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ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

NOVEMBER 30-DECEMBER 4, 2011


WELCOME


PROGRAM BOOK

TABLE Է&ʝQɀʑQWɡ {2-3} Core Competencies and FEA Welcome Letter {4} Schedule at a Glance {5} General Information {6-7} Wednesday Schedule and Events {8-18} Thursday Schedule and Events {19-24} Friday Schedule and Events {25-31} Saturday Schedule and Events {31} Sunday Schedule and Events {32} Exhibit Hall Map {33} Annual Meeting Exhibitors/Sponsors {34} AFA Foundation Information {35} Volunteer Planning Meetings {36} Hotel Maps

AFA MISSION

AFA ENHANCES ITS MEMBERS’ ABILITIES TO FOSTER

IMPACTFUL FRATERNITY/SORORITY EXPERIENCES


AFA &ʝȾɏ&ʝʛȼHɀʑQʎȲHɡIʝɠ

([ȪɰɸȵʑQȪɏʖɚʃȱɏ3ɠԸHVʣLʝɚ

THE ASSOCIATION OF FRATERNITY/SORORITY ADVISORS is comprised of professionals and volunteers who work on college campuses, work at a fraternity/sorority inter/national headquarters, work for businesses that support fraternity/sorority members, and/or volunteer locally or nationally for their fraternity/sorority, or for organizations that support fraternities and sororities. Two of the Association’s primary purposes are professional development and support for members and advocacy for the fraternity/sorority advising profession; the Core Competencies are designed to further those goals. The cultivation and consistent demonstration of these competencies are keys to success among professionals and volunteers who work with fraternities and sororities. AFA members are encouraged to strive to continually

WELCOME

strengthen their skills and gain more experience in these areas. In working with fraternities and sororities, the understanding and demonstration of these competencies will allow advisors to provide undergraduate members with positive fraternity/sorority experiences.

Throughout this document, the word “advisor” is used to refer to those AFA members who work for colleges, universities, and inter/national fraternities

WELCOME

or sororities; and/or who serve in volunteer roles. Look for the following icons throughout the program book, which indicate opportunities to expand your knowledge and skills in specific areas.

(ʏXFDWʝɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor applies student and/or organizational development theory to his/her practice in chal-

lenging and supporting organizations and individual members. The advisor also takes advantage of professional development and educational opportunities, and applies that knowledge and awareness to his/her practice. The advisor provides experiential learning opportunities that enhance the education students receive inside the classroom. An advisor provides leadership development and other educational opportunities for undergraduate members and alumni/ae volunteers that promote an open and inclusive learning environment for all participants.

WELCOME

9ɪʙɂHɡ$ʙLʔȸʑɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor sets and clearly communicates high expectations for chapters as values-

based organizations hosted at an institution of higher education and holds members/organizations accountable for their actions. The advisor considers issues of fundamental fairness, equity, and access when developing resources, implementing programs, and enacting community, chapter, and/or organization initiatives. As a result he/she promotes an inclusive and supportive environment, eliminating barriers that discriminate against full participation by all students. An advisor challenges members to live up to their shared organizational values and have these expectations of one another. When necessary, an advisor works with the institution’s and/or inter/national organization’s student disciplinary process. The advisor recognizes students and chapters for their improvements and achievements in adhering to their founding principles and institution/organization expectations.

ELCOME

&ɼɸOɪEʝUDWʝɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor collaborates with and often serves as a liaison among potential members,

initiated members, chapter officers, campus administrators, alumni/ae, volunteer advisors, house corporation officers, inter/national organization staff members, and/or inter/national officers. The advisor works with these diverse constituencies on the common goal of positively impacting the reputation and success of the fraternity/sorority community by building partnerships with colleagues and experts to impact positive and inclusive change; sharing information regularly; and maximizing the reach of and access to limited resources. The advisor builds trusting relationships for the betterment of the members and organizations.

$ʏʧLVʝɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor guides and facilitates the work of fraternity/sorority chapters and/or governing councils

and their respective officers. The advisor provides guidance, training, and resources on various organizational management topics, including, but not limited to, risk management, financial management, and creating an inclusive environment. The advisor assists the organizations in being prepared for unexpected or crisis situations and assists the student leaders in managing these situations and linking them to additional support services as needed. An advisor builds relationships with members to assist them with organizational, academic, or other concerns.

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AFA Annual Meeting


LCOME COME OME ME

$ʏʛʖʜLVʤUDWʝɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor maintains accurate and comprehensive records on membership statistics, scholarship achievement, and disciplinary matters. The advisor works with all necessary constituents and partners to resolve any member, organization, and/or institution crisis. An advisor may supervise or oversee student, professional, or volunteer staff. An advisor may have responsibilities in managing, or supporting students in managing, on- or off-campus chapter residential areas, offices, and/or other organization properties to ensure they are accessible and operating properly and safely. An advisor may also assist students in planning events. 5HȿHʋUɭȱʑɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor uses research to guide practice. The advisor assesses the needs of organizations, engages constituents in strategic planning to set goals for ongoing development and to provide programs and resources for the benefit of chapters and members, and assesses the impact of those initiatives. The advisor maintains knowledge of how current issues and research impact the undergraduate student experience, the chapters, and/or the fraternity/sorority community.

,ʜQʝYDWʝɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor implements new programs that benefit members. An advisor promotes the practical application and effective use of technology to communicate with members, support the positive use of online communities, provide online educational opportunities, and promote an inclusive and accessible fraternity/sorority experience. /HDȫʑɠ s A fraternity/sorority advisor is an involved, engaged member of a campus community and/or the interfraternal movement and participates in opportunities for continued professional development through the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors and other organizations. An advisor exhibits leadership skills in his/her daily work through critical thinking, risk taking, creativity, and by making values-based decisions. The advisor seeks knowledge to develop increased competence to advance goals of valuing diversity, strengthening inclusion, and promoting social justice. An advisor also shares his/her knowledge and mentors others in the field.

FEA:ɰOFʝȷɏ Dear Fellow Professionals, The relationship between the Fraternity Executives Association and the Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors has much history. It dates back to the founding of AFA in 1976 at the 200th anniversary celebration of the fraternal movement in North America in Williamsburg, Virginia. As fraternity/sorority professionals, we take pride in the impact that we have on our students in developing their leadership skills, as well as providing opportunities for consensus building, conflict resolution, and personal responsibility for their actions. On behalf of the Fraternity Executives Association, I encourage our members to share freely of their knowledge and experience. Our two associations continue to work collaboratively to develop skills and strengthen commitment to ideals, which pave the pathway to becoming better professionals. Larry Wiese s FEA President 2011–12 Executive Director, Kappa Alpha Order

AFA Annual Meeting

{3}


SCHEDULE $ɢɈ*OĘ‹QČŞÉ? :HĘ?ȸHVGʋɨ1Ę?ÉƒĘ‘ÉşČŠĘ‘É s{see pg. 6–7 for details}

5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m. 11:00 a.m. – 8:00 p.m.

AFA Foundation Board Meeting AFA Executive Board Meeting Fireside Chats Information Table First Timers Welcome Table Registration Technology Lounge

6:30 – 7:15 p.m. 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.

1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m. 1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Service Opportunity Annual Meeting Advance Educational Programs Graduate Training Track: Essential Skills for Advising Fraternities and Sororities

Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Rho Lambda National Honorary

4:15 – 6:15 p.m. 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. 7:30 – 9:00 p.m.

Volunteer Development Program and Committee Meetings The AFA Connection Kick Off Welcome Reception

)ʢLGʋɨ'HČŞĘ‘ÉşČŠĘ‘É s{see pg. 19–24 for details} 8:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

8:00 – 8:45 p.m. 8:30 – 10:00 p.m. 9:00 – 9:45 p.m.

AFA/Order of Omega Second-Year Case Study Competition Interest Meeting AFA/Order of Omega First-Year Case Study Challenge Interest Meeting AFA Foundation Reception (by invitation only) 2011 Annual Meeting Planning Team, Committees, and Ambassadors Meeting

8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Technology Lounge

8:00 – 9:00 a.m. 9:15 – 10:15 a.m. 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 12:15 – 2:15 p.m.

Educational Programs – Block V Educational Programs – Block VI Regional Meetings AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon

Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

Sponsored by ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

2:15 – 6:00 p.m. 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. 2:30 – 4:00 p.m. 4:00 – 7:00 p.m.

4:00 – 7:00 p.m.

7:45 a.m. – 8:15 a.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.

First Timers Informational Gathering AFA Foundation Silent Auction Fireside Chats Information Table First Timers Welcome Table Registration Developmental Resource Center Technology Lounge

Evening

8:30 – 10:00 a.m.

Opening Program, Perspectives from Student Affairs Scholars: How Do We Align the Fraternity/Sorority Experience with the Changing Dynamics and Enduring Principles of Higher Education?

Educational Programs – Block I Educational Programs – Block II AFA/Order of Omega First-Year Case Study Challenge

8:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

AFA Foundation Silent Auction Developmental Resource Center Registration Technology Lounge

8:00 – 9:00 a.m. 9:15 – 10:30 a.m.

Educational Programs – Block VII General Program, Journey Toward Relevancy: Taking the Next Step in the Right Direction

Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Delta Upsilon International Fraternity

10:45 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. 3:45 – 5:00 p.m. 5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

Educational Programs – Block VIII AFA Business Meeting Educational Programs – Block IX Graduate Students and Friends Reception Order of Omega Reception

Hosted by t.jelke solutions

Sponsored by Order of Omega

5:30 – 7:00 p.m.

1:30 – 6:30 p.m.

AFA/Order of Omega Second-Year Case Study Competition

7:30 – 9:30 p.m.

Closing Banquet

1:45 – 3:00 p.m. 3:15 – 4:30 p.m. 4:30 – 5:30 p.m. 4:30 – 7:00 p.m. 5:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Educational Programs – Block III Educational Programs – Block IV Tweetup Exhibit Hall 2012 Annual Meeting Planning Team Committee Meeting

9:30 p.m.

Various Organization Receptions and Events

Hosted by Order of Omega Sponsored by the Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel

Sponsored by Order of Omega

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Project Job Search: RĂŠsumĂŠ Review and Mock Interview Various Organization Receptions and Events

6DʤʌUGʋɨ'HČŞĘ‘ÉşČŠĘ‘É s{see pg. 25–31 for details}

Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

10:15 – 11:15 a.m. 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 1:30 – 5:00 p.m.

Exhibit Hall Nominations and Elections Committee Meeting Programming Preview Fireside Chats Sponsored by Fraternal Information and Programming Group

7Ę•ĘŚUVGʋɨ'HČŞĘ‘ÉşČŠĘ‘É s{see pg. 8–18 for details}

Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Beta Theta Pi Fraternity and Foundation

Fireside Chats Information Table AFA Foundation Silent Auction Developmental Resource Center Registration (Registration will be closed during the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon)

Sponsored by Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation

8:00 – 8:45 p.m.

2012 Regional Membership, Marketing, and Recruitment Team Meeting Fireside Chats Meet & Greet: Institution Edition First Timers Meal Gathering

AFA Annual Meeting

6ĘŚQGʋɨ'HČŞĘ‘ÉşČŠĘ‘É s{see pg. 31 for details} 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

2012 AFA Executive Board Meeting 2012 Annual Meeting Planning Leadership Team Meeting


GENERAL ,QIʝʢPDʤLʝɚ $ʜQʝʦQȪʑȷʑQWɡnAnnouncements of a general nature may be made by submitting a written message at AFA Registration. Announcements will either be read from the podium at General Programs or placed in the next daily newsreel. $ƫ$2ɑ£ ȪɏnThe AFA Office is located in Westmoreland/

Kingsbury, Conference Plaza, Lobby Level. The office will be staffed during all hours that AFA Registration is open.

$ZʋUGɡnAwards will be presented on two occasions. Awards

for Outstanding Volunteers, Change Initiative, Excellence in Educational Programming, Gayle Webb New Professional, AFA/CoHEASAP Outstanding Alcohol/Drug Prevention Program, Essentials, Oracle, and Perspectives will be presented during the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon on Friday. The Jack L. Anson, Robert H. Shaffer, and Sue Kraft Fussell Distinguished Service Awards will be presented during the Closing Banquet on Saturday.

&ʙʖPDɀɏ&ʝQʤUɼɗnClimate control issues in the meeting rooms may be handled by dialing “5000” on a house phone.

'ʋɵʙ ɨ1ʑZʂ ȵɏԽʑɠnIn an effort to support sustainability, a daily newsletter will not be printed. Updates will be communicated via an electronic newsreel in various locations for the duration of the Annual Meeting.

(ȷʑUȰʑQʎȲHɡnEmergencies may be handled by contacting the hotel operator or hotel security by dialing “0.”

(Yɪ ʙXDʤLʝQɡnEvaluations are essential for future planning

/RVɢʋQɍ)ʝʦQɍnLost and Found is located at the hotel concierge desk, security and housekeeping offices, or the AFA Office. 0Hɪ ɗ7LɭȴHWɡnTickets are required for the Recognition

Luncheon and Closing Banquet. Registrants were required to indicate their participation in these meals on their registration form in order for the Association to have accurate meal guarantees. Meal tickets for guests may be available for purchase at AFA Registration or the AFA Office. If available, tickets must be purchased 48 hours in advance of the event. Refunds for unused tickets are not possible, but those not planning to use their tickets may leave them at AFA Registration for purchase by latecomers.

0HȿVDȰɏ&ʑQɀʑɠnThe Message Center, located in

the Landmark Foyer, Conference Plaza, Lobby Level, will provide opportunities for announcing general information to Annual Meeting attendees. If you have a message you wish to leave for an individual attending the meeting, please leave those messages utilizing the hotel voice mail system. Announcements will be removed after the event has occurred. (Please note: Any unclaimed messages will be disposed of at 5:00 p.m. on Saturday.)

1ʋȷHWDJɡnNametags must be worn at all times during the

Annual Meeting. If a nametag is lost, please check at AFA Registration to see if it has been found or to request a new nametag.

4ɂHVʤLʝQɡnQuestions may be directed to the Annual Meeting staff, volunteers, and/or AFA leadership. Staff members and volunteers will be at AFA Registration or in the AFA Office during the AFA Registration hours listed in this program book.

and for providing presenters with feedback. Please return completed program evaluations to the Annual Meeting volunteer in your program or at the AFA Office. The overall Annual Meeting evaluation will be available electronically after the Annual Meeting. Presenters may receive their program evaluations at AFA Registration the day following the program. Evaluations for Saturday programs will be available at 7:00 p.m. prior to the Closing Banquet in the AFA Office. (Please note: Evaluations are only available during scheduled Registration times.)

5HʔLVʤUDʤLʝɚnAFA Registration is located at the registration desks in the Landmark Foyer, Conference Plaza, Lobby Level and will serve as the Annual Meeting check-in area as well as the AFA information hub for the duration of the Annual Meeting. See the daily schedules for detailed AFA Registration hours. Annual Meeting pens and lanyards are sponsored by Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity.

)UDɀ ʑʢʜLʤɨʋQɍ6ʝUʝʢLʤɨ)ʦQFʤLʝQɡn

gracious sponsorship by the Delta Zeta Foundation, in honor of Shelly Brown Dobek, we are once again able to host sign language interpreters at our Annual Meeting.

Fraternity and sorority functions are held throughout the Annual Meeting. Check the message center for announcements about a special event your group may be hosting/coordinating. Most functions are by invitation only.

+ԩɰ ɗ&ȱHɭ ɖ,ɚʋQɍ&ȱHɭ ɖ2XɢnCheck-in at the Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel is 4:00 p.m.; check-out is 12:00 p.m.

6Lʔɚ/ʋQʔXDȰɏ,QɀʑʢʠȾHɀʑUɡnThrough a

7Hɭ ʕQɼORʔɨ/ʝʦQȰɏnNeed to recharge your bat-

tery? Literally. Take a moment and stop by the Technology Lounge, sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK, to check your email, browse the web, and charge your mp3, mobile phone, or other electronic device.

/Hʋʢʜ ʖQɒ2XWFʝȷHɡnThe last sentence in each educational program description is the primary intended learning outcome. Please keep this in mind as you select and evaluate programs.

AFA Annual Meeting

{5}


WEDNESDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę…ČľÉ?Ôˇ(ÉƒĘ‘QWÉĄ {WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 30}  AM n  PM !&! &OUNDATION "OARD -EETING s !UBERT

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 AM n  PM &IRESIDE #HATS )NFORMATION 4ABLE s Landmark Foyer  AM n  PM &IRST 4IMERS 7ELCOME 4ABLE s Landmark Foyer  AM n  PM 2EGISTRATION s ,ANDMARK &OYER  AM n  PM 4ECHNOLOGY ,OUNGE s ,ANDMARK &OYER Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

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3ERVICE /PPORTUNITY s 3T 0ATRICK #ENTER (offsite)

1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

Annual Meeting Advance Educational Programs s "ARRIERS TO &ACILITATION s ,ANDMARK  s #ONNECTING WITH -EN 4EACHING -EN TO !LIGN 6ALUES s ,ANDMARK  s &ROM (AZING TO (EALTH s ,ANDMARK  s 2EAL #HANGE ! 0ROBLEM 3OLVING &RAMEWORK s ,ANDMARK 

1:00 – 4:00 p.m.

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Registration for Fireside Chats closed on November 4. However, the Fireside Chats Committee will accommodate onsite requests on a space-available basis.

)Ę–UVɢ7ʖȡʑUÉĄ:É°OFĘ?ȡÉ?7ÉŞ ÉŹ ČľÉ?  !- n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ &/9%2

Stop here with any questions or to obtain information on specific programming for first-time Annual Meeting attendees. Also, sign up for the Thursday night meal gathering or to get information about securing reserved seating with first timers at the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon and the Closing Banquet. Space is limited, so sign up early.

5HĘ”LVʤUDʤLĘ?Éš

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Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Rho Lambda National Honorary

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Gamma Sigma Alpha Board of Directors -EETING s !UBERT

4:15 – 6:15 p.m.

Volunteer Development Program and #OMMITTEE -EETINGS s ,ANDMARK 

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4HE !&! #ONNECTION +ICK /FF s -AJESTIC !"# 7ELCOME 2ECEPTION s -AJESTIC $% Sponsored by Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation

8:00 – 8:45 p.m.

AFA/Order of Omega Second-Year Case Study #OMPETITION )NTEREST -EETING s 0ORTLAND

8:00 – 8:45 p.m.

AFA/Order of Omega First-Year Case Study #HALLENGE )NTEREST -EETING s "ENTON

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-IZZOU 2ECEPTION s 7ASHINGTON

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#ORNELL 5NIVERSITY 5PDATE -EETING s Parkview (by invitation only)

8:30 – 10:00 p.m.

AFA Foundation reception (by invitation only)

9:00 – 9:45 p.m.

2011 Annual Meeting Planning Team, #OMMITTEES AND !MBASSADORS -EETING s Portland

AFA Annual Meeting

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Graduate Training Track: Essential Skills for !DVISING &RATERNITIES AND 3ORORITIES s Landmark 4

3:30 – 7:00 p.m.

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7HÉ­ Ę•QÉźORʔɨ/Ę?ĘŚQČ°É?

Need to recharge that battery? Stay connected to the office? Thanks to the generous support of CAMPUSPEAK, meeting attendees can do that and more by stopping by the Technology Lounge.

6ʑʢʧLČŞÉ?2Ę Sɛԯ ĘŚ ĘœLʤɨ

 n  0- s 34 0!42)#+ #%.4%2 /&&3)4% Pre-registration was required to participate in the service opportunity. Participants will meet in the hotel lobby at 12:40 p.m. and walk to the St. Patrick Center, located just blocks away from the AFA Annual Meeting. The Center’s mission is to provide opportunities for selfsufficiency and dignity to persons who are homeless or at the risk of becoming homeless. Individuals who are not able to participate in the service opportunity on Wednesday but would like to support the St. Patrick Center should consider going to McMurphy’s Grill for a meal. McMurphy’s Grill is the first-in-the-nation full-service restaurant for training homeless/mentally ill clients and is a program of the St. Patrick Center.


11.30.11 $QĘœXÉŞ É—0Č­HʤʖQÉ’$Ę?YĘ‹QČŞÉ? (Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞ É—3URĘ”UĘ‹PÉĄ  n  0- s 6!2)/53 ,/#!4)/.3

:É°OFĘ?ȡÉ?5HČŞĘ‘SʤLĘ?Éš  n  0- s -!*%34)# $%

Annual Meeting Advance programs, listed on page 6, required preregistration. To inquire about whether there is space available in a particular program and find out the associated costs, visit AFA Registration.

Join fraternity/sorority staff, volunteers, Associate members, and campus-based professionals in attendance at this AFA tradition. A great atmosphere and the company of colleagues will set a great tone for the remainder of our time together. Plan to meet friends here.

*UDĘ?XDÉ€É?7UĘ‹Ę– Ęœ Ę–QÉ’7UDÉ­ É– *Ćź7  (Ę˝ Ę‘QʤLÉŞ É—6Ę˜ÉľÉ¸OÉĄIĘ?É $Ę?ʧLĘŁĘ–QÉ’ )UDÉ€ Ę‘Ę˘ĘœLʤȲHÉĄĘ‹QÉ?6Ę?UĘ?ʢLʤȲHÉĄ

$ĆŤ$2UČŤĘ&#x2018;É Ôˇ2ȡHJÉ&#x2C6;6HFĘ?QÉ?<HĘ&#x2039;É  &DČżÉ?6ʤXĘ? ɨ&Ę?Ę&#x203A; ČźHʤLʤLĘ?É&#x161;Ę&#x2039;QÉ? )Ę&#x2013;UVɢ<HĘ&#x2039;É &DČżÉ?6ʤXĘ? ɨ&KÉŞ ɸȾĘ&#x2018;QČ°É?

 n  0- s ,!.$-!2+  Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Rho Lambda National Honorary

Participants in this program will learn concepts and skills related to the following topics: professional and personal relationships, valuesbased conversations, risk and crisis management, multiculturalism and diversity, and more. This Annual Meeting Advance program is framed by the Core Competencies for Excellence in the Profession. The GTT Capstone, a follow-up program specifically for participants of the track, will be held Saturday at 8:00 a.m. This special program will allow time for participants to reflect on their experience and discover ways to continue learning after the Annual Meeting. Graduate students who did not pre-register for the GTT and would like to participate or would like to purchase the GTT binder may visit AFA Registration to see if space is still available.

9ÉźĘ&#x2122; ĘŚQÉ&#x20AC; Č­Ę&#x2018;É 'Ę&#x2018;É&#x192;É°OĘ?ʠȡĘ&#x2018;Qɢ 3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;É&#x2122;Ę&#x2039;QÉ?&Ę?PĘ&#x203A; É&#x201D;Ô˝ Č­É?0Č­HʤĘ&#x2013;QJÉĄ (FOR ALL 2012 VOLUNTEERS)  n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ 

This training is required for any volunteer in a leadership or supervisory role. It is strongly suggested that all 2012 volunteers attend. The program will give volunteers an overview of the important role they play in leading the Association and provide the opportunity to connect with and learn from other volunteers. Additionally, the program will increase volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; awareness of available volunteer resources, Association policies/procedures, and the AFA Strategic Plan, as well as feature a brief educational presentation. Most committee meetings will occur during the last hour of this program.

7ČąÉ?$ĆŤ$&Ę?Ę&#x153; ȸHFʤLĘ?É&#x161;.LÉ­ É&#x2013;2Ő&#x201C;

SECOND-YEAR COMPETITION INTEREST MEETING  n  0- s 0/24,!.$ FIRST-YEAR CHALLENGE INTEREST MEETING  n  0- s "%.4/.

The AFA/Order of Omega Case Study program is a unique opportunity for graduate students to test their problem-solving skills in the area of fraternity/sorority advising. Pairs will be given a real-life fraternity/ sorority scenario that will challenge them to provide the strongest and most resourceful solution before a panel of judges. The three teams deemed to have the best solutions will be recognized and awarded prizes at the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon; winners of the Second-Year Competition will receive cash prizes, and First-Year Challenge winners will win a prize. During Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interest meeting, teams will be randomly assigned and receive the case study and presentation time for Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competition. The competition and the challenge are scheduled for Thursday afternoon. (Please note: Participation in the Second-Year Case Study Competition is limited to masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s level students in their final year of study. First-year graduate students are strongly encouraged to participate in the First-Year Case Study Challenge, which follows a similar format to the Second-Year Case Study Competition. More information will be provided at the interest meeting.)

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All 2011 Annual Meeting Planning Team Coordinators, committee members, and Annual Meeting Ambassadors should attend this meeting.

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The AFA Connection Kick Off is an interactive event designed to help first-time attendees navigate and take ownership of their AFA Annual Meeting experience. All first-time meeting attendees are encouraged to participate to learn more about what AFA and the Annual Meeting have to offer. Participants will become familiar with the Annual Meeting schedule, learn about canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t-miss programs, meet AFA Executive Board members, and discover other available resources. Participants will build a network of colleagues, network with experienced professionals, meet a Connection Captain (Annual Meeting volunteer who can be an on-site resource), and connect with fellow first-time attendees.

AFA Annual Meeting

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College of William & Mary Fraternity (OUSING )NFORMATIONAL -EETING s ,ANDMARK  (by invitation only)

7:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:15 a.m.

Penn Update Breakfast s ,ANDMARK  (by invitation only)

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8:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:00 a.m.

Opening Program, Perspectives from Student Affairs Scholars: How Do We Align the Fraternity/Sorority Experience with the Changing Dynamics and Enduring Principles OF (IGHER %DUCATION s -AJESTIC $% Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Beta Theta Pi Fraternity and Foundation

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AFA/Order of Omega First-Year Case 3TUDY #HALLENGE s !UBERT Sponsored by Order of Omega

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AFA/Order of Omega Second-Year Case 3TUDY #OMPETITION s 0ARKVIEW Sponsored by Order of Omega

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2012 Regional Membership, Marketing, and 2ECRUITMENT 4EAM -EETING s "ENTON

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7:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 p.m.

First Timers Meal Gathering

AFA Annual Meeting

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The Developmental Resource Center (DRC) is a dedicated space at the Annual Meeting for attendees to share sample products and programs. More than just recruitment brochures and summer parent mailings, the DRC offers program samples, developmental tools, and resources used successfully each day by colleagues. Attendees are invited to share resources with colleagues by leaving them on the DRC table. (Any materials left by the Closing Banquet will be disposed of at the conclusion of the Annual Meeting.)

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 !- n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ &/9%2 Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK Need to recharge that battery? Stay connected to the office? Thanks to the generous support of CAMPUSPEAK, meeting attendees can do that and more by stopping by the Technology Lounge.

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 n  !- s -!*%34)# $% Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Beta Theta Pi Fraternity and Foundation The Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors has set forth a powerful vision for the fraternal movement, but is it realistic? The question has to be asked, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What will it take for the fraternal movement to be seen as a relevant and valued contributor to higher education?â&#x20AC;? We have invited Dr. Susan Komives, Dr. Terrell Strayhorn, and Dr. Vasti Torres to share their perspectives on this question with us. Dr. Daniel Bureau will moderate this panel presentation and discussion. SUSAN KOMIVES

VASTI TORRES

TERRELL STRAYHORN

DANIEL BUREAU


12.1.11 (Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄ%ORÉ­É&#x2013;, 10:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:15 A.M.

WELCOME

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS: GIVING VOICE TO FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES IN WASHINGTON Landmark 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Nicholas Zuniga, AFA Government Relations Chair, nickz@tamu.edu Peter Smithhisler, North-American Interfraternity Conference, pete@nicindy.org Jane Sutton, NPC Chairman, janesutt@gmail.com Patrick Alderidice, President of the Fraternity and Sorority Political Action Committee, patricka@penningtonco.com Since 2001, fraternity and sorority members, alumni/ae, and professionals have lobbied for the Collegiate Housing & Infrastructure Act. The introduction of this legislation began a decade of growth for a government relations program adopted by the NIC, NPC, and AFA. Government relations continues to be of importance to the future of fraternities and sororities with additional issues being researched and addressed. Should fraternities and sororities have a presence in 7ASHINGTON 9ES 4HE PRESENTERS WILL ADDRESS THE WHY AND THE HOW As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will have a deeper understanding of the importance of a government relations program for all fraternities and sororities.

WELCOME TIPS AND TOOLS FOR ASSESSMENT Landmark 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Sarah Loge, Spring Hill College, sloge@shc.edu Trace Camacho, Michigan State University, camacho3@msu.edu Robyn Carr, Eastern Illinois University, rbcarr@eiu.edu Antonio-Phillip Lytle, Iona College, alytle@iona.edu Assessing student learning is a major part of working in student affairs, and the term â&#x20AC;&#x153;learning outcomeâ&#x20AC;? is everywhere. Do you find yourself struggling to develop learning outcomes? Do you find that you have learning outcomes, but have no way to know if they are being met? This program will review the basics of learning outcomes and then go a step further to providing a method to actually assess if the intended outcomes are being met. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will glean a deeper understanding of developing an assessment plan, from creation of learning outcomes through the assessment of those outcomes, allowing them to explain what is needed for a successful plan.

BECOMING A CULTURALLY COMPETENT ADVOCATE WELCOME FOR THE FRATERNAL COMMUNITY Landmark 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gregory Fontus, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., gfontus1906@gmail.com Are you a culturally competent advocate for students? Can you innately identify with both a historically white Greek-lettered organization and a historically black Greek-lettered organization? Have your own personal biases toward a particular culture ever influence the level of involvement you exude in a multicultural organization? This program is designed to discuss the importance of what a culturally competent administrator is and how being one within your fraternity/sorority affairs office can have a positive impact on student life and engagement. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn how identifying with the historical and cultural background of fraternities and sororities is a critical component to becoming a culturally competent administrator for advising, advocacy, policy, and practice.

WELCOME

AFA UPDATE Landmark 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Monica Miranda Smalls, AFA President, monica.m.smalls@rochester.edu Shelly Brown Dobek, AFA President-Elect, shelly_dobek@ncsu.edu Kelly Jo Karnes, AFA Past President, kellyjo-karnes@uiowa.edu Thad M. Doyle, AFA Executive Vice President, tmdoyle@uakron.edu Justin Kirk, AFA Vice President for Administration & Finance, kirk@deltau.edu Jeremiah Shinn, AFA Vice President for Resource Development, jeremiahshinn@boisestate.edu Join AFA Executive Board members in a discussion of the yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s accomplishments and the desired future for the Association. Ask questions about the myriad changes that have occurred in 2011. Spend time reflecting on the opportunities that lie ahead and learn how you can become engaged in the next chapter of the Association history. As a result of participating in this program, participants will gain insight into the future of the Association on strategic and operational levels. APPRECIATIVE ADVISING: A POSITIVE APPROACH TO DEVELOPING WELCOME FRATERNITY AND SORORITY COMMUNITY ACTION PLANS Landmark 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Dustin Struble, University of South Carolina, dustin.b.struble@gmail.com For decades, corporations and non-profit organizations have spent millions of dollars and countless hours creating or updating their strategic plans. In more recent years, many institutions similarly have turned to strategic planning to address issues facing college campuses. In order to help fraternity and sorority advisors facilitate a strategic planning process with their chapters and communities, this program will explore how the six phases of Appreciative Advising can be utilized to develop and implement community action plans. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand a framework for strategic planning with fraternity and sorority chapters through use of the Appreciative Advising model.

AFA Annual Meeting

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THURSDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ WELCOME

through a semester-long simulation experience. The presenters will discuss the different strategies and outcomes from both universities. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand why there is a need for leadership education on college campuses, based on current research.

.0# 2%,%!3% &)'52% -%4(/$ 2&- Landmark 7 – Julie Johnson, NPC College Panhellenics Committee Chairman, jjohnsonkd@aol.com Laura Malley-Schmitt, NPC Release Figure Method Committee Chairman, malley@alum.mit.edu Ever wondered why your RFM specialist makes the suggestions she does? Do you want to learn about the reasons for format changes, suggestions to improve retention in formal recruitment, how your RFM specialist can help when your campus expands, and the rationale behind the numbers? This presentation will focus on current trends and how to apply them to your campus, including a discussion on new rules effecting recruitment. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain a greater understanding of the reasons to change total, ways to improve retention in formal recruitment, and how your RFM specialist can help when campuses choose to adjust total. ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT LEARNING THROUGH EXPERIENTIAL PROGRAMS: LEARNING OUTCOMES-BASED PANHELLENIC RECRUITMENT MODEL Majestic A –

WELCOME

Sara Jahansouz, The University of Tennessee–Chattanooga, sara-jahansouz@utc.edu Ashley Faye Baker, The University of Tennessee–Chattanooga, ashley-f-baker@mocs.utc.edu Jim Hicks, The University of Tennessee–Chattanooga, jim-hicks@utc.edu

WELCOME

THE MORE YOU PUT INTO IT, THE MORE YOU GET OUT OF IT: THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE GENERAL MEMBER Majestic C – Alex Snowden, Texas State University, as66@txstate.edu Larry Long, Michigan State University, ldlong@msu.edu When you host a leadership retreat, do only chapter officers attend? Are officers the only ones who are encouraged to attend UIFI or LeaderShape? If so, how do you ensure members who do not serve in formal positions have the opportunity to develop their abilities? This session will highlight research to support the need for non-officer leadership development. The presenters also will discuss strategies for educating the general membership within fraternities and sororities from both a university and organization perspective. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to conceptualize strategies for improving the development of leadership, interpersonal, and personal development skills of fraternity and sorority members who are not officers in their organizations.

EXCLUSIVE OR SELECTIVE MEMBERSHIP CRITERIA: WELCOME !2% 7% #2/33).' 4(% ,).% /& 3/#)!, *534)#%

Student learning is often supported through a series of meaningful experiences that take place over a period of time. This session will explore student learning through participation in a panhellenic recruitment program. We will review the process of creating learning outcomes for the varying experiences of pnms, active members, and recruitment counselors; developing meaningful experiences that support student learning throughout the process; and assessing student learning through quantitative and qualitative measures. Findings from a three-year study will be shared. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to develop learning outcomes for experiential programs. THE IMPORTANCE OF LEADERSHIP EDUCATION: TWO UNIVERSITIES’ EXPERIENCES IMPLEMENTING FRATERNITY/SORORITY LEADERSHIP COURSES Majestic B –

WELCOME

Christine Haley, University of West Florida, chaley@uwf.edu Joshua Schutts, University of Southern Mississippi, joshua.schutts@usm.edu Robin Zimmern, University of West Florida, rzimmern@uwf.edu Recently, there has been a trend on college campuses to create fraternity/sorority leadership courses. The development of two courses, one at the University of West Florida and one at University of Southern Mississippi, took this idea to the next level. “Applied Leadership Development” and “Leadership in the Fraternal Movement” give students the opportunity to apply leadership theories and concepts

{10}

AFA Annual Meeting

Majestic F – Jessica Pettitt, I am... Social Justice, jess@iamsocialjustice.com Jessica Gendron Williams, Phired Up, jessica@phiredup.com Matt Mattson, Phired Up, matt@phiredup.com Are fraternity/sorority membership practices exclusive or selective? Are we making judgments or decisions about people? How can we give everyone the opportunity for a fraternity/sorority experience, not just those that we closely identify with, while not sacrificing what the organization stands for? This is a tough conversation that can begin at the intersection of tradition and new experiences. Come learn from and dialogue with the social justice expert and the recruitment expert. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand how personal positive and negative bias limits organizations and relationships. FRATSTARS, GAGA, AND GLEEKS: CREATING POWERFUL DEVELOPMENTAL SPACES FOR STUDENTS USING POPULAR CULTURE AND SOCIAL MEDIA Majestic G –

WELCOME

Corin Wallace, Sigma Sigma Sigma, cwallace@trisigma.org Chris Blackburn, Ohio University, christopher.blackburn.1@ohio.edu Afraid to admit that you think The Hangover is a funny movie or that Lady Gaga is a genius? Worried that students will see your humanity on Facebook? With the amount of influence pop culture and social media has on students, it is important to use those mediums wisely and with purpose. Movies, marketing, music, and social media may make you concerned about compromising healthy boundaries. The presenters will


12.1.11 discuss, in a values-focused way, the utility of popular culture. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain strategies to assist them in using social media tools and pop culture references appropriately to create a space for student development.

WELCOME 7(!4 %8!#4,9 )3 ! 2!0% 3500/24)6% #5,452% Majestic H –

Laura Whitney, Delta Upsilon, laura@deltau.org R.J. Woodring, Indiana University, rwoodrin@indiana.edu

FEA ROUNDTABLE: WOMEN’S EXTENSION Parkview – Beth Conder, Alpha Chi Omega, bconder@alphachiomega.org Sorority headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about Panhellenic extension. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives.

WELCOME FIRST 90 DAYS CAPSTONE

This research explored the promotion of a rape-supportive culture in three distinct environments: a residence hall, football tailgate, and local establishment. Key features of a rape-supportive culture are the acceptance of rape myths, promotion of hegemonic masculinity, and peer support. Findings indicated additional considerations: malecontrolled environments, use of women as entertainment, influence of interactions between men, and desensitization of sex. These findings are critical to understanding the recent institutional conversations about violent behaviors and sexual misconduct on campus. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to identify rape-supportive environments within the collegiate setting.

WELCOME 02/*%#4 */" 3%!2#( (/7 4/ 3526)6% 9/52 */" 3%!2#( Portland – Dominic Greene, Northwestern University, dominic-greene@northwestern.edu

This session is targeted toward graduate students entering the final semester/quarter of their program. The session will provide tips and strategies for a successful job search process. Facilitators will provide feedback from seasoned professionals and tools for staying organized throughout the process. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be better equipped to navigate the job search, learn common dos and don’ts, and be prepared to develop strategies for a successful job search. AFA/EBI FRATERNITY/SORORITY ASSESSMENT WELCOME INTEREST SESSION Benton – Darlena Jones, Educational Benchmarking, Inc., darlena@webebi.com Glenn Skaggs, Educational Benchmarking, Inc., gskaggs@webebi.com Representatives of Educational Benchmarking, Inc. (EBI) welcome current and past participants and others with interest in the AFA/EBI Fraternity/Sorority Assessment to this session. An overview of survey structure and innovative, new analyses will be reviewed. National trends based on the learning outcomes will be presented, followed by an open forum discussion to allow participants to express ideas. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn more about how to apply the information gathered through the assessment process to increase the effectiveness of their programs and initiatives.

Aubert – Amy Colvin, Alpha Chi Omega, acolvin@alphachiomega.org Participants in the 2011 First 90 Days Program, along with coaches and presenters, are invited to attend this Capstone Experience to wrap up the First 90 Days Program experience. Come discuss the relationship between your current role as a fraternity/sorority professional and the Core Competencies for Excellence in the Profession and how to sustain a long-term career in fraternity/sorority advising. Participants, coaches, and presenters will be recognized for their work and contributions. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify the relationship between their current role as a fraternity/sorority professional and the Core Competencies for Excellence in the Profession.

(ʏXFDʤLʝQɪ ɗ3URʔUʋPɡ%ORɭ ɖƮ, 11:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACT OF FRATERNITY WELCOME MEMBERSHIP ON FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS Landmark 1 – William Foran, North-American Interfraternity Conference, foran@nicindy.org Peter Smithhisler, North-American Interfraternity Conference, pete@nicindy.org Mark Frederick, Center for Measuring College Behaviors and Academics, mark@measuringbehaviors.com Andy Huston, North-American Interfraternity Conference, andy@nicindy.org Independent research complied by the University Learning Outcomes Assessment recently has presented valuable data concerning the impact of fraternity membership on student growth and performance. These findings reveal telling results surrounding several previously questioned areas of the student experience and will help professionals understand the real impact fraternity membership has on the development of fraternity men. Further discussion will focus on how fraternity/sorority professionals and volunteers can use this information to positively impact their communities and organizations. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand the impact of fraternity membership on the development of members during the first year of their undergraduate experience.

AFA Annual Meeting

{11}


THURSDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ WELCOME 7(!43 !,, 4(% 4!,+ !"/54 42!.3&%2 345$%.43 Landmark 2 – Amy Ayres, University of North Texas, amy.ayres@unt.edu Megan Petter, OrgSync, megan@orgsync.com Daniel Hernandez, University of Texas–Dallas, hernandez.daniel.ray@gmail.com Alex Seltzer, University of North Texas, seltzer@unt.edu In the fraternity/sorority world, most efforts and resources are spent recruiting and educating freshmen. While freshmen make up a large portion of new members, this must not be the limit of efforts. Transfer students possess certain college experiences that can enhance communities. Additionally, students are coming to campuses with fraternity/ sorority affiliation, but have trouble navigating their options. This presentation will provide a practical approach to working with transfers who are fraternity/sorority members and those who are not. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain knowledge helpful in meeting the needs of transfer students who already are fraternity/sorority members or have an interest in membership.

WELCOME

PANEL DISCUSSION: PERSPECTIVES FROM DIFFERENT SIDES OF THE CONDUCT TABLE Landmark 3 – Suzette Walden, Illinois State University, swalden@illinoisstate.edu Jack Kreman, Delta Tau Delta, jack@delts.net Laura Whitney, Delta Upsilon, laura@deltau.org Both AFA and the Association for Student Conduct Administration have included collaboration and partnership among their strategic objectives. Collaboration is imperative to the development of students. Education must be consistent among different actors within fraternity/sorority life personnel. This panel discussion will reveal the attitudes, assumptions, and potential synergies within collaborative relationships. Each panel member provides a unique perspective on this concept, but all subscribe to the importance of their establishment. Bring your questions to this exciting and interactive session. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will effectively compare and contrast the differing perspectives/political realities of campus-based and inter/national headquarters-based professionals when addressing chapter conduct issues.

WELCOME

EXAMINING VALUES THROUGH TODAY’S STUDENT DEVELOPMENT THEORIES Landmark 5 – Vasti Torres, Indiana University, vatorres@indiana.edu Advisors strive to educate fraternity/sorority members on the exposed values of the organization; yet many students don’t grasp how to enact these values in consistent and meaningful ways. This presentation will integrate current research on how college students develop and how organizations socialize members to have the desired shared values that can potentially restrain students’ journey toward self-authorship. Discussion will focus on how to align, support, and challenge the individual development of members. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will explore how activities conducted in the context of fraternities and sororities might either negate or reaffirm espoused values.

{12}

AFA Annual Meeting

IDENTIFYING EFFECTIVE EDUCATIONAL PRACTICES FOR WORKING WITH FIRST-GENERATION AND ETHNIC MINORITY STUDENTS IN FRATERNITY/SORORITY LIFE Landmark 6 –

WELCOME

Terrell L. Strayhorn, The Ohio State University, strayhorn.3@osu.edu Working effectively with first-generation and ethnic minority students in fraternity/sorority life requires knowledge of evidence-based strategies to promote student success. In this session, the presenter identifies the core issues involved, summarizes recent research relevant to this topic, identifies barriers that may limit students’ full participation, documents the effectiveness of educational practices for working with this population of students, and describes the benefits that can be realized when these conditions are present. Implications for future research and policy also will be highlighted. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will list and describe at least two barriers that might limit the participation of first-generation and ethnic minority students in fraternity/sorority life, as well as effective practices for reducing, if not eliminating, such barriers. LEADER IDENTITY DEVELOPMENT: APPLICATIONS WELCOME FROM THEORY AND RESEARCH Landmark 7 – Susan R. Komives, University of Maryland–College Park, komives@umd.edu Life span approaches to leadership development indicate that developing a leader identity is developmental. The Leadership Identity Development (LID) model and related research will be explored. Participants will identify pedagogical strategies and dimensions the fraternity and sorority experience that promote this identity development. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify education interventions to support leader identity development.

WELCOME

WHAT’S REALLY GOING DOWN ON THE YARD Majestic A – Michelle Guobadia, University of North Carolina–Charlotte, mguobadi@uncc.edu Shelly Brown Dobek, North Carolina State University, shelly_dobek@ncsu.edu Veronica Hunter, Lehigh University, vmh207@lehigh.edu Amy Vojta, Rutgers University, vojta@rci.rutgers.edu 7HAT YOU DONT KNOW CANT HURT YOU RIGHT 7RONG !S FACILITATORS AND campus-based professionals, the presenters had the opportunity to talk with hundreds of culturally based members about their experience with intake. What they have to say is shocking, but important to consider. Come and learn what students are afraid to tell you as their advisor (campus or fraternity/sorority), but are candidly sharing with others. The presenters will provide you tools to identify issues and start having real conversations with students. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will better understand the mindset of current undergraduates in culturally based organizations as it relates to hazing and the intake process.


12.1.11

WELCOME

ANALYZING STUDENT LEARNING CULTURE ON TODAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE CAMPUSES Majestic B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ry Beck, Delta Sigma Phi, beck@deltasig.org Recent research offers insight into the lack of learning that actually takes place on todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college campuses. As higher education comes under scrutiny for its ability to produce competent and capable graduates, fraternity and sorority organizations must continue to promote a culture of academic success amongst their members. This program will provide analyses on student performance, teacher pedagogy, and higher education learning outcomes. Participants also will have the opportunity to share experiences by relating provided information with their student/member academic culture. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain a greater awareness of current student learning trends on todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s college campuses.

WELCOME

ACCELERATE THE LEARNING IN YOUR LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS Majestic C â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Karyn Nishimura Sneath, Npower, karyn@npoweryourself.com Mark Koepsell, Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values, mark@aflv.org Accelerated Learning is not about teaching methods but about the results achieved. The purpose of Accelerated Learning is to maximize the learnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; abilities, to make learning enjoyable and fulfilling, and to contribute to their personal happiness, intelligence, competence, and success. The presenters will discuss the seven guiding principles of Accelerated Learning and demonstrate sample tactics for those principles. This will be a highly interactive session so be prepared to learn from and alongside this sessionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community of learners. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to summarize the seven guiding principles of Accelerated Learning and the practical application of those principles in leadership development programs.

WELCOME

WELCOME SOCIAL CLASS, COVERING, AND FRATERNITY LIFE Majestic H â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kimberlee Monteaux, University of Vermont, kimberlee.monteaux@uvm.edu How do fraternity/sorority life professionals enter into conversations regarding social class? Is it a professionalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s place to ask how one pays for their dues, or if they can afford the new iPad, Sperryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, or Lilly dress? Come be a part of a meaningful conversation about the idea of covering and hear tips on how to continue the conversation about class back on your campus. This program will contribute to your knowledge and skills of the invisible and taboo topic of social class. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand what covering means and why this is critical to understand when working to break down class barriers. FEA ROUNDTABLE: MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EXPANSION Benton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Michael Smoll, Sigma Tau Gamma, michael@sigmataugamma.org Daniel Stockton, Pi Kappa Alpha, dstockton@pikes.org Fraternity headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about fraternity expansion. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives. FEA ROUNDTABLE: MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RISK MANAGEMENT Parkview â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Blaine Ayers, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, bayers@sae.net Jeffrey Szumanski, Alpha Kappa Lambda, jeffrey@akl.org Fraternity headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about risk management for fraternity members. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives. FEA ROUNDTABLE: WOMENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S RISK MANAGEMENT Aubert â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

CREATING SAFE ENVIRONMENTS FOR CRUCIAL CONVERSATIONS Majestic G â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Amy Colvin, Alpha Chi Omega, acolvin@alphachiomega.org Erin Huffman, Delta Gamma, erinh@deltagamma.org

Jackie Petrucci, Bucknell University, jackie.petrucci@bucknell.edu

Sorority headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about risk management for sorority members. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives.

What do you do when people arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t doing what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re supposed to be doing? This session will use ideas from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Crucial Confrontationsâ&#x20AC;? as the premise for creating an environment for conversations about the hard topics. Different programs from one campus will illustrate how the environment and the players affect the conversation. You will learn ways to step out of the conversation, point to your shared purpose, and assure the students that you care about their concerns. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn to describe problems with their students in ways that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cause defensiveness while also setting up an environment that is both intentionally safe and non-judgmental.

$ĆŤ$2UČŤĘ&#x2018;É Ôˇ2ȡHJÉ&#x2C6;)Ę&#x2013;UVɢ<HĘ&#x2039;É &DČżÉ? 6ʤXĘ?ɨ&KɪɸȾĘ&#x2018;QČ°É?  n  0- s !5"%24 Sponsored by Order of Omega

Graduate students who attended the First-Year Case Study Challenge Orientation and were assigned to a team will present their solutions before a panel of judges.

AFA Annual Meeting

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THURSDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę&#x2026;ČľÉ?Ôˇ(É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;QWÉĄ $ĆŤ$2UČŤĘ&#x2018;É Ôˇ2ȡHJÉ&#x2C6;&DČżÉ?6HFĘ?QÉ?<HĘ&#x2039;É  6ʤXĘ?ɨ&Ę?Ę&#x203A;ČźHʤLʤLĘ?É&#x161;  n  0- s 0!2+6)%7 Sponsored by Order of Omega

Graduate students who attended the Case Study Competition Orientation and were assigned to a team will present their solutions before a panel of judges.

(Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞ É&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄ%ORÉ­ É&#x2013;Ç?ĆŽ, 1:45 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:00 P.M.

WELCOME

GRADES ANATOMY Landmark 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Aimee Ash, Gamma Sigma Alpha, director@gammasigmaalpha.org Tony Lake, University of Miami, tlake@miami.edu Wes Schaub, Dartmouth College, wesley.w.schaub@dartmouth.edu Beth Saul, University of Southern California, saul@usc.edu Greg Mason, University of Central Florida, gmason@mail.ucf.edu Academic achievement is a core value of the fraternity/sorority communities, but there is never time to critically dissect the issues surrounding the topic. It is less enticing than Thursday night television, but promises to be more engaging than that college anatomy course. This interactive program is geared toward campus-based professionals who wish to view their communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s academic progress differently. Participants will have the opportunity to sign-up for individual consultation and brainstorming with academic achievement â&#x20AC;&#x153;expertsâ&#x20AC;? during/following the conference. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will evaluate academic achievement within their own fraternity/sorority community.

WELCOME

A SIMPLE GUIDE TO THE NIC STANDARDS Landmark 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; William Foran, North-American Interfraternity Conference, foran@nicindy.org Peter Smithhisler, North-American Interfraternity Conference, pete@nicindy.org Andy Huston, North-American Interfraternity Conference, andy@nicindy.org Wade Lowhorn, North-American Interfraternity Conference, wade@nicindy.org The NIC Standards were passed in 2004 and continue to be the primary guidelines for all member organizations. Campus-based chapters, interfraternity councils, and national organizations each have a responsibility when it comes to standards compliance. Spend some time with NIC professional staff to talk about how full standards compliance can elevate the fraternity community on your campus. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will leave with the ability to advocate for complete standards compliance on their campus and in their community.

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AFA Annual Meeting

WELCOME

#!. 7% 4!,+ #2%!4).' ).4%.4)/.!, 3/#)!, *534)#% DIALOGUE IN FRATERNITY AND SORORITY COMMUNITIES Landmark 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Elyse Gambardella, Old Dominion University, egambard@odu.edu Thomas Whitcher, Indiana University-Purdue Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Indianapolis, twhitche@iupui.edu Conversations about social justice and difference can be difficult, often leading to discomfort, disagreements, and conflict amongst individuals. This program explores intergroup dialogue as a mechanism to engage participants in intentional and challenging dialogue surrounding social justice. Participants will be expected to interactively engage throughout the program to better understand best practices and examine their knowledge, skills, and comfort level in this area. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify approaches and methods to working with differences, through disagreements and conflicts, by examining theories and actively participating in group simulations.

WELCOME

COMPETENCY DEVELOPMENT...WHATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LEADERSHIP '/4 4/ $/ 7)4( )4 Landmark 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Erin Correa, The Leadership Institute-Women with Purpose, ecorrea@theleadershipinstitute-wwp.org Paul Whatley, James Madison University, whatlejp@jmu.edu Jill Courson, James Madison University, coursojd@jmu.edu Fraternal organizations and campus communities are increasingly challenged by change and a crucial need for strong leaders. One way to ensure maximum effectiveness of leadership development efforts is through the establishment of leadership competencies. Once defined, competencies can be integrated into the work of the organization in a variety of ways. In this interactive program, staff from James Madison University and The Leadership Institute-Women with Purpose will share how they utilized competency development to inform strategic plans, competency models, and collegiate member experiences. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand how to develop, validate, and implement a competency model within the community for which they serve.

WELCOME

WORKING WITH THE TEN PERCENTERS: CHALLENGING AND CHANGING TROUBLED AND STRUGGLING CHAPTERS Landmark 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; David Westol, Limberlost Consulting, Inc., david.westol@gmail.com They occupy a disproportionate amount of time: those struggling or troubled chapters that often make professionals say, â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we could just change ____, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be much better.â&#x20AC;? In reality, the culture in these chapters will not change quickly or easily, but it is the culture that must change. Presenters will assess chapter culture, discuss what â&#x20AC;&#x153;betterâ&#x20AC;? looks like, and review options to create change ranging from alumni/ae and reorganizations to challenging the good members. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will assess a variety of ways of working with and changing chapters that occupy a significant amount of time.


12.1.11 NAVIGATING YOUR WAY IN HIGHER EDUCATION WELCOME AS A PROFESSIONAL OF COLOR Majestic A – Darren Pierre, University of Georgia, depierre@uga.edu Veronica Hunter, Lehigh University, vmh207@lehigh.edu Recruiting and sustaining a diverse staff continues to be at the forefront of conversation within higher education. This program will look at the unique needs and experiences of professionals of color, paying particular attention to the experiences of black professionals in student affairs. This engaging presentation will look at current trends and best practices for sustaining the success of not only professionals of color, but also general practitioners in fraternity and sorority advising. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will leave with a greater understanding of needs/experiences of professionals of color.

WELCOME

#02 /2 $.2 -!+).' 4(% 2)'(4 $%#)3)/. 2%'!2$).' 4(% FUTURE OF A CHAPTER IN CRITICAL CONDITION Majestic B – Christian Wiggins, Pi Kappa Phi, cwiggins@pikapp.org Kyle Jordan, Appalachian State University, jordankf@appstate.edu The point at which chapters are closed for operational failures is ambiguous at best. Often campus professionals and headquarters professionals use separate methods to evaluate chapters’ health. Additionally, the relationship between headquarters and campus professionals often is cultivated too late to make a collaborative decision regarding the fate of a chapter. Utilizing a case study, this program will provide resources and techniques to evaluate chapter performance, as well as identify strategies for improving the relationship between headquarters/campus professionals. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to distinguish characteristics of a chapter capable of improving compared to a chapter that is best closed through critical assessment, resources, and techniques.

WELCOME

HELPING OTHERS REALIZE THEIR ROCK STAR POTENTIAL: TRAIN-THE-TRAINER VOLUNTEER FACILITATOR MODEL Majestic C –

WELCOME

EXTENSION FROM BEGINNING TO END: A VIEW FROM THE ORGANIZATION SIDE Majestic F – Beth Conder, Alpha Chi Omega, bconder@alphachiomega.org Melinda Mettler, Sigma Kappa, mstarbuck@sigmakappa.org Amber Huston, Delta Sigma Phi, huston@deltasig.org Is your campus thinking about opening for extension? Not sure what this really means, what you have to do, or what works best? Or are you wondering how to prepare your community for adding a new sorority? This session will provide you with tips, ideas, and highlights of how to structure an extension process that is beneficial for the campus and organization and to create a successful partnership with the inter/national organizations looking to establish a chapter on your campus. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to create successful extension processes and to establish a partnership with the institutions.

WELCOME

FROM PARENTAL CODDLING TO EXECUTIVE COACHING: A NEW MODEL FOR CHAPTER ADVISING Majestic G – Scott Reikofski, University of Pennsylvania, reikofsk@upenn.edu Ron Binder, University of Pittsburgh–Bradford, binder@pitt.edu The 2011 Interfraternal Summit examined the future of the fraternal movement, issuing a call for action to re-examine the advisory practices so critical for chapters. This session explores a necessary shift in chapter advising philosophy from “parental monitoring” toward one that is based upon professional coaching that would better prepare leaders and members for success in their chapters and in their professions. Participants will receive exemplary coaching models, discuss methods for enacting the models, and discuss expected outcome shifts. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to examine and discuss an advisory model based more upon professional coaching than maternal/paternal “monitoring.”

WELCOME @AFA1976 LET’S TALK TECH! Majestic H –

Suzette Walden, Illinois State University, swalden@illinoisstate.edu Archie Messersmith, Illinois State University, amesser@illinoisstate.edu

Ashley Whitlatch, University of Washington, ashwhit@gmail.com Daniel Miller, Northwestern University, daniel-miller@northwestern.edu

Have you ever sat in the back of a room at a session only to realize that your rock star volunteer was simply not a rock star facilitator? This session is the answer to ensuring you don’t experience that sinking feeling again.The presenters will offer very practical steps and proven techniques to help you train your volunteers to channel their inner rock star to become effective and dynamic facilitators. Turning drab to fab, these solutions will maximize student learning. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to understand training techniques necessary to ensure effective facilitation of educational programming for fraternity/sorority college students.

This program reveals emerging technology tools that create effective and efficient ways of working with students. In a world defined by 140-character updates and sound bites, a fraternity/sorority professional has to stay updated, so be prepared to learn about new TECHNOLOGIES AND HOW TO IMPLEMENT THEM 7HETHER YOU ARE LOOKING for simpler ways to communicate, manage time, or seek out budgetconscious resources, you will leave with answers to help you succeed in the fast-paced world of higher education. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to utilize new and growing technologies to further develop their programs at their respective institutions/organizations.

AFA Annual Meeting

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THURSDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ FEA ROUNDTABLE: NATIONAL PANHELLENIC CONFERENCE Benton – Nicki Meneley, National Panhellenic Conference, nicki@npcwomen.org

WELCOME

Sorority headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about the National Panhellenic Conference. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives.

Kate Planow, Longwood University, planowkm@longwood.edu Billy Boulden, Longwood University, bouldenwr@longwood.edu Tom Murphy, Phi Mu Delta Fraternity, ed@phimudelta.org Kaye Schendel, University of Wisconsin–La Crosse, kschendel@uwlax.edu Jessica Pettitt, I am…Social Justice, jess@iamsocialjustice.com

(ʏXFDʤLʝQɪ ɗ3URʔUʋPɡ%ORɭ ɖ,9

This program will use a facilitated conversation to discuss the involvement of transgendered students in fraternity/sorority life. There are a growing number of students that to do not fit the stereotypical or even the legal definition of “male” and “female.” Title IX, NCAA, and campus and state policies don’t have a consistent definition or procedure to determine actions steps for organizations. As single-sex or single-gendered organizations, it is time to start these conversations before the situation comes knocking. If it can happen in Farmville, it can and will happen to you. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be involved in a conversation regarding transgendered students access to fraternity/sorority life and come away with additional resources.

3:15 – 4:30 P.M.

WELCOME SIMPLIFY YOUR LIFE: USEFUL TECHNOLOGIES FOR 2012 Landmark 1 – Emily Perlow, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, eperlow@wpi.edu Dave Conner, The College of New Jersey, conner@tcnj.edu Allison St. Germain, Delta Zeta, asg@dzshq.com Seeing the workload continually increase? More budget cuts? No relief in sight? Come learn about ways to keep current in the field and simplify your daily routine. Back for a fourth consecutive year, this program presents and teaches easy-to-learn and easy-to-use technologies that are inexpensive (or free). No matter how “tech-savvy” you consider yourself, this session will provide you with fresh ideas and effective strategies to stay relevant and advance the fraternal movement. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain a working knowledge of simple and low cost ways to simplify their daily routines and workloads. LET’S GET SERIOUS ABOUT PUTTING AN END WELCOME TO HAZING: 10 THINGS WE NEED TO DO Landmark 2 – Gentry McCreary, University of West Florida, gmccreary@uwf.edu Paul Kittle, Auburn University, pkittle@auburn.edu Erle Morring, Behavioral Health Systems, emorring@behavioralhealthsystems.com Do you ever feel like a dog chasing your tail when it comes to conversations about hazing? Are you a seasoned professional who is tired of having the same conversations year after year about hazing prevention? Are you a national staff member looking to break the mold and create new member programs and policies that don’t inevitably lead to hazing? Are you interested in research about hazing? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, come to this session. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn new strategies related to hazing prevention.

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+./#+ +./#+ '5%33 7(/ )3 "%).' 2%#25)4%$ TRANSGENDER NEW MEMBERS, TITLE IX, AND WHAT REALLY HAPPENED ON OUR CAMPUS! Landmark 3 –

AFA Annual Meeting

WELCOME

NPC UPDATE: CURRENT TRENDS, LEGISLATION, ETC. Landmark 5 – Jane Sutton, NPC Chairman, janesutt@gmail.com The NPC values the role of the fraternity/sorority advisor. This program is an opportunity for NPC to update these key professionals on NPC, current trends within NPC, and any recently passed resolutions from the NPC Annual Meeting. This also is a great opportunity for the NPC executive committee to hear feedback from the fraternity/sorority advisors. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain familiarity with NPC’s long-range plan, current trends, and recently passed legislation. ADOPTING A CHAPTER SERVICES MODEL IN A FRATERNITY/SORORITY LIFE OFFICE: ONE PATHWAY TO IMPROVING YOUR COMMUNITY Landmark 6 –

WELCOME

Shelly Brown Dobek, North Carolina State University, shelly_dobek@ncsu.edu John Mountz, North Carolina State University, john_mountz@ncsu.edu Frustrated with the performance of specific chapters on your campus? Wish you could share more with headquarters and volunteers than just membership numbers and grade point average? Feel like you’re only spending time with the chapters in trouble or those winning awards and ignoring chapters in the middle? These were some of the reasons North Carolina State University incorporated a Chapter Services Model. Presenters will share the staffing model and strategies for designing individual chapter interventions. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn how to organize their campus unit, balancing the traditional role of council advising with chapter services to promote individual organizational development.


12.1.11

WELCOME

PAINTING A BIGGER PICTURE: CREATING INCLUSIVE FRATERNITY/SORORITY COMMUNITIES Landmark 7 –

WELCOME THE AFA MASTER CLASS

Marilyn Russell, The University of Texas–Austin, marilynr@austin.utexas.edu Cameron Warner, Arizona State University, cameron.b.warner@gmail.com Jaden Felix, The University of Texas–Austin, jaden@austin.utexas.edu Phil Butler, The University of Texas–Austin, plbutler@austin.utexas.edu Sorority and fraternity communities are diversifying and expanding. This program will educate participants on the great variety of organizations in the current fraternal realm and emphasize the value of educating students. It also will equip professionals with ways to advise and incorporate newer organizations into their communities. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will emphasize the importance of inclusion and providing culturally aware advising methods for fraternity/sorority communities.

WELCOME

WHY ARE FRATERNITY MEMBERS MORE 3!4)3&)%$ 4(!. 3/2/2)49 -%-"%23 Majestic B – Alan Nordyke, University of Central Missouri, nordyke@ucmo.edu Kathleen Peoples, Drexel University, kep33@drexel.edu Darlena Jones, Educational Benchmarking, Inc., darlena@webebi.com Is this experience the same for fraternity and sorority members? For the majority of factors (satisfaction and learning outcomes) measured on the AFA/EBI Fraternity/Sorority Assessment, fraternity members rate their experience higher than sorority members. The first question for the profession is, why? The second question is, can the experience for the sorority members be improved? This session explores this phenomena by looking at national data collected via the AFA/ EBI Fraternity/Sorority Assessment and through conversations with practitioners from public and private universities. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand how fraternity/sorority professionals at two different institutions use assessment information to understand which factors are rated higher by fraternity members and how to best support sorority members on these factors.

Majestic C – Karyn Nishimura Sneath, Npower, karyn@npoweryourself.com Shelley Sutherland, Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values, shelley@aflv.org Bill Nelson, University of Iowa, william-nelson@uiowa.edu Mike Hayes, Washington University in St. Louis, michael.hayes@wustl.edu They are the stories you’ve never heard from the people you thought you knew best. Handpicked for their unique impact on AFA and the fraternal advising field, four true modern masters sit down to share the untold stories that have shaped their careers and the greatest life lessons they’ve learned along the way. In an intimate setting, they open up about their successes, failures, triumphs, disappointments, and heartbreaks. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain new best practices, lessons learned, and recommendations for becoming and staying relevant professionals in AFA.

WELCOME

THE REALITIES OF PERSONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FOR PROFESSIONALS Majestic F – Jonathan Brant, Beta Theta Pi, jonathan.brant@betathetapi.org David Stollman, CAMPUSPEAK, david.stollman@campuspeak.com Times are changing, and it seems impossible to ignore thinning financial resources, empty pockets, and outstanding payments. Before getting overwhelmed with the weight of financial decisionmaking, this session will share useful ideas about effective budgeting, managing credit, paying down loans, saving for retirement, and charitable giving. This interactive session will provide instruction on how to put all of the pieces of your financial world together, and what each one will do to make you a financial winner. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify their personal financial planning issues and opportunities. $%$)#!4%$ %$5#!4/2 /2 -!3/#()34 ,/.' 4%2CAMPUS-BASED FRATERNITY ADVISORS KEEPING IT FRESH, IN BALANCE, AND REWARDING Majestic G –

WELCOME

Scott Reikofski, University of Pennsylvania, reikofsk@upenn.edu Campus-based fraternity advising is said to be among the highest burn-out positions in student affairs work, and often campus, advisors turn over faster than college generations. But how do long-term professionals maintain high levels of dedication and energy, motivation and inspiration, personal balance, and goal attainment? This highly interactive session encourages attendees to share the circumstances and experiences of their sustained and persistent commitment to the field. This program will identify mental health trends as well as develop a framework for responding to problems associated with mental and behavioral health in fraternity and sorority communities. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will examine personal and professional issues of motivation, balance, and energy for those long-term campus-based professionals.

AFA Annual Meeting

{17}


THURSDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę&#x2026;ČľÉ?Ôˇ(É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;QWÉĄ WELCOME

THE ART OF BALANCE Majestic H â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Kyle Witham, The Leadership Institute-Women with Purpose, kwitham@theleadershipinstitite-wwp.org Do you ever feel there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t enough hours in the day; that you pour yourself out to others and have nothing left for yourself? Society believes the art of balance is accepting the things you must do, spending time on the things you want to do, and eliminating things you feel you should do but arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t truly necessary. In this interactive workshop, participants will assess their current life balance and develop a plan to live in accordance with their values. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will make plans to modify their current schedule to reflect a more balanced life that aligns with their values. FEA ROUNDTABLE: NORTH-AMERICAN INTERFRATERNITY CONFERENCE STANDARDS Benton â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jameson Root, North-American Interfraternity Conference, jameson.root@gmail.com Fraternity headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about the North-American Interfraternity Conference Standards implementation. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives.

7É&#x201E;Č­HʤʌÉ&#x17E;

 n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ &/9%2 Do you follow @afa1976? Have you participated in an #afachat? Join us for the inaugural Annual Meeting Tweetup to meet the friendly faces behind the Twitter handle. At the Tweetup, participants will network, partake in discussion on the topics of the previous #afachats, and brainstorm future chat topics to advance the fraternal movementâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;140 characters at a time. Bring your creativity, CONVERSATION AND MOBILE BUSINESS CARDS

(Ę&#x2C6;Ę&#x2022;ÉľĘ?Lɢ+ɪɸÉ&#x2014;

 n  0- s -!*%34)# $% AFA Associate members contribute in excess of $70,000 each year to the Association. In addition to this generous support, the Associate members offer services that enhance the performance of campuses, chapters, and inter/national organizations. We are pleased to welcome almost 40 exhibitors to this yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Meeting. Please join our Associate members and interfraternal partners in the Exhibit Hall. Enjoy the opportunity to network and learn more about their various products, resources, and services.

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AFA Annual Meeting

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The Fireside Chats Meet & Greet: Institution Edition will be structured with campus-based professionals stationed at tables. Oganizationbased professionals and volunteers will be able to seek out an institutional representative with whom they want to meet. While this is a great opportunity to put a face with a name, meet up with an old colleague, or a say quick hello, this is not an appropriate environment for bringing up major issues which you have not scheduled a Fireside Chat to discuss. We encourage you to stop by the institutionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tables to say hello and introduce yourself. Begin creating those partnerships early. Be sure to stop by to pick up your Fireside Chats schedule. Preregistration is not required for the Meet & Greet.

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 0- s -%%4 ). 4(% (/4%, ,/""9 '2!.$ 4/7%2 Attending the AFA Annual Meeting is an incredible opportunity for you to meet other professionals, especially at mealtime. As you create your Annual Meeting schedule, be sure to pencil in the First Timers Meal Gathering. Joining the First Timers Committee for a meal will help you connect with other colleagues who are new to the Annual Meeting. Make plans to network and enjoy a great meal with other fraternity/sorority professionals from around the country. Please register at the First Timers Welcome Table ahead of time. We look forward to dining with you. (Please note: All participants will pay for their own meals.)


FRIDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę&#x2026;ČľÉ?Ôˇ(É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;QWÉĄ {FRIDAY, DECEMBER 2}  n  AM  n  AM

#IRCLE OF 3ISTERHOOD #OFFEE #LUTCH s Landmark 1/2

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'AMMA 3IGMA !LPHA /UTREACH "REAKFAST s Landmark 5

 AM n  PM

&IRESIDE #HATS )NFORMATION 4ABLE s Landmark Foyer

 AM n  PM

!&! &OUNDATION 3ILENT !UCTION s Majestic Foyer

 AM n  PM

$EVELOPMENTAL 2ESOURCE #ENTER s Landmark Foyer Registration (Registration will be closed during the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon)

 AM n  PM

4ECHNOLOGY ,OUNGE s ,ANDMARK &OYER Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

8:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 a.m.

Educational Programs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Block V

9:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:15 a.m.

Educational Programs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Block VI

10:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:00 p.m. Regional Meetings (see p. 23 for locations)  n  PM

!&!!&! &OUNDATION 2ECOGNITION ,UNCHEON s Landmark Ballroom Sponsored by ALSAC/St. Jude Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital

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%XHIBIT (ALL s -AJESTIC $%

2:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 p.m.

Nominations and Elections Committee -EETING s ,AFAYETTE "OARDROOM

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0ROGRAMMING 0REVIEW s -AJESTIC $%

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&IRESIDE #HATS s ,ANDMARK "ALLROOM Sponsored by Fraternal Information and Programming Group

4:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:00 p.m.

Project Job Search: RĂŠsumĂŠ Review and -OCK )NTERVIEW s 0ARKVIEW!UBERT

7:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8:30 p.m.

Reception for the Alumni and Friends of Bowling Green State University s -AJESTIC # (by invitation only)

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$ELTA 'AMMA 2ECEPTION s -AJESTIC ( (by invitation only)

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8:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m.

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&RIENDS OF $ELTA :ETA 2ECEPTION s -AJESTIC &' (by invitation only)

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 !- n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ &/9%2 Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK Need to recharge that battery? Stay connected to the office? Thanks to the generous support of CAMPUSPEAK, meeting attendees can do that and more by stopping by the Technology Lounge.

(Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄn%ORÉ­É&#x2013;9 8:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 A.M.

WELCOME

FIRST YEAR NPHC TRAINING Landmark 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Martin Hill, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., theblackman1911@sbcglobal.net Earl Merritt, Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., efm1269@yahoo.com The presentation is designed to provide helpful hints and tips for firstyear advisors of NPHC organizations or the NPHC council. Information on how to create a â&#x20AC;&#x153;safe environmentâ&#x20AC;? for discovery and promotion of growth will be discussed. The attendees will receive a checklist of action items to assist in creating a strong bond with NPHC members and promoting the positive growth of the NPHC Council. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be exposed to critical focus areas to assist them in being more successful as an NPHC advisor.

WELCOME

EXPANSION: A FOCUS ON COUNCILS OTHER THAN IFC AND PANHELLENIC Landmark 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Jessie Stapleton, University of Wisconsinâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Oshkosh, stapletj@uwosh.edu Amber VanLue Johnston, High Point University, ajohnsto@highpoint.edu Jessica Berner Heideman, Rochester Institute of Technology, jrbccl@rit.edu )&# %XPANSION AND 0ANHELLENIC %XTENSION 0OLICY #(%#+ .0(#

.!,&/ AND -'# %XPANSION 0OLICY (UH WHAT $OES MY CAMPUS or council have one? Non-NIC and NPC groups are growing all over the country, but there is little written or presented on how to work with expansion of these groups. Campus-based professionals will gain knowledge on how three different public universities have approached the expansion of these groups, differences in policies, and differences and similarities with NIC and NPC. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will differentiate between campus and council expansion policies for NIC and NPC groups and those for NPHC, NALFO, and MGC groups (if a policy exists on the campus or in the council).

'Ę&#x2018;É&#x192;É°OĘ?Ę ČˇĘ&#x2018;QWÉŞÉ&#x2014;5HVĘ?ĘŚUČŞÉ?&Ę&#x2018;QÉ&#x20AC;Ę&#x2018;É   !- n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ &/9%2

AFA Annual Meeting

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FRIDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ WELCOME

DITCHING THE BEACH! PLANNING ALTERNATIVE SPRING BREAKS THAT ALIGN WITH FRATERNAL VALUES Landmark 3 – Cameron Beatty, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc., ccbeatty@iastate.edu Ellen Shertzer, Delta Tau Delta, ellen.shertzer@delts.net Jon Turk, Tau Kappa Epsilon, jturk@iastate.edu This engaging presentation will provide a case study of a fraternity/ sorority alternative spring break trip planned at Iowa State University. The purpose of the trip was for students to explore their fraternal values through participating in service in the Indianapolis downtown community. This session will provide participants with strategies to partner with fraternal headquarters staff with the objective of planning an intentional and meaningful alternative spring break experience that enables students to reflect on how they live their fraternal values. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain knowledge from a case study of planning an alternative spring break trip with collaboration from national fraternal headquarters. FRATERNITY/SORORITY RESEARCH: CONTRIBUTING WELCOME TO THE KNOWLEDGE COMMUNITY

Landmark 7 – Tyler Johansson, Pi Kappa Phi, tjohansson@pikapp.org Patrick Romero-Aldaz, University of South Florida, romeroaldaz@usf.edu Carolyn E. Whittier, Virginia Commonwealth University, whittierce@vcu.edu What does a fraternity’s expansion planning process and a pregnancy have in common? Both take about nine months, can be a little scary if it’s your first time, and are most successful when there’s good partnership. This program will outline the necessary preparations and resources for a successful fraternity expansion on today’s college campus by utilizing cross-organizational data, as well as a recent expansion case study. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to identify the resources and strategies necessary to prepare an effective fraternity expansion process.

WELCOME AFA UPDATE

Landmark 5 –

Majestic A –

Anita Cory, Washington State University, cory@wsu.edu Cassie Gerhardt, University of North Dakota, cassie.gerhardt@email.und.edu Jami Harrison, Washington State University, jlharrison@wsu.edu Gentry McCreary, University of West Florida, gmccreary@uwf.edu

Monica Miranda Smalls, AFA President, monica.m.smalls@rochester.edu Shelly Brown Dobek, AFA President-Elect, shelly_dobek@ncsu.edu Kelly Jo Karnes, AFA Past President, kellyjo-karnes@uiowa.edu Thad M. Doyle, AFA Executive Vice President, tmdoyle@uakron.edu Jeremiah Shinn, AFA Vice President for Resource Development, jeremiahshinn@boisestate.edu Veronica Hunter, AFA Vice President for Membership, vmh207@lehigh.edu

Does research seem too difficult or too boring? It doesn’t need to BE #OME LEARN ABOUT SEVERAL PROFESSIONALS RECENT EXPERIENCES WITH research as they pursued advanced degrees and learn not only about their topic, but also how you can contribute to the knowledge community through your own research. Topics include perceptions of web-based alcohol programming, student involvement, moral judgment and hazing, and leadership identity development, along with the topics you bring to the table. This session is recommended by the Center for the Study of the College Fraternity. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn about several professionals’ recent research and understand ways to apply the findings to professional practice.

WELCOME

THE FEMALE FRATERNITY ADVISOR Landmark 6 – Christina Witkowicki, George Washington University, wicki@gwu.edu Cat Sohor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, sohor@mit.edu Su Bartlett McGlone, Tufts University, susanna.mcglone@tufts.edu Can women be effective advisors in male fraternal organizations? There are movements in some of the top men’s organizations for female volunteers and staff members. Many women also serve as the primary advisors to men’s governing councils. What are the benefits or drawbacks to women advising men? This program will discuss current research available, present the trends, discuss some of the successes and challenges female advisors face while working with men’s organizations, and identify best practices for their increased effectiveness. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to discuss the positive and negative aspects of female advisors advising fraternity men.

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WHAT TO EXPECT WHEN YOU’RE EXPECTING: WELCOME WHY FRATERNITY EXPANSION IS LIKE HAVING A BABY

AFA Annual Meeting

Join AFA Executive Board members in a discussion of the year’s accomplishments and the desired future for the Association. Ask questions about the myriad changes that have occurred in 2011. Spend time reflecting on the opportunities that lie ahead and learn how you can become engaged in the next chapter of the Association history. As a result of participating in this program, participants will gain insight into the future of the Association on strategic and operational levels. PURPOSEFUL PLANNING: DEVELOPING A WELCOME COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT BLUEPRINT Majestic C – Heather Kirk, Zeta Tau Alpha, heather-kirk@zetataualpha.org Jenny Pratt, Alpha Chi Omega, jpratt@alphachiomega.org Assessment is not a buzzword. It is the responsibility of fraternity/sorority professionals to measure students’ achievement of the intended outcomes and value of the fraternal experience. Yet, it can feel overwhelming unless you plan your work and work your plan. Participants will learn how to create a purposeful and intentional assessment plan to guide the measurement of student learning. They will explore the process to identify outcomes, gather and interpret evidence, and enhance the experience using research-based practices. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn how to create a purposeful and intentional assessment plan to guide the measurement of student learning.


12.2.11

WELCOME

ADVISING TOP DOWN: WHY WE SHOULD WALK AWAY FROM THE BOTTOM Majestic F – Spring-Eve Rosado, Florida Atlantic University, srosado2@fau.edu Annie Carlson, University of Oregon, carlson2@uoregon.edu In 1999, Mike McRee wrote in Perspectives, “Stop trying to save the dying.” Twelve years later, why do professionals continue to struggle with this concept? By focusing attention on the bottom chapters in communities and organizations, precious resources, time, energy, and intelligence are wasted. Advising strategies that focus on the worst chapters are inherently flawed. If you’re interested in reframing your approach to the fraternal experience, join the presenters for an honest dialogue about flipping this paradigm. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will interpret the fraternal experience with a new framework based on the theories of Social Darwinism.

WELCOME

RETURN ON INVESTMENT: WHAT YOU GET FROM THE AFA FOUNDATION Majestic G – John Mountz, AFA Foundation, john_mountz@ncsu.edu Amy Vojta, AFA Foundation, vojta@echo.rutgers.edu Ron Binder, AFA Foundation, ronbinder@yahoo.com “Because You Believe” stickers, silent auction, and scholarships may be what you have seen from the AFA Foundation, but have you ever wondered how they raise money and how they decide how to give it away? Here’s your chance to learn more about the Foundation, its mission to support your professional development, and its future plans. Come spend some time with members of the AFA Foundation Board, ask questions, and learn about this valuable partner in your professional development. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn about the purpose and practices of the AFA Foundation. HAZING PREVENTION THROUGH A POLICY LENS: WELCOME ONE CAMPUS’ STORY Majestic H – Keith Ellis, University of South Carolina, kellis@mailbox.sc.edu David Lowe, Alpha Tau Omega, davidlowephone@gmail.com Hazing prevention policy often is seen on campuses and in organizations as a dusty old document that outlines the rules of hazing. This program will offer an alternative to developing policy that utilizes a prevention framework to create a living document for the entire campus or organization. This program will present the University of Kentucky’s journey through hazing prevention policy development from a professional and student perspective. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn how one campus applied a hazing prevention framework to policy development for the entire institution.

FEA ROUNDTABLE: SOCIAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY Parkview/Aubert – Daniel Thompson, Delta Chi, danielt@deltachi.org Corin Wallace, Sigma Sigma Sigma, cwallace@trisigma.org Fraternity/sorority headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about social media and technology. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives.

(ʏXFDʤLʝQɪɗ3URʔUʋPɡn%ORɭɖƿ, 9:15 – 10:15 A.M.

WELCOME

MAXIMIZING THE EXPERIENCE: THE VALUE OF SERVICE LEARNING IN FRATERNITY AND SORORITY LIFE Landmark 1 – Jenny Lopez, Sigma Kappa, lopezjen@gvsu.edu Scott Hillman, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, scott.a.hillman@gmail.com Service learning initiatives are enriching the experiences of today’s college students across the nation. Through service-learning opportunities, fraternity and sorority members will experience critical thinking, individual growth, civic engagement, reflection, and the ability to strengthen their communities. This program will provide resources on logistical planning, social justice needs, and educational activities to foster these outcomes. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to design a service-learning trip geared toward fraternity and sorority members.

WELCOME

'2%%+ 3)0 2)3+9 "53).%33 /2 02/-/4).' 5.)49 Landmark 2 – Paunita Jones, Alpha Kappa Alpha, paunitajones@gmail.com Jazmyn Pulley, Zeta Phi Beta, jazmynpulley@gmail.com Cameron Beatty, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., ccbeatty@iastate.edu Would you like to come to the “Sip?”—words heard often from culturally based organization’s promotion of a council unity party, featuring tubs of juice with four or five different liquors in it. This program will discuss the inconsistency of risk management amongst institutions and councils by using first-hand accounts from students’ and facilitators’ personal experience. Come learn about multicultural students’ “parties,” dangers of what many advisors do not know, and tools for discussing future risk management policies. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to facilitate a discussion regarding issues of alcohol and risk management behavior within the NPHC community on their campuses and challenge students on possible risk management issues.

AFA Annual Meeting

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FRIDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ WELCOME

SISTER-SHIP: LEADING BY EXAMPLE Landmark 5 – Cassandra Joseph, University of Houston, cfjoseph@uh.edu Angela King-Taylor, Middle Tennessee State University, anking@mtsu.edu Maria Iglesia, University of California–Berkeley, msiglesia@berkeley.edu Jennifer Jones, Southern Methodist University, jmjones@mail.smu.edu Jessica Pettitt, I am... Social Justice, jess@iamsocialjustice.com Sorority women in culturally based organizations deal with many life challenges such as academic struggles, family concerns, body image issues, discrimination, racism, and sexism, just to name a few. Hear from a panel of professional women from diverse backgrounds on the current issues facing sorority women in culturally based organizations. Using principles from the Student Leadership Practices Inventory and StrengthsQuest assessments, best practices for the sorority women as they navigate through these challenges will be discussed. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will explore the ideology and concepts that can promote a healthy balance of academic and social experiences in life for sorority women in culturally based organizations.

WELCOME

THERE’S AN APP FOR THAT: LESSONS IN VOLUNTEER DEVELOPMENT Landmark 6 – Marsha Carrasco Cooper, RISE Partnerships, marsha@risepartnerships.com Dan Wrona, RISE Partnerships, dan@risepartnerships.com How do you deal with the dictator? The rookie? The politician? The ghost? Alumni volunteers can play any number of roles, but which one is right? And how do you work with each individual? Learn how to cultivate a positive relationship with advisors and keep them engaged in the community. Discover four principles for volunteer development in the 21st century and leave with new techniques for cultivating a stronger advisor base in your own community. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will use four principles for volunteer involvement to strategies for recruiting, training, and managing volunteer advisors.

WELCOME

TEACHING STUDENTS TO DESIGN SANCTIONS THAT WILL CHANGE BEHAVIOR Landmark 7 – Justin Angotti, Pi Kappa Phi, jangotti@pikapp.org Kim Novak, NovakTalks, knriskybiz@gmail.com How many times in the past year have your students been faced with the challenge of coming up with sanctions to address chapter or individual behavior? How many conversations have you been part of where it felt like the sanction assigned was nothing more than a prescribed remedy? In this train-the-trainer session, participants will be taught a sanctioning model intended to truly change behavior, as well as techniques for utilizing the model in student conduct board trainings. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to integrate a strategic problem-solving model into chapter- and council-level conduct board trainings in order to reframe the sanctioning conversation.

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AFA Annual Meeting

WELCOME

BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS WITH AND SUPPORT FOR LOCAL FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES Majestic A – Jessica Turuc, Georgia Southern University, jessturuc@gmail.com Whitney Swesey, University of North Carolina–Pembroke, wswesey@gmail.com It is understood in the profession that fraternities and sororities were established to provide young men and women with support networks of people who share common interests, similar ideals, and high standards. This includes local chapters who have agreed to hold themselves to higher standards, and it is the presenters’ responsibility to help them. This session will help campus professionals better understand their local organizations, as well as how to foster those relationships and create programming to meet their leadership needs. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn how to create successful programs for local organizations and share current practices.

WELCOME

MOVING FROM CONSULTANTS WHO “VISIT” TO STAFF WHO CONSULT AND SUPPORT CHAPTERS Majestic B – Scott Smith, Sigma Nu, scott.smith@sigmanu.org Alex Combs, Sigma Nu, alex.combs@sigmanu.org If each campus and chapter is truly unique, why do fraternity/sorority consultant programs treat every chapter interaction in exactly the same way? Sigma Nu’s chapter consultation and support program allows for adaptation and flexibility to a chapter’s situation and needs, while still addressing foundational issues common to all groups. Sigma Nu’s “consultation through choice” model incorporates the “must” issues like officer training and goal setting, with a menu of workshops, meetings, and problem-solving strategies to meet chapters where they stand. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn how one fraternity is transforming its consultant program through integration of its standards program and offering chapters the ability to design their own experience. LATINO/A FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES: NUESTRA #/,!"/2!#)/. /52 #/,,!"/2!4)/. !.$ $%6%,/0).' SUCCESSFUL PARTNERSHIPS Majestic C –

WELCOME

Juan Guardia, Florida State University, jguardia@admin.fsu.edu Vanessa Santiago, Omega Phi Beta Sorority, Inc., vanesantiago@gmail.com Francisco Lugo, University of Texas–San Antonio, francisco.lugo@utsa.edu Maria Diaz, Lambda Pi Chi Sorority, Inc., president@lambdapichi.org Latino/a fraternities and sororities can be found on many of college campuses across the nation. This program will deepen the knowledge and understanding of Latino/a fraternal organizations by translating theory into practice, while also identifying methods of advising and support from national volunteers that prompt effective engagement and advising of members. Participants will be equipped with the necessary knowledge, tools, and resources to actively and effectively challenge members on their values and ritual. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify methods of advising that prompt effective engagement of Latino/a fraternity/sorority members and organizations.


12.2.11

WELCOME ADVISING ACROSS DIFFERENCES Majestic F â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Trace Camacho, Michigan State University, camacho3@msu.edu Adrienne Jaroch, Loyola Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Chicago, ajaroch@luc.edu Thomas Whitcher, Indiana University-Purdue Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Indianapolis, twhitche@iupui.edu Advisors, like students, come from various cultural backgrounds and from a variety of multiple identities. Sometimes advising across racial and ethnic lines can be difficult and advisors often donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how to start the conversation or address challenging topics. Join a diverse group of campus-based professionals and headquarters staff as they share experiences as well as provide best practices in advising and working with students who are culturally different. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will develop a knowledge base of how to build relationships to advise all organizations through the experience of others and relevant research.

WELCOME

FRATFELLAS: SELLING THE FRAT FANTASY, THE INTERSECTION OF MASCULINITY AND MARKETING Majestic G â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Corin Wallace, Sigma Sigma Sigma, cwallace@trisigma.org Tanner Marcantel, Georgia Institute of Technology, tannerm@gatech.edu Jordan McCarter, Texas Christian University, j.mccarter@tcu.edu Professionals are losing the fight to define fraternity men, and sites like TotalFratMove.com are creating platforms for identity formation. Students respond to sophisticated and appealing marketing designed to create a culture and identity, and there is clearly a demand for captivating content that speaks to the fraternity experience. This program will use masculinity and marketing theories to explore larger themes present on sites like Total Frat Move and BroBible, as well as identify why those platforms have successfully integrated into fraternity culture. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will explore and identify the key theoretical principles behind effective marketing of masculinity to men aged 18â&#x20AC;&#x201C;25.

WELCOME

.!4)/.!, !0)! 0!.(%,,%.)# !33/#)!4)/. .!0! 50$!4% Majestic H â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Maria Iglesia, National APIA Panhellenic Association, execchair@napa-online.org Gordon Wong, National APIA Panhellenic Association, vicechair@napa-online.org Hannah Seoh, National APIA Panhellenic Association, secretary@napa-online.org Attendees will have the opportunity to hear updates, progress reports, and relevant information concerning all aspects of National APIA Panhellenic Association (NAPA). Attendees will gain a better understanding of the mission and operations of NAPA and its member organizations. The program covers current trends and how to best serve the NAPA community. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand the purposes of NAPA and its mission and gain a greater understanding of current trends and initiatives of NAPA.

FEA ROUNDTABLE: MEMBER EDUCATION Parkview/Aubert â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Heather Kirk, Zeta Tau Alpha, heather-kirk@zetataualpha.org Rick Burt, Pi Kappa Alpha, rburt@pikes.org Fraternity/sorority headquarters staff members are invited to join colleagues in a discussion about membership education. Come ready to share ideas and best practices, ask each other questions, and gain new perspectives.

5HĘ&#x201D;LĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;0Č­HʤĘ&#x2013;QJÉĄ

 !- n  0- s 6!2)/53 ,/#!4)/.3 AFA members are strongly encouraged to attend their Regional Meeting to learn more about the business of the Association and to build a network among nearby colleagues. 2%')/.  s -!*%34)# ( Connecticut, Delaware, District of Columbia, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Newfoundland, New Brunswick, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Nova Scotia, Pennsylvania, Quebec, Rhode Island, Vermont, West Virginia 2%')/.  s -!*%34)# &' Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia 2%')/.  s -!*%34)# !" Illinois, Indiana, Manitoba, Michigan, Ohio, Ontario 2%')/.  s -!*%34)# # Arkansas, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin 2%')/.  s 7!3().'4/. Alaska, Alberta, Arizona, British Columbia, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Saskatchewan, Utah, Washington, Wyoming

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 n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ "!,,2//Sponsored by ALSAC/St. Jude Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Hospital The AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon is the time to pause and celebrate the achievements of Association members and Foundation donors. The awards for Outstanding Volunteers, Change Initiative, Excellence in Educational Programming, Gayle Webb New Professional, AFA/CoHEASAP Outstanding Alcohol/Drug Prevention Program, Essentials, Oracle, and Perspectives will be presented, and AFA Foundation donors at a variety of giving levels will be recognized.

AFA Annual Meeting

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FRIDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę&#x2026;ČľÉ?Ôˇ(É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;QWÉĄ (Ę&#x2C6;Ę&#x2022;ÉľĘ?Lɢ+ɪɸÉ&#x2014;

 n  0- s -!*%34)# $% 4HIS IS THE ROOM TO VISIT TODAY 4HE %XHIBIT (ALL FEATURES THE LATEST products, speakers, and services available to you and the students and chapters with whom you work. We have a great mix of exhibitors who are available to discuss potential programs, products, and services. Looking for a software solution to manage your recruitment process? Looking for the best way to promote your programs? Looking for a great speaker? Come to the Exhibit Hall to meet our Associate members and a few interfraternal partners and learn about the many ways they can enhance your work. Even meeting attendees who are not looking for new partners or vendors should visit to thank the Associate members for being a part of the Annual Meeting. Circulate through the Exhibit Hall and enter to win great prizes. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth your while to spend time in the Exhibit Hallâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you can win in more ways than one, by meeting exhibitors that can assist you in YOUR WORK WHILE INCREASING YOUR ODDS OF BEING A PRIZE WINNER /N Friday, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be eligible to win one of several exciting prizes every 30 minutes and must be present to win. Prizes include an iPad, Flip 6IDEO #AMERA 0OWERMAT WITH ADAPTERS AND MORE .OTE .OT ALL OF these will be given away on Friday.) Be sure to complete the Exhibit Hall Passport to be eligible to win one of the grand prizes (one of two $500 gift cards or an iPad).

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Formerly known as Speaker Showcase, the Programming Preview highlights select Associate members representing speakers, programs, and workshops available for college/university campuses and inter/national organizations. This year, we are excited to include the Programming Preview in the Exhibit Hall. CHRIS BLACKBURN PersonalPower: A RESPONSE ABILITY Workshop

STEVE WHITBY Shaving the Yak

SHANE WINDMEYER Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Your Gay Point Average

EDDIE BANKSCROSSON Elephants and Onions Workshop

DR. ROBYN SILVERMAN Good Girls Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Get Fat: Surviving and Thriving in a Thin-Is-In World

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AFA Annual Meeting

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 n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ "!,,2//Sponsored by Fraternal Information and Programming Group Fireside Chats are a forum for campus and inter/national organization representatives to reinforce their collaborative efforts on a variety of issues through brief, 20-minute meetings. This year, we are able to offer a maximum of nine Fireside Chat opportunities. These meetings will provide attendees the opportunity to discuss the progress of their respective organizations and create collaborative action plans for future success. Possible topics for discussion may include but are not limited to: s Academics/scholarship s Chapter operations/management s Concerns and issues s Housing s Council and community updates s Re-development/re-colonization efforts s New chapter updates and discussion s Membership numbers s Chapter accomplishments Given the time limitations of these meetings, Fireside Chats should serve as a starting point for one-on-one discussions later on or regular communication between inter/national organization representatives and campus professionals throughout the year. We strongly recommend that you inform the other party of discussion items prior to the meetings in order for both parties to be fully prepared.

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Project Job Search gives professionals and graduate students a competitive advantage in the process of finding the perfect job. Experienced fraternity/sorority professionals will review participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rĂŠsumĂŠs and conduct mock job interviews. They will provide feedback to help make candidatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; written materials and interview responses more appealing to potential employers. This program is similar to a large placement conference setting, so participants can experience this setting before attending a conference in the spring.


SATURDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę&#x2026;ČľÉ?Ôˇ(É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;QWÉĄ {SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3} 6:45 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 7:30 a.m.

Clemson University Community Update "REAKFAST s ,ANDMARK  (by invitation only)

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)NTERFRATERNAL "REAKFAST s ,ANDMARK  (by invitation only)

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.!,&/ "OARD -EETING s (AWTHORNE,UCAS Flora, 21st Floor, Grand Tower

8:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30 p.m.

National APIA Panhellenic Association "OARD -EETING s !UBERT

 AM n  PM

$EVELOPMENTAL 2ESOURCE #ENTER s Landmark Foyer

 AM n  PM

2EGISTRATION s ,ANDMARK &OYER

 AM n  PM

4ECHNOLOGY ,OUNGE s ,ANDMARK &OYER Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK

8:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 a.m.

Educational Programs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Block VII

9:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 4:30 p.m.

National Multicultural Greek Council "USINESS -EETING s ,INDELL

9:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 10:30 a.m.

General Program, Journey Toward Relevancy: Taking the Next Step in the Right $IRECTION s -AJESTIC $% Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Delta Upsilon International Fraternity

10:45 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:00 p.m. Educational Programs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Block VIII  n  PM

!&! "USINESS -EETING s -AJESTIC $

3:45 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m.

Educational Programs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Block IX

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'RADUATE 3TUDENTS AND &RIENDS 2ECEPTION s Statler Ballroom Hosted by t.jelke solutions

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/RDER OF /MEGA 2ECEPTION s Hawthorne/Lucas/Flora, 21st Floor, Grand Tower Hosted by Order of Omega

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#LOSING "ANQUET s -AJESTIC !"#$ Sponsored by the Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel

9:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:00 p.m.

Reception Honoring Shelly Brown Dobek,  !&! 0RESIDENT s (AWTHORNE,UCAS Flora, 21st Floor, Grand Tower (by invitation only) Hosted by Delta Zeta and North Carolina State University

9:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 11:00 p.m.

Reception Honoring Mark Koepsell â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  *ACK , !NSON !WARD 2ECIPIENT s Parkview/Aubert Hosted by Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values

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 !- n  0- s ,!.$-!2+ &/9%2 Sponsored by CAMPUSPEAK Need to recharge that battery? Stay connected to the office? Thanks to the generous support of CAMPUSPEAK, meeting attendees can do that and more by stopping by the Technology Lounge.

(Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄn%ORÉ­É&#x2013;ƿƎ, 8:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:00 A.M.

WELCOME

USING CAS STANDARDS TO CREATE FRATERNITY/SORORITY LIFE LEARNING OUTCOMES Landmark 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Daniel Bureau, University of Memphis, dabureau@memphis.edu The development of learning outcomes is an expectation within divisions of student affairs. Fraternity and sorority life professionals should demonstrate their alignment with broad student affairs goals by advancing their own set of learning outcomes for their programs. Many have tried to create learning outcomes from scratch when models exist, most notably CAS. This audience will benefit from using an existing framework for learning outcomes development and applying it to their programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals and objectives. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to identify the six CAS learning domains.

WELCOME PROFESSIONAL/PERSONAL LIFE BALANCE: THE INDIVISIBLE SELF Landmark 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kate Steiner, University of Wyoming, ksteiner@uwyo.edu Kari Murphy, Illinois State University, kamurp2@ilstu.edu

Advisors work hard, harder than most; value good work; and at times, lose sight of professional/personal balance. Utilizing the framework of The Indivisible Self wellness model, you will be able to identify strategies to achieve your own professional/personal life balance. Presenters will share personal stories of finding balance and addressing feelings of guilt. Professional/personal life balance is an important life skill that is promoted to students; this program will help you to become a better model. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will have an understanding of how to work toward overall balance and wellness through use of The Indivisible Self, an evidence-based model of wellness.

AFA Annual Meeting

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SATURDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ WELCOME BE A MAN

THE CHAPTER GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT PLAN: HOW THE UNIVERSITY OF OREGON TRANSFORMED ITS COMMUNITY BY IMPLEMENTING STANDARDS Landmark 3 –

WELCOME

Landmark 7 – Steve Hartman, Phi Kappa Tau National Fraternity, shartman@phikappatau.org Wes Fugate, University of Georgia, wesfugate@gmail.com

Annie Carlson, University of Oregon, carlson2@uoregon.edu Shelley Sutherland, Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values, shelley@aflv.org Over the past decade, many universities and inter/national organizations have implemented standards programs as a way to improve the overall functioning of chapters. Among the first, the University of Oregon’s fraternity and sorority community has since revamped its program to empower chapters to drive sustainable change. During this session, participants will hear how the university adopted its first standards program, went dry, and then reinvented standards into a progressive plan for growth and development. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain knowledge about and an appreciation for the implementation of a standards program.

Matthew Nance, Eastern Illinois University, mcnance@eiu.edu

Landmark 5 – Kristin S. Fouts, North-American Interfraternity Conference, assessment@nicindy.org Since its first pilot in 2007, more than 50 colleges and universities have utilized the Fraternity/Sorority Coalition Assessment Project to carefully examine the overall health of their fraternity/sorority communities. In this session, participants will learn about the history of the project, its structure and process, and trends in data collected through site visits. Additionally, colleagues from partnering institutions and current assessment team members will share their experiences with the project. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will understand the purpose, function, and benefit of the Fraternity/ Sorority Coalition Assessment Project.

WELCOME

Teniell Trolian, University of Iowa, teniell-trolian@uiowa.edu Allison Foster, Nova Southeastern University, allisonjfoster@gmail.com The Impostor Phenomenon is an experience of high-achieving women who fail to attribute their accomplishments and successes to their own intelligence and hard work and may see themselves as “impostors.” This session will provide participants with an opportunity to learn more about the Impostor Phenomenon and discuss its characteristics in relation to one’s own life experiences. Additionally, participants will learn more about one campus’ approach to utilizing the Impostor Phenomenon framework as an approach to women’s student development on campus. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn more about the Impostor Phenomenon and its corresponding characteristics.

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AFA Annual Meeting

WELCOME

INCREASING MALE PARTICIPATION, ONE MOTIVATION AT A TIME Majestic B –

4(% #/!,)4)/. !33%33-%.4 02/*%#4 /52 ()34/29 WELCOME AND YOUR COMMUNITY’S FUTURE

UNDERSTANDING IMPOSTOR PHENOMENON Landmark 6 –

College students are immersed in popular culture, from movies, to video games, to television. The consistency with which popular culture portrays male role models as irresponsible, clueless, and directionless affects the expectations that students have for themselves and for their peers, including how women believe men will think and act. This portrayal is in contrast to the personal role models that men identify in real life. The information provided in this program includes survey data and focus group summaries. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will recognize the gap that currently exists between the stereotypical characteristics that are attributed to men in popular culture and the real characteristics that young men find in their real-life role models.

In this session, participants will learn about six motivations for service; especially, participants will learn about males’ motivations to serve others. Participants then will partake in a discussion about how to use those six motivations to increase volunteerism on their campuses. This increase in volunteerism includes increasing participation in their fraternity chapters’ service projects, as well as increasing the number of men willing to lead within their chapters and on their campuses. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will develop strategies to increase male involvement in community service projects and involvement in leadership positions.

WHEN THINGS WERE BLACK AND WHITE: MEMBERSHIP WELCOME RESTRICTIONS, “THE CLAUSE,” AND HOW WE CHANGED Majestic C – Dave Westol, Limberlost Consulting, Inc., david.westol@gmail.com “The Clause”...membership restrictions...”You can’t join us.” Those were not uncommon terms and dynamics in some fraternities and sororities in the decades following World War II. The presenters will review the history of membership restrictions, the changes that occurred from 1946 to 1966, the role of undergraduates in bringing about change, the legal and societal dynamics that were involved, and the role of institutions and the federal government in the process. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn about the chronological history of membership restrictions in fraternities and sororities during the 20th century and how those changed.


12.3.11 *Ę&#x2018;ȸĘ&#x2018;UÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;É&#x2122; -Ę?ʌʢȸĘ&#x2018;ɨ7Ę?ZĘ&#x2039;UÉ? 5É°ČľĘ&#x2018;YĘ&#x2039;QĘ&#x17D;ɨ7ÉŞĘ&#x2DC;Ę&#x2013;QÉ&#x2019; Ę&#x192;ČąÉ?1Ę&#x2018;[ɢ6É&#x20AC;Ę&#x2018;É&#x17E;Ę&#x2013;É&#x161;Ę&#x192;ČąÉ? 5LÉłKɢ'Ę&#x2013;ČžHFʤLĘ?É&#x161;

ANSWERING THE CALL TO ACTION: IMPLEMENTING A COMPREHENSIVE ALCOHOL AND RISK MANAGEMENT EDUCATION MENU Majestic F â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

WELCOME

Lori Hart, Pi Kappa Phi, lhart@pikapp.org Justin Angotti, Pi Kappa Phi, jangotti@pikapp.org Nine years ago, Pi Kappa Phi began to address the alcohol and risk management challenges prevalent on college campuses through both a strategic planning process and the implementation of the evidencebased approaches outlined in the NIAAA report. Today, Alpha Chi Omega has begun to utilize a similar approach with their women. This program will provide a brief history of Pi Kappa Phiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s strategic planning process, as well as a review of the current menu of alcohol and risk management education programs and resources both Pi Kappa Phi and Alpha Chi Omega use to better educate student members and volunteers. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to describe a variety of alcohol and risk management education initiatives and implement strategies to utilize similar programs on their campuses and/or with their inter/national organizations. GRADUATE TRAINING TRACK CAPSTONE: ESSENTIAL SKILLS WELCOME FOR ADVISING FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES Majestic H â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Karyn Sneath, NPower, karyn@npoweryourself.com This interactive and reflective program will allow Graduate Training Track participants an opportunity to think about their Annual Meeting experiences, whom they met, what they learned, and how they will implement the information they have gathered. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will develop strategies for taking lessons learned during the Annual Meeting and applying them to their professional development upon returning home.

 n  !- s -!*%34)# $% Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Delta Upsilon International Fraternity

Who are you? Who do you say you are? Who do you want to be? Who do prospective members think you are? What value do you add to your membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives? How will you remain a relevant force in the lives of your members beyond commencement? Rick Bailey, principal of Richard Harrison Bailey/The Agency and author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coherence: How Telling the Truth Will Advance Your Case (And Save the World),â&#x20AC;? will explore these questions and more in his presentation. While these might seem like heavy questions for a Saturday morning, this presentation will be nothing less than a captivating exploration of what makes your organization relevantâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;and stand outâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;to your members and your partners.

(Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄn%ORÉ­É&#x2013;ĆżÇ?ĆŽ, 10:45 A.M. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:00 P.M.

THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC POLICY ISSUES ON WELCOME FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES Landmark 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Teniell Trolian, University of Iowa, teniell-trolian@uiowa.edu Whitney Swesey, RISE Partnerships, whitney@risepartnerships.com The complex issues facing society continue to have an impact on higher education and fraternity/sorority communities. Issues like the American financial crisis, studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; decreasing levels of college readiness, and a call for increased access to higher education are all having an impact on organizations. This program will present an overview of several current public policy issues and will engage participants in a discussion of how these issues impact the profession. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn more about the major public policy issues facing higher education.

AFA Annual Meeting

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SATURDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ WELCOME DRUG TESTING WORKS! Landmark 2 – Erle Morring, Behavioral Health Systems, emorring@behavioralhealthsystems.com Gentry McCreary, University of West Florida, gmccreary@uwf.edu Paul Kittle, Auburn University, pkittle@auburn.edu Too often, drug-related deaths involving fraternity and sorority members occur. Campus officials often are quick to categorize these unfortunate losses as “isolated incidents.” Pulling from national research, existing fraternity/sorority life drug testing programs, and the presenters’ experience with the development and implementation of testing programs, this presentation will provide participants with an opportunity to see drug testing as an effective tool and equip them with the knowledge to implement programs with chapters on their campuses. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain knowledge of the theoretical models associated with peer accountability as they relate to behavioral intervention among college students.

WELCOME

REFLECTIONS ON RELEVANCE: AN HONEST LOOK IN THE MIRROR WE OFTEN HOLD IN FRONT OF OUR STUDENTS Landmark 3 – Darren Pierre, University of Georgia, depierre@uga.edu Brent Turner, Rollins College, bturner@rollins.edu The conversation on meaning-making has grown in relevance within the profession in recent years. Intentional reflection on the importance of the work deepens this commitment and strengthens professionals’ effectiveness in working as fraternity and sorority advisors. This engaging presentation will explore the ways that fraternity and sorority advisors invoke meaning in their work. Participants will leave with a greater understanding on effective ways to integrate the concepts of purpose and significance in their daily practice. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to develop three strategies for pursuing balance and meaning in their work.

WELCOME

REDEFINING THE “TOTAL LC MOVE” Landmark 5 –

Abbie Schneider, Alpha Gamma Delta, aschneider@alphagammadelta.org Chase Rumley, Pi Kappa Phi, crumley@pikapp.org Kodee Gartner, Alpha Gamma Delta, kgartner@alphagammadelta.org David Meigs, Pi Kappa Phi, dmeigs@pikapp.org Leadership consultants are frequently viewed as road warriors who spend a year gathering scholarship reports, interpreting recruitment statistics, or putting out risk management fires. This program challenges that paradigm by sharing the approaches two inter/national organizations have used to prepare their field staff to be educators and collaborators. Participants will hear from both a men’s and a women’s fraternity whose shifts in program philosophy and practice have resulted in increased retention of top talent and stronger relationships with chapters. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to identify techniques for training, coaching, and supporting leadership consultants.

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AFA Annual Meeting

WELCOME

LEGAL MYTHS VERSUS CAMPUS REALITY Landmark 6 – Beth Stathos, Chi Omega, bstathos@chiomega.com Michelle Willbanks, Pi Beta Phi, michelle@pibetaphi.org Cindy Stellhorn, MJ Insurance, cindy_stellhorn@mjinsurance.com You have heard the myths and legal horror stories on campus associated with fraternity and sororities. Can you separate the myths from reality? While this program will explore some of the humorous legal myths that have become legend on campus, it will also address the serious side of legal and insurance-related issues. The presenters will provide an overview of legal issues and a framework participants can use to analyze potential legal issues associated with fraternity and sorority advising. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain a working knowledge of actual legal issues facing fraternity/ sorority professionals versus the legal myths perpetuated from year to year on campus. COLLEGE ACB: A UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO CASE WELCOME STUDY ON SORORITY SOCIAL MEDIA BULLYING Landmark 7 – Stephanie Baldwin, University of Colorado, stephanie.baldwin@colorado.edu Corin Wallace, Sigma Sigma Sigma, cwallace@trisigma.org An anonymous message board allows a platform for sorority women at University of Colorado–Boulder to engage in reprehensible behavior online. Anonymity and a platform for judgment have encouraged toxic online interaction since the advent of online message boards and ranking sites. Online bullying has clear consequences, but women still struggle in an environment where public opinion has a permanent place online. This program will investigate the context and solutions for better behavior, using a specific campus community as a backdrop. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify, discuss, and critique the social media behaviors of a community engaged in online dialogue and bullying behavior. USING RUBRICS TO PROVIDE DIRECT EVIDENCE WELCOME OF LEARNING IN FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES Majestic B – Jason Bergeron, University of Houston, jberger@uh.edu Annie Carlson, University of Oregon, carlson2@uoregon.edu Daniel Bureau,University of Memphis, dabureau@memphis.edu The use of rubrics within student affairs can provide direct measures of student learning and development. A grid on which individuals or organizations can be objectively assessed, rubrics provide educators with the ability to advance student learning along a continuum. This session will explore how rubrics can be used to create intentional learning experiences, assess student learning, and strategically plan growth and development strategies in fraternity and sorority communities. This session is recommended by the Center for the Study of the College Fraternity. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify the core elements of an effective rubric.


12.3.11

WELCOME

STOP THROWING DARTS AT THE PROBLEM: HOW TO FOCUS ON REAL PREVENTION WITH YOUR STUDENTS Majestic C â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Lori Hart, Pi Kappa Phi, lhart@pikapp.org Justin Angotti, Pi Kappa Phi, jangotti@pikapp.org PRE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; VEN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; TION: (1) the act of going, or state of being there, before; (2) the anticipation of needs, hazards, and risks; forethought. Prevention can save lives, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also hard work. This program will introduce participants to a prevention-focused strategic planning process and provide campus and headquarters professionals with the tools necessary to help students make change in their chapters and/ or communities before an incident occurs. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be able to describe the basic steps of a prevention-focused strategic planning process and integrate them into conversations with students.

WELCOME YOUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;VE GOTTA READ THIS! GREAT BOOKS FOR 2012 Majestic F â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Karyn Nishimura Sneath, Npower, karyn@npoweryourself.com Bill Nelson, University of Iowa, william-nelson@uiowa.edu Anne Humphries Arseneau, College of William & Mary, aharse@wm.edu Mandy Womack, University of San Diego, awomack@sandiego.edu Do you have a huge list of recommended books or a pile that you just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to? AFA members with varied professional backgrounds will help you identify and prioritize the books which can help you with both your personal and professional development. This popular and fast-paced workshop will explore several books the presenters have read over the past year and offer brief overviews of the topics, what was learned, and practical application of the information. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be introduced to books related to student development, fraternity/ sorority life, and professional development.

WELCOME

AVOIDING LIABILITY 101 Majestic G â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Mitch Crane, CAMPUSPEAK, judgemitch@aol.com When students, organizations, parents, and communities rely on advice given to them by those in authority, it is of paramount importance that those in such positions understand how what they say and do, or fail to say and do, exposes the institutions and organizations they work for, or even volunteer for, to risk of lawsuit. This could include agent and personal liability for the failure to protect others from potential or known risks of harms. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will gain an understanding of basic liability law.

WELCOME

RESPONSE ABILITY: I HAVE THE POWER! Majestic H â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mike Dilbeck, RESPONSE ABILITY Project, mike@raproject.org Ever find yourself in a situation where you are compelled to take action, to make a difference, and you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t? Would you like three practical life skills to use in these kinds of situations? How about the ability to tap into your own power to actually use them? The presenters will explore the phenomenon of bystander behavior and the barriers that get in the way of intervening. You will leave with three life skills to use in any situation. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn three life skills for intervening in problematic situations.

$ĆŤ$%XĘŁĘ&#x2013;ȸHVÉĄ0Č­HʤĘ&#x2013;QÉ&#x2019;  n  0- s -!*%34)# $

All members of the Association are encouraged to attend and participate in the Business Meeting. During this meeting, Executive Board members will offer their final reports as we reflect upon the work of this past year, as well as offer remarks to guide us into the next year. Participants will have an opportunity to discuss the proposed revision to the Membership Categories of the Association. Additionally, the installation of 2012 Executive Board members and Regional Directors also will take place during the Business Meeting. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t miss out on this opportunity to take part in the business of the Association and learn more about the progress being made in relation to the 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 Strategic Plan.

(Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄn%ORÉ­É&#x2013;Ç?; 3:45 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 P.M.

WELCOME

AGENDA FOR THE FRATERNAL FUTURE: A FOLLOW UP CONVERSATION TO THE 2011 INTERFRATERNAL SUMMIT Landmark 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Scott Reikofski, University of Pennsylvania, reikofsk@upenn.edu Ron Binder, NASPA Fraternity Sorority Knowledge Community, binder@pitt.edu The 2011 Interfraternal Summit assembled 40 campus vice presidents, fraternity/sorority executives, and senior student affairs professionals to examine the future of the American Collegiate Fraternal Movement. After hours of conversation, a call for action was issued that considers current and projected concerns and actions necessary for positive change. This session will present/discuss the issues of fraternitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; evolving purpose within higher education, an aspirational model of advisement, and effective volunteer management and training, all having a potentially powerful effect on the profession. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will examine and discuss the projected future of the fraternity movement within the context of our work as campus advisors and fraternity professionals.

AFA Annual Meeting

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SATURDAY 6ɭȱHʏʅȵɏԷ(ɃʑQWɡ KEEPING MEMBERS THROUGH GRADUATION: WELCOME 2%35,43 /& .0#3 0!.(%,,%.)# 2%4%.4)/. 02/*%#4 Landmark 2 – Erin Nemenoff, NPC Measurable Outcomes Committee, erin@thetaphialpha.org Nicki Meneley, National Panhellenic Conference, nicki@npcwomen.org For years, it has been said that fraternity/sorority life improves retention on host campuses. This means that being in a sorority creates a greater loyalty to a particular campus and increases the likelihood that a student will stay through graduation. NPC’s Measurable Outcomes Committee now has real numbers to support that claim. In this workshop, presenters will share panhellenic retention data from six target campuses and offer a method for measuring retention on your own campus. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will be introduced to evidence that being in a sorority creates a greater loyalty to a particular campus and increases the likelihood that a student will stay through graduation. EDUCATION, AWARENESS, AND COLLABORATION FOR IDENTIFYING AND RESPONDING TO MENTAL HEALTH ISSUES IN FRATERNITIES AND SORORITIES Landmark 3 –

WELCOME

Leslie Fasone, Indiana University, lfasone@indiana.edu Fraternities and sororities are uniquely positioned to identify warning signs of problems and provide support and resources to college students. As the number of students entering college with mental and behavioral problems continues to increase, professionals need to respond in a manner that provides the best care to students and the community. This program will examine mental health trends, incorporate mental health into professional philosophy, identify campus and community resources, and provide best practices for response to mental health issues. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify mental health trends and develop a framework for responding to problems associated with mental and behavioral health in fraternity and sorority communities.

FRATERNITY/SORORITY CHAPTER ACCOUNTABILITY: REVIEWING PAST PRACTICES AND ANSWERING NEW NEEDS IN THE PROFESSION Landmark 5 –

WELCOME

Suzette Walden, Association for Student Conduct Administrators, swalden@illinoisstate.edu Daniel Swinton, Association for Student Conduct Administrators, daniel.c.swinton@vanderbilt.edu How is care and concern demonstrated while addressing conduct issues with the fraternal community? With millennials assembled on campuses, coupled with additional emphasis on learning outcomes, do professionals need to adjust sanctioning practices for these groups? Through intentional collaboration, both on campus and with inter/national organizations, professionals can have a sustainable impact with struggling chapters. This session will examine the need to transform procedures to include relevant theories, educational sanction options, and learning outcomes for student organizations to affect change in these groups. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will discuss best practices involved in fraternity/sorority conduct and/ or conflict resolution strategies and processes.

WELCOME

TAKING THE MYSTERY OUT OF ADVISING NPHC COUNCILS Landmark 6 – Jennifer Jones, National Pan-Hellenic Council, president@nphchq.org Beverly Burks, National Pan-Hellenic Council, execdirector@nphchq.org Why does it seem to be a mystery when it comes to successfully advising NPHC councils? What is the big secret? This session will share best practices for advising NPHC councils on college campuses, as well as provide a clear understanding of the structure of NPHC. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will develop strategies to better advise NPHC governing council on college campuses. CULTURE SHIFT: FOSTERING A RECRUITMENT CULTURE WELCOME IN CULTURALLY BASED ORGANIZATIONS Landmark 7 – Thomas Whitcher, Indiana University-Purdue University–Indianapolis, twhitche@iupui.edu Ceci Rivera, University of Toledo, cecilia.rivera@utoledo.edu Derrick Tillman-Kelly, Indiana University-Purdue University– Indianapolis, dtillman@iupui.edu It’s challenging, it’s frightening, and most of all, something needs to be done now. Underrepresented students affiliating with historically white organizations while culturally based organizations shrink in numbers is seen too often. This interactive program intended for campus professionals will engage participants in the challenges and success in cultivating a recruitment culture in the face of community resistance. The success and vitality of these groups begins with campus advisors. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn about the challenges campus professionals face in changing the thinking and perspective of students and advisors as it relates to recruitment for culturally based organizations.

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AFA Annual Meeting


12.3.11

WELCOME

THIS IS WHAT A SORORITY WOMAN LOOKS LIKE: EXAMINING GENDER DEVELOPMENT FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE Majestic A â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

7(9 $/.4 4(%9 '%4 )4 342!4%')%3 &/2 -!.!').' 50 WELCOME TO ADVANCE THE FRATERNITY/SORORITY EXPERIENCE Majestic C â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Elyse Gambardella, Old Dominion University, egambard@odu.edu Sharrell Hassell-Goodman, The Ohio State University, hassell-goodman.1@osu.edu

Ryan Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Rourke, Florida Atlantic University, rorourke@fau.edu Annie Carlson, University of Oregon, carlson2@uoregon.edu Daniel Bureau, University of Memphis, dabureau@memphis.edu

Social pressure, double standard, submissive behavior: These terms describe and influence the actions of many sorority women. This session examines the behavior of sorority women and the role of advisors and professionals in creating an environment that allows women to find their voice. The session explores the three domains of development and challenges participants to identify strategies to work with collegiate women. Participants will identify initiatives that encourage women to find their voice and further explore their identities as women. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will examine sorority womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behavior and identify strategies to promote womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Managing upâ&#x20AC;? is one of the most challenging skills that young professionals need to master. The process of working with supervisors/senior-level administrators to create a shared vision for your fraternity/sorority community is a daunting task, but one that must occur. Through facilitated discussion, this session will educate participants on working in an intergenerational student affairs environment and help them develop an approach to navigating those relationships. Consequently, they will be more collaborative in efforts to advance the experience on their campus. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will identify strategies to approach working relationships with supervisors and senior-level administration, benefiting participantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ability to advance the fraternity/sorority experience.

TEN MAN PLAN/TEN WOMAN PLAN APPROACH TO WELCOME SEXUAL ASSAULT PREVENTION Majestic B â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Matthew Supple, University of Marylandâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;College Park, msupple@umd.edu Corin Gioia, University of Marylandâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;College Park, cgioia@umd.edu Presenters will focus on promising practices in sexual violence prevention. This session will focus on the importance of using strong data, theory, practice, and knowledge of campus culture to affect program development. Members of the University of Marylandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Fraternity and Sorority Life will highlight one option for critical culture change, specifically the Ten Man Plan and Ten Woman Plan. Campus engagement, program development, and program impact will be discussed. As a result of participation in this educational program, participants will learn about a peer-based sexual assault prevention program to be used in fraternities and sororities.

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SUNDAY 6É­ČąHĘ?Ę&#x2026;ČľÉ?Ôˇ(É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;QWÉĄ {SUNDAY, DECEMBER 4}  AM n  PM

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AFA Annual Meeting

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Circulate through the Exhibit Hall and enter to win great prizes like an iPad, Flip Video Camera, Powermat with adapters, hotel accommodations for next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s subscription to NetFlix, gift cards, or more. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth your while to spend time in the hallâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;you can win in more ways than one by meeting vendors who can assist you in your work while increasing your odds of being A PRIZE WINNER

ENTRANCE

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AFA Annual Meeting


ANNUAL MEETING (ʈʕɵʍLWʝUɡ6SʝQVʝUɡ (ʈʕɵʍLWʝUɡ(*Denotes 2011 Annual Meeting Sponsor) 4HE FOLLOWING !SSOCIATE MEMBERS AND INTERFRATERNAL PARTNERS ARE EXHIBITING AT THIS YEARS MEETING AS OF .OVEMBER   s s s s s s s s s s s

Affinity Consultants, Inc. ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research /Hospital* Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation* Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values* Association of Fraternity/Sorority Advisors Association of Student Conduct Administrators CAMPUSPEAK* ChapterSpot Circle of Sisterhood Foundation CSL Management, LLC Delta Delta Delta

s s s s s s s s s s s s

Educational Benchmarking, Inc. Gamma Sigma Alpha GEICO Gill Grilling Company Greek101.com GreekBill, Inc. GreekYearbook* HazingPrevention.Org Herff Jones – Greek Division ICS Innova Ideas and Services OmegaFi

s s s s s s s s s s s

OrgSync, Inc. Phired Up Productions Public Identity, Inc. Pursuant Group RESPONSE ABILITY Project & Foundation RISE Partnerships RushEase, LLC Southeastern Interfraternity Conference TGI Greek The College Agency The Leadership Institute – Women with Purpose

6SʝQVʝUɡ

A special thank you is extended to the following Associate members and organizations who are sponsoring events throughout the Annual Meeting: PLATINUM LEVEL SPONSORS s AFA Foundation s ALSAC/St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital s Andrew McDonough B+ Foundation s Beta Theta Pi Fraternity and Foundation s CAMPUSPEAK, Inc. s Delta Upsilon International Fraternity s Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel

GOLD LEVEL SPONSORS s Association of Fraternal Leadership & Values s Delta Zeta Sorority and Delta Zeta Foundation, in honor of Shelly Brown Dobek s GreekYearbook s Rho Lambda National Honorary s The Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity

SILVER LEVEL SPONSORS s Fraternal Information and Programming Group s Order of Omega

$ɭʘQʝʇȵHGȰʑȷʑQWɡ(*Denotes endowed scholarship) In addition to our valued sponsors, AFA wishes to thank the following individuals, organizations, and companies who helped make this Annual Meeting possible: s AFA Foundation s Annual Meeting Scholarship Sponsors: – AFA Foundation – Alpha Delta Pi Foundation – Alpha Epsilon Pi Foundation – Dr. Ron Binder – Blake Bradley* – CAMPUSPEAK*

– – – – – – – –

Fraternity Executives Association Gamma Phi Beta* Gamma Sigma Alpha* Thomas B. Jelke Foundation* MJ Insurance, Inc. Pi Kappa Phi Sigma Sigma Sigma* Sigma Phi Epsilon*

s s s s

– Order of Omega – Zeta Beta Tau – Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. – Zeta Tau Alpha Foundation Innova Ideas and Services Order of Omega Renaissance St. Louis Grand Hotel Paramount Convention Services

…and the institutions and organizations supporting the Annual Meeting Planning Team and Graduate Staff.

AFA Annual Meeting

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AFA FOUNDATION ,QIĘ?ʢPDʤLĘ?É&#x161; 6ɾȾĘ&#x2018;Qɢ$XFʤLĘ?É&#x161; -!*%34)# &/9%2

THURSDAY: 8:00 A.M. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 P.M. FRIDAY: 8:00 A.M. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 P.M. SATURDAY: 8:00 A.M. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12:30 P.M. The AFA Foundation is proud to host the 18th Annual Silent Auction at the 2011 AFA Annual Meeting. Since 1994, the Silent Auction has been the AFA Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most popular event, raising more than $270,000 to support those involved in the advisement of menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fraternal organizations. Your donations help the Foundation fund projects aimed at strengthening our profession, including scholarships, research, and educational programs. As always, we will offer a wide variety of items in all price ranges, including fraternity/sorority and university items, jewelry, gift baskets, books, autographed items, sports memorabilia, gift cards, and more. All proceeds will benefit the AFA Foundation, so make an investment in your profession and walk AWAY WITH A FANTASTIC ITEM 4HE 3ILENT !UCTION CLOSES AT  PM on Saturday.

%HFĘ&#x2039;XČżÉ?<Ę?ɤ%É°Ę&#x2122;ȲĘ&#x2018;É&#x192;É?6ʤLÉ­Č´Ę&#x2018;UÉĄ

Because You Believe stickers are a great way to acknowledge and THANK YOUR COLLEAGUES FOR BELIEVING IN YOU 3TICKERS WILL BE AVAILABLE for $5 at the AFA Foundation table, from Foundation board members, and from Annual Meeting Ambassadors. With your purchase, you will receive a card that you may personalize and a Because You Believe sticker for your mentor, fellow volunteer, former coworker, or friend to proudly display on their Annual Meeting nametag. All sticker sales benefit the AFA Foundation; your purchases recognize and honor your COLLEAGUES WHILE RAISING MONEY FOR A GREAT CAUSE

7KĘ&#x2039;ÉťÉ&#x2013;<Ę?ɤ

The Foundation Board would like to take this opportunity to thank the individuals and organizations who made a contribution to the AFA Foundation in the past calendar year. We are able to provide scholarships to members, support research initiatives, subsidize the First 90 Days Program, and sponsor the General Program speakers and the Graduate Training Track here at the Annual Meeting only because of your generosity. If you made a donation in the past year, you should have received a green â&#x20AC;&#x153;DONORâ&#x20AC;? ribbon to wear on your Annual Meeting nametag. If you did not receive your ribbon, please stop by the AFA Foundation table in the Majestic Foyer, so we can give you a ribbon and ensure that our donor records are correct. Donors also will be recognized at the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon on Friday.

)Ę?ĘŚQGDʤLĘ?É&#x161;6ĘŚĘ SÉ&#x203A;Ô­ÔˇĘ&#x192;ČąÉ? $QĘ&#x153;XÉŞÉ&#x2014;0Č­HʤĘ&#x2013;QÉ&#x2019;

s Opening Program, Perspectives from Student Affairs Scholars: How Do We Align the Fraternity/Sorority Experience with the Changing Dynamics and Enduring Principles of Higher Education? Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Beta Theta Pi Fraternity and Foundation

s Graduate Training Track: Essential Skills for Advising Fraternities and Sororities Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Rho Lambda National Honorary

s General Program, Journey Toward Relevancy: Taking the Next Step in the Right Direction Funded by a grant to the AFA Foundation from Delta Upsilon International Fraternity

s s s s

Personal Financial Management program hosted by AFA Foundation 40 scholarships for more than $7,400 5th Annual Donor Recognition Reception Recognition of donors at the AFA/AFA Foundation Recognition Luncheon

(Ę?XFDʤLĘ?QÉŞÉ&#x2014;3URĘ&#x201D;UĘ&#x2039;PÉĄ

Again this year, the AFA Foundation is hosting two educational programs; the first will be on personal financial management (Thursday, 3:15 p.m.), and the second will be an opportunity for you to learn how the AFA Foundation supports your professional development (Friday, 8:00 a.m.). Please see the program description pages for more detailed information.

AFA FOUNDATION ASSOCIATION OF FRATERNITY/SORORITY ADVISORS FOUNDATION

{34}

AFA Annual Meeting

AFA FOUNDATION MISSION TO SECURE, INVEST, AND DISTRIBUTE THE NECESSARY RESOURCES TO SUPPORT THE EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES OF AFA AND OTHER RELEVANT RESEARCH, SCHOLARSHIP, AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMMING THAT FURTHER THE FRATERNITY/SORORITY ADVISING PROFESSION.


VOLUNTEER 3OĘ&#x2039;QĘ&#x153;Ę&#x2013;QÉ&#x2019;0Č­HʤĘ&#x2013;QJÉĄ 9ÉźĘ&#x2122;ĘŚQÉ&#x20AC;Č­Ę&#x2018;É 3OĘ&#x2039;QĘ&#x153;Ę&#x2013;QÉ&#x2019;0Č­HʤĘ&#x2013;QJÉĄ

The 2012 committees, editorial boards, and workgroups have planning meetings scheduled throughout the Annual Meeting. AFA members who have been appointed to a volunteer role for 2012 can find the times and locations of your planning meetings below. For those who have not been appointed to volunteer, please see the volunteer section of the AFA website or contact Kara Miller (ksm39@cornell. edu), Volunteer Coordinator, to learn how to contribute your time and talent to the Association in the future.

:HĘ?ȸHVGĘ&#x2039;ɨ1Ę?É&#x192;Ę&#x2018;ɺȊĘ&#x2018;É 

4:15 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:15 P.M. 6/,5.4%%2 $%6%,/0-%.4 02/'2!- s ,!.$-!2+  This training is required for any volunteer in a leadership or supervisory role. It is strongly suggested that all 2012 volunteers attend. The program will give volunteers an overview of the important role they play in leading the Association and provide the opportunity to connect with and learn from other volunteers. Additionally, the program will increase volunteersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; awareness of available volunteer resources, and Association policies/procedures, and the AFA Strategic Plan, as well as feature a brief educational presentation. Most committee meetings will occur during the last hour of this program.

7Ę&#x2022;ĘŚUVGĘ&#x2039;ɨ'HČŞĘ&#x2018;ɺȊĘ&#x2018;É 

5:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:00 P.M. 2012 ANNUAL MEETING PLANNING TEAM #/--)44%% -%%4).' s 0/24,!.$ Annual Meeting Coordinators and committee members are expected to participate. 5:00 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6:00 P.M. 2012 REGIONAL MEMBERSHIP, MARKETING, !.$ 2%#25)4-%.4 4%!- -%%4).' s "%.4/. Regional Directors and MMR Team members are expected to participate.

)ʢLGĘ&#x2039;ɨ'HČŞĘ&#x2018;ɺȊĘ&#x2018;É 

2:30 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3:30 P.M. ./-).!4)/.3 !.$ %,%#4)/.3 #/--)44%% s ,!&!9%44% BOARDROOM Appointed and elected committee members and alternates are expected to participate.

The following committee meetings for 2012 volunteer appointments will occur during this time: s Assessment Committee s Awards and Recognition Committee s Diversity Leadership Program Workgroup s Educational Programs Committee s Events Committee s Essentials Editorial Board s First 90 Days Program Committee s Graduate Student Programs Committee s Membership, Marketing, and Recruitment Teams (MMR) s Oracle Peer Review Board s Perspectives Editorial Board s Technology Committee s Volunteer Engagement Committee

afa annual meeting

{35}


MAPS +RWHODQG&RQIHUHQFH&HQWHU CONFERENCE PLAZA

9th Street

Washington Street

GRAND TOWER

Underground walkway connects the Grand Tower (Concourse Level) and the Conference Plaza (Lobby Level).


ASSOCIATION OF FRATERNAL LEADERSHIP & VALUES AFLV’s mission is for all fraternity/sorority members to exemplify and live ethical values. We work toward this mission by offering an array of programs, resources, and events. We’re proud to offer progressive, diverse, and relevant services to today’s inclusive fraternal communities.

Take a look, learn more about us, get on board, become a partner.

Programs

Resources

Events

The Bulletin

The Gathering

#GreekChat

Immersion Trips

Connections Magazine

Awards & Assessment

Fraternal Values Society

House Director’s Manual

Officer Manual Series

info@aflv.org | 970-372-1174 | www.aflv.org | P.O. Box 1576, Fort Collins, CO, 80522-1576

AFA Annual Meeting 2011 Program Book  

The official program book of the 2011 AFA Annual Meeting.

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