaborative provided an overview of some of the work that has been done — and has yet to be done — in the group's six phase one focus areas: White River/Eagle Creek; Eagle Creek/Lafayette Square; Central Canal/Midtown; Fall Creek/ Mid-North; Pogue's Run/Near Eastside; and Pleasant Run/Southeast. "ROW’s approach to creative placemaking is to place artists and art at the heart of the neighborhood and community revitalization planning and project implementation," organizers noted in event promotional materials. For more details on the workshop, visit ourwaterways.org. RSVP is required at rowworkshop.eventbrite.com. Organizers also noted that the creative placemaking workshop can serve as inspiration/orientation for people who want to enter Big Car Collaborative's next 5x5 competition. The next 5x5 theme is "re:Connect," inspired by ROW's "grassroots movement to leverage our waterways to strengthen neighborhoods and trigger opportunities for fun, culture, new businesses around our natural assets." 5x5 proposals are due April 27. The top five submissions will compete for a $10,000 grant to bring the plan to life. See 5x5indy.org for more details. — REBECCA TOWNSEND

NUVO FILE IMAGE


An 85-piece ensemble of the area’s finest amateur musicians

FREE PERFORMANCES at the Warren Performing Arts Center, Warren Central HS, 7:00-8:00pm

Tuesday, April 1st Next performance Thursday, May 8

317-726-1607 • indyband.org


y d n I n a Veg Three Carrots’ seitan bahn mi is one of the many vegan options available across Indy.

T

Twenty years ago anyone could be forgiven for assuming the diet of Indianapolis residents was comprised of two food groups, “Fast” and “Fair.” Ask any vegetarian from the mid-’90s. Better yet, ask a vegan. They’ll likely tell you about the desert landscape of options in most major grocery stores, of sparse health food sections (if they existed at all), of traditional food alternatives that were both uncreative and unappetizing. They will laughingly describe the selection of milk alternatives and insult the meat substitutes as a choice between soft tofu and firm tofu. They will explain with rolling eyes the term “Vee-gun” was consistently mispronounced as “Vay-gun.” What

Herbivore friendly menus and restaurants around our city

story by scott spitz • photos by stacy kagiwada they won’t tell you about, however, was the availability of vegetarian restaurants in the city or the oases of restaurants with menus they could choose from without concern of consuming obscure animal ingredients. Yes, things were quite different 20 years ago. Fast forward to today and in the relatively short span of twenty years, the conditions have changed dramatically. Groceries have built out health food sections with plentiful vegetarian options and entire stores are dedicated to health food. The options for milk alternatives can be confusingly extensive and traditional food analogues now include luxury items like vegan pepper jack cheese, vegan

10 COVER STORY // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

cookie dough and vegan marshmallows. Ex-presidents have adopted a plant-based diet along with professional athletes, and the cultural awareness of veganism has swelled to such a state that New York Magazine deemed 2014, “The Year of The Vegan.” Despite all these advancements, markers that Indianapolis might be more culturally progressive than we are given credit for, some things have stayed the same. Most tellingly, Indianapolis still lacks a vegetarian or vegan restaurant, despite being surrounded by Midwest cities of comparable size offering multiple vegetarian restaurant options. Although countless restaurants have begun adding vegetarian and vegan selections

to their menus, no one has stepped forward to establish an all-vegetarian restaurant. The reasons for this can be as elusive as they are obvious, but a few cultural pioneers have begun laying plans to remedy this oversight. Ian Phillips, creator of the locally popular meat alternative “Seitan HighFives,” is the among the cultural pioneers working to open a vegetarian restaurant in Indianapolis. Motivated by the popularity of his High-Fives and the realization of a much greater market for vegetarian food in the area, Phillips began detailing his plans for the Three Carrots vegetarian restaurant just over a year ago. Since then he has hosted multiple sold-out fundraising dinners,


Audrey Barron, right, presents a fully raw version of the Buddha Bowl: Organic spiraled beets, shredded carrots, avocado and sunflower sprouts lightly nested around a raw herbed almond pate over a bed of organic spinach and warm honey cayenne kale. It’s served with lemon garlic tahini dressing.

watched his High-Five’s sales increase and worked to untangle the red tape that marks the path to an official grand opening. Phillips has sifted through the market research, followed the national dietary trends and received support from the experts at Small Business Administration, who were surprised to learn Indy has zero vegetarian restaurants. He believes that the time is now ripe for a vegetarian restaurant to open and experience long-term success. A vegan for 17 years, Phillips will admit that Indianapolis was slow to embrace certain trends such as vegetarianism that are often more prevalent in diverse, urban environments, but he adds that our reputation as a strictly fast food populace is now dated. “I think Indy isn’t as meat and potatoes as we think we are,” stated Phillips. “I feel we are a vibrant city with people up and doing stuff.” He added, “I feel the concept that we’re going to have to make do with Applebee’s for the rest of our lives is not true … I don’t think we’re a backwards city. I don’t think we give ourselves enough credit, as far as what is available and what we can do with it. The city can be and do so much, but people don’t acknowledge it.” To that end Phillips is putting his money where his mouth is and continuing to push for a full-scale vegetarian restaurant with the belief this trend towards

plant-based diets will only continue, envisioning multiple vegetarian restaurants opening in the next five to 10 years. Jessica Suhre, an 18-year vegan and founder of the Indy Veg Society, shares Phillips’ belief that the market to sustain an all-vegetarian restaurant is already here — and the future of Indianapolis vegatarianism will only get better. Started in 1998, the Indy Veg Society was small enough to encompass its members on a call list, but now boasts over 1,700 users between its email list and Facebook page. IVS is an inclusive, vegetarianbased social group that hosts “dine-outs” at veggie-friendly restaurants and offers informational resources via its website, indyvegsociety.org, among other activities. To highlight her confidence in a successful vegetarian restaurant for Indy, Suhre will point to the growing IVS member roster and expanded menus of local eateries around town. “I think the demand is getting there and for places to change a special every week for vegans — that’s huge,” said Suhre. “They know we’re out there, we just need to convince them that a fullfledged restaurant is going to work.” To prove Suhre’s perception of a demanding vegetarian market, one only needs to visit Thai Taste’s vegan buffet the third Thursday of every month S E E , V E G A N , O N P A G E 12 NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // COVER STORY 11


Grilled tofu salad with Sriracha-balsamic vinaigrette, seitan High Fives and cookies and cream cake are part of Ian Phillips’ (below) menu at Three Carrots.

VEGAN , FROM PAGE 11 where table space is often shared amongst strangers and a wait-time is common. The same goes for Spice Nation’s mostly vegan buffet held every Thursday, and is a popular gathering for IVS meet-ups. The last themed vegan event planned by IVS, a vegan Valentine’s Day dinner, sold out as soon as it was posted online. The reasons for this rise in vegetarian popularity are debatable, but the ease of information sharing through social media has undoubtedly played a part. Phillips pointed out the same ethical and environmental issues related to animal agriculture still resonate today, but the ability to influence others via social media around these concerns has only expanded. That expanded sharing ability is coupled with a greater number of celebrities adding to the exposure, from ex-president Bill Clinton to Ellen Degeneres to Jay-Z influencing a new generation of vegetarians and vegans. Even Michael Pollan, foodie author and meat eater, contributing to the discussion of food in general has raised the overall awareness and acceptance of vegetarianism. These dynamics have been playing out around the country

for years, so why Indianapolis is just finally coming around is still a bit of a mystery. Indy may be slow to join the conversation, but that doesn’t mean we have never been on the same page as the West Coast when it comes to vegetarian dining. Few know better about what it takes to make a vegetarian restaurant work than Duos co-owner Becky Hostetter,

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who created and ran the vegetarian restaurant Essential Edibles in the ‘80s. Hostetter established the restaurant when the consciousness of the city was less accepting than it is today and yet, even then, the restaurant experienced success, which Hostetter attributed to quality food and direct customer interaction rather than a strong demand for vegetarian options. As the vegetarian

yin to the meat-based yang of Duos, Hostetter explained the closure of Essential Edibles was due to the learning curve of actually running a financially growing business. She has watched the development of progressive culture in Indy grow, enabled by the connectivity of social media, and feels the talent pool is now being filled with young entrepreneurs who have both the drive and culinary experience to establish another successful, long-term vegetarian restaurant. “A vegetarian restaurant is going to come. It has to be a certain attitude about trusting the city and trusting our population,” Hostetter said. That attitude for Hostetter has involved trust, but also a good dose of fortitude. She confesses it’s a challenge cutting a new path in a city slow to accept social change, but also admits to enjoying that challenge, both in running a successful business and in convincing people to expand their culinary horizons. Hostetter doesn’t necessarily like to fly the vegetarian flag as a marketing tool, but will intentionally point out the meal a customer just thoroughly enjoyed did not contain animal products or that the produce in their salad and on their burger came from a local farm. Hostetter SEE, VEGAN, ON PAGE 14


Duo’s food trucks, above, have expanded to brick and mortar locations with its newest location opening in Eskanazi Health. Right: Potato Tofu Rosti, with ginger, honey tofu topped with ginger tomato chutney, cilantro, and sesame seeds, side of mixed vegetables, Vegan Balance Bowl of tofu, spinach, brown rice, black beans, scallions, red peppers, cilantro dressed with Duos and a vegan chipotle sauce.

VEGAN , FROM PAGE 12 sees her challenges overcome through the value of good food and equally good customer interaction, which she feels all future vegetarian restaurant entrepreneurs need to keep in mind. With Duos expanding from their food truck to a brick and mortar location and another coming location inside the new Eskenazi Hospital, Hostetter is in a fortunate position with respect to the city’s vegetarian market. Although Duos does not have an extensive 10-year expansion plan, she feels there will only be progression with the vegetarian market and the up-and-coming culinary entrepreneurs will have a supportive community to feed. “Just get down and do the dirty work,” Hostetter advised. “I really think that if you know your audience and keep communication and be present … they’ll want to know you … and the more you’ll have a personal relationship with the people you are cooking for.” Admittedly, despite their hopeful outlook, not everyone is unreservedly confident in the Indianapolis vegetarian market. Nick Keener, creator of the vegan specials at The Sinking Ship, has bounced back and forth between Indianapolis and Minneapolis for the past 17 years, getting a taste for both cultures. Minneapolis boasts an all-vegetarian restaurant, all-vegan restaurant and countless veggie/ vegan-friendly options around the city. Keener has taken the influence of Minneapolis vegan options and adapted them to the menu at The Sinking Ship, and although some of them have

become best sellers for the bar/restaurant, he still isn’t sure Indy is ready to accept a restaurant that is limited to only vegetarian options. Keener attributes part of the success of The Sinking Ship to its offerings for everyone, omnivores and herbivores both. He believes a restaurant that excludes the omnivore niche is still going to struggle in the Indianapolis market despite the growing acceptance of vegetarian eating habits over the years. Sharing in Keener’s apprehension is WB Pizza founder, Will Barnes, who has been in the restaurant business for decades. But his co-owner and wife, Kathy Arensman, disagrees. An ethical vegetarian since 1978 and an “evolved” vegan since 1991, Arensman passionately wants a vegetarian restaurant to open in Indianapolis and has pledged her support for such an endeavor. In the meantime, she has expanded the options for vegetarians by adding options to the WB Pizza menu such as “The Vegan” pizza, a vegan stromboli, vegan pastas and salads. What Arensman and Barnes do agree upon is that any successful vegetarian restaurant will have to be based primarily on quality food. “What it would take for it to be successful is to make the food good enough that carnivores and omnivores want to eat it too,” Arensman stated. Barnes and Arensman have taken that approach with the options they offer to all their customers, relying on quality ingredients and not using meat substitutes. Barnes doesn’t want his food to pretend it is something it isn’t, but wants to offer something for everybody. Supporting their approach to quality food are the newly vegetarian customers

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Arensman says have made the transition to vegetarianism because of health concerns instead of concern for animal welfare. Made popular by an increasing number of celebrities and professional athletes, the focus on health has influenced more and more individuals to adopt a vegetarian/vegan diet or compelled omnivores to seek out vegetarian options on an intermittent basis. “I think in Indianapolis the progression is health-related, not ethical,” said Arensman. “We have customers who are in their 50s and are thinking about how to be healthier and live longer…older vegans are doing it for their health.” If Arensman is correct that health concerns will expand the vegetarian market in Indianapolis and create a successfully long-term restaurant for herbivores, then Audrey Barron is on the right path. Barron, an on and off vegetarian since 2005, is set to open Ezra’s Enlightened Cafe this May. The all-vegetarian, gluten-free cafe, and almost vegan except for the use of honey, will offer mostly raw food that has not been heated over 120 degrees, which is meant to preserve the nutritional density of the food’s ingredients. The offerings will also be completely organic. Barron admits it might be a risk to open a fringe market restaurant, not to mention a fringe of the fringe, in a city where most people come from the country, bringing along their ingrained, well-worn eating habits, but she also believes the awareness and demand for healthy food has hit something of an apex. Not only was her Kickstarter fund

INDIANAPOLIS VEGETARIAN FRIENDLY RESTAURANT LOCATIONS Three Carrots  900 Block of South Meridian (build in process) Opening Summer 2015 threecarrots.wordpress.com Facebook: Three Carrots Duos 2960 North Meridian Street & Eskenazi Public Health Hospital (opening date TBD) duosindy.com Facebook: Duos Indy WB Pizza 6165 Allisonville Road & 2290 W. 86th St. wbpizza.com The Sinking Ship 4923 N. College Ave thesinkingship.com Facebook: The Sinking Ship Ezra’s Enlightened Cafe 6516 Ferguson St. Opening May 2014 ezrasenlightenedcafe.com Facebook: Ezra’s Enlightened Cafe Indianapolis Vegetarian Society indyvegsociety.org Facebook: Indianapolis Vegetarian Society


drive successful, bringing in over $10,000 of start up capital, but the response she has received from potential customers has been more than encouraging. “I have a good pulse for what people are wanting,” Barron declared. “I’ve had people come to me in tears after announcing this.” Her health-focused approach to vegetarianism has developed such positive response that people are calling everyday with the perception the cafe has already opened. Barron has even compiled a list of individuals who want the cafe to succeed so much they offered to volunteer when the doors are open. A personal chef for many years, Barron wants to create a restaurant that offers high-quality food that is an alternative to traditional Midwestern fare such as fast food and heavily processed ingredients. Barron believes the state’s health problems are due to poor eating habits and wants to offer food that doesn’t just avoid bad health, but creates good health. She is, however, facing the same red tape that Ian Phillips and most restaurant entrepreneurs must navigate before bringing their ideas to fruition. Ezra’s Enlightened Cafe was originally set to open in October of 2013, but was pushed back to January of this year and is now scheduled for May, due primarily to obtaining various build permits. Logistics not withstanding, Barron

Indianapolis Vegetarian Society: Danielle Etter, Dave Rowe, Nicole Keller, Erin Houge, Marlene Dorfman, Jessica Suhre at their March 22 Indianapolis observance of the Great American Meatout at Big Car Service Center.

is ready to open the cafe, but admits she would not have tried this five years ago as she did not feel Indy was ready for such a culinary innovation. With the advancement of social media and a wider consciousness of food issues, she is more optimistic about Indianapolis’ vegetarian culture. “I can see Indianapolis becoming the Portland, Oregon of the Midwest,” Barron said. “I hope we get tons of vegetarian

restaurants, more local foods, a farmer’s market feel, using local farmers and produce. I see it happening. It’s going to take awhile…we tend to be a little slower, but I think it’s going to happen.” The Portland, Oregon of the Midwest may be pie-in-the-sky thinking, but it does express how the new wave of vegetarian entrepreneurs feel about Indy’s culinary and cultural future. There is less self-doubt about opening a cultur-

ally progressive restaurant and the naysayers have given way to a much more encouraging community. The idea that Indianapolis is a backwards, backwoods haven of old thinkers is giving way to the belief that we actually are a “World Class City”, influenced by the arts more than sports and that maybe the notion that we can’t take cultural and financial risks was all just a matter of a self-fulfilling prophecy. A perfect storm seems to be brewing in Indianapolis for vegetarian restaurants. It made its way around the country for years and has finally blown into our area, bringing a mixture of food issue awareness, innovative and driven young entrepreneurs, and the vision to create a culture that is as diverse and progressive as most capital cities tend to be. It may be far-fetched to say that a vegetarian restaurant or two will bring Indianapolis into the modern era of urban living, but it does indicate our willingness to embrace the fringes of popular culture and shed some of the perceptions those living outside the Midwest tend to have about us. And even if the red tape insurmountably entangles the restaurant entrepreneurs this time around, at least there are plentiful menu additions, milk alternatives and vegan marshmallows to tide the vegetarian/vegan community over until the next attempt. n

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REVIEWS LOOKING AFTER MINIDOKA: AN AMERICAN MEMOIR BY NEIL NAKADATE Indiana University Press

BOOKS

MY LIFE AS A SILENT MOVIE: A NOVEL My Life as a

Silent Movie

BY JESSE LEE KERCHEVAL Indiana University Press e

A N ov e l

Exactly 50 years after I made my first trip to Paris, the exhilaration of that memory came rushing back with Kercheval’s compelling yarn, which she spins like the finest gossamer, both revealing and hiding the truth. When her husband and 8-year-old daughter are killed in a car accident Emma retreats into unabated grief, having never reconciled the fairly recent deaths of her parents. The appearance of her not-so-loved aunt and her revelation of Emma’s status as an ‘adopted child’ propels Emma into a whirlwind set of flights from her Midwest home to New York City to Paris, to Moscow, and back to Paris. We’re with her through it all — angry, reckless, mad with rage, trying to recoup some semblance of family and self-identity. Is what transpires possible, plausible, permissible given ‘the facts’? In this finely-wrought odyssey of reconstructing a life while tracing birth parents, Kercheval’s prose reads like woof scuttling feverishly to fill in the warp. Jesse Lee KerchevaL

— RITA KOHN

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A HOOSIER ‘ARTIST’S ARTIST’

e With Looking for Minidoka, Neil Nakadate graciously invites us into his maternal Marumoto and paternal Nakadate family story, from their compelling reasons for separate 19th-century immigrations from Japan to Portland, Ore., and onward throughout two World Wars to the fourth generation on U.S. soil. “This is a Japanese story, a story of origins and imagination, and ambition, and hope,” writes Nakadate. “And insiders and outsiders, trauma and silent tears. It is a story of what it can mean in America to be from somewhere else.” Tears and laughter, defeat and hope are equally the reader’s as she moves through the decades in a place that wants the labor but hesitates to embrace the one who labors. U.S. treatment of Japanese Americans is not an example of sterling humanity. Nakadate rises above rant to relate the deep hurts that spiral into Minidoka, the South Dakota internment camp where second and third generations of Americans of Japanese heritage were held from 1941 to 1945. Poetic yet sharply honest, the family story unfolds within the larger context of the national saga. You’ll wince but read it anyway. Your soul will be better for it.

THIS WEEK

A new biography makes the case for artist and advocate William J. Forsyth

R

BY RI TA K O H N RKOHN@NUVO.NET

achel Berenson Perry’s sunny personality shines through in her richly illustrated and effectively balanced book on William J. Forsyth (1854-1935). The biography finally brings Forsyth the notice he deserves as an artist, teacher and advocate of other artists. We truly come to know him as a person who never wavered from an early passion for making art and who persevered in getting the training he believed he needed to gain recognition. Forsyth was part of the renowned Rachel Berenson Perry “Hoosier Group” of Indiana artists along with J. Otis Adams, Otto Stark, Richard Gruelle and T.C. Steele, who over-shadowed them all then as now. It was a group striving, as Perry puts it, “to establish a distinctly American school of painting.” An historical marker denotes Forsyth’s Irvington home at 15 S. Emerson Ave. NUVO: What especially drew you to share Forsyth’s story? RACHEL BERENSON PERRY: I always admired Forsyth’s willingness to be experimental with his paintings. He roared against modern art, yet several of his prizewinning pieces (“The Red City,” “The Last Gleam,” and “Moonrise and Twilight”) expressed a personal vision rather than depicting an identifiable place, aligning them with modern sensibilities. Forsyth’s fiery personality, documented by his ample collection of well-written letters housed at the Indiana Historical Society, provides an interesting take on the early 1900s art scene in Indiana. NUVO: What surprised you as you researched and pondered the writing? PERRY: There were a lot of contradictions in Forsyth’s life and character, and he wasn’t afraid to express his views. When I first started reading his letters, I found

PHOTO COURTESY INDIANA UNIVERSITY PRESS

“Red City,” by William J. Forsyth is among the paintings in William J. Forsyth: The Life and Work of an Indiana Artist. VISUAL

WILLIAM J. FORSYTH: THE LIFE AND WORK OF AN INDIANA ARTIST AUTHOR: RACHEL BERENSON PERRY PUBLISHER: INDIANA UNIVERSITY PRESS, FEBRUARY 2014 SUGGESTED PRICE: $35

BOOK SIGNINGS AND PROGRAMS: • M A R C H 2 7 , 6 P . M .: P R O G R A M A N D BOOK SIGNING AT FINE ESTATE ART, 59 14 N . C O L L E G E A V E . • A P R I L 5 , 6 - 8 P . M .: F O R S Y T H E X H I B I T A N D BOOK SIGNING AT BROWN COUNTY ART GALLERY, NASHVILLE • J U N E 10 , 6 :3 0 P . M .: B O O K S I G N I N G A T BOOKMAMA’S IN IRVINGTON

them to be arrogant and off-putting. But he was fully aware of his own shortcomings and, like all of us, went through periods of self-doubt and remorse. He was ambitious and competitive with other artists (especially T. C. Steele),

severe with his students, and judgmental of his acquaintances. But his loyalty and warmth for his family and close friends was exemplary. By the end of the project, I really liked the guy. NUVO: What especially do you want to happen as a result of your book? PERRY: William J. Forsyth has never gotten the recognition he deserves as a ground-breaking visual artist in his own time and as a champion of Indiana art in his writing, lectures and teaching of the next generation of artists. I’m hoping that renewed attention to his life and work may change that. NUVO: Where should we go to view Forsyth on exhibit? PERRY: An exhibition of Forsyth’s work will take place at the Indiana State Museum from Nov. 8, 2014 to March 29, 2015. Adding to most of the images from the book will be important paintings discovered post-publication. The variety and versatility of the work will speak for itself. n


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STAGE

EVENTS Romeo & Juliet Michael Francis conducts the ISO in three Shakespeare-inspired pieces: Delius’ The Walk to the Pleasure Garden, Bernstein’s Symphonic Dances from West Side Story and Prokofiev’s Excerpts from Romeo & Juliet.

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Hilbert Circle Theatre, March 28 and 29, 8 p.m., prices vary, indianapolissymphony.org Modern Spirit: The Art of George Morrison The Eiteljorg is presenting the first comprehensive retrospective of the work of George Morrison, described by exhibition curator W. Jackson Rushing as “both a major American modernist and an influential Indian artist.” An 80-plus piece show will consider the breadth of that work, from early figurative drawings in the ‘40s to abstract landscapes and wood sculpture by the ‘60s — and into a late phase that characterized by “quiet, lyrical and meditative work,” according to exhibition materials. Eiteljorg Museum, March 29-Sept. 14, included with museum admission, eiteljorg.org The Mountaintop “April 3, 1968. Room 306, Lorraine Motel, Memphis, Tennessee. Evening.” Students of history will recognize the dateline for Martin Luther King, Jr.’s last night on this planet. Katori Hall’s The Mountaintop reimagines those final hours, depicting a worn-out King as he works out ideas for upcoming speeches and, in the play’s key relationship, engages with a feisty maid who isn’t afraid to challenge or flirt with the civil rights leader. David Alan Anderson will play King with Tracey N. Bonner as the maid. Indiana Repertory Theatre, April 1-27, times and prices vary, irtlive.com Memphis Broadway Across America’s latest tells the story of a young white DJ who falls for a fetching black singer in ‘50s Memphis. A winner of four Tonys in 2010, including Best Musical, Original Score and Book. Clowes Memorial Hall, April 1-6, times and prices vary, broadwayacrossamerica.com Indy Magic Monthly Kevin Burke, on stage from now until eternity in Defending the Caveman at TOTS, is hosting a sixth anniversary edition of Indy Magic Monthly featuring Ken Abbott, Richard Ribuffo and two Taylor Martin characters: Andrea Merlyn and Rodney the Younger. Theatre on the Square, April 1, 7:30 p.m., $20 adult, discounts available, indymagicmonthly.com

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A VISUAL POEM ON WATER I

B Y K A TEL Y N CO Y N E ED I T O R S @ N U V O . N E T

t’s become an international touring sensation blending intense physicality and evocative visuals, but the U.K.based dance company Motionhouse, performing March 28 at Clowes, started as small as the rest of us. Co-founder Kevin Finnan takes it from the beginning, about 25 years ago. “There were just Louise [Richards] and I and two musicians in a beat up family car,” Finnan explains on a Skype call across the pond. “Whenever we needed to change the lights, we’d choreograph a solo so that one of us could run off and change the lights.” Over time, Motionhouse grew into one of the leading dance theater companies in the U.K., touring multiple productions throughout Europe and the world. The company hit new heights in 2012 during the London Olympics, when it performed one of the largest single commissions for the Cultural Olympiad (a series of cultural events in the Olympic Village) and choreographed the opening ceremony of the Paralympics. “That was massive,” Finnan says of the opening ceremony. “One billion

DANCE

U.K.’s Motionhouse to blend acrobatics, gymnastics and quirky graphics at Clowes Friday

MOTIONHOUSE

WHEN: MARCH 28, 8 P.M. WHERE: AT CLOWES MEMORIAL HALL T I C K E T S : $2 5- 4 0

people saw that. It was an awe-inspiring experience, because you know that you can perform your shows in theaters every afternoon and every night for the rest of your life, and you wouldn’t get anywhere near those numbers. It’s a massive thrill and very humbling.” Building on its reputation for extreme physicality and inventive productions, Motionhouse blends acrobatics, gymnastics and circus in the touring production of Scattered. “We are a dance spectacle company,” Finnan says. “We really push the dancer’s physicality and expand the type of physical vocabulary we expect the dancers to do. Audiences are going to see a company of dancers flying full throttle through a show which is visually quite stunning.” The visuals in Scattered were created by Logela Multimedia, a Spanish company Finnan discovered six years

ago while on tour. Finnan eventually traveled to the Basque country to convince the group to collaborate with him. Founded by a musician and graffiti artist who worked in a street art collective and hosted break dance festivals, Logela matched well with Finnan’s sensibilities. “Here in London, there are lots of companies doing cutting-edge, computer graphic work,” Finnan says. “But a lot of it kind of celebrates how technical it is. What I liked about Logela is that there is something wonderfully Spanish about them. They are quirky and have a surreal quality that really appealed to me. I thought it would be more emotionally engaging to blend that into working with dance.” Finnan describes Scattered as a “visual poem” that celebrates the beauty of water. He views dance as a “beautiful art form” that people can discover “their own meaning” through. “I do a lot of hiking in the north of Canada and Rocky Mountains,” he says. “There is one place in Canada where you stand there and watch the water dribble away, and you know it’s going to five different oceans and that’s pretty incredible. Water is a miracle in our lives.” n


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PHOTO BY ZACH ROSING

Eli Curry and Katherine Shelton perform in Lauren Gunderson’s new play, I and You.

I and You e If you enjoy the smart, funny, almost impossibly aware teenagers in John Green’s novels, you’ll probably like the leads in Lauren Gunderson’s new play, I and You. Anthony (Eli Curry) lives on Pop-Tarts and the music of John Coltrane. Caroline (Katherine Shelton) says things like “Of-course-o-lutely!” and texts her mom from her bedroom even though she’s in yelling distance. On the surface, it’s a coming-of-age story about two high school seniors — one female, white, and chronically ill; the other male, black, and healthy — getting to know each other while working on a project about Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. But ultimately it’s really about the sometimes subtle, sometimes breathtaking ways that strangers of any kind can help each other. The two young actors’ performances are each endearing and complex under the experienced direction of Martha Jacobs. The deft combination of surprise and predictability in Jim Beam’s design of a teenage girl’s bedroom is also a treat. Some people will hate the twist at the end but for me, it bumped the show up to 4 stars from 3.5. Phoenix Theatre through April 13 A Bomb on the Bus r Don’t worry if you’ve never seen the 1994 movie this “Speedy Musical” parodies. The show refers to other movies, too, and is hilarious on its own. As the title implies, some crazy person hid a bomb on a bus. He set it to arm when the bus went over 50 mph, and to detonate when the bus went back below that speed. I don’t know what made writer/ composer Paige Scott decide to turn the action flick into a musical theatre piece, but I’ve been looking forward to it since she previewed the opening song at Q Artistry’s 2012 Playwrights Festival. Her original book and music is fresh, funny, and satisfying, and for the most part, the performers deliver it well. Dave Ruark is a special gem as the hook-handed terrorist. The obviously low-budget set embraces and surpasses its limitations, adding another layer of wit. The cheerful, cartoon-y bus thrusts into the audience while other scenes take place on levels above and around it. Charming bits of choreography become funny in the cramped bus space. Still, the show lost a star because of uneven sound. Only three of eight singers have working microphones, and while the three-piece band sounds great, it overpowers the un-miked singers. Irvington Lodge through April 5 — HOPE BAUGH NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // STAGE 19


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FIRST FAMILY OF JAZZ

Dad Ellis and son Wynton chat with us ahead of a rare Marsalis Family gig

E

B Y SCO TT SH O G E R SSHOGER@N U VO . N ET

llis Marsalis, Jr. — the paterfamilias of the jazz-playing Marsalis clan — says he was “never big on family bands.” Maybe that’s why even after the Marsalis family performed together for the first time during a retirement celebration for Ellis in 2001, they still don’t play as a family all that often. The sole date on their online schedule is their Clowes Hall show. And then they’ll go their separate ways: Wynton with his Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra; Ellis, Branford and Jason with their respective quartets; Delfeayo with the Uptown Jazz Orchestra; spoken word artist Ellis III to wherever it is that he issues his oracular judgments on American life (Wynton will have more on that in a minute). In short, all the Marsalises lead busy professional and personal lives, so it’s only when Ellis is “interested in doing it,” according to Wynton, that they get together for another show. “He’s at the stage now of his life where we try to get together and touch base with him,” he adds. I talked with both Ellis and Wynton this week: Ellis from New Orleans; Wynton from somewhere on the road between San Francisco and Ames, Iowa (he prefers not to fly when he has a choice). The results are as follow, but a quick bio seems in order: Born in New Orleans in 1934, Ellis Marsalis, Jr. came up as jazz pianist, playing in a modern style that wasn’t obviously indebted to Dixieland and R&B, before moving into education, eventually teaching on both a high school and university level, notably at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts. He and his wife, Delores, have six sons, five of whom will perform at Clowes. There’s Branford, an adventurous saxophonist who’s worked with Art Blakey, Sting and the Grateful Dead and briefly served as musical director for The Tonight Show. Wynton, a nine-time Grammy winner, long-time artistic head of Jazz at Lincoln Center and notorious contrarian. Ellis, who contributes spoken word monologues to some Marsalis Family gigs. Trombonist Delfeayo, who has followed directly in his dad’s path in becoming a New Orleans-based educator. And drummer Jason, the youngest Marsalis, who has spent more time per20 STAGE // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

forming with his dad than any other son. Feel free to consult Wikipedia or, hell, the Grove Dictionary of Music for more information; for now, to the interviews!

Wynton Marsalis NUVO: So, who calls the shots at a Marsalis Family show? Your dad? WYNTON MARSALIS: Yeah, we go along with him, whatever he wants. He sacrificed for us so much, we have so much respect for him that it’s not a problem. NUVO: Is there any different sort of chemistry when playing with your family vs. playing with other talented musicians? WYNTON: We all grew up listening to our father’s music. But for Branford and I, it’s different because we grew up playing together. We didn’t play with Delfeayo so much because he’s younger than us. And Jason was two when I left home. He’s such a talented musician, with his hearing and the understanding of the concepts of what we play. He grew up playing with my father, so I’m sure there’s a chemistry between them. Jason was at a much higher level at a much younger age than we were. In high school, Branford and I played in funk bands, played more popular music, and we would sit in with our father every now and then, but we weren’t really qualified; he would just let us play. Whereas Jason at 13 or 14, he really could play; he could play a gig. NUVO: But you were playing classical with a symphony at the time... MARSALIS: It’s much easier to play your a Haydn concerto than to play your own solo on the charts my father was playing. NUVO: Was there much sibling rivalry growing up? WYNTON: Not for me. We played different instruments, and I was always practicing, working hard; it didn’t really make a difference to me. When we became younger men, then we had more of it than we had before. It’s a natural part of families. But we don’t have that at this age, of course. Once you have grown kids, you mature faster. If you’re still dealing with that as a grown man, a middle-aged man, you need to see a therapist.

NUVO: What have you taken from your dad, in terms of teaching, music, anything else?

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JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA WITH THE MARSALIS FAMILY WHEN: MARCH 29, 8 P.M. WHERE: CLOWES MEMORIAL HALL T I C K E T S : $6 3- 9 9 , C L O W E S H A L L . O R G

NUVO: Do you ever bounce ideas or music off of any of your family members? WYNTON: I talk with my father all the time about music and ideas — and with my other little brother who’s not playing music. His name is Ellis; we call him The Oracle because he knows everything. He’s probably the only person in America who’s read the Obamacare health bill. When he gives you information, you can go to the bank with it.

Wynton Marsalis

WYNTON: Everything. I had the good fortune to grow up watching him. And it was a struggle growing up; a struggle to feed us, to work everything out; when he was playing music, he played many times for very few people. The whole foundation of everything I know about came from him. He was a guy who always practiced and worked, was very serious about the music. It’s been my honor to acknowledge that it was my good fortune to grow up in a family that had him at the head of it. NUVO: How would you describe his approach to composition? WYNTON: A song like “The Garden” is a combination of downhome, New Orleansstyle music with the sophistication of modern jazz. It was unusual; both him and James Black had this kind of intellectualism combined with the downhome quality of our music. NUVO: When you talk about your dad combining jazz with high art, that sounds kind of like what you do in your own work. WYNTON: Everything I write comes from him and James Black — and musicians I heard when I was growing up. All the time I was going to their gigs. When I was two and three years old, I was in the clubs and listening to them. And I liked them as people; they were colorful, smart, struggling with the culture the way it was, that was in the 1960s. I identified with them. I come from them. I’ve never bought into a generation gap or trying to divorce myself from my elders and all of that. I’m not a believer in that; I’m the first in a generation that doesn’t believe in that. I try to develop on what they did and look at it like a continuum. I consider that they’ve given me a great inheritance. And it’s the same way in your family and the families of all of the people who will read this. That’s a way of life. We all come from families that all have degrees of dysfunction, but we all have great wisdom in our families. NUVO: Why didn’t anyone in the family take up bass? WYNTON: Laughs. We needed a bass player. My father played bass, too. My brother, The Oracle, was a guitar player, but he didn’t want to play and he stopped. NUVO: And I’ve heard that everyone played a different instrument to avoid competition. WYNTON: You heard that right, but we weren’t forced to play. If you didn’t want to play an instrument, you didn’t have to. That’s why my brother, Ellis, doesn’t play.


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Ellis Marsalis, Jr. NUVO: Would you like to play more often as a family? ELLIS MARSALIS: I was never big on family bands. Even when I was teaching, people would ask about that, and I would say everybody needs to do their own thing. Most of the family groups that I saw from a distance in the media, it was always like cats and dogs fighting over some money. I just never did really want a family band, per se. NUVO: Wynton said you thought they were kind of corny.

NUVO: Or your students were like your family, as Wynton suggested. ELLIS: That’s a good way to look at that, but

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NUVO: And then there’s that argument that something was lost when people started learning jazz in school instead of in clubs.

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Ellis Marsalis, Jr.

not all of the students that I taught decided to deal with music at the same level. When I was teaching at the New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, which is at the high school level, the most important thing was to help students make a decision about what they wanted to do in relationship with music. Once you get to the university level, the priorities are different. Once you get there, they’re either already good players who decided they want to get a degree; or they decided they’re not going to try and be a professional every day and want to get some educational credits to back them up.

I’ve never bought into a generation gap or trying to divorce myself from my elders.

ELLIS: I don’t know if I thought that it was corny. It begins to be rather tricky if you’re going to do it from a business standpoint. I had an interview one time with Wynton and I. We were in Japan, and the reporter asked, ‘Why aren’t you in Wynton’s band?’ I said, first of all, if I was in Wynton’s band, the music would be dated, because at that time, Wynton was still a growing musician, and he needed everyone to be on the same page musically with him. There were other factors involved; I was still teaching school. The freedom to move about wasn’t quite the same.

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D’Rivira, and the last thing he played was a Bach fugue. Even some of the older ones: Chick Corea was at Juilliard back in the day; he and Hubert Laws would talk about when they were together at Juilliard. It’s a slow process in terms of how these things come along and how they’re accepted. I don’t know that there’s a wide range of acceptance now, anyway.

NUVO: You have a certain reputation for speaking your mind about jazz and American culture. WYNTON: I had a point of view and I expressed it. As you get to a certain age, you get tired of repeating the same thing over and over again. It’s not because you’re burned by it; to be honest with you, I enjoyed the fact that they got mad. The general opinions I had such disagreement with, which were of such disservice to the general populace — they were so misinformed that I actually enjoyed it. At this point I’m older. I’m in another phase of my life. I don’t have time to spend going back and forth with people who’ve studied the music very little. I leave it to younger guys to do that, and I try to be part of education and part of defining the direction music goes in. But I enjoyed that repartee I had with the cultural cognoscenti, or whatever they go by now. I actually miss those days because things have fallen to such a level in terms of education that I don’t even know if people have that these days. But I haven’t followed it; I hope it still goes on, but I don’t see a lot of it.

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— WYNTON MARSALIS

Either way was fine with me. NUVO: So as a teacher and a father, you didn’t force anyone down a particular path. ELLIS: We had a great faculty. It was three of us, and what we tried to do was to get the students to be aware of what was possible out there. First of all, jazz does not speak to everybody. A son of a distant cousin of mine came to NOCCA to play jazz, but it didn’t speak to him. So he eventually went straight to classical music, and has a big group now called Rodney Mack Philadelphia Big Brass. There were at least one or two people who were really

marvelous pianists — and one of them is a banker, and another is a lawyer. We had a motto among us at the faculty: If a student completed our program and decided not to go into music at all, that’s fine; but if they completed our program, decided to go into music and weren’t able to function, either at a conservatory or some other situation, then we have failed as teachers. NUVO: Someone like David Baker at IU fought for acceptance of jazz in the academy, saying that it was equal in complexity to classical music, worthy of study for young people. Did you face some of the same kind of challenges when you started teaching? ELLIS: I haven’t really thought a lot about it. Some things I discovered vicariously. Chairmans of departments started to realize that if they had a jazz studies program they could get more students into the music department when it came time for budgets. In a lot of cases, it wasn’t about how good the program was; most of those universities, if they had a music department at all, their department was essentially based on a proliferation of European art music, and it had a long history of that. And jazz music had not yet been codified in a way which made it compatible with what else was going on. If you notice today, most of the young players coming out, the top-end players, are all coming out of conservatories, they’re all versed in classical music, and they just chose to go in that direction. Pianists like Danilo Perez; and I just saw a kid two nights ago, working with Paquito

ELLIS: It’s an ‘either way’ situation. I learned a lot from individuals in clubs, and in some cases the club was the only case to really perform what you were interested in. If you were listening to somebody like Oscar Peterson or Horace Silver, if you were going to play that you had to be in a situation where there was rhythm section. There’s some passages in Milt Hinton’s book Bass Line where he talks about when he and Dizzy were in Cab Calloway’s band. During breaks, they’d go on the road of some space they were playing and Dizzy would show him things to do as a bass player in this new music that was eventually called bebop. There was never any one particular way to learn whatever it is that you needed to learn. I don’t think the school is yet the sole way to do that because the curiculuum is not set up for jazz studies in a complete sense. NUVO: Wynton described your music as being a cross between art music and New Orleans tradition, more or less. Does that ring true? ELLIS: I think it depends on what I’m writing and what I’m trying to do. A lot of things that I wrote early on were designed to maximize opportunities to solo, whether me or a particular band I put together. And there were some pieces I wrote that were jazz-influenced, but were what was called “through-composed,” where you have to play it; there’s no improvisational aspect to it. NUVO: How about the New Orleans side of things. Do you try to pay tribute to or reflect New Orleans musical traditions in your music? ELLIS: The quality of your music is going to be reflected in the nature of the culture that you come out of. If you go back and listen to a lot of European music, at various points you can hear that there’s a very militaristic aspect to what is taking place. That had a lot to do with the culture that they came out of. Every now and then I’ll think about how in those pieces, at points you get that [more or less sings “The Imperial March” from Star Wars], that kind of thing. There was no real separation from that until you get to the French music. n NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // STAGE 21


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Noah The ambitious, maybe brilliant director Darren Aronoksky is right back where he started from after the failure of 2002’s The Fountain, making a visually overwhelming epic about an obsessive character searching for truth and enlightenment. (The Wrestler and Black Swan, made in the interceding years, were home movies by comparison.) Russell Crowe plays Noah. PG-13, Opens Thursday in wide release Cesar Chavez Michael Pena plays labor organizer Cesar Chavez in a bio-pic directed by Diego Luna, best known for parts in Y tu mama tambien, Milk and Casa de mi padre. America Ferrera, John Malkovich and Rosario Dawson also star. PG-13, Opens Thursday at AMC Castleton and AMC South Indianapolis Bad Words Jason Bateman (making his directorial debut) is an eighth-grade dropout who enters a national spelling bee via the sort of loophole that exists only in Sitcomlandia. Not that reviews aren’t fairly positive in the early going. R, Opens Friday at AMC Castleton and Keystone Art Sabotage A starring role for Ahr-nold, as a DEA agent infiltrating a drug cartel. R, Opens Thursday in wide release

NUVO.NET/FILM Visit nuvo.net/film for complete movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes

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Regarding volume one of Lars von Trier’s latest full-frontal attack on Western mores

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pity the poor soul that buys a ticket for Nymphomaniac: Volume One expecting a rollicking sex-o-rama. They are going to be soooo disappointed. Yes, the film is about a self-described nymphomaniac. Yes, it features full frontal nudity and explicit sex. But no, it is not erotic. Is it interesting? Consistently. Is it insightful? Um … it’s interesting. Why am I asking myself questions? I don’t know. Nymphomaniac: Volume One is the latest from Lars von Trier, the Danish filmmaker who made Breaking the Waves, The Idiots, Dancer in the Dark, Dogville, Antichrist and Melancholia. The 57-yearold von Trier is widely known as a bad boy who loves causing controversy. Nymphomaniac was originally somewhere between four and six hours long. To make the movie more accessible, it has been cut into two volumes. Volume One clocks in at a quite manageable two hours. Volume Two will open locally in a week or two. Both films are in English. Von Trier was reportedly against the decision to divide his production. The long version is said to be more graphic than the current edits. In both the long and shorter cuts, the explicit sex scenes digitally mix the credited actors with body images of porn actors. So if you’re looking forward to seeing what Shia LaBeouf’s erection looks like, you’re out of luck (FYI: It’s most likely around six inches long and pointy). As for the story: Joe (Charlotte Gainsbourg) lies beaten and bloody in an alley where she is discovered by Seligman (Stellan Skarsgard), a celibate good Samaritan, who takes the woman into his home. Joe turns down Seligman’s offers to call an ambulance or the police. While resting in bed, she tells him about her life.

Stellan Skarsgard welcomes Charlotte Gainsbourg to his home in Nymphomaniac: Volume One. REVIEW

NYMPHOMANIAC: VOLUME ONE

OPENING: FRIDAY AT KEYSTONE ART RATED: NR r

We watch young Joe (model Stacy Martin) on a train, where she and a friend compete to see who can have the most sexual encounters with the male passengers. Seligman compares their activities to fly fishing. Interesting! Joe later becomes involved with Jerome (LaBeouf), the fellow who took her virginity. In the film’s most electric scene, Uma Thurman plays the wrathful wife of a man having an affair with Joe. Uma steals the movie as her character brings her three children with her to confront her husband and Joe, asking for a look at “The Whoring Bed,” because she feels it “will help the children in the future

Banff Film Festival Want to see some new docs about mountain culture, from action sports to landscape worship? The traveling Banff fest will present films over two nights in Bloomington, with proceeds benefitting IU student leadership program Outdoor Adventures. Buskirk-Chumley Theatre, Bloomington, March 29-30, $15 single day, $27 weekend 22 FILM // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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when they go into therapy!” There’s more, including some moving exchanges between Joe and her father (Christian Slater), but I’m running out of space and need to tell you about the penis parade. As Joe tells Seligman about sleeping with so many men she that can’t keep track of them all, von Trier illustrates her words by presenting a series of full-screen close-ups of penises. I’m not talking about shiny, happy penises here — these are mostly unattractive units, looming over the audience, one after another after another … I haven’t seen so many dicks since the last session of the Indiana General Assembly. So there you go. Lars von Trier’s Nymphomaniac: Volume One. Hooray for Uma Thurman. Hooray for the thunderous musical blurts of Rammstein. Hooray for fly-fishing. Sorry I didn’t analyze the movie. Sometimes a reviewer’s job is to skip the critic-speak and just tell people what they’re in for. n

Duck Soup (1933) A Marx bros classic, presented in 16mm with reasonably priced refreshments. Garfield Park Arts Center, March 29, 7 p.m., $5, gpacarts.org


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CONTINUING Divergent r Did you see The Hunger Games? Well here it is again, more or less. This time the post-apocalyptic society has divided the population into groups based on dominant character traits. Young adults take tests that tell them what group would best suit them, but they decide for themselves which group to join. The government fears “divergents” — individuals that can function in any group. Young Tris (Shailene Woodley) is such a person. In boot camp she encounters troubles — and intrigue — while getting acquainted with her tough-as-nails but dreamy instructor (Theo James). Kate Winslet plays the baddie. Lots of action, lots of angst. It’s fine for what it is. PG-13, In wide release The Grand Budapest Hotel q A creation this engaging, funny, melancholic and agreeably odd deserves to be seen now — and on the big screen. It’s the eighth feature film by writer-director Wes Anderson, whose visual style I’ve compared to pop-up books, dioramas, dollhouses, puppet shows and ornate pastries. Aided immeasurably by Ralph Fiennes’ exceptional performance, the fanciful trappings and shifting spotlights somehow seem more genuine than the real world. Director Wes Anderson doesn’t just take viewers through the looking glass, he shows us the depth within it. R, At Keystone Art Need for Speed u The incredibly successful video game franchise (over 140 million copies sold) becomes a forgettable action movie. The stunt work is fine and the car race scenes are diverting (competent, but unremarkable). It’s the parts in-between, when the characters talk, where the movie sinks into generic-ness. Aaron Paul, so amazing in Breaking Bad, is strictly by-the-numbers in the lead role. Aside from Michael Keaton’s colorful villainy, there’s nothing special going on here. And the damn thing’s two hours and 10 minutes long! No thank you. PG-13, In wide release and 3D Mr. Peabody and Sherman y My favorite part of the Rocky and Bullwinkle cartoon show was watching Mr. Peabody and his pet boy Sherman travel through time and make elaborate, often obscure puns. This glossy computer-animated feature doesn’t capture the ragged charm of the original — no surprise — but I suppose it’s good to at least keep the characters going in some form. The story is presented in the frantic style that seems the norm for contemporary kid’s films. The pop culture references are unwelcome and out-of-date (“Don’t tase me, bro!” How embarrassing). But enough of the comedy works to make the movie passable family fare. PG, In wide release and 3D Muppets Most Wanted y Standard issue Muppet fare. This one features a jewel heist and a Kermit lookalike. Tina Fey, Ricky Gervais and Ty Burrell are the main humans interacting with the mucking Fuppets (as John Belushi used to call them). The songs are okay, the comedy is corny and the family film includes cameos by actors your kids won’t recognize. PG, In wide release

Sat. & Sun. March 29 & 30

BUSKIRK-CHUMLEY THEATER, BLOOMINGTON, IN DOORS AT 6:30 PM & SHOWS AT 7 PM INTERMISSION GIVEAWAYS SUBMITTED PHOTO

Shailene Woodley stars in the newest thriller based on a young adult series, Divergent.

300: Rise of an Empire y Sorta sequel/prequel to the 2006 battle and abs epic, based on Frank Miller›s graphic novel Xerxes. Okay, but not as entertaining as the original, although the gushing tomato soupy blood is cool. Alas, the novelty of the presentation style has worn off, the time-hopping doesn’t help and the absence of Gerard Butler is notable. Eva Green as Artemisia and Rodrigo Santoro as Xerxes give it the old college try, though.

TICKETS $15 OR $27 2-NIGHT FESTIVAL PASS

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R, In wide release and 3D Tim’s Vermeer e Johannes Vermeer painted meticulous interior scenes of domestic life in the 1600s. They were photo-realistic, making masterful use of light. So how did he create such works long before the invention of the photographic camera? That’s the question inventor Tim Jenison — a groovy rich dude with all kinds of time and money — tries to solve in this engaging documentary, seeing if he can reproduce one of Vermeer’s works using only tools available during the painter’s days. The short doc is sometimes mesmerizing, sometimes a bit slow, and in the end, a satisfying pice of art in its own right. PG-13, At Keystone Art Tyler Perry’s The Single Moms Club y Haven’t seen a Tyler Perry film in a while so I thought I’d check this out. Turns out it’s business as usual, with Perry aiming for multiple demographics and writing well-intentioned stories with the subtlety of an ox. This one deals with a group of put-upon moms (Nia Long, Amy Smart, Cocoa Brown, Wendi McClendon-Covey and Zulay Habao) forming a support group. Good intentions, so-so execution. At least there isn’t a Madea spotting. PG-13, In wide release — ED JOHNSON-OTT NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // FILM 23


BEER BUZZ

BY RITA KOHN

Brewers of Indiana Guild president Clayton Robinson wrote this for NUVO in light of the signing into law of a bill that could allow alcohol sales for the first time in 67 years at the Indiana State Fair: “The Brewers of Indiana Guild worked with the Indiana State Fair to allow Indiana breweries and wineries to showcase our products alongside all of the other great things that Indiana grows and produces. The initiative actually started over a year ago, but it took until this legislative session for it to gain any real traction. We are excited that this measure was viewed so favorably by not only lawmakers, but by the general public and that Governor Pence recently signed the bill into law. It is our hope that everything will be in order to christen an Indiana Beer and Wine Garden at this year’s State Fair.” Tow Yard Brewing opened at 501 S. Madison St. in the former Chateau Thomas Winery building as a craft brewery and dining spot, highlighting locally sourced food in its walk-up meat deli. Head Brewer Bradley Zimmerman returns to Indianapolis after nearly a decade at Elysian Fields Brewery and Big Time Brewery & Alehouse in Seattle. He features Northwest style brews including Hook It Up Shandler, Goldie Hops Golden Ale, Emerald Circle IPA, 
and Horse Power Double IPA, ranging from 4-7.8 percent ABV. Evil Czech of Culver expanded its brewing operations to 3703 N. Main St. in Mishawaka with a completely remodeled Public House on the site of the former Mishawaka Brewing Co. and Restaurant. Evil Czech’s Culver Brewpub at 530 S. Ohio St. now will be their research and development site with food service. Events MARCH 27 — Barrel-Aged ReplicAle Takeover, Tomlinson Tap Room, 5-9:30 p.m.; brewers from Barley Island, Black Acre, Bloomington Brewing, Flat 12 and Sun King will arrive at 7 p.m. MARCH 27 — Pink Ribbon Saison on tap for social hour and tour, Triton Brewery, 6-9 p.m., with Girls Pint Out and the Women’s Mentoring Network. APRIL 3 — Tapping Hatchblower Pepper IPA, Triton Brewery, 5 p.m., honoring Gus Grissom’s nickname. Grissom was inducted into the US Army Air Forces at Ft. Ben. New brews The RAM Ahhhhnold SCHWARZ-enegger Schwarzbier, a smooth German dark lager with a touch of roast barley character lingering into the finish. Oaken Barrel Kolsch, a springtime beer fermented in warm temperature like an ale, then lagered in cold temperature for prominent but not extreme hoppiness. Black Acre and Flat 12 collaboration Crap Shoot Common is based on rolls of the dice. It’s really tasty. Learn more at flat12.me.

NUVO.NET/FOOD Visit nuvo.net/food for complete restaurant listings, reviews and more. 24 FOOD // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

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COFFEE WITH A CONSCIENCE

New documentary follows fair trade coffee beans from farm to cup

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B Y R EBECCA BERF A N G ER ED I T O R S @ N U V O . N E T

new film about two U.S. coffee roasters and the farmers they work with in Central America sheds light on the process that gets fair trade coffee from the farm to caffeine addicts. Connected by Coffee will premiere April 2 at the Athenaeum Theatre in connection with the Fair Trade Federation’s national conference. In January 2013, husband and wife filmmaking team Chelsea Bay Dennis and Aaron Dennis traveled with Chris Treter of Higher Grounds Trading Co. in Traverse City, Mich., and Matt Earley of Just Coffee Cooperative in Madison, Wisc., to witness small-scale farming. Many of the film’s subjects are also members of Cooperative Coffees, a green coffee importing cooperative of 23 roasters in the U.S. and Canada. The film’s interviews depict farmers’ methods and show how small-scale fair trade farms are generally more environmentally responsible than large-scale operations. Many of the farmers are indigenous, and some have literally fought to keep their land. “Each place had its own culture and voice on the journey,” says Chelsea. She knew about fair trade before the film: Treter first mentioned the concept to her when they were college classmates, and many of her graphic design business clients are fair trade companies. However, she said her work on the film reiterated to her that while fair trade practices “can change lives,” because there is “just such a deep history of poverty, we’re not going to change things overnight.” But it’s a good start: “Fair trade is bringing farmers [to global markets], and giving the farmers dignity and pride by forming long-term, direct relationships with the people who buy and sell their products,” she continues. “So when something like this current coffee rust happens,” (it’s been estimated that more than half of the 2013 coffee crop in Central America was lost to disease), “the long-term relationships will still be there for them to help them replant or raise money to help them replant.”

PHOTO BY CHELSEA BAY DENNIS

Jose Osmin Romero, member of Las Marias 93 Coffee Cooperative, sits on Tiger Mountain in El Salvador in January 2013. FILM

CONNECTED BY COFFEE WORLD PREMIERE

WHEN: APRIL 2, 8 P.M. WHERE: THE ATHENAEUM THEATRE T I C K E T S : $8 F R O M G L O B A L G I F T S O R GLOBALGIFTSFT.COM

Some of these partnerships also include humanitarian aid projects, like enabling access to clean drinking water. The Dennises have addressed fair trade issues before: Their 2012 documentary, The People and the Olive, follows six Americans on a marathon run across the West Bank in support of Palestinian fair trade olive farmers. Compared with other industries, coffee companies are among the most likely to follow fair trade principles, according to Madeline Kreider Carlson, membership and program manager of Fair Trade Federation (FTF). That’s because coffee farming methods often involve significant manpower, with farmers inspecting and picking

the beans by hand. “A cup of fair trade coffee is more expensive than the cheapest option, but not more than a cup of specialty coffee,” says Carlson. “For a lot of fair trade shoppers, and consumers in general, I think the idea of being able to make a difference with a couple dollars can be really powerful. I also think many people can connect to the idea that if things are made by hand, there is a sense of a connection to another human being, which can be really valuable.” n


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In celebration of our cover story on the state of Indy veganism, we offer a few options friendly to vegetarians, vegans and carnivores alike. DUOS & DUOS Kitchen Started as a food truck, DUOS has since moved into a permanent kitchen in the medical office building on 29th and Meridian Streets. If you’re not familiar, DUOS has, far and away, some of the best vegetarian dishes available in Indy, notably their trademark Balance Bowl (available in vegan form, or with added chicken or egg), the nifty quinoa croquettes with red cabbage and lime chutney and, new to the menu, corn and risotto stuffed poblanos.You could call it “slow, whole food” done fast for working folks. Every day the menu changes (with the salad bar remaining perennially awesome), so expect something fresh each time. 2960 N. Meridian St., 508-8614, duosindy.com The Sinking Ship While we lament the disappearance of live comedy from The Sinking Ship, which has dismantled its stage in favor of a couple of pool tables, we continue to love its smart, adventurous vegan options, which include the Smash the State Meatball Sandwich (meatless meatballs, house marinara, vegan mozzarella), seitan wings in spice varieties including hot and mild Korean and the appropriately named “asshole” sauce, a black bean burger and seitan-centric salads and wraps. 4923 N. College Ave., 920-7999, thesinkingship.com Pure Eatery Located smack-dab in the middle of historic Fountain Square. All sauces and dressings at Pure are made inhouse (definitely try the aioli), and all produce is bought from local farms. The whole place is, in short, quite conscious of its environmental impact, meaning that many dishes are meatless. But what’s most distinctive about Pure Eatery is its wine tap — luscious, high-quality wine by the glass or carafe! Owners also partner up with several local businesses (like Fountain Square Brewing Co.) and participate in First Fridays. 1043 Virginia Ave., Suite 3, 602-5724; pureeatery.com

SoBro Café SoBro Café offers a relaxing oasis in which to cool off and enjoy some made-to-order sustenance at almost any time of the day. Pleasantly devoid of attitude or pretense, this smartly appointed eatery caters to a wide range of tastes, from vegan to carnivore, with a strong emphasis on freshness. The menu is short, but well thought out. The house specialty is the pannekoek, or Dutch pancake, which comes in a dozen or so preparations, some sweet and some savory. The chai tea, rich and complex, takes a few minutes to brew, but it’s absolutely worth the wait. 653 E. 52nd St., 920-8121, sobrocafe.com La Chinita Poblana At the risk of revealing too much insider information or food bias, it should be known that La Chinita Poblana is known around the office as “Magic Taco Place.” Why? Because La Chinita combines Asian flavors with Mexican dishes, creating a truly wondrous mash-up of umami and south-of-the-border flavors and ingredients. Best of all, La Chinita has all your vegetarian needs covered, making tacos out of everything from eggplant to tofu, with no cardboard or plasticine attempts at recreating meatlike flavors and textures. It’s not a fancy spot (within the old Boogie Burger location), and is mostly made for standing and snacking, but if you don’t mind the dresseddown vibe, then you’ll find flavors and combinations quite simply unavailable elsewhere. 927 Westfield Blvd., 722-8108; lachinitapoblana.com BARcelona Tapas Barcelona Tapas offers a very agreeable way to spend a relaxed evening consuming small plates of traditional Spanish fare while en-

For more information or to view our menu visit

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DOWNTOWN 207 N. Delaware St. 634-6060

Duos’ Balance Bowl is gluten free and has a vegan option. PHOTO BY STACY KAGIWADA

joying a pitcher of sangria, a Catalonian lager or glass of Rioja. The décor and ambience are old-world in tone: vibrant, clattery, ceramictiled, and brightly-colored, bringing a taste of the Mediterranean to Downtown. Lots of the small plates on this menu are vegetarian or vegan, and don’t forget the flan or churros for dessert. Tapas dishes are reasonably priced, and generally serve two. 201 N. Delaware St., 638-8272; barcelonatapas.com 3 Sisters Cafe Tucked behind the Broad Ripple strip, this cafe specializes in delicious vegetarian food. They’re not following any trends though; 3 Sisters has been serving up tasty dishes in their Broad Ripple location for years. If it’s warm, grab a seat outside on the porch of the beautiful Victorian home converted into a restaurant. Since it’s already nestled back by the canal, go for a walk on the canal after your meal for an added perk. 3 Sisters is a great option for breakfast and lunch, offering great vegetarian and vegan alternatives to the classics. 6360 Guilford Ave., 257-5556; 3sisterscafein.com

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235 S. Meridian Street, Indianapolis, IN 46225 • 317.280.7648 NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // FOOD 25


MUSIC

MINI CHATS BURNT ONES RETURN TO INDY Since migrating from Indianapolis to San Francisco, Mark Tester and his group Burnt Ones have achieved impressive feats. From their slew of releases with Cali’s infamous Burger Records label to their current U.S. tour, everything is looking rosy for the dynamic feedback-drenched four-piece. And part of that success is informed by their Hoosier roots. “Living in Indiana was indescribably informative to how I look at pretty much every aspect of life, and especially the value of space and distance, particularly the time I spent living in Muncie and Indianapolis,” Tester says. “Working on art and creative prospects out of either desperation or amongst a small community of friends, without any ridiculous aspirations or expecPHOTO BY WILLIAM KEIHN tations beyond one another, has continued to be inspiring and being able to see it firsthand when I come back to the city is always really refreshing.” The San Fran psychers are no stranger to Fountain Square, having played numerous gigs at Debbie’s Palace of Noise and Laundry, the central hub of Indy’s daylong psych rock fest Cataracts. “The set that we played at Cataracts a few years ago is probably the most memorable show I’ve ever personally played in my life,” he says. “Though I don’t remember much about actually playing because I was transfixed on the mass of people gathered on the roof and on top of the porch of Debbie’s.” Their recently released third full-length was recorded at the band’s San Fran practice spot between September and December of 2013. GIFT is inspired by Tester’s recent experiences as a driver and show bootlegger out on the road with Mike Donovan (formerly of Sic Alps), while he opened for Ty Segall on his acoustic Sleeper tour. “After spending the last few years focusing on live music as an excuse to blast people with feedback, I got way more interested in space and incorporating all the types of sound I’m interested in, instead of just limiting Burnt Ones to being some sort of mediocre rock band,” Tester says. “For me, it’s the most realized chunk of music I’ve ever recorded and I’m excited to start on volume 4.” — SETH JOHNSON Burnt Ones with Raw McCartney, Thee Open Sex and Creeping Pink, Friday, March 28, 9 p.m., White Rabbit Cabaret, 1116 E. Prospect St., $5, 21+ Burnt Ones with Bloody Mess and Raw McCartney, Friday, March 28, Vibes Music, 1051 E. 54th St., 3 p.m., FREE, all-ages (Editor’s note: A longer version of this interview is online at NUVO.net.)

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Indy Sound Map explores urban sounds Photos provided by Stuart Hyatt

B Y TA Y L O R P ETERS MU S I C @ N U V O . N E T

met Stuart Hyatt, the Grammynominated interdisciplinary media artist, on the top of the Indianapolis City County Building. If you don’t know (I didn’t), there’s an observatory there. From 28 floors up, the city looks oddly unfamiliar at first. But quickly, as buildings and streets start to resolve, it’s tempting to feel like you’ve got the city figured out. If Hyatt’s Indy Sound Map project is doing anything, it’s showing us just how far we are from totally understanding any urban space. Hyatt says the observatory is “criminally underutilized.” Beyond the simple fact that not many know about it, it’s difficult to find. That’s something else he loves about it. “You have to go through a lot to get here.” Specifically: the freight elevator to the 26th floor, then another elevator for the final two floors. “Today I had to stand in the corner of the elevator,” he says, “because the freight elevator is where they transfer people going to trial from the jail.” But for the howling wind we heard on the morning we met, it’s usually pretty peaceful up there, a fact that Hyatt thinks stands in contrast to all that humming life down below. “I think it’s the most interesting place in the city,” he says. Understanding why this building is so fascinating to Hyatt is crucial to understanding the Indy Sound Map. At one level, the Sound Map is simple: Hyatt walks around with a backpack, a small camera, a field recorder

ARTS

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WHEN: FRIDAY, APRIL 4 , 6 P.M. WHERE: HARRISON CENTER FOR THE ARTS, 1505 N. DELAWARE ST. TICKETS: FREE, ALL-AGES

and a shotgun microphone, and he records the sounds of the city, interviewing people he meets on his way. It’s more than that, though. The idea behind the Sound Map is to use these recordings to to highlight the complexity and strangeness buried in what most of us file away as banal and everyday. And what better place to exemplify this than at the City-County Building, a building most see as nothing more than a monument

to bureaucracy? By putting his recordings into a “geotagged database of moments,” (the beginnings of which you can see now at soundry.com/indy-sound-map) which he hopes will lead to, “a bigger, more complete truth” about this city, something that will surprise even people who have lived here all their lives. This interest in giving voice to what might otherwise be skimmed over is nothing new in Hyatt’s work. Through projects such as the Prison Mixtapes, where Hyatt helped inmates in the Minnesota State Penitentiary write and record songs about their experiences, Hyatt has striven to be an, “arbiter of meaning or of form for people who might not have access to the writing and recording process” more than anything else. He says the Indy Sound Map might be his “most literal interpretation of this yet.” Eventually, the Sound Map will cover the whole city, but he started with a 20-mile-long segment of Washington Street, stretching from the airport to German Church Road. “If you want to learn about the 19th, 20th, and 21st century Midwest, all you have to do is walk on one street.” Washington Street, he says, “has everything,” effectively encapsulating something essential about city life and its unpredictability. A striking example pops up just west of Downtown, right near the Indianapolis Zoo and the now-vacant General Motors SEE, SOUND MAP, ON PAGE 28


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thing Calvino couldn’t have predicted in 1972 — to guide his approach to the Indy Sound Map. They also form the skeleton of an upcoming album he’s created using stamping plant. Tucked behind the railthese recordings as source material. road tracks, there’s a homeless encampEntitled The National Road, it will be ment not visible from the road. “I’ve intercredited to a group of musicians he refers viewed those folks who have literally built to as Field Works. Field Works are hardly a homes out of trash and are living in the traditional band. Instead, they are a loose brambles,” Hyatt says. collection of collaborators from around the Hyatt asked them if the trains ever world, including Nick Zammuto formerly wake them at night given the camp’s of The Books, and Valerie Trebeljahr of Lali proximity to the tracks. Puna. The album came together mostly “And they said no, it’s the sea lions barking from the zoo.” He says, “You can’t online. “I would write a few paragraphs, and then just send a musician an email make that up. Here we are right in view of and a Dropbox folder and I’d say, ‘This is Downtown, and you have sea lions wakyour assignment,’ ” Hyatt said. ing up homeless people. It’s just bizarre.” Of course, this notion that cities are Despite including work from people all strange, difficult-to-interpret organisms around the world, the album is remarkably is not new to Hyatt. His whole projunified. Perhaps even more surprising is that, ect is inspired by Italo Calvino’s 1972 for something made almost entirely of ambinovel Invisible Cities. In it, the emperor ent urban sounds and snippets of conversaKublai Khan receives an account of his tion, far from being a noisy and un-tuneful, The National Road is melodic, even poppy. Hyatt says that was intentional. “My tastes skew toward folk and pop, accessible music. I love the super “Here we are right in view far-out stuff, but it’s not what I want to of Downtown, and you listen to while I’m cooking.” On April 4, Hyatt will present a have sea lions waking up “visual manifestation of everything that the album was trying to explore” homeless people.” at the Harrison Center for the Arts. In addition to a live performance and an — STUART HYATT array of photos taken throughout the project, there will be an interactive 3D model of Washington Street. “It will look nothing like a map, nothing incomprehensibly vast empire from like a street, but it will have these strata of the explorer Marco Polo. Polo divides components that a visitor to the gallery will his account into 11 thematic categoget to play.” Recordings from the Sound ries, such as “Cities & the Sky” which Map will be embedded in the model and accounts for cities building upwards, and “Cities & the Dead” which addresses mapped to a keyboard; a simple interface that anyone can use. Hyatt sees it as a how cities deal with their histories. Hyatt has lifted these categories, addmetaphor for the whole project.   ing one of his own “Cities & the Field” — “Anyone can make music out of their which deals with the rise of the Internet’s environment,” he says. “Anyone can find “invisible waves that surround us,” somemeaning in their surroundings.” n

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BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA

hroughout the 1940s and ‘50s, The Blind Boys of Alabama recorded a string of electrifying gospel roots classics. On April 13 at  Butler’s Schrott Center for the Arts, the Blind Boys will be reunited with one of their recent collaborators as the group splits a bill with Shara Worden and My Brightest Diamond. Worden was a featured vocalist on the Blind Boys 2013 release I’ll Find A Way. Here’s a portion of our chat with Blind Boys founding member Jimmy Carter in advance of group’s Indianapolis appearance. NUVO: Do you remember what inspired you to start singing as a child? JIMMY CARTER: I started singing when I was very young, at five or six years old. I was brought up in a Christian environment and I listened to the church music. I think my real answer is God gave me the gift to sing. I was chosen by him to sing.  NUVO: When did you realize that?     CARTER: At a very young age when they sent me to a school for the blind in a little town in Alabama called Talladega. While I was there I met some other boys who were singing and we started working together. At that time there was a gospel group on the road called the Golden Gate Quartet. We idolized those guys. We thought if they made it maybe we could too. So, in 1944, the Blind Boys of Alabama left school and decided to try their luck. The rest is history, my friend. NUVO: During the ‘50s and ‘60s so many artists like Sam Cooke and Aretha Franklin were coming out of the gospel scene and crossing over into rock and R&B. Were the Blind Boys ever tempted to move into secular pop music? CARTER: When Sam Cooke crossed over, the Blind Boys were there at the same time in the same studio. On that same day, they talked to us too; they wanted the Blind Boys to crossover. We told them no because we felt this is our calling and our mission. It was easy for us to say no because we felt God gave us this mission to perform for him. NUVO: I grew up in the ‘90s. I was mostly exposed to rock and hip-hop, but I remember the first time I heard one of your early recordings with the Blind Boys. The energy in the music was like nothing else I’d ever heard. The sound was so powerful, I really felt like I’d been struck by a bolt of lightning when I heard your music. How do you manifest that energy in the music? 

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WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

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WHEN: SUNDAY, APRIL 13, 7 P.M. WHERE: SCHROTT CENTER, 610 W. 46TH ST. TICKETS: PRICES VARY, ALL-AGES

CARTER: Gospel music is very intense. You’re talking about God, you’re happy and you want that to resonate to your audience. Sometimes it gets loud and it is intense. But that’s all right because it is has to be that way. Because God is powerful and he’s everywhere and you want to let people know.   NUVO: When I listen to a great gospel singer perform it almost feels like they’ve gone into a trance or that they’re not in this world when they’re in that performance. What goes on in your mind in those moments? CARTER: You are exactly right, my friend. When the Blind Boys go onstage. Jimmy Carter is not Jimmy Carter at that time. He’s not there. He’s been overtaken by a higher power and it stays with him until he finishes.  NUVO: Is it easy for you to get in that state of mind when you hit the stage? I would imagine it takes a lot of energy to perform at that level. CARTER: Your first order of business onstage is to feel out the audience. I tell people that the Blind Boys do not like to sing to a conservative crowd. That means wake up and don’t be so sophisticated. Let your hair down; we came out to have a good time. We don’t want nobody sitting there, we want to make you move. Clap your hands, stomp your feet and jump up if you want to. That’s what we’re all about, my friend. n >> Kyle Long creates a custom podcast for each column. Hear this week’s at NUVO.net


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WEDNESDAY HIP-HOP Juicy J, Travis Scott A one-act play featuring Juicy J and NUVO Music Editor Katherine Coplen.

NUVO: Juicy, what is your favorite piece of equipment to use while producing in the studio?

JUICY: In the strip club? NUVO: No, in the studio. JUICY: The strip club? Fin (Our full interview is online at NUVO.net.) Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 9 p.m., all-ages Brenda Williams, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Retro Rewind, Vogue, 21+ OMG, Casba, 21+ Midwest State of Mind, Bumpin Uglies, Rock House Cafe, 21+ Hot Sauce Committee, Bluebird, 21+ From Indian Lakes, Irving Theater, all-ages Red Hot Whiskey Sippers, Jazz Kitchen B-Side, 21+ Russ Baum and Huck Finn, Blind Pig, 21+ Open Mic Night, Tin Roof, 21+ Burlesque Bingo Bang Show, White Rabbit Cabaret, 21+ From Indian Lakes with The American Scene, Naïve Thieves, Gentlemen, Float, Irving Theater, all-ages

Latin Fever, Blu, 21+ Blues Jam with Jon Strahl, Slippery Noodle, 21+ The Family Jam, Mousetrap, 21+

THURSDAY DANCE Shpongle and Desert Dwellers Shpongle plays low-paced beautiful tracks that lull fans into a dream like state allowing them to open their minds and deeply think about life and its truest meanings. A mix of trance and psychedelic themes as well as ambient noise makes for truly original sounds. And if for some odd reason you feel like doing hot and sweaty yoga during this concert then you’re in the right place; the Desert Dwellers combine the sounds of yoga with progressive electronic music to form a series of chilled down tunes perfect for a yoga mat or dance floor. Lafayette Theatre, 600 Main St. (Lafayette), 8 p.m., $20 in advance, $25 at door, all-ages ROCK Neutral Milk Hotel It finally happened: Neutral Milk Hotel is actually reunited and coming to Indianapolis. Take a moment to collect your thoughts and emotions, and then prepare to have them completely smashed into oblivion again because this show is (deep breath) sold out. There may be ways or sites to get ahold of loose tickets, or

maybe one of your Facebook friends will take pity on you if you post enough sad statuses about this and take you. Because this is it. The ‘90s nostalgia show to end all ‘90s nostalgia shows. They’ll play with Elf Power. Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., 8 p.m., SOLD OUT, all-ages DJ Lockstar, Tin Roof, 21+ Bryan Lee, Slippery Noodle, 21+ So Sayeth, Stonecutters, Those Crosstown Rivals, Three Cent Queen, Melody Inn, 21+ The Four Freshmen, Zionsville Performing Arts Center, all-ages Another Round’s 18th Annual Spring Concert, BuskirkChumley Theatre, all-ages Animal Haus with Slater Hogan, Blu, 21+ Altered Thurzdaze, Mousetrap, 21+ Jay Jones Band, Tin Roof, 21+ 18th Annual Spring Concert, Buskirk-Chumley Theater (Bloomington), all-ages Glorious Rebellion, Irving Theater, all-ages

FRIDAY GLORIOUS RETURN Burnt Ones, Raw McCartney, Thee Open Sex, Creeping Pink Flip back to page 26 for our Burnt Ones preview. White Rabbit Cabaret, 1116 E. Prospect St., 8 p.m., 21+ ROOTS Rhett Miller of Old ‘97s with Vess Ruhtenberg Rhett Miller has made a number of fine solo albums over his long, illustrious career, but none have felt quite as exemplary as The Dreamer. A collection of “simple American songs and instrumentation,” the album marks NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // MUSIC 31


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the second release on Miller’s own Maximum Sunshine Records as well as the singer-songwriter’s first foray into self-production. Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St., 8 p.m., $15, 21+ HIP-HOP

SCHOONER NIGHT! EVERY MONDAY & THURSDAY

$2 Domestics w/ 32 oz. refills $5.75 Craft Beers w/ 32 oz. refills (not all beers available in schooners)

50 BEERS ON TAP!!

Ghosttown Showcase Featuring The Day After, To Kill A Monster, It’s Safe I Swear. The Hoosier Dome continues to prove that it’s the best place to play for the hungry and new on the scene. This showcase is gonna blow the doors off, with Indy quickly becoming the new Midwest epicenter for hip-hop and plenty of new talent filling out the ranks. Hoosier Dome, 1627 Prospect St., 7 p.m., $10, all-ages JAM Cornmeal, The Twin Cats, Funky Junk Full-on jamfest at the Vogue this weekend, featuring The Twin Cats and Funky Junk alongside Cornmeal, a bluegrass jamband hailin’ from the Windy City. Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 9 p.m., $10 in advance, $12 at door, 21+ FUNK Jimkata The returning funk group just released Feel In Light EP, which includes four new tracks. It’s their first release since 2012, and as they describe it, “more indie rock than jam, more electro-pop than EDM,” so they’re sure to wrap in all the different sorts of crowds that hang at the Trap. Mousetrap, 5565 N. Keystone Ave., 10 p.m., varies, 21+ Jorma Whittaker, Heavy Hometown, Joyful Noise, all-ages Burn, Devil To Pay, By The Bulls, Stealing Volume, Melody Inn, 21+ Avante, Chante Moore, Old National Centre, all-ages Harley Poe, Mr. Clit and The Pink Cigarettes, Fiber, Draw Blood, Rock House Cafe, 21+ Songwriter’s Circle, Irving, 21+ The Elect, Rathskeller, 21+ Kelly Pardekooper and The Distal Down, Melody Inn, 21+ (Hillbilly Happy Hour early show) Over The Rhine, BuskirkChumley Theatre (Bloomington), all-ages Boo Ya with Slater Hogan, Bartini’s, 21+ WTFridays, Social, 21+

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Juicy J Hoosier Dome High School Battle of the Bands Sign Ups, Hoosier Dome, all-ages 20 Year Celebration, Rock Lobster, 21+

SATURDAY SINGER-SONGWRITER Marsha Ambrosius, Steve James Formerly the melodic half of the English singer-songwriter and spoken word duo Floetry, Marsha Ambrosius has busted out on her own. She is currently based in Philly, touring the US with her sensual vocals and piano on offer. Already, she’s collaborate with The Game, Busta Rhymes, Jaimie Foxx and Wale and is touring in support of her second solo studio album, Friends and Lovers. Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., 9 p.m., $20, 21+ UNPLUGGED Hero Jr., San Dimas Local rockers Hero Jr. will play an unplugged event alongside San Dimas (Minneapolis). Bonuses of in-store shows at record shops? All-ages, almost always free, plenty of things to buy while you wait, usually runs on time, among many others. Indy CD and Vinyl, 806 Broad Ripple Ave., 7 p.m., FREE, all-ages ANNUAL Earth Hour Party Unabashedly excited about this Mother Earth-loving jamfest, featuring music by DJ Kyle Long, Sphie Holman and The Threshold Choir (plus maybe more), in addition to catacombs tours and the chance to explore the historic Market in complete darkness. It is Earth Hour, after all – an hour of darkness, celebrated globally. (P.S. It’s also former Managing Editor Jim Poyser’s birthday party.) City Market, 222 E. Market St., 7 p.m., donations suggested, all-ages

SOUL Aryk Crowder, Bashiri Asad Chicago-based soul singer-songwriter Aryk Crowder will be embarking on a string of Midwestern dates in the coming weeks, kicking off the stretch with a visit to the DO317 Lounge. Crowder’s set comes on the heels of his 2010 debut solo EP, Ready, Set..., and 2012’s Over Being Over, a release recorded and co-produced with Greg Magers of Lupe Fiasco’s The Cool. He initially started out by crafting rhythm and blues-inspired music with a four-track tape recorder in his modest Windy City apartment. Pulling early inspiration from Jimi Hendrix guitar links and the vocals of Al Green, Crowder refined his sound with the focus of a determined artist and worked his way up to getting booked at heralded venues throughout Chicago. Our interview with Aryk is online now; he’ll play with local soul singer Bashiri Asad. DO317 Lounge, 1043 Virginia Ave., Suite 215, 9 p.m., $10, 21+ Punk Rock Night featuring Necrodemon, Lucifist, Hex Bombs, Melody Inn, 21+ Burnt Ones, Raw McCartney, Magician Johnson, Thee Open Sex, Magnetic South, all-ages Ladies for Liberty, Brown County Playhouse (Nashville), all-ages Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with the Marsalis Family, Clowes Memorial Hall, all-ages Arpetrio, Eumatik, Mousetrap, 21+

SUNDAY LOCALS The Icks, Bonesetters, Buffalo Rodeo, Strange Double dose of some of our favorite locals currently playing out, both touring new albums (The Icks, Little Rotten and Bonesetters, Figure It Out). Plus, relative newcomers Stranger and Kentucky’s Buffalo Rodeo. Melody Inn, 3826 N. Illinois St., 9 p.m., $5, 21+


SOUNDCHECK ALBUM RELEASE Matt Pivec Album Release Party Matt Pivec’s Wikipedia page entry begins thusly: “Known to many as Master P. Funk, Matt Pivec is a Saxophonist and the director of Jazz Studies at Butler University.” To inspire your students enough to permanently alter your internet record to reflect your nickname must mean Pivec really has something going with the young minds he’s molding. He’s worked with Ray Charles, The Temptations and Maria Schneider and many, many more in his short but satisfying sax life. Jazz Kitchen, 5377 N. College Ave., 6 p.m., 21+ As Artifacts, Set To Reflect, Creating Constellations, Ursa Minor, Forgotten Memory, Emerson Theater, all-ages Authors, Upon a Broken Throne, Of Creations, Mapmaker, Hoosier Dome, all-ages Kari Jobe, Murat Theatre at Old National Centre, all-ages Acoustic Bluegrass Open Jam, Mousetrap, 21+ Gordon Bonham, Jes Richmond, Slippery Noodle, 21+ Demi Lovato, Bankers Life Fieldhouse, all-ages

how nerdy is this human? Here’s Adam Warrock’s particular brand of nerdiness: he’s a nerdcore rapper that busts out bars about the pop culture stuff he loves. Sample lyrics: “Gamma radiation, nobody could mess with this venomous symbiotes in my penmanship / Your friendly neighborhood emcee back on the scene / You wouldn’t like me when I’m angry, all I’m seeing is green” Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St., 8 p.m., 21+ Grant Street Musician’s Co-Op Monthly Benefit Show, Back Door (Bloomington), 21+ Jenny Hval, Hunterchild, Bishop (Bloomington), 21+ Sindustry Mondays, Latitude 39, all-ages Benito DiBartoli and Friends, Slippery Noodle, 21+

TUESDAY Matthew Mayfield, Radio Radio, 21+ Lady Lamb The Beekeeper, Bishop (Bloomington), 21+ Yellow Ostrich, Pattern Is Movement, DO317 Lounge, 21+ Broke(n) Tuesdays, Melody Inn, 21+ Take That! Tuesdays, Coaches, 21+

CHICAGO

Earth, Empty Bottle, Mar. 27 From Indian Lakes Beat Kitchen, Mar. 27 Kraftwerk Riviera Theatre, Mar. 27 Larry And His Flask Reggies Rock Club, Mar. 27 Mountain Sprout Mayne Stage Theatre, Mar. 27 Real Estate Metro / Smart Bar, Mar. 27 Reuben And The Dark Schubas Tavern, Mar. 27 Whitewater Ramble Abbey Pub, Mar. 27 Bend Sinister Juniors Night Club, Mar. 28 Jake Clemons Schubas Tavern, Mar. 28 PJ Morton, Double Door, Mar. 28

CROSSWORD NUVO’S STREET TEAM Read last week’s paper?

Solve the crossword to reveal a codeword with the letters circled in red.

Head over to NUVO.NET/contests to enter the codeword for a chance to win a $20 GIFT CARD TO

LOUISVILLE Louisville Orchestra Whitney Hall, Mar. 28 Archnemesis Headliners Music Hall, Mar. 29 Canadian Brass Whitney Hall, Mar. 29 Downlink Diamond Pub & Billiards, Mar. 29 Gavin DeGraw W.L. Lyons Brown Theatre, Mar. 29

CINCINNATI

MONDAY HIP-HOP Adam Warrock What can you say when someone is declared one of the top ten standout nerds of the year? You say, why,

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BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

Band Of Heathens Taft Theatre, Mar. 28 Kelly Richey Legends, Mar. 28 Mindless Self Indulgence Bogart’s, Mar. 28 K Camp Club Cameo, Mar. 29

ACROSS:

DOWN:

2. For Indy to flourish, it must invest in ____ as it does in sports? (pg. 4) 4. Enbridge, Inc. planned to run a new oil pipeline across what Indiana town? 5. What Indianapolis Jazz photographer died recently? *(last name) 6. What Indy bar is decorated with antique typewriters? (Spring City Guide, pg. 29) 8. What’s the name of Indy’s ONLY hot sauce tiki bar? (Spring City Guide) 9. Sean Stuart and DJ Metrognome host what monthly event at the Sabbatical? 10. Who was booked for operating a vehicle while intoxicated and possession of a controlled substance?

1. Line 6B spilt over 800,000 gallons of oil in what river near Marshall, Mich.? 3. Term used to describe electronic music that is lo-fi or distorted 7. Jay Brookinz created a collaborative project called ___?

QUESTION:

What Zodiac Sign is currently being celebrated?

CODEWORD: NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // MUSIC 33


RESEARCH STUDY: ADULTS 18 TO 50 WITH GENITAL HERPES FOR AT LEAST 1 YEAR ARE NEEDED FOR A STUDY TO TEST A NEW VACCINE NOT APPROVED BY THE FOOD AND

SEXDOC THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

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DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THERE WILL BE 3 DOSES OF VACCINE GIVEN WITH STUDY PARTICIPATION LASTING UP TO 17 MONTHS. RESEARCH IS DONE AT INDIANA UNIVERSITY INFECTIOUS DISEASES RESEARCH AT THE ESKENAZI HEALTH CAMPUS. CALL 278-2945 OR E-MAIL IUIDR@IU.EDU. RISKS ARE DISCLOSED BEFORE ENROLLMENT. PAYMENT IS PROVIDED.

EXCERPTS FROM OUR ONLINE COLUMN “ASK THE SEX DOC” W

e’re back with our resident sex doctor, Dr. Debby Herbenick of Indiana University’s Kinsey Institute. To see even more, go to nuvo.net!

Tit Bit Too Sensitive I know people are supposed to get excited over nipple stimulation, but the second anyone’s hand touches mine I immediately want to jab them in the chest and put my bra back on. I can understand not caring about nipple play…but why are mine so goddamn sensitive? — Anonymous, from Tumblr

ON

WITH ER PRODUC REO JONES O

2 HOUR

BLOCK LOCAL MUSIC on x103

Sundays

10p.m.-MIdnight

listen read tweet @ x103.com

@ nuvo.net

@tremendouskat

34 VOICES // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Central Indiana musicians & bands can submit tracks at www.x103.com

SARAH: I’m going to have to ask you to review the basics on this one first: Is your bra constructed of a repurposed Tickle Me Elmo? Do you wrap your chest nightly with stinging nettle leaves filled with live wasps? Is your sweater filled with fairies, fairy dust, and/or fairy wings? Do you regularly faceplant on treadmills? Are you, at this moment and every moment, tripping your balls off on Molly? If not, you’ve just got some very sensitive nipples. That doesn’t mean they have to be totally off-limits, only that you have to treat them like a car with a touchy gas pedal and a lot of horsepower. Just let your partner know beforehand; here, feel free to get creative, like tattooing a ring of caution tape around your areolas, or fashioning a pair of tiny hard hats. DR. D: Not everyone is into nipple play and they can be awfully sensitive. Plus some people jump right into nipple play without warming up the breasts. You might see if it feels different if you ask your partner to cup your breast with his or her whole hand first, or ask your partner to stimulate other areas of your body and help you become sufficiently aroused before trying nipple touching. And if you’re still not into it, that’s totally fine — not every body part needs touching during sex. You can always say that while you have sex, nipples are off-limits.

DR. DEBBY HERBENICK & SARAH MURRELL SARAH: If I have learned anything from being alive in the last 26 years (and writing this column), it’s that “square” people just don’t really know how to deal with non-binary sex—outside gay/straight or male/ female sexual choices. It’s kind of like being in a car full of people who are really picky eaters and it’s your turn to choose a restaurant. I bet you’re known as “The Adventurous One.” You like Tex-Mex and sushi. Philly cheesesteak with a side of broccoli rabe. Mac and cheese on a bed of baby organic micro greens. If it sounds good, you’ll have it—and, I wager, a lot more complexity and variety in your relationships. (Luckeeey-uh!) Similarly, your doctor doesn’t really care what you like taste-wise, just that you’re getting all your proteins and vitamins and so forth and not exposing yourself to pathogens and poisons. Sexually, your healthcare is really a matter of which parts go in which holes and what infections and things like to live in there. If they’re confident you’re informed about making the right choices and keeping yourself safe and healthy, they probably don’t have a lot of questions. Gold star! You win at sex! DR. D: The sex of your partners is a little less important than the kinds of sex acts you engage in and, mostly, whether those people have infections or whether there’s a pregnancy risk. For example, if you’re having sex with other-sex people then your healthcare provider would be wise to talk with you about birth control. If a man’s penis goes in your anus sometimes, then you might want to be screened for rectal STIs (which is a separate test than being tested in the vagina or mouth/ throat for STIs). But all in all, if you are getting your sexual health questions answered and you feel that issues around pregnancy and STIs are being addressed, then it may be a fine healthcare relationship. All that said, if you feel you want a more open or comfortable relationship with your healthcare provider, you can specifically seek out an LGBT-friendly provider.

Have a question? Email us at askthesexdoc@nuvo.net

Omnivore’s Delight I have sex with men AND women. Whenever I bring it up to my doctors, they always seem surprised and then don’t really address it. Are there health issues that someone who is active with all types of folks should be aware of, or is the doctor ignoring it because it doesn’t matter who I sleep with? — TwoWaySheets, from email

NUVO.NET/BLOGS Visit nuvo.net/blogs/GuestVoices for more Sex Doc or to submit your own question.


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RELAXING MASSAGE Advertisers running in the Relaxing Massage section are licensed to practice NON-SEXUAL MASSAGE as a health benefit, and have submitted their license for that purpose. Do not contact any advertisers in the Relaxing Massage section if you are seeking Adult entertainment.

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CLASSIFIEDS TO ADVERTISE:

Phone: (317) 254-2400 | Fax: (317) 479-2036 E-mail: classifieds@nuvo.net | www.nuvo.net/classifieds Mail: Nuvo Classifieds 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200 Indianapolis, Indiana 46208

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POLICIES: Advertiser warrants that all goods or services advertised in NUVO are permissible under applicable local, state and federal laws. Advertisers and hired advertising agencies are liable for all content (including text, representation and illustration) of advertisements and are responsible, without limitation, for any and all claims made thereof against NUVO, its officers or employees. Classified ad space is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion.

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Restaurant | Healthcare | Salon/Spa | General To advertise in Employment, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

RESTAURANT | BAR

SALON/SPA HAIRSTYLIST SALON Two openings. Booth Rental, Downtown/Mass Ave. FullTime/Part-time. Reduced starting rent. Ask for Mitch 317-985-8003 EUROPA DAY SPA Looking for Nail Technicians and Massage Therapists. Booth for rent. Considering candidates with existing clientele looking to develop business. Call Sandra at 317-926-4350

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THIS WEEK

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GENERAL

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HEALTH CARE

$1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) Africa, Brazil Work/Study! Change the lives of others while creating a sustainable future. 6, 9, 18 month programs available. Apply today! www.OneWorldCenter.org (269)591-0518 info@OneWorldCenter.org (AAN CAN)

HHA/PCA NEEDED Home Health Agency hiring for in-home care employee. Males welcome to apply. Apply in person. 5226 Southeast Street. suite A9. Indianapolis, IN 46227. Via fax: 317-405-9045 or apply online at www.attentivehhc.com Mobile Medicine Company seeking Health Care Professionals for the following positions: - Physician - Nurse Practitioner - Physician Assistant - Medical Assistant - Podiatrist - Psychiatrist Please forward resume/CV to: piercemobilemedicine@ gmail.com or fax:317-288-9386

PROMO COORDINATOR Latitude 39 is now hiring an outgoing person, energetic person with an outstanding personality as Promo Coordinator. Applicants should have great communication and organizational skills and be available to work weekdays and weekend. Interested applications should email resume to sarah.baird@latitude360.com. Latitude 39 is located at 4106 East 82nd St.

ARTS

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REAL ESTATE Homes for sale | Rentals Mortgage Services | Roommates To advertise in Real Estate, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

RENTALS DOWNTOWN DOWNTOWN Affordable Living Studios—1 bedroom apts. Utilities Included $450-$600 month Call Cynde 317-632-2912

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MARKETPLACE Services | Misc. for Sale Musicians B-Board | Pets To advertise in Marketplace, Call Kelly @ 808-4616

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Advertisers running in the CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY section have graduated from a massage therapy school associated with one of four organizations: American Massage Therapy Association (amtamassage.org)

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Libra

ARIES (March 21-April 19): I have coined a new word just for your horoscope this week. It’s “zex,” short for “zen sex.” Zex is a kind of sex in which your mind is at rest, empty of all thoughts. You breathe slowly and calmly, move slowly and calmly, grunt and moan slowly and calmly. You are completely detached from the sensual pleasure you are experiencing. You have no goals other than the intention to be free of all goals. Zex is the ONLY variety of sex I recommend for you right now, Aries. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Zex may be fine to practice at any other time, but not these days. The style of sex you need most is exuberant, unbridled, expansive, and even zany. Aries

Pisces

Virgo

Scorpio

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Taurus

Libra

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In Somalia, there’s a law that forbids you from putting your used chewing gum on your nose and walking around in public. Fortunately, you don’t live there, so it’s fine if you want to do that. In fact, I encourage you to go right ahead. To do so would be right in alignment with the cosmic omens. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You should definitely not take yourself too seriously this week; you should look for opportunities to playfully lose your dignity and razz the status quo. But there are craftier ways to do that than by sticking gum on your nose. Taurus

Aries

Pisces

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Virgo

Sagittarius

Scorpio

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Libra

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Tata Massage is a salon in San Francisco that provides an unusual beauty treatment: face-slapping. The Thai masseuse named Tata claims to be improving your complexion as she smacks your cheeks and forehead with her hands. She also does “massage boxing,” in which she administers health-giving punches to your body with her fists. Is there a comparable service available where you live? I highly recommend it. APRIL FOOL! I lied. Here’s the truth: You should be absolutely firm that you won’t tolerate whacks and wallops — including the psychological kind — even if they are supposedly good for you. Gemini

Taurus

Virgo

Sagittarius

Scorpio

Aquarius

Capricorn

Leo

Cancer

Libra

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Now would be an excellent time to launch a new tradition or instigate a fresh trend or make a beautiful thing that will last for a thousand celestialdawning.com years. I’m talking about an amazing marvel or useful innoOpen Saturday 10-8 • & Sunday 10-6 vation or unique creation that will improve the lives of 7602 North Michigan Road • 679-5225 countless humans all over the planet for the next 40 generations. APRIL FOOL! I was exaggerating a bit. Producing something that will last a thousand years is too ambitious. How about if you simply launch a new tradition or instigate a fresh trend or create a beautiful thing that $15 OFF 1ST 1HR SINGLE SESSION! will last for the rest of your long life — an amazing marvel $110 1HR COUPLES MASSAGE! or useful innovation or unique creation that will continue to teach and amuse you all along the way?

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Aquarius

Capricorn

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Scorpio

Aquarius

Leo

Libra

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your patron saint for the next

three months is surrealistic artist Salvador Dali. Regard him as your muse and role model. In fact, you might want to spout some of his famous declarations as if they were your own. Start with these: 1. “The only difference between me and a madman is that I am not mad.” 2. “I do not take drugs; I am drugs.” 3. “Mistakes are almost always of a sacred nature.” 4. “Have no fear of perfection. You’ll never reach it.” APRIL FOOL! I lied. Salvador Dali is your patron saint, role model, and muse for only the next 14 days, not three months. Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Taurus

Aries

Pisces

Virgo

Pisces

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Scorpio

Libra

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You know how Jesus

could supposedly turn water into wine? Well, St. Brigit, a sixth-century Irish nun, was legendary for an even greater miracle. When visitors came to her monastery in Kildare, she changed her old bathwater into beer for them to drink. I think there’s a good chance you will develop that precise talent sometime soon. APRIL FOOL! I kind of lied. You won’t really possess St. Brigit’s supernatural power. However, you will have an uncanny ability to make transmutations that are almost as dramatic as changing bathwater to beer. Virgo

Leo

into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame last May. Guitarist Alex Lifeson delivered an unusual acceptance speech. For the two minutes he spoke, he repeated one word endlessly: “blah.” “Blah-blah-blah,” he began. “Blahblah-blah blah-blah blah-blah.” Many hand gestures and shifting vocal inflections accompanied his rap, always in support of variations on “blah-blah.” This is the spirit you should bring to all of your important conversations in the coming week. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, the opposite is true. It’s crucial for you to speak very precisely and articulately in the coming week. Say exactly what you mean. Don’t rely on meaningless bullshit like “blah-blah.” Aries

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When a human embryo

begins to develop in the womb, the very first body part that appears is — can you guess? — the anus. This scientific fact led the witty commentators at QI.com to declare that “Every human being starts out as an asshole.” They were making a joke, of course, hinting that every one of us has an unattractive quality or two that make us at least a little bit of a jerk. That’s the bad news, Scorpio. The good news is that you now have an unprecedented chance to transform the asshole aspects of your personality. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You’re not an asshole, not even a little bit. But it is true that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to try to fix or at least modulate your least attractive qualities. Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

Aries

Pisces

Capricorn

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The band Rush was inducted

Libra

Cancer

Gemini

Taurus

Aries

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): To be in strict compli-

ance with cosmic necessity, you should attend a party every day in the coming week. Dance ecstatically, make love abundantly, and expose yourself to previously unknown pleasures. Feast on a wide variety of food and drink that introduces you to novel tastes. Make sure you experience record levels of sensual enjoyment, nonstop excitement, and dynamic socializing. APRIL FOOL! I’m exaggerating, although just a little. Try doing a 70-percent version of what I advised. Sagittarius

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Lifehacker.com has a step-

by-step guide to set up your home as a command center where you can pursue your plans for world domination. The article provides advice on how to build a surveillance system, encrypt your computer files, and prepare for black-outs and weather emergencies. Do it, Capricorn! Get the lowdown at http://bit.ly/secretlair. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You don’t really need to create a high-tech fortress. But you would be wise to make your home into more of an ultra-comfortable, superinspiring sanctuary — a place where you feel so safe and strong and smart that you will always have total power over yourself, and never feel driven to fulfill anyone else’s standards of success but your own. Capricorn

Sagittarius

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The planetary omens sug-

gest that you need to experience all possible flavors of Doritos corn chips. Here’s the problem: The place where you live offers only a limited range. That’s why I urge you to drop everything and travel to Japan, which is the world leader in Dorito variety. There you can sample coconut curry-flavored Doritos, along with fried chicken, corn soup, smoked bacon, tuna and mayonnaise, and many others. Buy your plane ticket now! APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, you will benefit from communing with a wide variety of sensations and experiences and ideas in many areas of your life, not just Doritos. Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): According to a survey by Public Policy Polling, four percent of the population believes that “shape-shifting reptilian people control our world by taking on human form and gaining political power to manipulate our societies.” My own research suggests that 62 percent of those believers are Pisceans. Are you one? If so, now is a good time to intensify your fight against the shape-shifting reptilian people. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, I strongly encourage you NOT to feed your paranoid delusions and fearful reveries. This should be a time when you bolster your positive fantasies, constructive visions, and inspiring dreams. Pisces

Virgo

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

Homework: Describe what you’d be like if you were the opposite of yourself. Write Freewillastrology.com. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.26.14 - 04.02.14 // CLASSIFIEDS 39


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NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - March 26, 2014