Page 1


THISWEEK

ALWAYS FRESH ON NUVO.NET

Vol. 26 Issue 49 issue #1249

FROM THE EDITORS:

FOR NUVO, TRUMP IS NOW DRUMPF

09 K-12 FOOD RESCUE

31 LILY & MADELEINE

ED WENCK

AMBER STEARNS

MANAGING EDITOR

ewenck@nuvo.net

NEWS EDITOR

@edwenck

COVER

astearns@nuvo.net

09 NEWS

K-12 Food Rescue How one group is trying to divert untouched school food from Indiana’s landfills — and instead sending it to hungry people.

Between school lunch and the landfill.................................... P.09 LIVING GREEN We’ve got excerpts from our online column “Ask Renee” — she’s an expert on recycling items large and small.

Ask Renee.......................................... P.28

NEXT WEEK

15 TARKINGTON ART

EMILY TAYLOR

@amberlstearns

ARTS EDITOR

etaylor@nuvo.net

Undocumented immigrants are not eligible for Medicaid unless it is a medical emergency. As a result hundreds of people can’t access regular dialysis treatment until they are on the brink of death. One women’s story highlights the struggle of this ongoing roulette game of disaster. Plus, a federal court says Gov. Pence’s stance on Syrian refugees is national origin discrimination.

Dangers to the undocumented.......... P.06 VOICES Krull on Drumpf................................. P.04 Hoppe on Covanta............................ P.05 Savage Love...................................... P.35

CAVAN MCGINSIE

cmcginsie@nuvo.net

15 FOOD

The IMA will be hosting a show with portraits from Indiana author Booth Tarkington’s private collection. Women317 is gearing up for a night that will highlight the work of Latina immigrants. Did you know that Bin Laden once went shopping at a mall in Indianapolis? Neither did Hoosier author Doug Wissing until he dug into his new collection of essays. 

Booth Tarkington............................... P.15 Women317........................................ P.17 Doug Wissing..................................... P.19

You’re never too old to play dodgeball — especially if you’re playing on TRAMPOLINES.

On stands Wednesday, Mar. 9 2 THIS WEEK // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

BRIAN WEISS, ENGAGEMENT EDITOR

bweiss@nuvo.net

@bweiss14

Here’s what’s hot on NUVO.net currently: Late to the soul food party? We’ve compiled a list of the best soul food restaurants in Indy to catch you up. And relive The Children’s Museum’s big fundraiser this past weekend with our collection of photos.

@CavanRMcGinsie

SENIOR EDITOR/MUSIC EDITOR

kcoplen@nuvo.net

@tremendouskat

23 MUSIC

Food Network Star contestant and all-around badass Loreal Gavin (aka Butcher Babe), chats with Emily Taylor about her art, culinary chops, and her final hosted dinner in Indy. Plus, we give you an overview of where you should be getting your cold cuts and charcuterie in the Circle City.

The “Butcher Babe”........................... P.23 Cold cuts and charcuterie.................. P.25

29

Seth Johnson dials up Ty Segall and Charles Moothart before Moothart’s show at State Street Pub — which features a rare-ish appearance from Creeping Pink Monday at the FS spot. In a Cultural Manifesto, Kyle connects the dots between Bernie Sanders and Kurt Cobain; elsewhere I chat with Lily and Madeleine on the occasion of their third album release, and Paige finds Melanie Martinez on the eve of her national tour, which stops in Indy in a few weeks. Plus: Literally hundreds of concerts in Soundcheck.

Segall and Moothart......................... P.29 Lily and Madeleine............................ P.31 Kyle on Drumpf, Bernie and Kurt....... P.32

SCREENS Ed Johnson-Ott reviews Zootopia … P.20

WHAT’S HAPPENING ON THE WEB

SPORTS FOR EVERYBODY

KATHERINE COPLEN

FOOD & DRINK EDITOR

@emrotayl

06 ARTS

In keeping with John Oliver’s recent suggestion on his Last Week Tonight program that we all #MakeDonaldDrumpfAgain — Drumpf was the original Trump family name — we’re going along. If Dan Savage can singlehandedly create a “Google problem” for Rick Santorum, the least we can do is try and help take a xenophobic, racist “billionaire” down a few pegs, eh?

WE EFFED UP In last week’s issue of NUVO (Feb. 24-March 2, 2016), the story “Looking Up: How the Vonneguts built Indianapolis” had numerous issues with photo captions. Those issues have been corrected (and properly ID’d) in the online version of that story at NUVO.net.

CONTRIBUTORS EDITORS@NUVO.NET FILM EDITOR ED JOHNSON-OTT COPY EDITOR CHRISTINE BERMAN CONTRIBUTING EDITOR DAVID HOPPE CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS WAYNE BERTSCH, ERNIE MILLS

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS TRAVIS DINICOLA, DAN GROSSMAN, JAKE HARPER, SETH JOHNSON, RITA KOHN, JOHN KRULL, KYLE LONG, DAN SAVAGE, SAM WATERMEIER, PAIGE WATSON


8WORDS:

The expired thing in your fridge

OUR FRIENDS

ELLIOTT MOOSE via Facebook

You say moldy stroganoff, I call it procrastination.

ANDREA KUIECK

ANGELA NICOLESMITH SMAIL

via Facebook

The leftover Mexican food now speaks English.

via Facebook

Yogurt, my bacterialaden friend: are we still good?

DESIGN & PRODUCTION

ELAINE BENKEN

Production Manager / Art Director ebenken@nuvo.net

Any hope of a decent meal.

WILL MCCARTY

Senior Graphic Designer

It’s sure not birthday cake!

FRED LEAREY

ERIN CARR

Cream cheese...mmmh.

Chinese food’s stayed longer than my last relationship.

via Facebook

Graphic Designer

ADVERTISING & MARKETING

JAMES PACOVSKY

Director of Sales (317) 808-4614 jpacovsky@nuvo.net

Water filter; costs $35 at Sears to replace.

DREW DONOVAN

Account Executive (317) 808-4616 ddonovan@nuvo.net

Pizza coupons. So many pizza coupons.

VICKI KNORR

Senior Account Executive (317) 808-4612 vknorr@nuvo.net

Milk. It’s always milk.

KATELYN CALHOUN

Account Manager (317) 808-4615 kcalhoun@nuvo.net

So much cheese, so little time.

CASEY PARMERLEE

DAVID SEARLE

Account Executive (317) 808-4607 dsearle@nuvo.net

Hummus. Bad habit: can’t toss nearly-empty tubs.

JOEY SMITH

Events & Promotions Coordinator (317) 808-4618 jsmith@nuvo.net

Nothing! I eat all of the things!

Account Executive (317) 808-4613 cparmerlee@nuvo.net

I’m going to eat more salads!! (never happens)

EMILY GROUNDS

Sales & Promotions Coordinator (317) 808-4608 egrounds@nuvo.net

Condiments. Or a jar of pickles. Typical culprits.

ADMINISTRATION

KEVIN MCKINNEY

Editor & Publisher kmckinney@nuvo.net

It appears to be melting and smells bad.

BRADEN NICHOLSON

General Manager bnicholson@nuvo.net

Moldy veggies, good intentions, and shame.

KATHY FLAHAVIN

Business Manager kflahavin@nuvo.net

Nothing. Our dog likes green bologna!

SUSIE FORTUNE

Contracts sfortune@nuvo.net

Nothing I cleaned my fridge last weekend.

DISTRIBUTION

RYAN MCDUFFEE

Distribution Manager rmcduffee@nuvo.net

Can’t name them in 8 words.

DISTRIBUTION SUPPORT: SUSIE FORTUNE, DICK POWELL

Need more NUVO in your life? Contact Ryan if you’d like a NUVO circulation box or rack at your location! COURIER: DICK POWELL DISTRIBUTION: ARTHUR AHLFELDT, MEL BAIRD, LAWRENCE CASEY, JR., BOB COVERT, MIKE FLOYD, MIKE FREIJE, BILL HENDERSON, LORI MADDOX, DOUG MCCLELLAN, STEVE REYES, HAROLD SMITH, BOB SOOTS AND RON WHITSIT

HARRISON ULLMANN (1935-2000) EDITOR (1993-2000) ANDY JACOBS JR. (1932-2013) CONTRIBUTING (2003-2013)

MAILING ADDRESS: 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200, Indianapolis, IN 46208 TELEPHONE: Main Switchboard (317) 254-2400 FAX: (317)254-2405 WEB: NUVO.net DISTRIBUTION: The current issue of NUVO is free and available every Wednesday. Past issues are at the NUVO office for $3 if you come in, $4.50 mailed. Copyright ©2016 by NUVO, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction without written permission, by any method whatsoever, is prohibited. ISSN #1086-461X

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // THIS WEEK 3


VOICES I

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

DRUMPF AND THE GOP FIRING SQUAD

t’s a shame the early 20th-century humorist Will Rogers isn’t alive to edit one of his most famous remarks. “I don’t belong to any organized political party,” Rogers once quipped. “I’m a Democrat.” If Rogers were with us today, he’d likely be aiming that jab at Republicans, who are dealing with the possibility that Donald Drumpf might be their presidential candidate this fall with the sort of discipline and organization one normally sees from hyperactive toddlers who have been denied sleep and fed massive amounts of caffeine and sugar. They’d have to calm down quite a bit just to return to panic status. It’s always interesting to see how people react to stressful situations. Denial is one common response. U.S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kentucky, is an example of that approach. McConnell has been attempting to reassure his fellow Republican senators who are up for reelection this fall and worry that Drumpf’s presence at the top of the ticket will cost them votes – and perhaps their seats. McConnell tells his colleagues not to fret, because they can distance themselves from Drumpf. They can drop Drumpf “like a hot rock,” McConnell says. Really? And how does McConnell think the message that Republicans can’t govern their own party but they are ready to govern the country is going to play with voters? Doesn’t that approach also run the risk of telling

4 VOICES // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

THIS WEEK

the people who might vote for Drumpf that the Republican Senate candidates don’t care about them and don’t want their votes? Then there’s U.S. Sen. and GOP presidential candidate Marco Rubio, R-Florida, who in recent days has decided the best way to deal with Drumpf is to sink to the billionaire’s level. Starting with last Thursday’s debate, Rubio has attacked The Donald by delivering insults that range from sophomoric to snarling. Rubio has pounded Drumpf for hiring undocumented workers, for defrauding the public with Drumpf Uni-

JOHN KRULL EDITORS@NUVO.NET John Krull is director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism, host of “No Limits” WFYI 90.1 Indianapolis and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com.

Or has insulting people now become a new way to persuade them? But that’s the thing about panic. When people are this scared, they can’t think about anything but the danger that’s right in front The truth is that Republicans can’t of them. If they’re terrified of the oncoming semiwound Drumpf without wounding truck barreling straight at themselves. And, if they try to them, they’ll steer themselves right over the cliff destroy him, they risk destroying with the 2,000-foot drop to their right. themselves. That’s where the GOP is right now. The truth is that Republiversity and other ventures and, in a move cans can’t wound Drumpf without woundthat’s sure to soothe the tender sensibiliing themselves. And, if they try to destroy ties of old-money Republicans, for being a him, they risk destroying themselves. trust-fund baby. The even greater truth is that he’s a Rubio’s most telling shot – the refrain monster they made themselves. to which he keeps returning – is Drumpf A large part of Drumpf’s appeal is is “a con man” who is out to take over the that he says full-throated and in plain conservative movement by deluding and speech – immigrants are evil, anyone who betraying working people. disagrees with you is either weak, dumb That may be true, but Rubio’s line of or a traitor, etc. – that many rightwing attack also illustrates the problem Republicans have said in whispers and in Republicans have in dealing code for decades. with Drumpf. That’s why the McConnells, the Rubios If The Donald is nothing and even the Karl Roves (who apparently but a huckster, doesn’t that is trying to shop various “stop Drumpf” mean the people who strategies to conservative funders) have vote for him are been so flummoxed. They can’t attack rubes too stupid Drumpf without attacking themselves. to see through Once again, Will Rogers could offer aphis con? propriate commentary. How do Rubio Long ago, he made a quip about the and other Repubway Democrats form a firing squad. licans plan to bring those He said they arrange themselves in a Drumpf voters back into the circle and then shoot back toward the fold after telling them, over and center. over again, that they are simpleIt appears Republicans have taken that minded morons for falling for the not as a joke, but as a campaign strategy. n bombastic billionaire’s shtick?


THIS WEEK

I

VOICES

A RECYCLING REBOOT

s recycling important to Indianapolis, or not? This week’s Indiana Court of Appeals decision, nullifying the Ballard administration’s 2014 deal with Covanta to set up a commingled trash-recycling center, begs a question the city has been ducking for years. Curbside recycling has been available in Indianapolis for over two decades. But unlike other communities, where recycling is an integrated part of regular waste disposal services, Indy city administrations have insisted on making recycling optional, something households could choose to do, or not, depending on whether they paid a special fee.

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

BRINGING COMEDY TO INDY FOR 34 YEARS

DAVID HOPPE DHOPPE@NUVO.NET David Hoppe has been writing columns for NUVO since the mid-1990s. Find him online at NUVO.net/Voices.

what it collected into energy. Some of it would have made it to the commodities market. The rest would have gone the way of most American waste: into a landfill. And there’s the rub. Depending on who you talk to, the problem with commingling is that a lot of what otherwise might be recycled, like glass, gets ground into trash, and is not recycled at all. But then there are those who will tell you that the commodities markets for recyclables have never materialized as promised. That turning trash into profit is proving harder — and more energy intensive — than The city’s message has been that anyone expected. Profitability, when recycling is a kind of lifestyle choice. it comes to recycling, would be sweet. It has undoubtedly lured some policymakers into thinking they could do The unsurprising result is that fewer right and make money at it — the civic than 10 percent of city households have equivalent of hitting the jackpot. engaged in regular recycling. But profitability has never been the The city’s message has been that recyfirst principle of recycling. First and forecling is a kind of lifestyle choice, a way most, recycling is about recognizing and for citizens who can afford the monthly trying to come to terms with our almost fee to feel like they are doing their bit incalculable capacity to produce waste. to save the planet. Call it boutique From last season’s iPhone to the foil environmentalism. around a Hershey’s kiss, we humans leave Making recycling optional has triviala trail, not of breadcrumbs but of junk, ized the concept. Worse, it has reinforced much of it toxic, in our collective wake. the notion that environmental sustainRecycling is a way of making us pause, for ability is a luxury, an indulgence for a at least a moment, to think about this. certain social class that everybody else Is that important, or not? n can ignore without consequence. The city’s unwillingness to truly commit to recycling from a policymaking standpoint helps to account for why the Ballard administration was attracted to the Covanta deal. Commingling trash and recycling would have spared citizens the pesky process of having to separate items like metal, glass and paper from all their other guck. Having to think about this, er, stuff, is why the local household recycling rate is so low. At least that’s what the Ballard administration claimed. Not having to think: This was the beauty of the Covanta deal. By allowing everyone to simply throw their trash away, in one commingled blob, the city’s recycling rate would jump to 100 percent. Covanta would have turned some of

BROAD RIPPLE

ARI SHAFFIR MAR 3-5

NEW PARKING GARAGE ACROSS STREET

6281 N. COLLEGE AVE. • 317-255-4211

IN FREE THURSDAY LADIES COLLEGE ID NITE $5 TEXT CRACKERS TO 82202 FOR SPECIAL VIP DEALS!

UPCOMING: NICK GRIFFIN

MAR 10-12

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // VOICES 5


WHAT HAPPENED?

NEWS

THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

DANGERS FOR THE UNDOCUMENTED Federal court sides with Exodus on Syrian refugee resettlement It’s yet another smack in the face by a federal court for Gov. Mike Pence. U.S. District Court Judge Tonya Walton Pratt ruled in favor of Exodus Refugee Immigration in its complaint against the governor for his decree to deny access to assistance for Syrian refugees. In her decision, Pratt stated that, “The State’s conduct clearly discriminates against Syrian refugees based on their national origin.” The ACLU of Indiana and the national American Civil Liberties Union represented the local nonprofit agency in its lawsuit against Pence and the director of the Family and Social Services Administration. Exodus challenged Pence’s directive to all state agencies to withhold federal grant funds to all refugee resettlement agencies for social services directed toward Syrian refugees attempting to settle in Indiana. Pence then requested Exodus and Catholic Charities to stop settling Syrian refugees in Indiana for security reasons. Exodus’s lawsuit, filed in November, sought an injunction to stop the governor from taking any actions to suspend, block or withhold aid from refugees or from Exodus. In her decision, Pratt determined Pence’s position was one of discrimination. “Although the State says it has a compelling reason for doing so — the safety of Indiana residents — the withholding of federal funds from Exodus that it would use to provide social services to Syrian refugees in no way furthers the State’s asserted interest in the safety of Indiana residents.” The governor has instructed the Attorney General to seek an immediate stay and appeal of the district court’s order. “As governor I have no higher priority than the safety and security of the people of Indiana. During these uncertain times, we must always err on the side of caution,” said Pence following the release of the court’s decision. “So long as the Obama administration continues to refuse to address gaps in the screening of Syrian refugees acknowledged by the FBI and a bipartisan majority in Congress, Hoosiers can be assured that my administration will continue to use every legal means available to suspend this program in Indiana unless and until federal officials take steps to ensure the safety and security of our citizens.” — AMBER STEARNS 6 NEWS // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

PHOTO COURTESY OF WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Medicaid rules are causing undocumented immigrants to get ‘bad care for high costs’

C

BY J A K E H A RP ER, SIDE EFFECTS PUBLIC MEDIA ED I T O R S @ N U V O . N E T

arla used to get dialysis a couple of times a week at the public hospital in Indianapolis, Eskenazi Hospital. She would sit in a chair for hours as a machine took blood out of her arm, cleaned it, and pumped it back into her body. Then one day in 2014, she was turned away. She says even though her lungs were full of fluid, her doctors told her that her condition wasn’t urgent enough to treat that day. “I explained to the doctors that I couldn’t breathe and they told me it wasn’t true, that I had to wait three more days,” she recalls. So she waited as toxins continued to build up in her blood and fluid gathered in her lungs. Standard treatment for people with kidney failure is to give dialysis every two to three days. But at that

point, Carla was getting it about every 10 days, and sometimes ended up in the ICU because her symptoms were so severe. “I was like that for three months,

immune disease lupus she’s had since her early 20s. To stay alive, she needs regular dialysis treatment, but getting that has been difficult as an undocumented immigrant. (Her legal status is why we’re not using “It’d be one thing if it was better care for her last name). Carla can’t afmore cost, or worse care for low cost, but ford private health insurance. And like it’s bad care for high cost. It’s the worst the estimated 5,500 possible answer.” undocumented immigrants in the — DR. MICHAEL GARDNER, HOUSTON, TX U.S. who need dialysis, the only publicly-funded insurance she’s eligible for is a govsuffering, throwing up. I couldn’t eat ernment program called Emergency anything,” she says. “It was really hard Medicaid. for my daughter and my mom and dad But in most states, including Indiana, to see me like that.” hospitals can’t bill Emergency Medicaid Carla is just 31 but her kidneys no until they know for sure they’re dealing longer function, damaged by the autowith an emergency. So for kidney disease,


THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

citizens should be covered by Emergency Medicaid. “They’re here, they’re working and live with us, they are part of our communities,” says Michael Gardner, a doctor and hospital “You see them one day and then you see administrator in them two months later, and they’ve aged Houston, Texas who deals with and you can see the suffering…You know this issue. “To that they they might die before you see them again.” ignore require health — DR. MELISSA ANDERSON, INDIANAPOLIS care like anyone else in the country — I think it’s morally suspect and I think it’s fiscally foolish.” Carla’s doctor, Melissa Anderson, is a He says it’s “fiscally foolish” because it nephrologist in Indianapolis. She says costs a lot more to wait for emergencies. she quit working at Eskenazi partly Instead of just paying for dialysis, you because repeatedly delaying dialysis end up with more expenses, such as ER harms the patients. charges, lab charges, X-ray charges, and “You see them one day and then you medication charges. see them two months later, and they’ve In a paper published in 2007, reaged and you can see the suffering…You know they might die before you see them searchers from Baylor University found emergency treatment is 3.7 times as again,” she says. “It’s heart-wrenching.” expensive as regular dialysis — costing For many doctors who treat kidney more than $280,000 a year per patient. disease, it’s an ethical issue. In fact, the Renal Physicians Association published a statement saying that dialysis for nonS E E , U N DOC U M E N T E D , O N P A GE 0 8 doctors will often wait until there are dangerous levels of potassium in the blood or fluid in the lungs — levels they deem urgent enough to merit hospitalization.

A report by the Indiana University Robert H. McKinney School of Law Health and Human Rights Clinic found the following:

• Currently, there are estimated 85,000 undocumented immigrants living in Indiana.

• Undocumented Hoosiers pay an estimated $108.9 million in taxes annually in Indiana alone, and generate nearly $3 billion each year in economic activity in the state.

• Undocumented immigrants are barred from most federally-funded government programs like Medicare and non-emergency Medicaid indefinitely. Legally-present immigrants face waiting periods of up to five years before being granted access to programs.

• The U.S. government estimates about half of all undocumented immigrants in the U.S. pay income taxes.

• Undocumented immigrants pay about $15 billion per year into Social Security, but only access about $1 billion per year.

• For reasons that seem genetic but are still poorly understood, ESRD is disproportionately present among Mexicans and Mexican-Americans.

• Although 1% of harvested organs come from undocumented persons, that population is usually excluded from receiving transplants.

• To read the entire report, “Dialysis Access for Undocumented Immigrants in Indiana” go to nuvo.net.

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // NEWS 7


THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

UNDOCUMENTED, FROM PAGE 07 And taxpayers are footing the bill. “It’d be one thing if it was better care for more cost, or worse care for low cost, but it’s bad care for high cost. It’s the worst possible answer,” says Gardner. He says one better answer is charity care. For instance, Gardner runs a program at the Riverside Clinic in Houston that gives free dialysis to 176 people, primarily undocumented immigrants. Another solution is for states to change their Medicaid guidelines to treat the need for regular dialysis as an emergency, so hospitals can bill Medicaid for it. Some states, such as California and New York, have already done that. But in Indiana, a bill to fix the issue — authored by state Sen. Jean Breaux — has died in committee for the past two years. For Carla the short-term solution was charity care. A local hospital lent her in-home equipment to do peritoneal dialysis. Every night before bed, Carla connects a tube to an opening in her abdomen. The other end of the tube connects to a machine about the size of a couch cushion. While she sleeps, it pumps fluid into her abdomen to clean her blood.

5,500

UNDOCUMENTED

Approximately 5,500 undocumented immigrants in the United States need dialysis due to end stage renal disease.

THINKSTOCK

The real goal is to get off dialysis for good. Carla’s doctor has told her that a transplant would be ideal for her, and her brother is even willing to donate a kidney. But her undocumented status means she has no way to get coverage for a transplant operation. She’ll need a visa for that. She applied two years ago, and she’s still waiting for it to come through. n Side Effects Public Media is a collaborative health reporting project based at WFYI in Indianapolis. Jake Harper can be reached at 317-614-0482 or jharper@wfyi.org. Follow him @jkhrpr

$280,000 PER PATIENT

Emergency treatment for undocumented immigrants with ESRD costs $280,000 per patient — 3.7 times more than the cost of regular dialysis.

For the last two years, Sen. Jean Breaux (D-Indianapolis) has authored legislation to help undocumented immigrants in Indiana get the dialysis care they needed. SB 276 (2016) and SB 542 (2015) would have required the office of Medicaid Policy and Planning to apply to the United States Department of Health and Human Services for a Medicaid state plan amendment or demonstration waiver to provide kidney dialysis treatment for undocumented immigrants who have been a resident of Indiana for at least one year and have been diagnosed with end stage renal disease. Both bills were assigned to the Senate Health and Provider Services Committee where they died without a hearing. Sen. Pat Miller, (R-Indianapolis) chairs the Senate Health and Provider Services Committee. 8 NEWS // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO


J

BETWEEN SCHOOL LUNCH AND THE LANDFILL K-12 FOOD RESCUE DIVERTS FOOD WASTE FROM LANDFILLS

BY ED WENCK EWENCK@NUVO.NET • PHOTOS BY ERNIE MILLS

ohn Williamson doesn’t quite cut the figure that brings the word “activist” to mind. Phys ed teacher? Sure. That’s his training, a Ball State degree that led to a stint in elementary education. A quick study with a quicker smile, Williamson looks like The Guy in the Next Cubicle. Or Jim Gaffigan’s Second Cousin, maybe. Nonetheless, through Williamson’s efforts, Indiana leads the nation when it comes to reducing school food waste — and sending that nutrition to the needy. The concept’s simple: untouched, unopened and unpeeled food that school kids don’t eat goes into a bin. Then, that bin is refrigerated and then picked up by what’s called a “caring agency” — often a food pantry or a shelter or some other charitable organization. It’s such a simple act. So simple that the minimal effort involved might make the gesture seem almost insignificant.

>>> NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // COVER STORY 9


(LEFT TO RIGHT) DEBBIE DIAZ, JOHN WILLIAMSON, WALTER HAZELWOOD, PASTOR FRED KNOLL. (TOP RIGHT) RESCUED PIZZA FROM LITTLE CAESARS, (BOTTOM RIGHT) MILK RESCUED FROM PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

FOOD RESCUE ,

F R O M P A G E 09

he wants every school in the state (heck, in the nation) to see the food rescue movement as critically important. Tailoring that message without looking too critical can be tricky. The concept that became K-12 Food Rescue started with a conversation Williamson had with his wife in 2007: “My wife read to me an article about freegans … [people] who get food out of trashcans, but they’re not homeless. I’m like,

That is, until you consider the following: Schools in the United States trash one billion food items a year. Americans waste 40 percent of the food we’re making. A frightening portion of that food (and its attendant packaging) is trucked into landfills and incinerators, leaving a methane-andsmoke footprint that’s incredibly harmful. And all of that waste “I get edgy because there is so much could be feeding our neighbors: In Indiana, at stake. I sometimes feel like I have one in six people are hungry right now. failed in those instances … knowing Williamson doesn’t all the children and families who wear his activism like a badge — until, that is, he might have benefited.” starts talking about food waste, landfills, public — JOHN WILLIAMSON, school kids and people K-12 FOOD RESCUE with food insecurity. Williamson has found a way to feed his passion and feed the needy, and, in turn, feed less to Indiana’s landfills. “Are you kidding me? Why would that Williamson and Jennifer Carmack food not be going to families and chilBrilliant, a former broadcast news dren in need rather than people who are reporter who’s now a program director just trying to make a political statement for K-12 FR (and who covered John’s to bring attention to the issue?” work on two different TV outlets in town Williamson, as anyone who knows the before taking the position), meet me man quickly learns, doesn’t exactly have to talk about the program. The two are the apathy gene. overflowing with info, but Williamson has to temper his zeal with caution — 10 COVER STORY // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

FROM LITTLE CAESARS TO THE LUNCHROOM Carmack explains: “[Initially, John] was very concerned about how much waste we as Americans participate in. And he wanted to do something about it. He reached out to Panera, Little Caesars, and a couple of other restaurants to find out what they do with their leftovers. When they expressed interest in donating some of their leftovers, he coordinated an effort with his friends for volunteers to pick up the food to take it to places like Third Phase, which is a battered women’s shelter in Noblesville.” “I went down to Whole Foods, and Walmart and Panera and they all said they had it completely under control — ‘We give to this organization and that organization,’” Williamson recalls. “But Panera said, ‘No, we have 11 Paneras around the city and a lot of them are throwing [the day’s leftovers] out.’ So my wife and I started picking up food one day a week at one Panera in Noblesville, then two, then four.” “Then we sent emails to our friends and our friends were like ‘Yes, we’d love to help,’ and then we started picking up at Einstein’s and Paradise.” Next, Williamson and company managed to hook the food-waste equivalent of a great white whale: Little Caesars Pizza. As it turns out, the Little Caesars model — having pies ready-

made to go — can make for quite a bit of daily waste. Williamson shares the stats via email: “We’ve connected 154 Little Caesars franchises with caring agencies to pick pizzas and prevent them from going into landfills. [In 2015] that’s 21 stores with 100,000 pizzas donated to caring agencies instead of landfills. If you consider 2 pieces of pizza a meal, that’s over 400,000 meals from those 21 stores alone.” Since Williamson had spent nine years as an elementary ed teacher in Carmel, he figured there was one more source that had to be chucking vast amounts of ready edibles: public school cafeterias. Brilliant says, “Two years ago, the focus shifted from restaurants to K-12 schools. What we’re seeing in Indiana alone is approximately 22 million pieces of unused, unopened, unwanted food going into landfills each year. These are items that kids, for a myriad of reasons, decide they don’t want to eat. So instead of throwing this perfectly good and nutritious food away, we partner the K-12 schools with a caring agency. They coordinate a pickup schedule and the school puts out a bin near the trays and trash for the unopened, unwanted, unpeeled


food to go into. We’re talking about items like milk, yogurt cups, unpeeled fruit, prepackaged fruits and vegetables, peanut butter crackers. The bin is then taken into the fridge until the caring agency comes for pickup. At that point, the food is then redistributed to people in need.”

BENEFIT ONE:

Less food rotting away at the dump.

BENEFIT TWO:

Hungry people eat. “This saves all of that food from going into landfills, which produces methane gas — 21 times more potent than CO2.” (Brilliant’s referring to the methane’s effect on climate change — and her figures are actually a bit conservative.) “The other element of food rescue that was very appealing to me is the student focus of the organization. Our generation created this mess with food waste — we aren’t going to be the ones to fix it. “The kids will be the ones to fix it.”

APPLES, APATHY AND THE LAW So here’s the challenge: “The first thing to do is teach the kids the value of food. You can’t tell a kid, “Look at this apple, it’s so nutritious!’” says Brilliant. “But if you don’t eat it, you don’t want it, go ahead and throw it in the trash. Instead, you have to teach the child that it’s okay to not eat food that you don’t want to eat.” And when the time comes to clear the tray, that food, those uneaten, untouched leftovers can go to someone who needs them. “We don’t have third world country hunger here but we do have food insecurity,” says Brilliant. By that, she means that although we — as a state and a nation — produce plenty to feed everyone, but making sure that the healthy eats make it to the hungry bellies is the challenge. “It’s not a food supply issue in this country. It’s a food distribution issue. We have the food. We are throwing it away at an alarming rate. We are throwing so much food away that in this country, we could fill Lucas Oil Stadium up to the brim every single day, every day of the year with good food that we throw away. “So, by engaging the kids, you are doing two things. You are teaching them the value of food, which will then change the course of food waste for the next generation. But you’re also empowering these kids, even at a young age, to show them that they can change the world. You can help feed someone S E E , FO OD RE SCUE, O N P AG E 12

LUNCH, KIDS, FOOD DESERTS AND MICHELLE OBAMA Beyond the idea that some food not consumed in school can help the needy, John Williamson and Jennifer Carmack Brilliant of K-12 Food Rescue are painfully aware that the notion of waste reduction on the front has become a political football. (Google “Michelle Obama school food” and watch the horror show.) Brilliant and Williamson have a counter for that rhetoric. Jennifer Carmack Brilliant: “With the changing landscape of the school lunch, I always like to tell this story: I used to be a volunteer counselor at children’s burn camp. Many of these kids that were burn survivors, well, their lives were tough long before their burn injuries ever happened. One day for snack, we had apples. A 7-year-old girl was just staring at the basket. I said “Do you not like apples?” And she said “We can’t eat those. Those aren’t real.” .” It took me 40 minutes to explain to her to explain to her that this was an apple, and you take an apple to make applesauce and apple juice. But first, it’s an apple. It’s not made of plastic; it’s not made of wax. It’s a real fruit that you can actually bite into and enjoy. She had never even eaten a fresh apple in her life. And she was 7 years old. And if you think that’s not a real case, you need to visit some of the more challenged neighborhoods in Indianapolis and talk to kids. They just don’t have access to fresh fruits and vegetables. So, if you place this food on a plate in a cafeteria and they have no reference point to it in their lives, they’re not going to eat it. They’re just not. . Especially when you consider that oftentimes most of their food is purchased at a convenience store. It will take time and education to change that.“ John Williamson: “I told my wife yesterday, “I can go to McDonald’s and get a meal for $3. We can’t make a meal for our family of 4 with that much. And it’s typically not good for you. And you’re going to pay for that on the healthcare side of things. We aren’t choosing sides of the political debate, we are just pointing out that there are two sides.” Jennifer Carmack Brilliant: “First and foremost, we want the kids to eat the food they have at lunch. But I invite you to go to the cafeteria and spend time with the kids. It’s a multi-faceted issue as to why kids don’t eat their lunch. And there are studies that show, on the USDA’s website, that if you schedule lunch directly after recess, the kids consume 30 percent more of their lunch. If you stretch lunch from 20 minutes, which is what it is across the board thanks to standardized testing, to to 30 minutes, waste is reduced by one-third. I have a 5-year-old, a Kindergartner in IPS.. I have a 5-year-old, a kindergartner at Butler Lab. And the kid comes home with a full lunchbox almost every single day. My child doesn’t miss a meal. This kid, I think he has a hollow leg. But at lunch, he doesn’t eat. And he says he’s too busy talking. It’s his time to be social. The other issue is, his lunch period is at 10:45 in the morning. But when I pick him up in the car, he’s cramming everything down that’s in his lunchbox.” NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // COVER STORY 11


LUNCH BY THE NUMBERS

1 BILLION

USABLE, EDIBLE FOOD ITEMS UNEATEN BY U.S. SCHOOL KIDS EVERY YEAR

22 MILLION

USABLE, EDIBLE FOOD ITEMS UNEATEN BY INDIANA SCHOOL KIDS EVERY YEAR

A GUEST “SHOPS” AT WHITE RIVER CHRISTIAN CHURCH’S FOOD PANTRY.

FOOD RESCUE ,

200

APPROXIMATE NUMBER OF INDIANA SCHOOLS INVOLVED IN FOOD RESCUE

2,000+

APPROXIMATE NUMBER OF SCHOOLS IN INDIANA

60

AVERAGE NUMBER OF ITEMS RESCUED DAILY FROM A SINGLE SCHOOL

You read that correctly. It wasn’t until 2011 that the law regarding cafeteria food rescue was clarified and schools were althat is hungry, you can save our environ- lowed to give their leftovers to the needy. ment, and you can literally change the The Good Samaritan Food Act, a product world,” says Brilliant. of the Clinton administration, protected Currently, roughly 10 percent of Indidonors from liability — simply put, exceptana schools are involved in food rescue, ing cases of gross negligence, recipients of 270 out of over 2,000 statewide. “It seems donated food couldn’t sue the donor if the like a no-brainer that all of these schools food harmed the recipient. The law further should participate but there are plenty of standardized “liability exposure,”which differed by state, and set the parameters for that aforementioned “gross “One of the biggest barriers we face negligence.” Brilliant wants to is a lot of the schools don’t think this clarify: The original law had only been directed is legal. And there was a time that at restaurants. Schools hadn’t been mentioned this wasn’t [perceived as] legal.” per se, so the assumption was made that the — JENNIFER CARMACK BRILLIANT, lunchroom couldn’t K-12 FOOD RESCUE participate. “It was just one of those things that was overlooked and no one addressed. Giving the barriers,” says Brilliant. She continues: schools those protections, that opens the “One of the biggest barriers we face is a door to encourage schools to participate. lot of the schools don’t think this is legal. It goes a step further because not only is And there was a time that this wasn’t it perfectly legal but the USDA and EPA [perceived as] legal. But in 2011, the encourage schools to participate. “ National School Lunch Act was amended Now some really good news for [to clarify] that schools have the same Indiana’s battered rep, both in educaprotections as restaurants under the tion and beyond: As mentioned earlier, Good Samaritan Laws.” the Hoosier State is at the forefront of

12 COVER STORY // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

F R O M P A G E 11

school-food-donation program. “Indiana is in a very unique situation because we are one of two states —it’s us and California — that have state guidelines for schools to donate. And the crazy thing about this is, no one knows about this. Legislators don’t know that this exists,” says a perplexed Brilliant. Williamson’s lobbying efforts with the Indiana Department of Education and the Indiana State Department of Health put the Hoosier state at the forefront of such initiatives. According to Williamson, he’s now advising other states on crafting guidelines, including progressive strongholds such as Vermont.

EDUCATING THE EDUCATORS As the food rescue evangelists try to take their message to more Indiana counties and even other states, they also encounter a few other obstacles; namely, fear and overwork. The fear’s understandable: From test scores to teacher burnout, public school educators are wary of anything that might be perceived as pushing the limits of legality. That’s why supporting documents from the Feds are front and center on the Food Rescue website: “It explains that it’s not only legal, its encouraged” — by the EPA and other federal agencies. “John and I face the challenge every-


OMG FACTS

&

AMERICANS THROW AWAY ROUGHLY 40 PERCENT OF THEIR EDIBLE FOOD. THAT’S ENOUGH TO FILL LUCAS OIL STADIUM TO THE TOP EVERY DAY.

day of removing the stumbling [blocks] that stop schools from participating, from thinking that this is illegal to, ‘We don’t have the room or the staff,’ ” says Brilliant. “There are already so many mandates on schools that there’s the mentality that they couldn’t possibly take on one more thing. But when you talk to a school that’s participating, they’ll tell you it’s not that big of a deal.” It’s even less of a big deal when the kids take ownership. The S.L.E.I. program (pronounced “sleigh”), standing for Student Lead Entrepreneur Initiative, was the brainchild of a student at the University of Maryland who’d become familiar with Williamson’s group via the K-12 Food Rescue website. Ben Simon — who was 20 years old when he began his mission — started finding ways to move untouched cafeteria leftovers into the pantries of caring agencies. Simon’s initiatives spread to other campuses across the nation. Here in Indiana, the kids that were participating initially found that an average of 45 items a day stayed out of Indiana landfills and made it into local food pantries. The idea began to spread, aided by student-produced video shorts that explained the concept and dramatically outlined the stats. “Those kids would count the food and provide us with statistics and make videos to inspire others. … We have robotics teams, Key Clubs, special needs kids, which opens up another door of opportunity for these kids to really feel like they can change the world. The S.L.E.I. program is written for high school kids but I firmly believe that kindergarteners can do this program. We’re talking about counting food and having kids tell us how many milks they are collecting.” And the average of recovered food-

ROTTING FOOD IN LANDFILLS PRODUCES METHANE, WHICH, ACCORDING TO THE EPA, HAS A POUND-FOR-POUND IMPACT ON CLIMATE CHANGE THAT’S MORE THAN 25 TIMES GREATER THAN CO2 OVER A 100-YEAR PERIOD.

stuffs is climbing, says Brilliant: “What we’re seeing from most schools is about 60 items a day.” As long as a school makes the simple commitment to simply provide a bin. “I just [heard] from a lady in Kentucky who was a food service director,” says Williamson in an email. “She said there were 100,010 students in 150 schools in  Kentucky. Lots of back and forth but in the end they decided they were just too busy. It was just an incredibly sad day, because we know how much food was involved in that decision.    Williamson’s voice rises a little. “I get edgy because there is so much at stake.  I sometimes feel like I have failed in those instances ... knowing all the children and families who might have benefited.

SATURDAY APRIL 30

FOYT WINE VAULT SPEEDWAY, IN

12 Indiana Breweries Unlimited Sampling And craft beer’s idea of fashion BUY B UY Y YOUR OUR TTICKETS ICKETS N NOW: OW: NUVO.NET/TICKETS NUVO.NET/TICKETS

Adam Schick Managing Editor at Indiana on Tap and runway model?

THE PANTRY Hamilton County is often perceived as exclusively well-to-do, a bedroom community for Indy’s mid-and-upper-level executives. From the booming town of Fishers to the high-end Carmel art galleries, it’s tough to imagine that anyone in the county might be going to bed hungry. The food pantry at the White River Christian Church paints a different picture. On Thursday afternoons, the pantry’s open for business — and business is booming. Pastor Fred Knoll is greeting those the church is serving. There’s a massive waiting room to keep the floor of the pantry organized. When a family’s name is called, a volunteer walks the “shopper” through the pantry, offering one-on-one guidance. S E E , F OOD R E S C U E , O N P A GE 1 4 NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // COVER STORY 13


ALL OF THE NOBLESVILLE SCHOOLS AND FOUR HSE ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS DONATE TO THE WRCC FOOD PANTRY. (RIGHT) DIAZ AND KNOLL.

FOOD RESCUE ,

F R O M P A G E 13

Shoppers are issued bags, the number dependent on the size of the family. The amount that a family can take, though, isn’t necessarily limited to the bag; some items — bread, for example — are plentiful enough that a few loaves aren’t required to be placed in the sack. Knoll, Bible in hand, is happy to offer his testimony, but listening isn’t required. Although the sprawling WRCC campus is clearly an evangelical place of worship and outreach, this food pantry is a no-questions-asked, no-worshiprequired operation. And although this pantry’s run by Debbie Diaz, Pastor Knoll, WRCC and a full complement of volunteers, Willliamson and his organization’s fingerprints cover the placet: Stacks of Little Caesars’ pizza boxes grace one table, crates full of single-serve school milk cartons cover another. All of the Noblesville schools donate, along with four HSE elementary schools. But the need vastly outweighs just items that can be rescued. “Gleaner’s food bank has bumped up [donations] to twice a month now — we have a huge partnership with Meijer … which is our greatest financial donor.” A volunteer, Walter Hazelwood, stands in front of a cooler, handing out milk. Those industrial size fridges have been donated by places like Starbucks and City Barbecue.

very concerned that you don’t want to give an incentive to children to donate — ’cause it does feel good to give. So you don’t want a kid grabbing an apple just to put it in the bin.” “But when they do grab that apple and they’re chatting with the kid next to them instead of eating that apple, we want someone to be able to eat that apple instead of it rotting in a landfill,” says Brilliant. And Williamson adds, “We say that every kid deserves the right to make a better choice than feeding a landfill and ignoring hungry children and families.” “We say that every kid deserves But it’s the broader community that’s going to the right to make a better choice make K-12 Food Rescue’s than feeding a landfill and ignoring efforts ubiquitous — and the idea that kids are hungry children and families.” schooling the adults about food waste is marketing — JOHN WILLIAMSON, gold. Williamson underK-12 FOOD RESCUE stands the impact of social media: “I go to the local TV station’s Facebook feeds. When they post a story, it gets like 15 to 75 shares. A piece about from Noblesville Schools, though, and us that aired on WRTV the other day got Williamson again stresses that distincshared 817 times. tion: It’s K-12 Food Rescue, not “dona“People are interested in this school tion.” food waste much more than the regular “The environmental issue is actually food waste that I’ve been talking about a gift,” Williamson explains. “It’s a gift to for years. get the food donated. Because the food “It’s hitting a nerve.” n service directors understand and are “We get about 240 to 250 families every Thursday,” says Knoll. “In terms of retail value, per family that goes out the door … it averages about 75 dollars per family.” “What makes WRCC unique as far as food rescue is that there are teachers in the community that are part of the congregation are the ones that are bringing the food and making the deliveries,” says Williamson. There’s one difference between what comes from Gleaners and what comes

14 COVER STORY // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

MORE INFO K-12 FOOD RESCUE’S WEBSITE IS • K12FOODRESCUE.COM • FOODRESCUE.NET TO SEE THE SCHOOLS THAT ARE ALREADY INVOLVED IN THE PROGRAM • K12FOODRESCUE.COM/ACTIVE-SCHOOLS JOHN WILLIAMSON CAN BE CONTACTED AT • JW@FOODRESCUE.NET • (317) 694-4006 THE EPA HAS A WEALTH OF INFO ON FOOD WASTE AND RECOVERY HERE: • EPA.GOV/SUSTAINABLE-MANAGEMENT-FOOD SCHOOLS INTERESTED IN THE USDA’S “FOOD WASTE CHALLENGE” CAN FIND DETAILS HERE: • USDA.GOV//OCE/FOODWASTE/JOIN.HTM


VISUAL

MORE BOOTH THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

BEHIND BOOTH TARKINGTON

Portraits from the Gentleman’s Collection at the IMA

TARKINGTON IN THE MOVIES Long before Pittsburgh substituted for Indianapolis in the 2014 film adaptation of John Green’s young adult novel The Fault in Our Stars, Orson Welles directed an adaptation of Booth Tarkington’s Pulitzer-Prize winning novel The Magnificent Ambersons (1942). The novel, published in 1918, documents the decline of an old money family due, in part, to the advent of the automobile. While the story of Tarkington’s novel was set in turn of the century Indianapolis, the film was shot in various locales in and around Los Angeles. Against Welles’ wishes, the movie’s length was cut considerably by the film studio and given an upbeat ending. Despite these changes the movie was nominated for 4 Academy Awards In 2002, the A&E Network shot The Magnificent Ambersons as an original film for television using Welles’ original script and production notes. (Seeing the long, hard slog of the A&E version, you may get some idea why the studio decided to cut the movie down to a viewable length.)

Booth Tarkington by James Montgomery Flagg.

T

B Y D A N GR O SSMA N ARTS@NUVO . N ET

he name Booth Tarkington should ring familiar if you’re an Indianapolis resident — especially if you’re an alumnus of the old Shortridge High School or live in Indy’s ButlerTarkington neighborhood, much less if you’re familiar with his novels. (Let’s just say that Tarkington as a novelist is as far away from the sciencefantasy of the late Kurt Vonnegut — a fellow Shortridge alumnus — as you can get. Take, for example, one of Tarkington’s most famous novels The Magnificent Ambersons which is dense with all things late Victorian: parlors, manners, and dress. It’s a love story that might seem overstuffed to the contemporary reader, but not to Orson Welles. He turned the plot into a movie in 1942.)

SHOW

A GENTLEMAN COLLECTOR FROM INDIANA: PORTRAITS FROM THE COLLECTION OF BOOTH TARKINGTON

WHEN: FEB. 26, 2016 – FEB. 26, 2017 WHERE: INDIANAPOLIS MUSEUM OF ART, 4 0 00 N . M I C H I G A N R O A D TICKETS: FREE IMA MEMBERS AND AGES 5 & U N D E R , $18 A D U L T S , $10 Y O U T H A G E S 6-17

Anyway, Tarkington — like Vonnegut — was something of a sketch artist, and a passionate collector of art. The IMA exhibition A Gentleman Collector from Indiana: Portraits from the Collection of Booth Tarkington, which runs until Feb. 26, 2017, explores Tarkington’s passion for portraiture using six paintings from his own collection (all now part of the IMA’s) as a point of departure. A high-

light is a portrait of Tarkington himself by James Montgomery Flagg. Reproductions of Tarkington’s own drawings — the originals of which are housed in the Princeton University archives — are also featured. A Gentleman Collector from Indiana is one of the IMA’s special exhibitions celebrating Indiana’s 2016 Bicentennial. The exhibition is curated by Dr. Jacquelyn N. Coutré, the Bader Curator and Researcher of European Art at Agnes Etherington Art Centre in Kingston, Ontario. Coutré answered the following questions by email. NUVO: What kind of painting was Tarkington interested in collecting? Why his particular interest in portraiture?

S E E , T A R KI N GT O N , O N P A GE 1 6

Tarkington’s novel Alice Adams also got the film treatment. In this 1935 feature, Katharine Hepburn playing the role of Alice, a woman from a lower middle class who tries to conceal her family’s poverty in order to woo the man with whom she falls in love. This man who just so happens to be engaged to a debutante from the richest family in their small Midwestern town. The film has an engaging love story, but also contains some unfortunate historical aspects, such as the Adams’ character referring to African-Americans as “darkies.” The movie’s also interesting from a sociological/linguistic perspective because of the cultivated Transatlantic accent employed by Hepburn. This accent, which sorta sounds like a mishmash of British English and Brooklynese, was the Hollywood standard at the time, a state of affairs wryly noted in a 2013 article in the Atlantic Monthly entitled “The Rise and Fall of Katharine Hepburn’s Fake Accent.” (This article provides a great explanation about why all the actors in the movies from the ’30s and ‘40s sound so funny.) The funny thing is that Hepburn’s accent actually works in Alice Adams because her character is all about putting on airs — and so is the accent. —DAN GROSSMAN

NUVO.NET/VISUAL Visit nuvo.net/visual for complete event listings, reviews and more. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // VISUAL 15


VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

T A R K I N G T O N, F R O M P A G E 15

MR SAD

Midwest Recipes for Seasonal Affective Disorder BY LISA BERLIN

DR. JACQUELYN N. COUTRÉ: His collection of paintings was diverse, from Renaissance to what was then contemporary, but it consisted primarily of 17th and 18th-century British portraits. Tarkington wrote once that “art’s what tells man about himself.” He admired portraiture because of the different ways in which the self could be presented in terms of pose, background, and attributes indicative of the sitter’s character. I think he saw portraits as revealing a great deal about the human psyche, a major theme in his writings.

SUBMITTED IMAGES

(Above) Ernest Leonard Blumenschein (American, 1874–1960), Portrait of a German Tragedian, 1907, oil on canvas, 57-1/2 x 33 in. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Booth Tarkington, 41.32 © Ernest Leonard Blumenschein. (Below) Guy Péne Du Bois (American, 1884–1958), Poria in a Pink Blouse, 1942, oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. Booth Tarkington, 62.3 © Guy Péne Du Bois.

NUVO: Tarkington made many trips to Europe, perhaps the most influential of which occurred in the first decade of the twentieth century. There were many emerging artist movements in Europe at the time (Post-Impressionism, Fauvism) but the exhibited work doesn’t reflect this. Did Tarkington have especially conservative tastes in art, or were they typical for the time period? COUTRÉ: His taste tended toward the conservative, but so did the tastes of other trustees of the John Herron Art Institute (the precursor to the IMA) in this era. The portrait by Guy Pène du Bois — which is so striking because of the way that Portia LeBrun’s gaze turns away from the viewer — demonstrates that he was not totally entrenched in the art of past centuries. NUVO: How does the art in this exhibition shed light, if any, on Tarkington’s output as an author and/or his life?

known? If not, should we know them better? COUTRÉ: There is a portrait of a viceadmiral of the English navy by Gilbert Stuart. Stuart is most known for his iconic portraits of George Washington, which show the first president in rather sober attire. The portrait of Edward Hughes, in contrast, captivates through

COUTRÉ: The paintings in this show are paired with Tarkington’s own words about them. I think these quotes reveal how deeply he engaged with these “Art’s what tells man about himself.” portraits, not merely as a pastime but as inspiration for his literary nar— BOOTH TARKINGTON ratives. He even wrote a novel (Wanton Mally) that was sparked by a the rendering of gold braiding and the Nicolas de Largillière portrait that he star of the Order of Bath. It demonowned! strates another side of Stuart’s ability. NUVO: Does this exhibition show anyNUVO: Do you have a favorite painting thing about Indiana life (or Hoosier art) in this exhibition? in the first half of the 20th century? COUTRÉ: While there are no portraits by Indiana artists in the show, Tarkington did own works by Wayman Adams and Robert W. Davidson. NUVO: Are there any portraits in this collection that are particularly wellknown, or by painters who are well16 VISUAL // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

COUTRÉ: I love Ernest Blumenschein’s “Portrait of a German Tragedian.” The sensitive rendering of the ephemeral — the reflections on the polished floor and in the man’s glasses, the smoke wafting from his cigarette — is brilliant. I also love the way that Blumenschein links the burly sitter to his more refined

Lisa Berlin is an Indianapolis artist whose other projects include HEN, a two-person performance troupe with Aimee Brown (aka Tender Evans), and General Public Collective, an artist-run gallery, project space and concept shop in Fountain Square. She will be releasing Mr. Sad. soon in book form, but for now NUVO will run these bits of advice, comics and general guidance for your well being.

THIS WEEK

environment by repeating the striped pattern of the bench on the cuffs of his sleeves. NUVO: The focus of the exhibition is on the human face. Where can one find Tarkington’s writings on the subject? Is there any work by him that you find particularly enlightening? COUTRÉ: Tarkington wrote several books that consider the world of art. In terms of portraiture, there is the novel Rumbin Galleries, which contains a lengthy and fascinating description of a portrait by Thomas Lawrence. His book of essays Some Old Portraits is all about his personal collection. They both capture with great sensitivity the value that portraits held for him. NUVO: Is there a particular impression that you would like patrons to walk away with? COUTRÉ: I would like viewers of the show to see how the connection between visual art and literature was fundamental to the author. He drew throughout his childhood, taking tips from the likes of James Whitcomb Riley, and even enrolled in university-level courses in art. Seen in this light, it is only natural that art should play an important role in so many of his books. n


STAGE

REVIEW THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

KILLER JOE

CLASSIFIEDS

e

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Artists and emcess at a previous women317 event.

ELLE: THE PERSONAL IS POLITICAL Each women317 meeting proves it

E

BY EMILY TA Y L O R ETAYLOR@NU VO . N ET

lle Roberts made it a point in the past to differentiate between the two — to ensure that political did not interfere or make anyone feel like the women317 space was no their’s. Since women317 is a derivative of Shehive — a meet up of women in Indianapolis to discuss different points of sexism, race, intolerance and simply to share perspectives — it made sense for the group to fire the gun at this starting line. Now. Now, things are a bit different. The group realized that every situation they were encountering did have a personal element, but it had a systematic derivative that was rooted in a political problem. This is why Roberts decided to kick off 2016 with a night that was all about what it is like to be a woman who is considered less than by the laws that dictate the actions of Indiana and influence how women in the state are educated. The next event that women317 will host is based on the idea of “Homecoming.” They are focusing the show on immigrant artists who identify as women. The night will be a partnership between Indy Parks and Indiana Undocumented Youth Alliance (IUYA) held at Garfield Park. The park was already planning on hosting a visual art exhibit showcasing

WOMEN317: HOMECOMING

united states, what does that mean in Indianapolis — all of those things present very different issues.” The idea to make this show political W H E N : M A R C H 5, 7 - 9 P . M . was not far left of where women317 has WHERE: GARFIELD PARK ARTS CENTER been for a while. ( G P A C ) , 2 4 32 C O N S E R V A T O R Y D R . “When you have a show featuring TICKETS: FREE BUT DONATIONS all women, that is political,” laughs ENCOURAGED Roberts. “They could be reciting their ABCs but [the fact that it’s] all women together is political.” the work of women artists around the Another element of the show is laying city. The Homecoming night will be in the groundwork for how Indy residents the same gallery space. can make the city a more welcoming “The focus of the show is talking place as a whole, and giving a president about the struggles of being undocufor what those spaces can look like. mented in Indiana, specifically being Roberts quantifies it as: “How can women specifically lead the charge on talking about “When you have a show featuring how undocumented all women, that is political.” people, immigrant communities, are valuable, — ELLE ROBERTS worthy of respect and should not have to take any lack of respect.” Roberts added that she has been playing with the idea a woman who is undocumented in for nearly two years — since Shehive Indiana,” says Roberts. “That comes started to take root. with an added layer and issue concern“What kept me from doing it was, one: ing gender and also not having papers. What does that mean moving through the wold, what does that mean in the EVENT

S E E , W O M E N 3 1 7 , O N P A GE 1 8

Oral rape with a “KFriedC” chicken leg. This is a summation of the lewd lack of morality found in Killer Joe, the first play by Tracy Letts, who went on to pen SUBMITTED PHOTO the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for Drama-winner August: Osage County. Theatre on the Square stages this playwright’s inaugural exploration into his penchant for darkness in its cabaret theater, which puts the audience claustrophobically close to exposed buttocks and graphic fight scenes. Calling this “family” dysfunctional, psychopathic, or trailer trash is an insult to those labels. The Smiths plot to have the estranged ex-wife of Ansel whacked in order to collect her insurance money, an idea motivated by Chris’s (Ansel’s son) desperation to avoid being whacked himself by his drug pushers. Enter the play’s namesake, Killer Joe Cooper, a detective nefariously moonlighting as a hit man. These are raw characters, and director Lori Raffel mines the cast for that rawness. Nate Walden as Chris and Lisa Marie Smith as Sharla, Ansel’s second wife, have a twisted sense of entitlement, though Chris and Sharla seem incapable of outward self-control. Ben Asaykwee executes his cruelties with Hannibal Lecter-type calm, but when he gets really angry, his pent-up rage is a physical explosion. Asaykwee is at his best in these hands-on moments. Smith’s Sharla is glorious in her Texas-drawling, big-haired glory. Her Sharla would pick fights in the Walmart clearance aisle. Dan Scharbrough is a benignly distracted Ansel and seamlessly refocuses on his static-y TV. He is a foil to Walden’s excitable Chris. While Joe should be the most disquieting character given his disposition and side work, Jaddy Ciucci’s Dottie is the most enigmatic of the group. She is obviously mentally disturbed, but observant at the same time, sleepwalking (often literally) through most of the action and murmuring occasionally creepy non-sequiturs. This character could be seen as a throwaway, but Ciucci makes her sympathetic and somehow fascinating. The play could be viewed as a study of misogyny: the crafty women are punished; the vulnerable one is bartered. Sharla takes the brunt of the crude: in the first scene, her stepson Chris complains of her beaver hanging out, and she is the victim of the above-mentioned fellatio. Even the second-weekend run of the show was packed, so make reservations early for its final weekend. — LISA GAUTHIER MITCHISON Through March 5, Theater on the Square, 627 Massachusetts Ave., $15-20, tots.org

NUVO.NET/STAGE Visit nuvo.net/stage for complete event listings, reviews and more. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // STAGE 17


THIS WEEK

VOICES

WOMEN317,

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

for (specifically) undocumented students who, under Indiana law, are forced to pay out of state tuition even though they have wanting to build actual authentic relagrown up as a Hoosier. This is a struggle tionships with people who identify as imthat stretches far beyond the theoretical migrants. And not wanting it to feel icky for Dara Márquez. — like a token kind of thing. I hate that. I Márquez is one of the poets who will hate being a token and would never want be reading at Homecoming, and one of to make anyone else feel like that … [It’s the representatives of IUYA. She, like so about] opening up this space that we cremany other women in Indiana was deated for women and realizing that when nied a right to education because of her we are talking about women, we are talkfamily’s decision to see a more stable life. ing about all women. A lot of time when “It (the idea of Homecoming) reminds me of the different times or different moments where my family, myself or my “My college degree is my community has essentially been asked to go demonstration of my family’s back home in different sacrifice, and how much I value it, ways — not directly, but in different ways like ‘go and how it will no longer be denied back where you came from,’” says Márquez. that that sacrifice was made.” She was born in Mexico — DARA MÁRQUEZ but came to the Elkhart, Ind. at three-years-old. When the time came for her to attend college she found that the same year we talk about women we have this idea she graduated there was legislation enin our minds and we forget that there are acted that would strip her of her scholarall kinds of different women who live here ship due to her documentation status. in the city. And really being intentional “In that college degree, our family, and about making sure that people of other our community, and our parents, will be cultures feel like this is a space where I able to earn that respect that we have can be a women too.” often been denied — that we haven’t The show will not only be held in the been shown as humans,” says Márquez same gallery space as an understood describing the two poems that she will space for female artists, it will host musibe blending in her reading at Homecomcians, visual artists, poets and perforing in reflection of her personal experimance artists who are willing to lend their ence. “Maybe not just the respect, but time and creative energy to raising funds also the conformation and validation of

F R O M P A G E 17

SURVIVING SCHIZOPHRENIA? Volunteers with a past or current diagnosis of schizophrenia are being sought by the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Indiana University to participate in a brain imaging study. Your participation will help unravel mysteries concerning causes and effects of schizophrenia and resilence in those who have overcome schizophrenia. The study requires up to 8 hours and will be scheduled over several days. Eligible participants should be in good health, have received a diagnosis of schizophrenia at any time in their life, and be between 18-55 years old. Eligible participants will be compensated $15/hr for general study participation and $30/hr for the MRI brain scanning session. Participants will receive a DVD of their brain scan.

If interested call (317)941-4502 or email: eeglab@indiana.edu 18 STAGE // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

#1009001702

“How do we, in the artist community, act as advocates for people who may not have been born here but are building community just like we are?” — Elle Roberts

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

our human dignity. Even “though that’s not how it should be, society should respect and value all human dignity. But through a college education is how this poem is interpreting it. I combined both of those poems to tell my story and how if it weren’t for my mom working as a housekeeping lady, or working in a factory and breaking her back, I wouldn’t have a college education. My college degree is my demonstration of my family’s sacrifice, and how much I value it, and how it will no longer be denied that that sacrifice was made.” The show will be a fundraising benefit for IUYA and the constant work they do to repeal the legislation baring undocumented students from the same education that their peers might have. n

Get your fix!

NEWS LETTERS ASK RENEE • ILG FOOD • PROMO MUS I C • ARTS

sign up at

NUVO.NET


BOOKS

REVIEWS THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

FROM BEER TO BIN LADEN

The unexpected connections to Indiana with author Douglas Wissing

D

B Y M . TRA VIS D INIC O L A ARTS@NUVO . N ET

NUVO: The subtitle of the book is Uncovering the Unexpected, and Ezra Pound at Wabash was certainly unexpected. What was most unexpected for you?

ouglas Wissing is an award-winning journalist-scholar-adventurer who has written about the war in Afghanistan, a Hoosier missionary in Tibet, and the history of Indiana’s beer. His latest book, IN Writing: Uncovering the Unexpected Hoosier State, is a collection of articles about aspects of Indiana’s history that might be forgotten or ignored as the state celebrates its second century as a state this year. Travis DiNicola recently spoke to Wissing about his new book and the unexpected ties to Indiana. NUVO: In this collection, are all the pieces previously published? DOUGLAS WISSING: They were, with the exception of the “Jihadis in Indiana” which was written just for this book. NUVO: That was certainly unexpected. It’s wild to think that at one point in the late ’70s Osama Bin Laden was here in Indianapolis and his wife went shopping at the mall. WISSING: (Laughs) Yea, the image is just so bizarre, but it is really true! I was surprised to find that out. Then of course the question is, why is he here? That doesn’t make sense. But then in the process of tracing it back, it all makes sense. Indiana is clearly an interesting place, and as I realized while I was putting the book together it has held my interest for most of my life. NUVO: Let me ask you about the story “The Stuff of Legend,” about how Indiana limestone was used to build the Empire State Building, you wrote about everyone from the original cutters to the people today who are waterproofing the stone. WISSING: For me it was all about that journey — from being down in the quarry to hanging on the outside of the Empire State Building at about the 60th floor clutching on a guy-wire as the catwalk is swaying away from the building. I was out there for an hour or two, and the waterproofers are saying, “Oh, this isn’t so bad, some days it flips all

EVENT

DOUGLAS WISSING: THE UNEXPECTED RELIGIOUS HISTORY OF INDIANA

WHEN: MARCH 2, 7 P.M. WHERE: INDIANA INTERCHURCH CENTER, 1 1 00 W . 4 3 N D S T . TICKETS: FREE

the way around!” And my stomach was lurching. It’s hard to take notes when you have a death-grip on a guy-wire. But that’s what's great about these stories, with each one I got to learn something new and that’s such a great joy. NUVO: I didn’t realize that Ezra Pound had taught at Wabash College. When I first read that I thought you were making it up.

WISSING: Well, I’ve been doing this a long time, and there are lots of weird things . . . but there’s that connection between Indiana and Tibet that goes back far more than a century. At one point the only place you could learn how to speak Tibetan was in Indianapolis. It was a Hoosier who introduced Tibet to an America. It was a famous ethnologist that lived out in a very remote part of Tibet. Indiana was the epicenter of Tibetology from a very early point. That was a surprise to me. And then of course, with the Kinsey Institute Art Exhibit, who would have known that we have the second largest collection of erotica in the world, right after the Vatican, and here in my hometown? Also, I was working on some article once about a remote Belgian brewery that was rated the best beer in the world, and it was made in a monastery by these monks. And I thought it was fascinating, and went to Belgium, and wrote about it, and that later lead to me writing about Indiana breweries in Indiana: One Pint at a Time. And the thing that was really funny, is after once writing about the best beer in the world, that year that I’m working on One Pint,

What’s the common thread between Tibet, the Empire State Building, Ezra Pound and Osama Bin Laden? Indiana.

WISSING: (Laughs) I had read about that in a book on modern poetry. It was literally one sentence: “Ezra Pound moved to England after being thrown out of a job at Wabash College.” And you know, Ezra Pound and Wabash College don’t go in the same phrase, or the same paragraph much less the same sentence! I tucked that thought away and it was some years later I finally had time to look into it. And I found this enormous body of material in the Wabash College archives because it was a pretty juicy story!

Three Floyds brewery ends up being ranked as the best beer in the world! And I thought, that’s odd. And then later they were ranked best brewery in the world. So, I wasn’t expecting the find the best brewery in the world in Indiana.

MAPPING INDIANA

FIVE CENTURIES OF TREASURES FROM THE INDIANA HISTORICAL SOCIETY

q Maps have been my lifelong passion. I’m less reticent about this confession now that Paula Scher has ‘fessed up’ in the Feb. 29, 2016 New Yorker magazine. If Scher, creator of the iconic Citibank logo amongst others, can say she first heads to the map section upon entering a bookstore, I too can even add that’s where I head in any antique shop — to the box with old state maps, the walls with framed maps mercilessly purloined from old atlases, the corners reserved for outdated globes. So expect me to be partial to the exquisite map exhibit at the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center. I’ve snatched every opportunity to circle the 4th floor Rosemary McKee Lanham Gallery to revisit the 30 maps on display and gain tidbits of data about the mapmakers and the events that propelled the making of that particular map. My favorites keep changing — the fanciful depiction of the United States as an eagle in flight; the geography of Abraham Lincoln’s life; the early routes — by Indian trails, roads, rail lines, bicycle routes for the serious enthusiast. And the maps that bring sadness because all this comes at the expense of displacing the people who made this place their home centuries before we made it ours. It’s worth the trip to be in the presence of these originals, carefully exhibited so as not to compromise their integrity as precious keepsakes. And then you can head down to the Basile History Market to examine — and purchase—the truly magnificent hardcover book that measures 17”x13”, weighs at least five pounds and has over 100 maps covering 320 pages. When we speak of “poring over a book,” this is the essence. I’ve bypassed many vacuuming and dusting “moments” to “pore over” Mapping Indiana: Five Centuries of Treasures from the Indiana Historical Society and I suspect the lure will continue as I reread the overview introductory chapters by Donald Cresswell and Nicole Etcheson. To name a few, specialized maps depict daily weather; where our writers were born; how Frances Slocum came to a Miami Indiana village, married and made a lasting contribution to who we are. Topical maps take us along changing travel routes, provide bird’s eye-views of towns, villages, cities; show our geological makeup and our historical progression. The book represents only a part of the maps collection housed in the IHS William Henry Smith Memorial Library. —RITA KOHN

NUVO.NET/BOOKS

NUVO: Well, it’s a little bit easier of a trip. WISSING: (Laughs) Yes it is. It is a little bit easier of a trip! n

Visit nuvo.net/books for complete event listings, reviews and more. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // BOOKS 19


SCREENS

FILM EVENTS

Cartel Land Mar. 4, 6:30 p.m. An Academy Award nominee for Best Documentary, Cartel Land follows two vigilante groups as they rise against murderous Mexican drug cartels. One is led by a small-town physician in the Mexican state of Michoacán; the other is a paramilitary group called Arizona Border Recon, which aims to prevent Mexico’s drug wars from spreading into America. This film immerses viewers in this dangerous world of drugs and sheds light on how to clean it up. IU Cinema, 1213 E. 7th St. (Bloomington), FREE but ticketed, cinema.indiana.edu Best of the Heartland Film Festival Mar. 4-5. Four of last year’s Heartland Film Festival entries are playing for two nights at The Historic Artcraft Theatre. The selection opens with Waffle Street, a quirky comedy about a Wall Street broker turned waffle-maker. And it concludes with One Day in April, a dazzling documentary portrait of Bloomington’s Little 500 bike race. 57 North Main Street (Franklin), $6, historicartcrafttheatre.org Double Exposure Mar. 6, 6:30 p.m. An exciting program of original, experimental student work. This event, which features films and live music, is a collaboration between Indiana University composition, audio engineering and film students. Individual film titles, directors and composers will be posted on the IU Cinema website as details are finalized. IU Cinema, 1213 E. 7th St. (Bloomington), FREE but ticketed, cinema.indiana.edu

CONTINUING 45 Years e The week before her 45th wedding anniversary, Kate Mercer (Oscar nominee Charlotte Rampling) learns that her husband Geoff (Tom Courtenay) was engaged before. What’s more, the body of his ex-fiancé is found, 50 years after she slipped into an Alpine crevasse. Rampling delivers a masterful performance as a woman quietly crumbling. Writer-director Andrew Haigh maintains the pace and mood of a chilling mystery as the couple plunges into a rabbit hole of regret, doubt and despair. — SAM WATERMEIER Now playing at the Keystone Art Cinema

NUVO.NET/SCREENS Visit nuvo.net/screens for complete movie listings, reviews and more. • For movie times, visit nuvo.net/movietimes 20 SCREENS // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

CANDY AND CULTURE CLASHES The newest Disney animation drives home diversity

I

B Y ED J O H N S O N - O TT EJO H N S O N - O T T @ N U V O . N E T

n the rollicking Disney animated feature, Zootopia, diversity is celebrated. All sorts of anthropomorphized animals – big ones and small ones, predators and prey – live and work together in harmony. Sorta. Within the boundaries of Zootopia, the sprawling Toronto-ish metropolis where most of the story takes place, we learn that day-to-day life is messier than the noble ideals would have you believe. Big animals still bully small animals. Boy animals tend to push around girl animals. Stereotypes abound, sometimes reinforced by the very species trying to retire them. When the workday is over, many animals go home to neighborhoods populated by their own kind — a celebration of their heritage or self-segregation? Where does Disney come up with such crazy ideas? Don’t worry, Zootopia is not just a movie about bullies, bigots and cultural confusion. There are lovable critters all over the place, loads of adventure, comedy of every ilk, and scads of pop culture references for the grown-ups. There are a few scares as well, but the kids I heard after the screening were laughing over the moments that made them jump. The story follows young rabbit Judy Hopps (voice of Ginnifer Goodwin), who leaves her 225 brothers and sisters on the family farm to realize her dream of becoming a police officer in the big city. The fabulous Zootopia is introduced as she takes a train that passes through a number of the metropolis’ colorful districts. How nice of the filmmakers to give us a chance to get oriented, at least a little bit. Judy becomes the first bunny on the force, but Capt. Bogo (Idris Elba), a Cape Buffalo, assigns her to work as a meter maid while most of the force focuses on a missing animal case. Despite the mammal-inclusion initiative designed by Mayor Lionheart (J.K. Simmons), the old boys network

REVIEW

ZOOTOPIA (2016)

SHOWING: IN WIDE RELEASE RATED: PG, e

continues to reinforce species, sexual, and size related stereotypes. The definitely not dumb bunny makes some friends; Clawhauser (Nate Torrence), the police force’s effeminate cheetah receptionist, and Bellwether (Jenny Slate), a sheep working as assistant mayor. She also develops a wary working relationship with Nick Wilde (Jason Bateman), a sly fox who claims to be turning over a new leaf. Squirm with me as Clawhauser refers to Judy as “cute” and she brusquely explains that, while it’s okay for one rabbit to call another rabbit cute, it’s considered offensive when other species do it. Ahem. Credit for the ambitious production goes to directors Byron Howard, Rich Moore, and co-director Jared Bush, working from Bush and Phil Johnston’s screenplay, based on a story by Howard, Bush, Moore, Johnston, Josie Trinidad, Jim Reardon and Jennifer Lee. Usually films coming from a writing team that big are a mess, but Zootopia is messy in a way that serves the concept. Sure, some moments are philosophically confusing. There’s a very funny scene at the DMV, where all

the employees are sloths that behave like … sloths. Even as I laughed, a part of me — the annoying part that overthinks everything – said, “Hey, we’re laughing at behavior that reinforces a stereotype right in the middle of a movie that aspires to rise above stereotypes!” Then I decided to stop analyzing and just enjoy the bit. Complaints? Only a couple. Around the two-thirds point of the film the story gets a little draggy. Nothing drastic, but enough to note. And there are a few moments where I thought the whole BULLYING IS BAD, DIVERSITY IS GOOD thing was being laid on a bit thick. Then again, we’re in the middle of a political campaign where bigots are calling themselves “victims” and bullies are being celebrated for “telling it like it is.” Can our menagerie afford subtlety right now? Zootopia is stuffed with characters, situations, culture clashes and eye candy. Part of the fun of the movie is realizing that this is the beginning of a brand new Disney franchise. Kids are going to watch this flick a million times. They’ll learn all the city’s districts, along with the notable characters within them. I expect this film to spawn a comic police procedural TV show starring Judy and Nick, along with theatrical sequels and the inevitable direct-to-video follow-ups as well. Heck, someday we may be able to explore a Zootopia at Disney World. As long as Disney keeps creating product this inventive and entertaining, more power to them. n

He’s an upstanding guy. Promise.

SUBMITTED PHOTO


THIS WEEK

VOICES

SOARING ON SKI JUMPS

Eddie the Eagle follows the sports drama formula

E

B Y SA M W A T E R ME IE R SWATER@NUVO . N ET

ddie the Eagle recently won Heartland Film’s Truly Moving Picture Award — and it completely lives up to that title. This is the kind of film that will send shivers of excitement up your spine and tears of joy down your face. Yes, it’s a sports drama, but the sport — ski jumping — doesn’t really matter. The characters soar even when they’re not on the snow-swept slopes. Ever since he was a little boy, Eddie Edwards (Taron Egerton) wanted to compete in the Olympics. Knee problems and leg braces didn’t dissuade him from pursuing his dream. Neither did disqualification from the downhill skiing team in the 1984 Olympic Games. With a lot of failure under his belt and very little funding, Eddie went on to become the first competitor to represent Great

REVIEW

EDDIE THE EAGLE (2016)

SHOWING: IN WIDE RELEASE RATED: PG-13 e

Britain in ski jumping. The film is largely true. The only fullfledged fabrication is Hugh Jackman’s character, Bronson Peary. An Olympic ski jumper turned snow plow driver, Bronson warms his bitter bones with alcohol and hides his insecurity by constantly spewing insults. Of course, that doesn’t stop Eddie, who eventually persuades Bronson to be his coach. The chemistry between Jackman and Egerton is electric. The two of them fit together like puzzle pieces. Eddie’s optimism patches up the holes in Bronson’s heart, the chinks in his armor. Through

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Ski jumps and leg braces. What could go wrong?

his eyes — which are always searching for hope and approval — Egerton effectively conveys the idea that Bronson is as challenging for Eddie as the ski slope. And Jackman shows vulnerability beneath Bronson’s bravado. Bronson tries to keep him humble, but Eddie becomes a celebrity at the 1988 Olympics — not for his athleticism but for his enthusiasm. After barely setting a

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

record for Great Britain, Eddie dances in front of the crowd and flaps his arms like a bird, thus earning his famous nickname. Some think he’s a sideshow, many others think he’s a hero. Eddie drives the media wild. Director Dexter Fletcher maintains a playful tone, setting a brisk pace and bringing out the quirkiness of the story with a bouncy synth-pop score. The whole film feels like a power ballad from an ’80s hair band. It has “an especially unique aesthetic for an offbeat sports movie,” said Heartland Film Artistic Director Tim Irwin in a recent press release. It’s often striking and original, but Eddie the Eagle ultimately still falls prey to the sports drama formula. It’s a story you’ve seen a million times, following an underdog as he defies expectations and beats the odds. It’s no surprise that he soars in the end. What’s really surprising — and inspirational — is that he tried. As the founder of the International Olympic Committee once said, “The most important thing in the Olympic Games is not to win but to take part; the most important thing in life is not the triumph but the struggle.” Sports movies have been saying this for a long time, but it’s a reminder worth hearing again. n

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // SCREENS 21


VOICES

THIS WEEK

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

48 HOURS LATER Indy winners of the 48 Hour Film Fest have a shot at the Cannes film festival

E

B Y E MIL Y T A Y L O R ETAYLO R@ N U VO . N ET

very year teams of local filmmakers run frantic though the city for two days in the hopes of taking home a win from the 48 Hour Film Fest. In 2015 NUVO followed the winning team for the weekend, seeing what it takes to pull together an entire production in such a short time. Next week in Atlanta, Swipe Left Productions’ film Dessert will screen alongside 128 other films where an international panel of judges will select the Best Film of 2016. The top 10 films will be screened at the Short Film Corner at Cannes 2017. We chatted with Elizabeth Friedland, one of the team members about the film and their potential to win. Health Benfield running the camera during filming.

NUVO: Lay out the timeline of events that happened after you guys took home the win from 48 Hour. Where did the film go next? What was the process like?

started production, but unfortunately our schedules got in the way. We’re hoping to pick it back up again this year with the same cast and crew.

ELIZABETH FRIEDLAND: The win took awhile to sink in; we still couldn’t believe we won. We wanted to ride the wave of excitement and momentum, so right away we buckled down on a new script. Our favorite movie has always been When Harry Met Sally, and we wanted to create something along the same lines; something that explores the complicated relationship between two opposite sex friends who may or may not have feelings for one another. We ended up writing The All Nighter, our new short (clocking in at about 30 minutes in about a month, after countless nights at Dorman Street with a little help from Prince’s “Purple Rain.” (It’s bizarre, but whenever we got stuck on a line or plot point, we’d cue up that song on the juke box and before it was done, we’d find genius.) We cast the film last fall using professional actors from both Indy and LA, and we

NUVO: What kind of feedback did you get from the film?

22 SCREENS // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

FRIEDLAND: It was interesting to watch people react to it; often times they’d laugh at parts I hadn’t thought of as funny, or find poignant moments that I would gloss over. Watching it with an audience is terrifying and amazing. NUVO: What do you plan to do with film in the future? FRIEDLAND: We’d like to clean it up a bit and take care of the loose ends we weren’t allowed to do for the 48 Hour Film Project due to time constraints — dub the audio, fine tune the music selections, etc. Ideally, we’d love to submit it to a few film festivals and use it as proof of Swipe Left Production’s potential as we work on other films. NUVO: Have your thoughts/reaction to

the film changed at all? FRIEDLAND: I feel like I’m harder on myself on it than I was at first. I still like it; I think the story is original, and the twist is something you don’t see coming, but because I know it so well, I tend to just focus on the errors. I guess that’s normal! NUVO: How did the process of the 48 Hour Film Fest impact you when you were making it and has it changed your creative approach in any way? FRIEDLAND: Filmmaking is bizarre — especially in 48 hours. You go into the weekend not having a single clue what you’re going to come up with — if anything — and magically two days later you have this amazing little creation that has a little bit of the entire team in it. It’s hard to even remember how the idea came about, or who was responsible for what. It feels so organic. The whole process is magical; it’s a little bit of a miracle just to find a creative partner. You’ve got to feel comfortable open-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

ing up and sharing these intimate and sometimes wacky ideas you have floating through your mind. You have to feel safe enough to critique the concepts and refine the story. You have to respect them enough to know it’s all coming from a good place, and trust them enough to know they care just as much as you do about making this amazing. And, perhaps most importantly, you have to like them enough to not want to murder them after spending every single day for several weeks on end together. And then you see actors bring your characters to life, which is… weird. And amazing. And if that’s not enough, you rally this crew that, for some inexplicable reason, not only gets your vision and sees this new world you’re trying to create, but wants to forgo sleep and a social life for an entire month to help you build that world and make it look and sound and feel gorgeous. It all boils down to that relationship; you can overcome insane deadlines and low budgets and writing blocks, but forming that collaboration is essential. And tough. n


FOOD

THE BUTCHER’S BLOCK THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

If you want to get better tasting, local meat (and you should), here’s a few places around town. Goose the Market Possibly the most talked about, highest praised establishment in the city of Indianapolis. Their popularity with the community stems from their incredible customer service and at a close second their extensive choice of charcuterie options, including the fan favorite Delaware Fireball. This signature salumi, made from coarse ground pork, is a little ball of fire packed with crushed chili, espelette pepper and garlic. Grab a bottle of beaujolais from the wine cellar and dig in. 2503 N. Delaware St., 317-924-4944, goosethemarket.com Claus’ German Sausage & Meat Market At 103 years in business, Claus’ is undoubtedly the longest running meat market in the city, and for that fact they have a staunch group of regulars that stand by this Indiana landmark. It is also the most wallet-friendly option in the city (bring cash, so you don’t have to pay the 3% credit card charge), and with a huge variety of meats and the ability to easily customize your order, it is the perfect place to stock up. Might I suggest the double smoked bacon? 1845 S Shelby St, 317-632-1963, clausgermansausageandmeats.com L. E. Kincaid & Sons This is my meat shop. I mean, I don’t own it, but when I need meat, I head to Kincaid’s. It’s close to home, which is lucky for me. Kincaid’s has quality meats, and they’ve been running for just short of that century mark, so they know what they’re doing. While I could steer you towards their hand stuffed sausages that are out of this world good, I would be doing you a disservice if I didn’t tell you to get the bacon burgers. What makes these magical is that the bacon is ground in with the beef. Yes, it’s almost sinful, but hot damn are these burgers good.

THE BUTCHER BABE’S LAST BOW

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Food Network Star and local celeb chef Loreal Gavin is hosting her last dinner and goodbye to Indy

W

B Y EM IL Y TA Y L O R ETAYLOR@NU VO . N ET

hen Loreal Gavin answered the phone, she was sitting in a bathing suit, in the sun, outside of one of her client’s houses, eating a fresh slice of divorce cake (come on, all occasions deserve a cake). Gavin — an Indy butcher, chef, and artist — is most well known for her time on Food Network Stars traveling around the country and showing off her knowledge of meat. The Kincaids butcher

EVENT

MEATS AND SWEETS WITH THE BUTCHER BABE

W H E N : M A R C H 5, 6 - 1 0 P . M . WHAT: CHARCUTERIE, APPS AND DESSERT WHERE: TASTE CAFE & MARKETPLACE, 5164 N. COLLEGE AVE. P R I C E : $ 3 5 / P E R S O N ( P L U S T A X & G R A T U I T Y ).

didn’t come home with the win, but has since been working in various kitchens and high profile events like Indy Rev. Her chapter in Indianapolis is soon to end, but not without a proper sendoff.

We caught up with her before her final dinner, hosted and prepared by her at Taste Cafe and Marketplace — the first place she worked after moving to Indy years ago. “I am just following my heart,” says Gavin. “I am just excited for a new adventure, new groups of chefs. I kind of feel like a big fish in a little pond in Indianapolis. People are more into spending money on having private chefs and stuff [in California], that’s the type of S E E , B U T C H E R B A B E , O N P A GE 24

5605 N. Illinois St., 317-255-5497, lekincaidmeats.com Joe’s Butcher Shop Located in the trendy Carmel Arts & Design District, Joe’s is a haven for the Ron Swanson in all of us that simply needs a good selection of meats in unassuming refrigerated glass cases. The coolest part about this place is an addition on their website that is beyond useful, especially for when we want something more than a grilled pork chop. Joe’s has graciously provided free recipes to try out at home. My personal favorite is the beer marinated spareribs recipe, because mixing meat and beer is my favorite American pastime. 111 W. Main St., 317-846-8877, joesbutchershop.com — CAVAN MCGINSIE

NUVO.NET/FOOD Visit nuvo.net/food for complete restaurant listings, reviews and more. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // FOOD 23


THIS WEEK

10050 E. 10th St. • (317) 897-1010

MARCH MENU Dine in only, drink purchase required

Monday - Thursday 11am - 7pm

MONDAY • HOTDOGS Chili or CCheese extra 25

ea. for a

TUESDAY• TACOS TUESDA Sour cream extra 25

ea. for a

WEDNESDAY • SLIDERS WEDNES Cheese eextra 25 ea. slider

ea. for a

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

avenue I am going towards. I don’t really want to own a restaurant at this point in my life.” She plans to give more time to her visual art as well; namely through a coffee table style cookbook that she is writing and illustrating. “By the end of the book people will have a pretty good understanding of what it is like to be a meat cutter,” says Gavin. “They will be enthused about buying in bulk and how to package at home … I have never actually slaughtered animals — and not to say I wouldn’t at some point just for the experience — but we are so out of touch with that. Hopefully I can, in an elegant sort of way, help people touch base with that ... This cookbook will be Alton Brown, Shel Silverstein, salt and peppered with Ren and Stimpy.” She also hopes to start a program for young women that is food based and has a strong focus on equality. “[I want to show them] you’re not a piece of meat, this is a piece of meat,” says Gavin. She also plans to focus on longform private dining experiences and on maintaining the healthy balance she has been able to achieve (with the help of Wellness Origin day spa) over the past few months in Indy. NUVO: Do you ever feel boxed into butcher babe and having this meatheavy focus? LOREAL GAVIN: I definitely have at points in my career. I have a lot more going on upstairs, especially in the culinary department. I always consider myself an artist first and a chef second. I hope that the release of this book could capitalize off of my career as an artist. NUVO: Do you still feel under the shadow of Food Network Stars?

THURSDAY • WINGS Blue Cheese/Ranch or celery extra 25 ea.

ea. for a

MARCH MENU

continues with NCAA Payoff (Indiana) games we will be offering half price appetizers. Karaoke every Friday w/ Dr. Phil 9pm-1am 24 FOOD // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

Gavin is also a visual artist. She will be creating all of the illustrations in her forthcoming book.

GAVIN: I think I did for a brief moment when I got so close to winning but didn’t. Now I really don’t give a shit. The less I am attached to any sort of ego, the better off I am, the better off everyone is. I think I was put on this earth to motivate people through my own example. That they can have their cake and eat it too — or rather have their steak and eat it too.” NUVO: What was your earliest really influential memory of food? GAVIN: One of those memories is being

SUBMITTED PHOTO

in Louisiana. One of my memories in particular started off with all of the food thoughts that I had. I am pulling out a chair to the kitchen counter, because I was too little to stand up, and I started making steak sauce. (She was around age 4 at the time) … Ever since then that’s all I have been doing is cooking. NUVO: How do your music, art and cooking all influence each other? GAVIN: They are all different forms of energy really. They feed off muses. There are high and lows in life, but music is a silent best friend. I could be having a bad day and not know where to start or how to end, and you can just get lost, but find yourself in something therapeutic like that. It translates to every walk of life. Even if you and I didn’t speak the same language, if we were standing across the table from each other and someone is playing guitar, and you have an apple and I had a steak we could start a conversation with our eyes. You can hand me half of your food and I can hand you half of mine. That is universal. I can’t think of two other things in this world that translate so well without >>>

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Gavin has not owned a TV for years and opts to ride her bike for transportation.


THIS WEEK

<<< saying anything … those things keep me humble and to my roots. I am not looking at your handbag. I don’t care. Why can’t we just drink some wine and enjoy the sunset? I don’t know your name and it doesn’t matter. Anywhere you go those are things that connect cultures. That’s what’s wrong with the world, people don’t sit around and actually sit down and eat dinner, turn your TV off, put your phone away, shut up …

INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46202

317.955.1700 DAILY LUNCH BUFFET 11:00 a.m. –– 3:00 p.m.

DINNER HOURS, MON-SUN 3:45 p.m. — 9:30 p.m.

NUVO: How do you keep a balance of body image and health when you are on camera a lot and working in an industry that is all about nutrition and what you put in your body?

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

NUVO: Is the idea of a kitchen being the “dude’s club” something you have encountered around the country or is it restricted to certain spaces?

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Gavin was vegetarian for years. Now she wants to educate people on the health issues that arise when you don’t buy your meat locally and organically.

the artistic disposition, I started to feel out of touch with myself. When I was on the road I didn’t have art supplies, I didn’t have a guitar, I didn’t have any of the things that really make me happy. I couldn’t ride a bike. You know what I mean? If you look at food Network.com at my bio I wrote something on there on a day where I was particularly sad,

Fine Indian Cuisine

1043 BROAD RIPPLE AVENUE, INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46220

317.465.1100 • www.shalimarindianapolis.com DAILY LUNCH BUFFET 11:00 a.m. — 2:30 p.m. DINNER HOURS Mon-Fri — 5:00 p.m. — 10:00 p.m. Sat — 2:30 p.m. — 10:00 p.m. • Sun — 2:30 p.m. — 9:30 p.m.

CAT E RING FOR PRIVAT E PART IES — C AL L FO R C AR RY OU T OR D E R S 3 1 7 . 2 5 0 . 3 5 4 5

NEWS

where I wrote “I love” and I wrote all the things that I love. I realized that in order to be successful in this industry, if I decided to make a career out of it, there were certain things I was going to need. Maybe that makes me more complicated than the average person, but I am a plant and this is the water I needed.

of chefs would get together and hang out … I felt like when I was working in kitchens … people weren’t so quick to celebrate one another … Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t think so.

GAVIN: Part of my reasoning, beyond the fact of feeling really tired, I found that Food Network Stars “I will push, and shove, and chastise when came out I wasn’t really happy with how I was peranybody that gets in my way.” ceived on camera, physi— LOREAL GAVIN cally, to be honest. I didn’t really feel comfortable. Food Network had makeup artists and wardrobe speHow are you? I love you. Here’s some cialists and everyone was really nice, but potatoes. I didn’t have as much say as I wanted over my image so to speak. So I feel like NUVO: You have said that Indy’s culinow, moving forward, I don’t necessarnary talent is segregated. Where do you ily want to lose weight, but I want more see those lines? control over what I look like. I think it had a lot to do with how comfortable GAVIN: I don’t so much see them as feel I felt in general. Considering I am of them. When I worked in Louisville, a lot

901 B INDIANA AVENUE

VOICES

GAVIN: Now that I am getting older and I have worked in so many different avenues within the food world, I am realizing that that phenomenon exists in your mind. If you are younger and novice or maybe not as secure in your skill set, those sort of perameters exist. Or rather you could have the state of mind that Rosa Parks did when she was like, I have a ticket to ride and I am going to be on this bus. You are not going to get in my way and I am going to stick up for myself. So in the past I can definitely see that there are parameters, but now those really exist in your mind. And I will push, and shove, and chastise anybody that gets in my way. n

4213 LAFAYETTE ROAD INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46254

317.298.0773

www.indiapalace.com DAILY LUNCH BUFFET 11:00 a.m. — 2:30 p.m.

DINNER HOURS

Mon-Fri — 5:00 p.m. — 10:00 p.m. Sat — 2:30 p.m. — 10:00 p.m. Sun — 2:30 p.m. — 9:30 p.m

COME VISIT ALL THREE OF OUR FINE DINING ETHNIC INDIAN CUISINE LOCATIONS IN INDY

MENU I TEMS F EATUR ES VE G E TA RIA N & VE G A N E NT RE E S • LA R GE ST B U F F E T I N T OWN

10% OFF

BUY ONE DINNER ENTREE & GET THE 2ND ENTREE

$1.00 OFF DAILY LUNCH BUFFET

CARRY OUT OR DINE IN

One Coupon Per Table. Not Valid With Any Other Offer. Only valid on menu order.

Up to $10.00. Dine In Only. Not Valid With Any Other Offer

One Coupon Per Table. Dine In Only. Not Valid With Any Other Offer

Minimum purchase of $25.00 and get $4.00 off. Menu order only.

Expires 03/16/16

Expires 03/16/16

Expires 03/16/16

Expires 03/16/16

CARRY OUT OR DINE IN

1/2 OFF

$4.00 OFF

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // FOOD 25


’S NIGHTCRAWLER:

TAYLOR SMITH

NUVO Marketing Intern

@nuvonightcrawler @supimtaylor @nuvo_promo

NIGHTCRAWLER 1

2

SHOTS

4

SO YOUR PIC DIDN’T MAKE IT IN PRINT? The rest of these photos and hundreds more always available online: PHOTOS BY NATHAN WELTER nuvo.net/nightcrawler

NIGHTCRAWLER

S O R E D S P O N

3

B Y

fuzzyvodka.com PHOTOS BY RILEY MISSEL

*NUVO’s Nightcrawler is a promotional initiative produced in conjunction with NUVO’s Street Team and Promotions department.

​1 The Children’s Museum was hoppin’ during Museum by Moonlight. 2 Guests played a room full of instruments in the Children’s Museum’s Playscape. 3 Party-goers got to try their hand at adult paint by numbers. 4 Chefs prepared delicious hors d’oeuvres.

&

Elise Lane

SATURDAY APRIL 30

FOYT WINE VAULT • SPEEDWAY, IN

12 Indiana Breweries • Unlimited Sampling And craft beer’s idea of fashion BUY YOUR TICKETS NOW NUVO.NET/TICKETS

26 NIGHTCRAWLER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Owner and Head Brewer of Scarlett Lane Brewing and fashion icon?


NIGHTCRAWLER

Q+A

NIGHTCRAWLER ONLINE

SPONSORED BY:

Nightcrawler and NUVO followers were also asked: What was your favorite cafeteria food in grade school? Here is what they had to say:

What was your favorite cafeteria food in grade school?

BRYANA C. Facebook Turkey and noodles and mashed potatoes!

JEFFREY S. Noblesville Taco salads.

EMILY S. Noblesville Chicken nuggets.

ERIK B. Noblesville Mac & Cheese.

TYLER M. Plainfield Chili Day.

ALLISON M. Plainfield Chili Day .

JORDAN B. Facebook French bread pizza!

BLAKE Z. Downtown Pizza Friday.

SAMI S. Facebook PIZZA!

MISSED THE NIGHTCRAWLER?

FIND HER ONLINE!

MELANIE Z. Downtown Pasta and breadsticks.

ERIC H. Indianapolis Country fried steak.

KATIE L. Indianapolis Chicken nuggets.

BRIAN W. Broad Ripple Spicy chicken sandwich

MOLLIE MARIE Broad Ripple Pizza. Definitely pizza.

DREW B. Indianapolis Pepperoni pizza pockets.

ANSWER THE QUESTION OR JUST FIND OUT WHERE SHEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;LL BE NEXT! @NUVO_Promo #NUVONightCrawler @NUVOIndy /NUVOPromotions

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // NIGHTCRAWLER 27


LIVING GREEN

GREEN EVENTS

INDIANA

Catwalk and Cocktails for Water March 5, 8-10:30 p.m.

BOTTLE CAPS AND WINDMILLS

Central Indiana’s Aveda salons put on this “green carpet” event at City Market — quite literally (and so do you). The organizers tell us:

Come dressed in your best eco fashion (upcycled, recycled, vintage) ready to celebrate the Earth in style. Prizes for best hair, makeup and eco fashion. We’ll have 3 signature eco cocktails featuring 360 Vodka (a portion of sales benefit HEC). Beer and wine will also be available for purchase from Tomlinson Tap Room and the kitchen is open for food orders until 9 p.m. Indianapolis City Market, 222 E. Market St., $10 advance, $20 door Earth Charter Indiana Night (Pacers V. Bulls) March 29, 5 p.m., 7 p.m. tipoff. This event during NBA Green Week is presented by Earth Charter Indiana, a group headed up by former NUVO Managing Editor Jim Poyser (who’s now the Big Kahuna at ECI). The 5 p.m. presentation preceding the game is a look at what Poyser’s been doing; namely, educating Indiana’s youth about everything from climate change to proper recycling. Your ticket includes admission to the event and the game that follows, plus a chance to see your group’s name in lights on the big board and courtside seats during warmups. (Upper and lower balcony seats have been reserved for ECI ticketholders for the game.) Order online by heading to pacers.com/ tickets/938 and using the password “earth.” We like Jim. We like Earth Charter Indiana. We like the Blue and Yellow Menace. You should, too. Bankers Life Fieldhouse,125 S. Pennsylvania St., $24.20 upper balcony, $40.70 lower balcony Sustainable Indiana 2016’s 366 Days of Climate Now through Statehood Day, Dec. 11, 2016, Sustainable Indiana 2016 is asking YOU to choose a day, any day, to DO SOMETHING good for the planet.

“Your action/event can be as unique as you, as long as it is something you know will carry an impact on making your life or the lives around you more sustainable. Perhaps you want to get a community garden started, or raise money for solar panels for your school. Maybe you want to register voters or winterize homes in your town. You can host events with lots of people or just have an individual action for yourself! Your organization, school, business, or family can take a day.”

Excerpts from “Ask Renee”

Cap this

Q: In December you mentioned one should

only recycle bottle caps when they’re attached to their bottles. I wanted to bring to your attention to the “Bottle Caps for Benches” initiative.  IUPUI partnered with the 2015 NCAA Men’s Final Four Sustainability Committee to collect plastic bottle caps of any kind that would be made into benches.  The company that makes the benches, Green Tree Plastics, is based in Evansville, Indiana.  The project went so well that we now have an ongoing bottle cap collection.  I know a lot of schools in the area collect them as well.  Just thought you might want to share this with your readers.  Any organization can take up its own collection to have a bench made. — CHRISTY

A: Hi Christy! I’m so happy you shared this

captivating story. I have long admired Green Tree Plastics and hope more schools can take advantage of this cool program. So, to recap my answer from back in December: If you’re recycling a plastic bottle and cap in your curbside bin or a public bin, you should attach the cap to its bottle. However, if your daycare, Sunday school, sports team, nonprofit, club, neighborhood association or school would like to have a special bench made from recycled caps, you should start a cap collection and work with this really cool Indiana company, Green Tree Plastics. Check ‘em out at greentreeplastics.com. PIECE OUT, RENEE

ASK RENEE ASKRENEE@ INDIANALIVINGGREEN.COM SIGN UP for the AskRenee Newsletter at indianalivinggreen.com.

A: Dorothy, good call. There are so many

positive things happening here we need to break it down. For those who aren’t familiar, CREDO is a cellular provider that brings social change by donating to progressive causes and funding activism work. Customers vote monthly on which nonprofits, including those focusing on issues such as women’s rights, the environment, peace and social justice, receive a portion of revenue. More than $80 million has been donated since 1985. So, CREDO offered Dorothy an opportunity to sign up for Arcadia Power and get $20 off of her next electricity bill. Arcadia would turn around and use her monthly investment to purchase renewable energy from wind farms. While I pretty much love everything about this concept, I would actually advise Dorothy to take a different path.

Investing in Arcadia is really just offsetting her electricity usage — she’s not actually powering her home with wind. Arcadia Power is headquartered in Washington, DC, and charges 1.5 cents per kWh premium for 100 percent wind energy. I would encourage her to find a more local way to offset her carbon emissions. Here in Indianapolis, IPL offers the Green Power Option, which is currently priced at $0.0003 per kWh. The premium stays in our local economy by funding renewable energy purchased from Indiana and Midwestern wind farms and local jobs at IPL. Or, maybe you’d like to make your offset investment more personal. If Arcadia was going to charge you $9 per month, why not commit $9 per month to a local nonprofit that is working on a clean energy future for Indiana? Sierra Club’s Indiana Beyond Coal campaign and the Hoosier Environmental Council are both very worthy of your support. If you’d like to see your investment be less of an offset and more of a direct impact on your carbon emissions, save your pennies and invest in energy efficiency methods in your home. Sure, it’ll take a lot of 1.5 cents per kWh to pay for solar panels, but you can always start by installing LEDs or an Energy Star appliance. PIECE OUT, RENEE SIGN UP for the AskRenee Newsletter at indianalivinggreen.com.

Too good to be true?

Q: I have had CREDO cell service for several years, and have utmost confidence in their integrity. Still, what they’re offering is so TOO GOOD TO BE TRUE that I feel I should verify the info locally before taking this action: They’ve sent me an email with “an opportunity to sign up for wind energy from Arcadia Power” and get $20 off my electric bill. Do you know about it? Thanks, — DOROTHY

Sign up for your day at: sustainableindiana2016.org/366 28 INDIANA LIVING GREEN // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

If Arcadia was going to charge you $9 per month, why not commit $9 per month to a local nonprofit that is working on a clean energy future for Indiana?


MUSIC

TINY CHATS THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

IT’S MELANIE MARTINEZ’ TOUR, AND SHE’LL CRY IF SHE WANTS TO

SUBMITTED PHOTO

CFM

HOT FUZZ: CFM AT STATE STREET Chatting with Charles Moothart and Ty Segall

C

B Y SETH JO H NSO N MUSIC@NUVO . N ET

harles Moothart's band memberships number more than you can count on one hand. Based in the Bay Area, the drummer/guitarist and singer is often seen playing with much-loved garage rocker Ty Segall, whether that’s in Fuzz, GØGGS or Ty Segall Band. Moothart and multi-instrumentalist bandleader Mikal Cronin play together quite a bit as well, with Moothart assisting Cronin on some of his solo albums and putting out records together as Charlie and The Moonhearts in the late aughts. Now, the multi-instrumentalist is adding yet another notch to his belt

LIVE

CFM, FEELS, CREEPING PINK, THEE OPEN SEX, RAW IMAGE

WHEN: MONDAY, MAR. 7, 9 P.M. WHERE: STATE STREET PUB, 243 N. STATE AVE. TICKETS: $5, 21+

with the start of his very own solo project, CFM. With an album slated for release in April via In the Red Records, CFM features Moothart up front, with a cast of bandmates that includes high school friend Michael Anderson on guitar, Tyler Frome on bass, and Audacity’s Thomas Alvarez on drums. He's on tour with Ty Segall and The Muggers right now, but

will stop in Indy on a day off from touring on Monday to headline a bill otherwise made up of Creeping Pink, Feels, Raw Image – the newest incarnation of Raw McCartney — and Thee Open Sex. Titled Still Life of Citrus and Slime, Moothart’s first-ever solo record was written during two months of isolation brought on by a temporary separation from his longtime girlfriend and bandmate. “The record came from a feeling of necessity,” Moothart said on the phone to us. “I needed to sort out a lot of thoughts and emotions and creating something new is always the best way to do that.” S E E , C F M , O N P A GE 3 0

PHOTO BY EMILY SOTO

Melanie Martinez’ songs are sadistic sugarcoated lullabies, but on the phone and onstage, she’s got the spunk and pizzazz of an animated cartoon. The quirky New York singer was discovered on the NBC’s The Voice in its third season and last year released her debut album Cry Baby, landing at number 6 on the Billboard 200 chart. Martinez’ electropop sound covers a lot of unique and interesting themes. “When writing the album, at the beginning, it was more focused on toy sounds, and that kind of inspired this whole idea of pairing childhood themes with adult situations. That was kind of the main focus on the album,” says Martinez when NUVO reaches her by phone. “After writing it I realized while I was putting together the track list that it also told a story that was similar to my life but also very different just because of the whimsical fairy tale element that I like to throw in there while writing songs.” Each song on the album tells a story of the protagonist Cry Baby, Martinez’ alter ego. “A lot of the stories that I tell — some of them are based off of personal experience,” she says. “But it’s definitely fun writing stories like that to go along with other stories that are kind of personal. Because it’s like a mix of my life, and also Cry Baby, who is a character that I play.” Her international tour kicked off in Dallas on March 1, and she’ll head to the Egyptian Room at Old National Centre on the 15th to perform singles like, “Pity Party,” “Soap” and “Carousel,” the last of which was featured on the television series American Horror Story: Freak Show. The Cry Baby tour is sold out at almost every venue thanks to Melanie’s loyal fans who come to concerts knowing every word to every song and dressed just like her. Having such loyal fans “means so much to me because I put so much into my music. So much of it is reflected, myself, and stuff. It’s just super personal and it’s really cool that there are people who are supporting that,” says Martinez. — PAIGE WATSON

NUVO.NET/MUSIC Visit nuvo.net/music for complete event listings, reviews and more. NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // MUSIC 29


THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

3826 N. Illinois 317-923-4707

UPCOMING SHOWS Wed 03/02

Thu 03/03 Fri 03/04

Sat 03/05

Sun 03/06

Tues 03/08

RORY KELLY(N. Carolina) of Crank County Daredevils and his band w/ THE 10 CENT CIGARS(Wisconsin) and MOTOR CHIEF. Doors @ 8, Show @ 9. $6. BUMMER’S EVE(Cincy) w/ HOLY SHEETS and CHIVES. Doors @ 8, Show @ 9. $5.

Moothart, at work

SUBMITTED PHOTOS

HILLBILLY HAPPY HOUR... Doors @ 7, show @ 7:30...$5. DEVIL TO PAY, SHADELAND, ASTRAL MASS (ex-Necropharmacon and ex-Hedons.) Doors @ 9, Show @ 10, $5. PUNK ROCK NIGHT w/ Lickers, Yavin 4 (Star Wars themed band), Messengers (Cincy), Anti-Queens(Toronto). Doors @ 9. Show @ 10, $6. METAL NIGHT! w/ OCCULT DECEIVER, ARSON PARTY(Kalamazoo), MAKESHIFT TRAGEDY and special guest STUCK ON PLANET EARTH(Toronto.) Doors @ 8, Show @ 9, $5. NAP DNB PRESENTS 9p-3a, NO COVER.

melodyindy.com /melodyinn punkrocknight.com

BRAIN IMAGING STUDY

Must be 21-55 Study takes about 10 hours over 2-3 days Up to $200 for participation. We are especially interested in imaging people who regularly use alcohol!

CALL 317-278-5684 EMAIL YPETLAB@IUPUI.EDU Center for Neuroimaging Indiana University School of Medicine Indianapolis, IN 30 MUSIC // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

CFM,

F R O M P A G E 29

becoming friends the summer after graduation. “He was just hanging around with a bunch of our mutual friends. And then, he joined this band I was in, and we just kind of became musical soulmates,” Segall says. Their relationship sparks all kinds of music, from garage rock with Ty Segall Band to proto-metal with Fuzz. Initially drawn to working with him

Initially, he had no plans of turning this collection of songs into an album, either. “I started recording songs just to see what I could do on my own as a sort of meditative exercise,” he says. “As I started to have more songs, I realized the possibility of doing a record. I didn’t go into it thinking I wanted to make a record, but every step of the process led to another personal challenge “Charles is just one of the most that ultimately came to releasing a record talented people that I know literally and playing the songs across the board. He’s the most live with my friends.” Moothart records proficient in all instruments. He’s as CFM with an open mind, a quality he a crazy drummer and an incredible brings to all of his guitar player.” musical pursuits, says longtime collaborator and friend Segall. — TY SEGALL “The best part about Charles is he’s all about never doing because he was “just a good guy,” the same thing, even live. He wants to Segall eventually discovered just how play his riffs differently every night. talented Moothart was. He wants to continuously find every “Charles is just one of the most different way to play a riff or explore an talented people that I know literidea. It’s rare to meet people like that ally across the board. He’s the most who aren’t just satisfied with playing a proficient in all instruments. He’s a song the same way every time.” crazy drummer and an incredible “I’m lucky to have a group of close guitar player,” Segall says. Combine friends that are talented and down to this with their “complimentary styles,” get weird,” Moothart says. “We all went he says, and there’s no wonder why into it knowing it was going to be chalthe two have played in so many bands lenging and different. So in that way together. it has been very fun and scary at the “He’s like my brother-in-arms,” same time.” Segall says. “We’re trying to achieve the Moothart and Segall first met while same thing, so we continuously push attending Laguna Beach High School each other into doing that.” in Southern California – fun fact: the With this in mind, Segall is certainly same Laguna Beach where they filmed excited about what Moothart is doing the MTV reality TV show, while Segall with CFM. “It’s just full-on his style, and Moothart were matriculating –

which is great,” he says. “He’s a great singer, and I’m so happy to see him front a band and do his thing. I’m a huge fan of people doing their thing, and that’s what he’s doing.” Segall says to expect to hear “righteous rock'and 'roll” when the band makes its way to State Street Pub Monday. In terms of local connections, both Moothart and Segall are no strangers to Indianapolis’ Landon Caldwell, who fronts the band Creeping Pink and books shows at State Street Pub. Caldwell’s California-based band Burnt Ones even toured with Ty Segall Band at one time. “I’ve known Landon for a while. I feel like I got to know [Burnt Ones] better in the short time we had together in L.A. versus San Francisco, but obviously great people,” Moothart says. He also notes he’s really looking forward to Creeping Pink’s set when he comes to Indy on Monday. “I’ve seen Creeping Pink play a couple times and I’m really looking forward to see what the Indianapolis incarnation will be like,” Moothart says. “I know it will be great.” While he does play in other bands, Moothart admits that he’s currently committing himself to CFM. However, it’s not likely that this will remain the case for too long, considering the way he approaches making music. “Having different sources of outlet is crucial and keeps things interesting. I feel lucky to be able to create in different environments and to different capacities,” he says. As for the future of CFM though, Moothart plans to continue writing songs for the project, with hopes of doing another full-length record featuring his other CFM band mates. “The whole point was to bring a group of radical people together to try to have fun and push ourselves out of our comfort zones,” he says. n


THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

LILY AND MADELEINE KEEP IT TOGETHER New label, new writing model, new SXSW stops

S

BY K A TH ERIN E C O P L E N KCOPLEN@NU VO . N ET

omewhere in between bites two and three of a highly delicious fish taco from Monon Food Company I realized I've never actually seen harmonysinging sisters Lily and Madeleine apart. Not onstage, not when I've bumped into them around town, not in taco-filled interviews. They're a unit, a united front, onstage, on record and in interviews. They've kept it together.  Now that's not to say that they're the same person, or twins, or anything like that. Just that, artistically, I've encountered them as a pair — which is a gift, because the Jurkiewiczes, voices go so sweetly together.  But on Keep It Together, their third album and first on New West Records, the pair separated, writing and conceptualizing music more independently.  "You can tell on the record which songs are more Lily songs, and which songs are Lily and Madeleine Madeleine songs," Madeleine says.  " 'Westfield,' I would say, is the most super helpful." mine," says Lily. "I think we only took They'll head to South By Southwest one word out that I wrote, and the rest is next month for showcases with Noisemine. 'Nothing,' Madeleine wrote all of."  trade, their new label New West, and unThe pair both retain co-writing credits doubtably a few others. (Time gets filled on all songs. "We edited them all togethquickly at SXSW.) After, Lily, Madeleine, er," Lily says. "And we arranged them all Kate and Shannon will make their way together," Madeleine jumps in.  south for that, and all other shows. "All "Before we went into the studio [with of our tours are going to be just the four Paul Mahern], we arranged everything with Shannon and Kate." Madeleine says. That's drum“You can tell on the record which mer Kate Siefker and cellist Shannon Hayden, songs are more Lily songs, and which both Hoosier musicians. songs are Madeleine songs.” "We had the songs done, and some of them we had written on guitar, some — MADELEINE JURKIEWICZ on piano. We got together with the ladies, and said, 'Here are the songs. How can we add percussion, cello, mandolin? of us," Madeleine says. A West Coast tour What are we going to add to them?'" trip and Europe are hopefully on the For the next two weeks they worked in horizon. Shannon will open many shows a space above the Jurkiewicz family gaon their tour as a solo cellist — she's rage and figured out the arrangements. recently released her new full-length The recording process was simpler after album, and the addition of a in-band that — "We still got stuck on stuff," Madopener will make full show setup quick eleine says. " And there were some songs and easy. "It's so easy. We know her set that we scrapped that I was disappointed so well," Madeleine says. about, but it was no big deal because the They wrapped a trio of shows in process [of arranging in advance] was Central Indiana this weekend, showcas-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

ing all of Keep It Together at Deluxe at Old National Centre on Saturday with Hayden opening. (How was the show? I appreciated that the packed room was quiet for the performance, which included tracks from the band's first and second albums as well. Fuzzed-out mics eclipsed some of the Jurkiewiczs' vocals at the beginning. But levels were quickly tweaked – I saw producer Paul Mahern stepping over momentarily to the sound board. There is a real magic to seeing naturally gifted vocalists sing in harmony together live. Perhaps that explains the popularity of a capella reality TV shows and Pitch Perfect.) Outside of Lily and Madeleine (the band) stuff, Lily and Madeleine (the women) have expanded creative endeavors in mind. "I'm hoping to start acting a little bit this year," Madeleine says. "I'm interested in working on production, collaborating with other artists and people," Lily says. And a big move lurks in the future, too. Maybe to Nashville, maybe to California, maybe to New York, Chicago.  And they'll probably do it together.  "Right now, I think it makes sense to live together," Madeleine says. "We're just taking it week by week." n Buy Keep It Together at lilandmad.com NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // MUSIC 31


EMERSON THEATER

4630 E 10TH ST, INDIANAPOLIS, IN EMERSONTHEATER.COM MARCH 7

LETLIVE.

MARCH 9

KIRKO BANGZ

MARCH 10 MONTANA OF 300 MARCH 11 BLACK CROWN INITIATE & BLACK FAST MARCH 12 BLAZE YA DEAD HOMIE MARCH 18 KODAK BLACK APRIL 1

SAYWECANFLY

APRIL 15

THY ART IS MURDER

32 MUSIC // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

THIS WEEK

VOICES

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

DONALD DRUMPF, BERNIE AND KURT COBAIN

W

hatever the outcome of this year's presidential election, one thing has already become evident to me: The damage caused by Donald Drumpf's irresponsible and racist provocations has already begun to take root. Indiana received a taste of what Donald Drumpf's America might hold after a mosque in Plainfield was vandalized with anti-Islamic graffiti. It's a dark and uncertain time in America, particularly for religious and ethnic minorities. The only thing that gives me hope in this bleak political landscape is SUBMITTED PHOTO the candidacy of former Independent and current Democratic hopeful Bernie Sanders. As depressing as it's stale, saccharin, artistically void power been these last several months to live ballads and what these tunes lacked in under the specter of Donald Drumpf's compositional skill was compensated ignorant – and after his refusal to for in grossly overwrought studio prodisavow David Duke this weekend, duction sheen. possible white supremacist-adjacent As terrible as the final product was, – platitudes, I've received inspiration these glossy impersonations of rock in equal measure from the success of and roll ruled the radio dial. Sanders' campaign for social equality. Against heavy odds Sanders burst into the primary season as a formidable contendThe most important element er for the Democratic Nirvana brought to the world of nomination against tough competition from mainstream rock was the injection longtime party favorite Hillary Clinton. of Cobain’s humanist values. Sanders' unexpected push into the forefront of the American psyche reminds me of an unforgettable pop culture moment from my If the music itself weren't bad own adolescence. enough, the lyrical themes were often No one expected Nirvana's Neverworse. Mindless misogyny was the ormind LP to make a dent on the Billder of the day. Warrant's “Cherry Pie,” board album charts. But in one of the with its accompanying sexist video, great coups in rock and roll history the provides a typical example. album rocketed to Billboard's number Not content to wallow in the degone spot in January of 1992, just a few radation of women alone, one of the months after its release in September most critically respected bands of the of '91. If you weren't around to absorb day, Guns 'N Roses, attempted to give the atmosphere of popular rock and mainstream acceptability to expresroll culture during the era that presions of blatant racism and homophoceded Nevermind, it might be difficult bia. The lyrics of the band's "One In to understand exactly how unexpected A Million" off their hit LP GN'R Lies and revolutionary the album's ascenlamented the existence of "niggers,” dancy was. "immigrants” and "faggots.” During the late 1980s, popular rock Corporate execs heading the big record music had hit a real low point. Inlabels had perfected a moneymaking stantly forgettable hair metal acts like formula with hair metal, and, at the time, Winger and Nelson were cranking out it seemed nothing would stop them from

A CULTURAL MANIFESTO WITH KYLE LONG KLONG@NUVO.NET Kyle Long’s music, which features off-the-radar rhythms from around the world, has brought an international flavor to the local dance music scene.

continuing the scheme in perpetuity. It was in this morally regressive and musically hopeless environment that Nirvana's Nevermind arrived. Initially, the album received very little media support, its reputation grew largely through eager word of mouth praise from music fans tired of the same recycled hair metal tropes. The record's growth in popularity came through grassroots support. Nirvana's raw, stripped-down aesthetic challenged everything the hair metal era represented. Cobain's anguished, caustic howl rendered the pubescent fantasies of hair metal into an embarrassment. For me, the most important element Nirvana brought to the world of mainstream rock was the injection of Cobain's humanist values. Cobain celebrated the work of women and LGBT artists, and spoke out against racism and the corrupting influences of corporate music culture. Nirvana brought progressive change to the consciousness of an entire generation of rock and roll listeners. While there are vast worlds of difference in the machinations of politics and the music biz, it gives me some comfort to remember that sudden and unexpected progress is possible. But this sort of progress can't happen on its own. Right now, we need every capable citizen of consciousness to begin acting immediately to thwart the cancerous campaign of fear and hatred promoted by Donald Drumpf. For me the best political option in this fight is Bernie Sanders. n

KYLE LONG >> Kyle Long broadcasts weekly on WFYI 90.1 FM Wednesdays at 9 p.m.


SOUNDCHECK

Joe Fletcher, Fan the Flame, Dos Ringos, Birdy’s, 21+ Bashiri Asad, Union 50, 21+ Open Mic Night, Soho Cafe, all-ages Karaoke Thursday, Club Syllowet, 21+ Latin Dance Party, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Animal Haus, Blu, 21+ Hammer and Nigel, Coaches, 21+ Free Jazz Thursdays, Chatterbox, 21+ Karaoke hosted by Rhett Coles, Dear John’s Pub, 21+ Thursday Night Karaoke with Patsy’s DJ and Karaoke Services, Tick Tock Lounge, 21+ CandyShop Thursdays, Tin Roof, 21+ SBG Thursday Night Karaoke with Phat Kats, Southport Bar and Grill, 21+

SUBMITTED PHOTO

Christian Atunde Adjuah Scott, Sunday at Jazz Kitchen

NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK SUBMIT YOUR EVENT AT NUVO.NET/EVENT DENOTES EDITOR’S PICK

WEDNESDAY

Open Stage Night, Claude and Annie’s, all-ages

Conan, Serial Hawk, Fistula, Drude, 5th Quarter Lounge, 21+

The Family Jam, Mousetrap, 21+

DJ Little Town, David Peck, DJ Hyperbeast, Dilettante & Levante, The Hi-Fi, 21+

Wacky Wheel of Fortune Karaoke, Monkey’s Tale, 21+

Indy’s Best: Hip-hop Showcase with Supreem Da Rezarekta, Stitchy C, M3, Real Life Music Crew ft. DJK-Note, Dawn Omega, Emerson Theater, all-ages Finish Ticket, Vinyl Theatre, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages Rory Kelly, The 10 Cent Cigars, Melody Inn, 21+ Cole Woodruff, Union 50, 21+ Blues Jam, Slippery Noodle, 21+ Blues Jam, Main Event, 21+ Bring Your Own Vinyl Night, Lola’s Bowl and Bistro, all-ages

Karaoke with Magik, Webble’s Bar and Grill, 21+

Service Industry Night, PT’s Showclub, 21+

THURSDAY LOCALS Dan Hubbard 7 p.m. The self-titled album being released at this show isn’t Dan Hubbard’s first – it’s his fourth solo effort, this time recorded with Grammy nominated Ken Coomer (Wilco, Uncle Tupelo). The Hi-Fi, 1043 Virginia Ave. Ste. 4, $8 advance, $10 door, 21+

Salsa Night, The Red Room, 21+ Tim Brickley, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Coleman, Moss and Kouts, Rick’s Cafe Boatyard, 21+ Songwriter’s Select, Salt Creek Brewery, all-ages EchoCheck’s Wednesday Night Open Stage, Drifty’s Sports Bar, 21+ Free Jazz Wednesday, Chatterbox, 21+ Karaoke Wednesdays, Shorty’s Pub and Eatery, all-ages Open Stage, Red Lion Grog House, 21+

HIP-HOP Lil Wayne, Rae Sremmurd 7 p.m. Rap king Lil Wayne – we’ll check on the status of his many feuds before the show for you – and rising rap princes Rae Sremmurd stop in to IU. Assembly Hall, 1001 E. 17th St. (Bloomington), prices vary, all-ages

TRIBUTES God Save The Queen 9 p.m. So if you wanna see a tribute band, your best bet is The Vogue these days. Their calendar is stacked with ‘em. This week’s flavor? Argentine Queen tribute band God Save The Queen whose members are apparently VERY faithful to clothing, setlists, and “stage antics” of Queen. The Vogue, 6259 N. College Ave., prices vary, 21+ HIP-HOP Logic 8 p.m. Rapper/singer/ producer Logic’s latest is The Incredible True Story, which is both an album and a … sci-fi exploration of the 100 years in the future. Yeah, he’s out there. In a great way. Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New jersey St., SOLD OUT, all-ages DANCE Altered Thurzdaze 9 p.m. UK dubstep producer p0gman is the wobbly guest at this week’s Altered Thurzdaze. Mousetrap, 5565 N. Keystone Ave., $7 advance, $10 door, 21+ Hero Jr., Player’s Pub (Bloomington), 21+ American Aquarium, The Bluebird (Bloomington), 21+ Bummer’s Eve, Holy Sheets, Chives, Melody Inn, 21+

Best Dam Karaoke, Wild Beaver Saloon, 21+ Thirsty Thursday with Radio RX, Rock House Cafe, 21+ Oozing Wound, Rectal Hygienics, Potslammer, MW, State Street Pub, 21+ Thirsty Thursdays, Bartini’s, 21+

FRIDAY OPENINGS Indiana Music and Entertainment Museum Gallery Opening 7 p.m. We wrote up IMEM last year when a collection of historically-minded locals started gathering resources and donations. Their efforts culimatined in the opening of their first gallery space, located in the Wheeler Arts building and opening doors this weekend. Daryl Spurlock will provide tunes.

narratives and talismans. It is a temple, a secret mechanical garden, an extraterrestrial portal, a museum for the post-internet age. Within this trans-dimensional sanctuary you will discover curiosities documenting the great counter-conspiracy that is continually waging battle against the threat of big Silence.” A zine curated by Benjamin and Janneane Blevins, and featuring the writing of a variety of local writers, will be showcased. Oreo Jones, Sedcairn Archives and DJ Little Town will provide sonic accompaniment. Joyful Noise Recordings, 1043 Virginia Ave. Ste. 208, FREE, all-ages DANCE Audiodacity, Spiritual Rez, Merkwood 7 p.m. Have you copped Audiodacity’s newest LP yet? “On a Roll” is great. Mousetrap, 565 N. Keystone Ave., prices vary, 21+ SLAP DA BASS Victor Wooten 7 p.m. Wooten returns to the area regularly, thank god. That doesn’t make any of his shows any less of an event, though. The bass master is a legend for a reason. Zionsville Performing Arts Center, 1000 Mulberry St., $15 in advance, $20 at door, all-ages

Cash Bash 2016 9 p.m. One of our Barfly’s best events, this celebration of all things Man in Black means you have an excuse to watch the Cash music vid for “Hurt“ a million more times, while crying, to prep. Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St., $10, 21+ COUNTRY Kacey Musgraves 7:30 p.m. She broke out big by breaking the country mould – girls don’t always wanna get knocked up young and stuck in their hometowns no matter how much the songs Hank FM spin regularly may try and convince you. Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., $32 advance, $25 doors, all-age BALLADEER Edwin McCain, Derik Hultquist 7:30 p.m. I’ll be your crying shoulder, I’ll be love’s suicide I’ll be better when I’m older, I’ll be the greatest fan of your life. The Rathskeller, 401 E. Michigan St., $20 advance, $25 door, all-ages JAZZ Christian McBride Big Band 8 p.m.

Wheeler Arts, 1035 Sander St., Ste. 202, FREE, all-ages

Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, 355 City Center Dr. (Carmel), prices vary, all-ages

WEIRDNESS Museum of Psychphonics Openings 5 p.m. This delightfully unhinged gallery is the “spiritual sibling of the 24-Hour Church of Elvis, the Museum of Jurassic Technology, Marvin Johnson’s Gourd Museum,” etc. Here’s a description of the museum in full, because we really cannot do Michael Kaufmann and Kip Normand’s project rewriting justice: “We live in a world where all things not-strange are propped up as a fiction of normalcy. We aim to corrupt this charade with a new normal — a psychphonic disruption, a shared consciousness built upon outlawed

TRIBUTES

Stomp, Clowes Memorial Hall, all-ages Rickie Lee Jones, The Warehouse, all-ages (sold out) Native Sun, My Gold Mask, The Hi-Fi, 21+ Northern Kind, Birdy’s, 21+ Brandon Whyde, Union 50, 21+ Hillbilly Happy Hour, Melody Inn, 21+ Friday Night Karaoke, Living Room Lounge, 21+ Open Stage Blues Jam, Hilltop Tavern, 21+ SUBMITTED PHOTO

Rickie Lee Jones, Friday at Warehouse

Night Moves with Action Jackson, The Metro, 21+ The Rhaspers, Billy O’Neal’s Pub, 21+A Jazz-ful Weekend, Indy Reads Books, 21+

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // MUSIC 33


Hoodie Allen, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages

SOUNDCHECK

MONDAY

Mikial Robertson and Guests, The Mousetrap, 21+ T-Shirt Night, Greg’s, 21+

ROCK

Devil To Pay Shadeland, Astral Mass, Melody Inn, 21+

Heartless Bastards, Susto 9 p.m. Midwest transplants Heartless Bastards are really, at their heart (which they do have, name be damned) the writing project of singer/guitarist Erika Wennerstrom, whose ragged blues voice is a gift from the Cincinnati music scene heavens – even though we’ve long forgiven them for moving to Austin and leaving the Heartland.

Hairbanger’s Ball, The Bluebird (Bloomington), 21+ Snails, Deluxe at Old National Centre, all-ages Ramin Karimlook, Cabaret at the Columbia Club, 21+ The Farrelly/Markiewicz Jazz Quartet, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Giant Giants, Sirius Blvck, Jeron Braxton and The Tomagatchis, Runahwae, Joyful Noise, all-ages Macabre, Carpathian Funeral, Corpuscide, Troglodyte, Lurking Corpses, Summon The Destroyer, 5th Quarter Lounge, 21+ Molly Soda, The Bishop (Bloomington), 18+ Chin Up Kid, Freshman Year, Blisshead, Mascots, Hoosier Dome, all-ages The Learning Machine, General Public Collective, 21+ Terry Mullan, The Boiler Room Arcade Bar, 21+ Choking, Photian Schism, 187, The Devil’s Hellion, State Street Pub, 21+

SATURDAY FUNDRAISERS Beta Cell Bash 8 p.m. This annual event features Jenn Christy, Don Elbreg, Levi Driskell, The Dead Weight, and a bunch more, and don’t forget that all proceeds go to support juvenile diabetes research. Radio Radio, 1119 E. Prospect St., $15 advance, $20 doors, 21+

Victor Wooten, Friday at Zionsville Performing Arts Center

as “I’m Nothing Without You” (City of Angels) and “Old Devil Moon” (Finian’s Rainbow) plus an Elvis, Duke Ellington, Cole Porter and an Indigo Girls jam. Palladium at the Center for the Performing Arts, 355 City Center Dr., (Carmel), varies, all-ages FUNDRAISERS Slothfest 9 p.m. All money raised at this show benefits Little Red Door, which provides everything from cancer screenings and early detection treatments to transportation to and from chemo treatments. Up4daze, Desevren, Static Tension and Highway 9 will perform.

Dr. Spin, Hotel Tango, 21+ Thea Be-Ya and The Thieves, The Mousetrap, 21+ EDM, Wild Beaver, 21+ Sleeping Dog, Livin’ the Dream, Maad Hatterz, 5th Quarter Lounge, 21+ Southern Bridges, 8 Seconds Saloon, 21+ Afton Local Showcase with Brothers Grimm, Komptoro, Self-Propel, Nicholas Blair, Nik Geinger, Olivia Kay, We Are Gentlemen, Emerson Theater, all-ages The Williams Menefield Trio, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ Decaf Chemjax Acoustic Entertainment, Harmony Winery, 21+ Hamilton Loomis Band, B-Squared Country Saloon, 21+

Alibi’s Pub, 81 N. Washington St., $5, 21+

Metric, Joywave, Egyptian Room at Old National Centre, all-ages

Lickers, Yavin 4, Messengers, Anti-Queens, Melody Inn, 21+

The Dozens, White Rabbit Cabaret, 21+

Black Voodoo, The Rathskeller, 21+

SCREAMS

Seldom Surreal, The District Tap, 21+

Hawthorne Heights, The Ataris, Mest 7:30 p.m. We will never give up the opportunity to remind you that the mighty Ataris are technically a local band – started just north in good ol’ Anderson.

John 5 and The Creatures, The Vogue, 21+

The Dozens, White Rabbit Cabaret, 21+

SUNDAY

Deluxe at Old National Centre, 502 N. New Jersey St., $18.50 advance, $25 doors, 21+

John 5, The Creatures, The Vogue, 21+ Fan The Flame, Brandon Whyde and The Devil’s Keep, The Goodspeed Brothers, Whiskey Business Sport Bar, 21+ DJ Topspeed, Skeme Richards, Paren and Antonio Leiriao, State Street Pub, 21+ Charlie Ballantine, Union 50, 21+

STANDARDS

Hyryder, Old Shoe, Mousetrap, 21+

Michael Feinstein and Cheyenne Jackson 8 p.m. Behold, the power of two – no, really, that’s what Feinstein and Jackson called their duo album, which includes such Broadway hits

Skybar Saturday, 247 Sky Bar, 21+ Punk Rock Night, Melody Inn, 21+ Karaoke with Travis, Nipper’s II Grill and Tap, 21+ From Graceland to Indy Concert, Karaoke Gold Club, 21+

34 MUSIC // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

AMBIENT Metavari, Mike Adams at His Honest Weight 8 p.m. Fort Wayne soundscape explorers and Bloomington feels explorers join forces at this majestic show. The Bishop, 123 S. Walnut St. (Bloomington), $7, 21+ JAZZ Christian Atunde Adjuah Scott 7 p.m. This Grammy-nomi-

SUBMITTED PHOTO

The Bishop, 123 S. Walnut St. (Bloomington), $15, 21+ Video Grave, Straberry, Lil Toughies, General Public Collective, all-ages

nated, Edison Award-winning trumpet player and composer is young, gifted and Black. Fun fact: Scott once counted virtuoso bassist Esperanza Spalding in his ensemble. Jazz Kitchen, 5377 N. College Ave., $25, 21+ Occult Deceiver, Arson Party, Makeshift Tragedy, Melody Inn, 21+ The Fantasies, Thee Rockefeller Sheiks, Thee Fine Lines, Yesterday’s Chips, The Spot Tavern (Lafayette), 21+ Rogues, From Another Planet, Treachery Within, Forget Me Not, 5th Quarter Lounge, 21+ Conquer Divide, Brothers Grimm, The Wise Man’s Fear, The Cambion, Noesis, Hoosier Dome, all-ages

Black Mass XXXVII, Artifex Guild (Bloomington), all-ages Michael Kelsey, Edgar Cruz, Birdy’s, 21+ King Crabb, Chef Joseph’s at the Connoisseur Room, 21+ letlive., Emerson Theater, all-ages The Eastern Sea, The Hi-Fi, 21+ Weakley, Clark and Wood, Jazz Kitchen, 21+ CFM, Feels, Creeping Pink, Thee Open Sex, Raw Image, State Street Pub, 21+

TUESDAY The Chieftains, IU Auditorium (Bloomington), all-ages Take That! Tuesdays, Coaches, 21+

BARFLY BY WAYNE BERTSCH

NAP DNB Presents, Melody Inn, 21+

WEDNESDAY POP Jon McLaughlin 7:30 p.m. Longtime Hoosier pop songwriter Jon McLaughlin spent much of the last two years in a slowwww move down to Nashville with his wife and two daughters. There, he’ll continue writing for himself and other artists. He told NUVO in an interview last year that getting onstage is the most natural thing in the world for him now.” If you go to one of my shows, there’s no pyro, there’s no persona. It’s just me up on stage playing my songs and talking, telling a couple of stories about my kid, my [life]. It sort of just feels like as a person I wanted to do something, and I of course used whatever assets I had, just like anybody would. Just like you use the platform that you have for things that you feel called to do.” The Warehouse, 254 1st Ave. SW, prices vary, all-ages Kenneth Patton, Chef Joseph’s, 21+ Brenda Williams, Jazz kitchen, 21+ Kriko Bangz, Emerson Theater, all-ages Radkey, Cowboys, Pills, The Bishop (Bloomington), 18+ Rory Connolly, Union 50, 21+ Scarface, The Vogue, 21+ Phunk Nastys, The Bluebird (Bloomington), 21+ PunkySkaRockabilly Party with The Innocent Boys, Melody Inn, 21+ NUVO.NET/SOUNDCHECK


SAVAGELOVE THIS WEEK

VOICES

FOUR WORD LIMIT Are you incapable of concision? Your answers are too long! You blather on, often rehashing the problem (unnecessary!) before giving four words (at most!) of (rarely!) useful advice. I’ve heard you say you have to edit letters down for space. Try this instead: Edit yourself! I want more of the letters — more from the people asking questions — and less of YOU. Keep It Short, Savage, Expressed Sincerely Feedback is always appreciated, KISSES. I am a kinkster. I have been since I can remember (I am now 21 years old), and I’ve never told anyone about my deep dark desires until the last year. During my time at university, I made good friends with a guy who I was able to open up to about my preferences, as he had similar desires. We created a beneficial arrangement. I suddenly no longer felt like I needed to suppress my “fucked up” masochistic needs and became extremely happy and more comfortable with them. I keep a journal, and naturally I wrote about this arrangement and a lot of the explicit details. Last summer, my mother read my entire journal

NEWS

ARTS

MUSIC

CLASSIFIEDS

7259 Pendleton Pike Indianapolis, IN 46226

317.545.5100

DAN SAVAGE Listen to Dan’s podcast every week at savagelovecast.com @fakedansavage

those “weird” sex practices are, and say that I’m cured and will never engage in them again. Months have passed and I’m still angry with her for having read my diary. I feel sad about the lies I told and having to pretend — still — that I regret what I did. Because the truth is I’ve never felt more like myself than when I am doing BDSM. It’s not my entire world, but it is an important part of who I am. How do you think I should take things from here? She’ll never understand, so telling her isn’t an option, but that means suppressing my deep upset at her as well.

OPEN DAILY 3PM - 3AM SUNDAYS 6PM - 3AM

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS CALLING ALL BABES!

FREE

NOW HIRING

ADMISSION! with this ad

babeseastshowclub.com

— MOTHER UNFAIRLY DESTROYED DAUGHTER’S LIBIDO ENTIRELY

DAN SAVAGE: Fuck mom; be you, Shit, I really can’t do this one in four words. Confront your fucking mother, MUDDLE, once you’re out of grad school (priorities!), about the awful, shitty things she did to you: reading your Last summer, my mother read my journal; shaming you for your sexual interests and entire journal and was horrified. your private, consensual, respectful, and healthy sexual explorations; and and was horrified. After she read it, I her unforgivable acts of emotional and received a very nasty text message from financial blackmail. And you should her about how our relationship was over, wave the results of this study under her she couldn’t believe what I had done, nose when you confront her: livescience. and she was no longer going to help com/34832-bdsm-healthy-psychology. pay for my postgraduate courses, etc. html. It’s just one of several studies She was deeply disturbed to learn that showing that people who practice BDSM some money she had given me for my — not just fantasize about it but actually 21st birthday was spent on a hotel room practice i t— are psychologically healthier where I met up with my kinky friend. (It than vanilla people. n wasn’t like we could meet in my family home!) I never wanted my mother to On the Lovecast, Dan and The Gist’s Mike know about any of this, and I feel bad for Pesca “tackle” a football relationship how it upset her, but this was also a huge question: savagelovecast.com. violation of my privacy. The only way to resolve the situation was for me to pretend that I deeply regretted everything, tell her I can see now how messed up

WELCOME BASKETBALL FANS!

Question? mail@savagelove.com Online: nuvo.net/savagelove

WELCOME BASKETBALL FANS!

FREE

DAILY DRINK SPECIALS

ADMISSION WITH THIS AD 4444 S. HARDING ST., INDIANAPOLIS, 46217 CLASSYCHASSYSHOWCLUB.COM • 317.787.3442

OPEN DAILY 3PM-3AM SUNDAYS 6AM-3AM

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // VOICES 35


WELCOME NTEA! NO COVER ‘TIL 8PM

VOTED BEST PLACE FOR A LAP DANCE! DAILY LUNCH AND BEER SPECIALS!

Fr ee w

NOW HIRING ENTERTAIN CALL 35 ERS

SUNDAYS! • $.25 CENT WINGS • $7.50 U-CALL-IT PITCHERS Ad

ith

th

m

is

iss

Ad

317-356-9668

10 mins southeast

io

n

4011 SOUTHEASTERN AVE. of downtown BRADSBRASSFLAMINGO.COM

HOURS Mon-Sat: 11 am-3 a.m. Sun: Noon-3 a.m. FULL SERVICE KITCHEN Mon-Sat: 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

Sun: Noon-10 p.m.

6-7044

TUE: $3 Wells $5 Long Islands

WED: $3 Single Drafts $7 Domestic Pitchers

BUCKET OF 6 BABY BUDS $10 ALL WEEK!

FREE ADMISSION W I TH TH I S A D

FREE ADMISSION WITH THIS AD

the

HOURS: MON-SAT 2PM-3AM SUNDAY 6PM-3AM

35 MADISON AVE. 3512 INDIANAPOLIS INDI

317.783.6144 317

INDY’S PREMIER ADULT ESTABLISHMENT 3 PRIVATE ROOMS•VIP SEATING•COUPLES WELCOME

EVERYDAY SPECIAL! 10 OZ DRAFTS - 2 FOR $5

ALWAYS HIRING QUALITY ENTERTAINERS JUST MINUTES FROM DOWNTOWN & AIRPORT

Check out the newnuvo.net nuvo.net Check out Check outthe the new new nuvo.net


ADULT

RELAXING MASSAGE Advertisers running in the Relaxing Massage section are licensed to practice NON-SEXUAL MASSAGE as a health benefit, and have submitted their license for that purpose. Do not contact any advertisers in the Relaxing Massage section if you are seeking Adult entertainment.

NEW!

MAGICAL! Try a Massage with the Magnificent Morgan! Downtown 12pm-10pm CALL/TEXT 317-366-1332 To Schedule.

The Adult section is only for readers over the age of 18. Please be extremely careful to call the correct number including the area code when dialing numbers listed in the Adult section. Nuvo claims no responsibility for incorrectly dialed numbers.

ADULT SERVICES Biracial Beauty Full Body Rub! Performed By Busty Curvy Female!! 44 DD Chest, 29 Inch Waist, 39 Inch Hips Very Physically Fit Apple BTTM, Long Legs, Light Brown Skin Domination/Discipline 513-545-2644

ADULT RETAIL

TO PLACE AN AD IN NUVO’S ADULT SECTION CALL 317-808-4616.

PASSION BY PHONE

VIAGRA!! 52 Pills for Only $99.00. Your #1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed Delivery. Call today 1-877-621-7013 (AAN CAN)

DATES BY PHONE

MEET SOMEONE TONIGHT! Instant live phone connections with local men and women. Call now for a FREE trial! 18+ 317-612-4444 812-961-1111 www.questchat.com

#1 Sexiest Urban Chat! Hot Singles are ready to hookup NOW! 18+ FREE to try! 317-536-0909 812-961-0505 www.metrovibechatline.com

CALL NOW, MEET TONIGHT! Connect with local men and women in your area. Call for your absolutely FREE trial! 18+ 317-612-4444 812-961-1111 www.questchat.com

TRANSEXUALS THE BEST OF THE BEST IN TS EXPERIENCE!! The Transexual of Your Dreams 36D-28-42 Available Now! 100% Real and Safe In the Indianapolis Area In Call/Out Call TS Now is Your Chance 317-362-7136 www.tsluxuryd.com

#1 SEXIER Pickup line FREE to try 18+ Call Now! 317-791-5700 812-961-1515 www.nightlinechat.com

PASSION BY PHONE

FREE

POOL TA B L E S !

ADMISSION!!

2211 Kentucky Avenue, Indpls, 46221 • 317-241-2211

NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // ADULT 37


CLASSIFIEDS

S N R E T IN ict the

TO ADVERTISE: CALL DREW @ 808-4616 Phone: (317) 254-2400 | Fax: (317) 479-2036 E-mail: classifieds@nuvo.net | nuvo.net/classifieds Mail: Nuvo Classifieds, 3951 N. Meridian St., Suite 200 Indianapolis, Indiana 46208

pred e! futur

Payment & Deadline All ads are prepaid in full by Monday at 5 P.M. Nuvo gladly accepts Cash, Money Order, & All Major Credit Cards.

Policies: Advertiser warrants that all goods or services advertised in NUVO are permissible under applicable local, state and federal laws. Advertisers and hired advertising agencies are liable for all content (including text, representation and illustration) of advertisements and are responsible, without limitation, for any and all claims made thereof against NUVO, its officers or employees. Classified ad space is limited and granted on a first come, first served basis. To qualify for an adjustment, any error must be reported within 15 days of publication date. Credit for errors is limited to first insertion.

Q: It’s 2172. Teleportation still doesn’t exist. How are people getting around?

MARKETING With these things called legs.

ANTHONY LOMBARDI

Social Media & Content Intern Ball State University Major: Journalism

Real hover boards.

GABE LINDMAN

Hoverboards & jet packs!

BRITTANY DUNCAN

Photography Intern IUPUI Major: Journalism

Mass system of jungle vines, swinging from place to place.

GAGE HEIN

Social Media & Content Intern IUPUI Major: Marketing & Public Relations

Photography Intern Ivy Tech Major: Photography

Autonomous cars.

Stuck in traffic.

EMPLOYMENT

GROOMER NEEDED Upscale Doggy Hotel. 54th & the Monon Trail. To apply, call Sam at 317-255-2525.

CAREER TRAINING

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

RESTAURANT | BAR

BARTENDER WANTED Day and night shift needed. The New Yorker Bar, 302 N. Colorado Ave. $7/hr plus tips. Call 317-250-5887.

CLARION HOTEL AND CONFERENCE CENTER Hiring experienced bartenders and banquet bartenders. Apply in-person with Jason Crider at 2930 Waterfront Parkway West Drive.

MARKETPLACE

McGilvery’s Taphouse Now hiring all positions! Come by 8249 US 31, Indianapolis, IN 46227. Monday-Friday, 11am-4pm.

GENERAL

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 a Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.TheIncomeHub.com (AAN CAN)

HEALTH CARE

$300.00 Sign-on Bonus Apply within for details Attentive Home Healthcare is seeking qualified candidates for employment. Certified HHA’s/CNA’s are encouraged to apply. Please apply at www. attentivehhc.com or call 317-405-9044

KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT Complete Treatment System. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot. com (AAN CAN)

MISC. FOR SALE

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-244-7149 (M-F 9am-8pm central) (ANN CAN)

PENIS ENLARGEMENT MEDICAL PUMP Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently! Money back guarantee. FDA Licensed since 1997. Free Brochure: Call (619) 294-7777 www.drjoelkaplan.com VIAGRA FOR CHEAP 317-507-8182 VIAGRA!! 52 Pills for Only $99.00. Your #1 trusted provider for 10 years. Insured and Guaranteed Delivery. Call today 1-888-403-9028 (AAN CAN)

$ OPPORTUNITIES $

JAHA JEFFERSON

Event & Promotions Intern Indiana Wesleyan University Major: Masters of Business Administration

JAZMYN THOMAS

Event & Promotions Intern IUPUI Major: Business Management

WITH LOCAL DJ AND NUVO COLUMNIST

KyleLong

Personal robots carry us around.

KAMRON SANDERS

Event & Promotions Intern IUPUI Major: Public Relations & Event Management

FOLLOW US

PICK US UP

@NUVO_PROMO

SELENA ROSAS

Event & Promotions Intern IUPUI Major: Journalism

WEDNESDAY PM

NIGHTS 9

FIND US

ON

THIS WEEK, NUVO INTERNS WILL BE HERE:

Saturday, Mar. 5, 8 p.m. Indiana Repertory Theatre 140 W. Washington St.

@NUVOPROMOTIONS

A Cultural

MANIFESTO

INDY GOLF EXPO

Need more NUVO in your life? Contact Ryan if you’d like a NUVO circulation box or rack at your location! rmcduffee@nuvo.net

38 CLASSIFIEDS // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // NUVO

Mar. 4-6 Indiana State Fairgrounds 1202 E. 38th St.

AUTOMOTIVE

2006 Blue Buick Terraza CXL Excellent Condition. Entertainment Center. 158,000 miles. $4,885. Call Ron at 317-605-1138.

WANTED AUTO

#1 INDY AUTO BUYER! Guaranteed top cash paid for all junk/runnable vehicles. Open 7 days. Free towing included. 317-450-2777

VOICES OF A GENERATION

@NUVOINDY

NUVO.NET/STREETTEAM

Tubes are connected everywhere. Step in and travel.

We Pay CASH For Diabetic Test Strips Local Pickup Available Call or Text Aaron (317) 220-3122

PHOTO BY JENN GOODMAN

explores the merging of sounds from around the globe with the history of music from right here at home.

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! We Buy Like New or Damaged. Running or Not. Get Paid! Free Towing! We’re Local! Call For Quote: 1-888-420-3808 (AAN CAN)

DONATE YOUR CAR FOR BREAST CANCER! Help United Breast Foundation education, prevention, & support programs. FAST FREE PICKUP 24 HR RESPONSE TAX DEDUCTION 855-403-0215 (AAN-CAN)

WANTED Ford Mustangs, Shelbys, Boss cars and parts. Ford Performance cars and parts. Any condition. Finders fee paid. Call Kevin 317-332-3716

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Are you in BIG trouble with the IRS? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 844-753-1317 (AAN CAN)

LEGAL SERVICES

LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, an experienced Traffic Law Attorney I can help you with: Hardship Licenses-No Insurance SuspensionsHabitual Traffic ViolatorsRelief from Lifetime Suspensions-DUI-Driving While Suspended & All Moving Traffic Violations! Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law FREE CONSULTATIONS www.indytrafficattorney.com 317-686-7219

ADOPTION

Pregnant? Let’s get together and discuss your options! Adoption can be a fresh start! Let Amanda, Carol, Alli or Kate meet with you and discuss options. We can meet at our Broad Ripple office or go out for lunch. YOU choose the family from happy, carefully screened Indiana couples that will offer pictures, letters, visits & an open adoption, if you wish. www. adoptionsupportcenter.com (317) 255-5916 Adoption Support Center


BODY/MIND/SPIRIT FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

REAL ESTATE RENTALS DOWNTOWN

FLETCHER PLACE SKYLINE VIEW Efficiency, Nice Place, Appliances Included. Utilities Paid. $600/mo. 317-730-0782

RENTALS NORTH

BROAD RIPPLE AREA! Newly decorated apartments near Monon Trail. Spacious, quiet, secluded. Starting $525. 5300 Carrollton Ave. 317-257-7884. EHO PIKE TOWNSHIP 4007 Westover 3BR dbl., 1.5 BA. A/C. W/D hookups. $995 + deposit. 317-414-1435 or 803-736-7188

RENTALS

Advertisers running in the CERTIFIEDPisces MASSAGE THERAPY section have graduated Scorpio Aquarius Capricorn Sagittarius from a massage therapy school associated with one of four organizations:

BROAD RIPPLE! The Granville & The Windemere 1BR & 2BR Rents from $600-$675!! The Maple Court Large 2BR Reduced to $795! Located at 6104 Compton Ave Dorfman Property CALL 317-257-5770 FROM $525/MONTH 2, 3, and 4 Bedrooms from $525/month on the East Side. Call 317-370-1779.

ROOMMATES

ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN)

American Massage Therapy Association (amtamassage.org) Virgo

International Massage Association (imagroup.com) Leo

Gemini

Cancer

Taurus

International Myomassethics Federation (888-IMF-4454)

Association of Bodywork and Massage Professionals (abmp.com)

Additionally, one can not be a member of these four organizations but instead, take the test AND/OR have passed the National Board of Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork exam (ncbtmb.com). Pisces Aquarius Capricorn Sagittarius EMPEROR MASSAGE THIS WEEK’S SPECIAL! $38/60min, $60/95min (Applies to 1st visit only) Gemini Cancer Leo Virgo PRO MASSAGE Call for details to discover Top Quality, Swedish, Deep & experience this incredible Tissue Massage in Quiet Home Japanese massage. Studio. Near Downtown. Northside, InCall, Avail. 24/7 From Certified Therapist. 317-431-5105 Paul 317-362-5333 CONNECTIVE LIVING ISLAND WAVE MASSAGE Healing, peace, posture, Dealing with Fibromyalgia, relaxation, confidence. Crohn’s Disease, MS, joint Advanced bodywork, pain, inflammation, lower back lifecoaching, boxing, dance. pain and/or headaches? Caring professional. State certified 8 years. 17yrs experience. Pisces Aquarius Capricorn 317-605-9492. www.connective-living.com. Chad A. Wright, COTA, CMT, CCLC THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE 317-372-9176 Please call Melanie “Everything Virgo is connected” Cancer Leo 317-225-1807 Deep Tissue & Swedish 11am-8pm Southside

CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPISTS

WANT TO ADVERTISE WITH NUVO? call Drew @ 317-808-4616

Pisces

Aquarius

© 2016 BY ROB BREZSNY Libra

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Actress Blythe Baird writes about the problem that arises when her dog sees her eating a peanut butter and chocolate chip bagel. Her beloved pet begs for a piece and becomes miserable when it’s not forthcoming. Baird is merely demonstrating her love, of course, because she knows that eating chocolate can make canines ill. I suspect that life is bestowing a comparable blessing on you. You may feel mad and sad about being deprived of something you want. But the likely truth is that you will be lucky not to get it. Aries

Pisces

Scorpio

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Pisces

Aquarius

Capricorn

Libra

Virgo

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I do not literally paint that table, but rather the emotion it produces upon me,” French artist Henri Matisse told an interviewer. “But what if you don’t always have emotion?” she asked him. This is how Matisse replied: “Then I do not paint. This morning, when I came to work, I had no emotion. So I took a horseback ride. When I returned, I felt like painting, and had all the emotion I wanted.” This is excellent advice for you to keep in mind, Taurus. Even more than usual, it’s crucial that you imbue every important thing you do with pure, strong emotions. If they’re not immediately available, go in quest of them. Taurus

Sagittarius

Aries

Scorpio

Libra

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Some night soon, I predict you’ll dream of being an enlightened sovereign who presides over an ecologically sustainable paradise. You’re a visionary leader who is committed to peace and high culture, so you’ve never gone to war. You share your wealth with the people in your kingdom. You revere scientists and shamans alike, providing them with what they need to do their good work for the enhancement of the realm. Have fun imagining further details of this dream, Gemini, or else make up your own. Now is an excellent time to visualize a fairy tale version of yourself at the height of your powers, living your dreams and sharing your gifts. Virgo

Gemini

Capricorn

Taurus

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Pisces

Aquarius

Aries

Scorpio

Libra

Virgo

Virgo

Leo

@tremendouskat

Leo

CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s not always necessary to have an expansive view of where you have been and where you are going, but it’s crucial right now. So I suggest that you take an inventory of the big picture. For guidance, study this advice from philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche: “What have you truly loved? What has uplifted your soul, what has dominated and delighted it at the same time? Assemble these revered objects in a row before you and they may reveal a law by their nature and their order: the fundamental law of your very self.” Cancer

Gemini

Taurus

Aries

Pisces

Pisces

Virgo

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Scorpio

Libra

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Sportswear manufacturer Adidas is looking for ways to repurpose trash that humans dump in the oceans. One of its creations is a type of shoe made from illegal deep-sea nets that have been confiscated from poachers. I invite you to get inspired by Adidas’s work. From an astrological perspective, now is a good time to expand and refine your personal approach to recycling. Brainstorm about how you could convert waste and refuse into useful, beautiful resources — not just literally, but also metaphorically. For example, is there a ruined or used-up dream that could be transformed into raw material for a shiny new dream? Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Taurus

Pisces

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Virgo

Aries

Scorpio

Libra

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “There isn’t enough of anything as long as we live,” wrote Raymond Carver. “But at intervals a sweetness appears and, given a chance, prevails.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, Virgo, you’ll soon be gliding through one of these intervals. Now and then you may even experience the strange sensation of being completely satisfied with the quality and amount of sweetness that arrives. To ensure optimal results, be as free from greed as you can possibly be. Virgo

Pisces

Sunday Nights 10:00 on

!

Virgo

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Taurus

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Taurus

Aries

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “For a wound to heal, you have to clean it out,” says author Yasmin Mogahed. “Again, and again, and again. And this cleaning process stings. The cleaning of a wound hurts. Yes. Healing takes so much work. So much persistence. And so Libra

much patience.” According to my analysis, Libra, you should be attending to this tough but glorious task. Although the work might be hard, it won’t be anywhere near as hard as it usually is. And you are likely to make more progress than you would be able to at other times. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “The other day, lying in bed,” writes poet Rodger Kamenetz, “I felt my heart beating for the first time in a long while. I realized how little I live in my body, how much in my mind.” He speaks for the majority of us. We spend much of our lives entranced by the relentless jabber that unfolds between our ears. But I want to let you know, Scorpio, that the moment is ripe to rebel against this tendency in yourself. In the coming weeks, you will have a natural talent for celebrating your body. You’ll be able to commune deeply with its sensations, to learn more abut how it works, and to exult in the pleasure it gives you and the wisdom it provides. Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In his “Dream Song 67,” poet John Berryman confesses, “I am obliged to perform in complete darkness operations of great delicacy on my self.” I hope you will consider embarking on similar heroics, Sagittarius. It’s not an especially favorable time to overhaul your environment or try to get people to change in accordance with your wishes. But it’s a perfect moment to spruce up your inner world — to tinker with and refine it so that everything in there works with more grace. And unlike Berryman, you won’t have to proceed in darkness. The light might not be bright, but there’ll be enough of a glow to see what you’re doing. Sagittarius

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Here’s the dictionary’s definition of the word “indelible”: “having the quality of being difficult to remove, wash away, blot out, or efface; incapable of being canceled, lost, or forgotten.” The word is often used in reference to unpleasant matters: stains on clothes, biases that distort the truth, superstitions held with unshakable conviction, or painful memories of romantic break-ups. I am happy to let you know that you now have more power than usual to dissolve seemingly indelible stuff like that. Here’s a trick that might help you: Find a new teacher or teaching that uplifts you with indelible epiphanies. Capricorn

Sagittarius

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According to poet Tony Hoagland, most of us rarely “manage to finish a thought or a feeling; we usually get lazy or distracted and quit halfway through.” Why? Hoagland theorizes that we “don’t have the time to complete the process, and we dislike the difficulty and discomfort of the task.” There’s a cost for this negligence: “We walk around full of halffinished experiences.” That’s why Hoagland became a poet. He says that “poems model the possibility of feeling all the way through an emotional process” and “thinking all the way through a thought.” The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get more in the habit of finishing your own feelings and thoughts, Aquarius. It will also be more important than usual that you do so! (Hoagland’s comments appeared in Gulf Coast: A Journal of Literature and Fine Arts.) Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Unless you work at night and sleep by day, you experience the morning on a regular basis. You may have a love-hate relationship with it, because on the one hand you don’t like to leave your comfortable bed so early, and on the other hand you enjoy anticipating the interesting events ahead of you. But aside from your personal associations with the morning, this time of day has always been a potent symbol of awakenings and beginnings. Throughout history, poets have invoked it to signify purity and promise. In myth and legend, it often represents the chance to see things afresh, to be free of the past’s burdens, to love life unconditionally. Dream interpreters might suggest that a dream of morning indicates a renewed capacity to trust oneself. All of these meanings are especially apropos for you right now, Pisces. Pisces

Virgo

Aquarius

Capricorn

Sagittarius

Leo

Cancer

Gemini

Scorpio

Libra

Taurus

Aries

Aries

Homework: Imagine gazing into the eyes of the person you were ten years ago. What do you want to say to the Old You? Freewillastrology.com NUVO // 100% RECYCLED PAPER // 03.02.16 - 03.09.16 // CLASSIFIEDS 39


LICENSE SUSPENDED? Call me, the original Indy Traffic Attorney, I can help you with:

Hardship Licenses Specialized Driving Privileges Insurance and Points Suspensions Habitual Traffic Violator Charges and Suspensions Lifetime Suspensions Uninsured Accident Suspensions Operating While Intoxicated Charges and Suspensions BMV Suspensions, Hearings, and Appeals Court Imposed Suspensions All Moving Traffic Violations and Suspensions

FREE CONSULTATIONS Christopher W. Grider, Attorney at Law indytrafficattorney.com

317-637-9000

NUVO HOTLINE TO ADVERTISE ON HOTLINE CALL DREW AT 808-4616

BANKRUPTCY

#1 INDY AUTO BUYER Guaranteed top cash paid for all junk/ runnable vehicles. Open 7 days. Free towing included. 317-450-2777

GUITAR LESSON GIFT CERTIFICATES Buy/Sell/Trade + Live Music for Events Rob Swaynie-Jazz/Blues/Rock www.indyguitar.com 291-9495

KENTUCKY KLUB

Services:

317.454.8188

indybankruptcyhelp.com

101 W Ohio Street, Ste 2000 Indianapolis, IN 46204

As a debt relief agency, our law firm helps people file for bankruptcy.

GENTLEMEN’S KLUB Female DANCERS needed. Located Kentucky & Raymond. No House Fees 241-2211

PAYMENT PLA PLANS

100% Organic E-Juice High Grade Equipment Free Shipping!

1 N. Pen Pennsylvania Suite 43 430 Indianapolis, IN 46204 Indianap

VETERANS WANTED! Artists & Craftsmen Jeff Piper, 317-946-8365

317.974.0177

· Criminal Defense · Family Law · Bankruptcy · 1 N. Meridian Street, Suite 600 • EskewLaw.com

• Seal your Records • Driving Licenses and Offenses • Criminal Law • Mediation • DUIs • Probation • Drug Offense Law Violations and • Business Matters Modifications

317-800-0855

TheVapeSpace.net

Aggressive & Effective

CRIMINAL DEFENSE

Shop. Smart. PICK UP NUVO AT KROGER

NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - March 2, 2016  
NUVO: Indy's Alternative Voice - March 2, 2016  

K-12 Food Rescue: Keeping untouched school food out of the landfill