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#2 2013

THE BOWL IS OUT, THE BAR IS IN

MORE ABOUT Old Dogs

OFF THE WALL DOG POSTERS

PROTEIN CUPLETS: to Play With Your Dog

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TIPS FOR TRIPS Goggles for dogs


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TRUE FO

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OOD 3


THE BOWL IS OUT, THE BAR IS IN

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For the very first time there is a snack food for dogs that is so honestly nutritious in its all-natural formulation that it can alternatively be served as a meal. This is in part made possible by its super premium, no by-product chicken protein, abundant vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, amino acids, omega 3 and 6 fatty acid ingredients that meet The Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) standards. In fact, the guaranteed analysis on the package shows that a single, four-ounce NUTRABAR is the kilo-calorie equivalent of an 8 ounce cup of super-premium dry dog food. Moreover, NutraBars are so pocketportable so you needn’t always look for a dog bowl to serve a meal. That makes it easy to go anywhere, anytime. Beyond NutraBar’s nutritional values, it has such a great taste and aroma that dogs come to crave the bar, so it becomes a great training reward suitable for any size dog at every lifestage as it is semi-moist and easily breakable into any size bite.

NutraBars are an all-in-one solution to nourishing the love you share with your dog.

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NutraBars are available in Original, Low Fat and Senior Bars. While the bars share a common formula, the Low Fat Bar has 30% fewer fat calories for the less active or over weight dog and the Senior Bar is supplemented with Glucosamine and Chondroitin for joint support.


OLD DOGS Getting Old

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Change is a normal part of the aging process. Not every dog will experience every possible age-related change, of course.  The way your individual dog ages will be affected by its general health and environment, and its family heritage. The breed or combination of breeds will also play a role in the changes you should expect. Some breeds tend to be more prone to heart problems, for instance, while others are susceptible to other conditions. You and your veterinarian can help your aging dog as changes occur.

Regular checkups to diagnose problems early, and changes in your dog's care and environment, may help it live longer and healthier. 

Changes in Nutritional Needs

An older dog generally requires fewer calories than when the dog was younger. If you continue to feed as much as you used to, your dog will get fat. Don't let that happen! Obesity is a serious health threat and can contribute to many problems, including heart disease, arthritis, and other debilitating conditions.

Some older dogs require nutritional supplements. Speak to your veterinarian and read about canine nutrition to determine which, if any, supplements may help your dog age more comfortably.

Changes in Skin, Coat, and Nails

Many dogs get gray hair as they age, particularly on the muzzle and around the eyes. Their coats may also become thinner, although that can be a sign of problems other than advancing age. If your dog's coat changes suddenly or substantially, tell your veterinarian. Regular grooming


Arthritis and Muscular Problems

Arthritis is common in older dogs. Its effect on your dog's life can vary from mild stiffness after sleeping to debilitating pain that keeps them from doing many things they used to do with ease. Many people find that glucosamine and other supplements seem to make their arthritic dogs more comfortable. Anti-inflammatory pain relievers are often recommended as well. Consult your veterinarian before treating your dog, though, as some medications may interfere with one another or be harmful if your dog has other medical conditions. 

Dental Disease

Dental disease is common in older dogs. Routine dental care is more important than ever for dogs as they age. Don't assume that your dog should have bad breath— it shouldn't. Bad breath often indicates gum disease, which can affect the heart, lungs, kidney, and other organs and contribute to life-

threatening complications. Proper oral hygiene will protect your aging dog from gum disease and also give your veterinarian a chance to examine your dog's mouth for telltale signs of disease. A professional cleaning should be scheduled at least once a year or more frequently if necessary. Regular brushing at home will also help maintain your dog's oral health, as will chew toys designed to help keep teeth and gums clean and healthy.

Heart, Kidney, and Liver Problems

As your dog ages, his internal organs may lose some of their ability to function properly. Their heart will probably become less efficient, and the heart valves— particularly the mitral valve—will lose elasticity. Some changes are a normal part of aging, but if your dog had indications of heart problems when younger, or if the breed is prone to heart problems, talk to your vet about screening and care as it ages.

Loss of Hearing

Your dog may experience hearing loss as it ages. Most people don't notice the first indications of hearing loss in a dog because the signs tend to be subtle. Dogs use many cues to interact with us besides their hearing—they watch us, they know our patterns (probably better than we do), and they continue to interact effectively. By the time you do notice, your dog may already

have experienced considerable, irreversible hearing loss. Don't despair if your dog can't hear as well as it used to. Many people successfully teach their dogs to respond to hand signals and light signals in place of voice signals. For instance, you could use a flashlight to call your dog in from the yard. Even in daylight it will be able to see a flashing light unless your dog also lost its vision to age. If you start teaching these new communication skills before your dog loses its hearing, all the better.

Eye and Vision Changes

Changes in the eye are also common in aging dogs. If your dog's breed, or one of the breeds is a mix, it may be prone to inherited eye disease, so consider taking your dog to a veterinary ophthalmologist for a thorough eye exam once every year or two. Other changes are simply a normal function of aging or in some cases the result of injury or other diseases.

Longer Lives.

Altering your pet will increase his chances of living longer and healthier. 

Cognitive Dysfunction

More than half of dogs over 10 years of age will experience some signs of canine cognitive dysfunction (CCD), which is characterized by a number of behavioral changes ranging from confusion to changes in longestablished behavior patterns. If you think your dog may have CCD, talk to your veterinarian. There are drugs now that can alleviate some of the symptoms,

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will let you check for lumps, bumps, and other signs of potential trouble. Benign tumors and fatty deposits are common in older dogs, but cancerous tumors can also occur. Have any new bumps or suspicious areas on the skin checked by your veterinarian. Your dog's nails may become more brittle as it gets older. If that happens, speak to your vet about nutritional supplements that may help. You may need to trim your dog's nails more frequently as it becomes less active. If your dog's nails are very brittle, be careful when clipping or consider learning to use a grinder. You don't want a nail to split into the quick. Ouch!


but it's important to rule out other problems first. Not all age-related behavior changes indicate CCD. Let's look at some of the more common changes your dog may experience.

Aggression

Some older dogs show signs of aggression. In many cases, aggression is a reflexive response to pain. If your dog has lost its hearing or vision, it may be startled at times and snap. If it's not as spry as your dog used to be, it may fight back when it can't get away

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from something that's bothering or hurting it, such as a puppy or even a child. If your dog has a nervous system problem or is on certain medications, they may not know what it’s doing.  The first step in solving the problem is to find its source. If your dog's behavior changes, get it an exam. If your dog’s on medication, ask your vet if there could be behavioral side effects. If no medical cause can be found, consider talking to a qualified animal behaviorist who is familiar with canine geriatric problems. Ask your veterinarian for a referral.

Loss of Housetraining

Some older dogs have accidents in the house, even though they've been reliably housetrained for years. Some medical problems may directly affect the dog's ability to control elimination. Other problems make elimination painful and make the dog reluctant to go until it really can't hold it any longer, and soils the house. You can help your vet diagnose a medical problem. Write down as much information as possible about when accidents occur,


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Glu

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including whether you're home, how often your do g needs to eliminate, its posture while eliminating, any sounds made that might indicate pain, unusual characteristics of the urine or stool, how much urine or stool your dog passed, and change s in your dog's food or wa ter intake. Sometimes the solutions to inappropriate eliminatio n are easy. A ramp in place of stairs may make it ea sier for a dog that has trouble walking to get in and ou t. Medications help with some medical problems . If your dog needs to go more frequently now tha n when it was younger, se e if you can arrange to ge t it out more often. If you ca n't figure out what to do, ag ain, talk to your vet. Your bu ddy isn't the first old dog with this problem, and your ve t may have some excelle nt suggestions based on the specifics of your dog's problem

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ami ne/ Chondroitin


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Their joys are simple. A soft bed. A scrap fallen from the table that the younger dogs missed. The memory of a treed squirrel. A storm-less night. White whiskered faces and legs crooked as question marks. Old Dogs…their sweet Buddha bellies hang over crossed legs as they fall asleep in a coveted patch of sun. Dreaming of out-racing their shadows down long, shady lanes. Once they danced by your side. The very definition of joy unleashed. A perfect poem caught in shining eyes and wagging tails. They have followed you faithfully for years. And would plunge into fires, untamed wildernesses, raging waters if you asked. Now, they struggle to catch up. Their pace slow but their hearts still valiant. Their cloudy eyes are starting to dim and go distant,

tuning in to some invisible world. Just beyond your reach. Don’t go you say, as you scratch the tender part between their ears. Stay longer. I can’t imagine a world without your fur pressed close to my cheek. There are still so many roads we haven’t explored.  And they look up at you with a wisdom that just slays you Their backs are bent, not from the weight of years, but from the invisible wings they are growing That will soon take them to a place where once more they are warriors of speed. Drunk with the sights and scents of a thousand meadows. Able to leap high enough to touch the wing of the tiniest butterfly. A place where they will now wait for you to catch up.

H/T Donna Swajeski

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Dog Years

Hum Yea an rs


1-3 Posters by Ken Bailey

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OFF THE WA LL

Unlike fine art, poster art is designed to speak to as many people as possible. And unlike many art forms, you can own a significant poster image for as little as a few hundred dollars, with the sweet spot of vintage poster prices in the neighborhood of $2,000. But be aware that when we talk about the poster market, we are talking about original print runs of graphic advertisements – at least 25 years old.. The poster market originated in the 1870s when Paris artist Jules Cheret introduced a printing technique that produced images with intense color and rich texture. By the early 1890s, Paris streets were plastered with lithographic images hawking everything from bicycles to cognac to circus performances. These artful graphics became instant collectibles, spawning exhibitions, journals and dealers. That initial market wave died out by WWI and wasn’t revived until the 1960s, when it began its steady climb to today. So, how is poster value determined? There are essentially four criteria: artist, image, rarity and condition. The masters of the early Paris heyday, referred to as the


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1. Pottery Barn, “Take Your Dog With You By Rail” 4. Poster by Ludwig Holhlwein for a 1912 Frankfurt festival.

Belle Epoque – names like Jules Cheret, the “father” of the modern poster, and Henri de ToulouseLautrec, a fine artist best known for his images of Paris nightlife. In fact, his three-sheet poster Moulin Rouge: La Goulue sold for $241,500 in 1999, an auction

2. Dogs at Play by Guy Juke 5. Spratt’s Patent Ltd by Auguste Roubille, c. 1909.

record for an art poster. At the turn of the century, a Czech artist named Alphonse Mucha became popular for posters using the elegant, swirling lines of Art Nouveau, while a young Italian caricaturist named Leonetto Cappiello captured attention with

3. Poster by Johanna Kriesel - 30s 6. WPA Pet Show poster, 1939, by Arlington Gregg.

arresting, often humorous images, such as his 1906 Maurin Quina, an absinthe ad featuring a mischievous green devil floating against a simple black background. Depending on rarity, Cappiello’s works sell for anywhere from $1,000 to $15,000. http://dreamdogsart.typepad.com/art/


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Proteins are essential nutrients found in complete diets. All proteins are made of amino acids, but not all proteins in the diet contain all the amino acids required. Nutritionists classify proteins as essential or nonessential. Experts consider some sources of protein to be of greater value owing to their greater bioavailability. Chicken and chicken meal are very bioavailable to a dog’s digestive system yielding higher amounts of amino acids than other protein sources. To make all the proteins that the body needs, diets must contain 22 different amino acids, which are listed in the following table. Ten are considered essential, which means you can’t synthesize them within the your body and must obtain them from food which is why All American Pet products contain an abundance of all natural proteins that are supplemented with amino acids to assure the highest nutritive values.

AMINO ACIDS Essential Histidine Isoleucine Leucine Lysine Methionine Phenylalanine Threonine Tryptophan Valine

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N I E T PRO

: S T E CUPL

Nonessential ** Alanine Arginine* Aspartic acid Cysteine* Glutamic acid Glutamine* Glycine* Proline* Serine* Tyrosine* Asparagine* Selenocysteine


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Food. Carry nutritious snacks- NUTRABARSfor your dog and offer them regularly to keep your dog’s energy level high. It’s better to feed your dog smaller amounts on a more frequent basis to prevent the discomfort of being ON THE GO on a full stomach. Water. Carry at least 8 ounces of water per dog per hour of being ON THE GO. Avoid letting your dog drink standing water from puddles and ponds, as bacteria and parasites can be present there and cause your dog to become sick. Antibacterial Wipes: Germs are everywhere and on everyone. ID. It is also useful to have an identification tag engraved with your dog’s name and your phone number, since anyone who might find your dog could read the information without having a special microchip scanner. Electrolyte Supplements: Sodium and potassium on hot days, after strenuous exercise or to prevent shock from an accident/injury or threat. Vaccinations/License: Both need to be current Veterinarian Contact Info: A must have with you all the time. Plastic bags. You know why. Health Certificate: Secure from your Veterinarian. You will need to present one if you travel by air. Leash: Another must have.


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Goggles for dogs – the first and only eye protection designed and created just for dogs! DogglesŽ are are actually goggles for dogs protecting their eyes from foreign objects, wind, and UV light. Research has shown that long hours in the sun without adequate eye protection increase the chances of developing eye disease. UV-absorbent sunglasses and sungoggles can help protect your eyes and the eyes of your pet from sun damage. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) has set standards for UVA and UVB protection in sungoggles. ANSI requires that a pair of sungoggles block at least 50 percent of UV rays. Doggles.com


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every dog has its day

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TM

Super Premium Protein TRUE FOOD Bar for Dogs www.nutrabar.com facebook.com/nutrabar www.allamericanpetcompany.com


Go Magazine Issue2