Page 1

NU-MODE´ FASHION ART & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE S/S 2012 ISSUE 5

VAGABOND Sutan “Raja” Amrull

ANDREA BOEHLKE NUTE NICHOLSON CLAIRE LAMPERT BRIAN PARILLO RICHARD MOON MUSTAFA MALUKA YUMIKO KAYUKAWA VICTOR CRISOSTOMO GOMEZ SARA NAIM CHRIS BIRKMEIER CARTY SEWILL YVETTE JONES ANN CT BRAUNSTEINER


WWW.NUMODEMAG.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY JEFF ORGINA

Welcome To Issue 5


N U - M O D E´ EDITOR IN CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR LATOYA HENRY LATOYA@NUMODEMAG.COM FASHION EDITOR RENESSTA OLDS RENESSTA@NUMODEMAG.COM MARKET EDITOR KAI-LEE PARKER KAILEE@NUMODEMAG.COM FASHION FEATURES & MUSIC EDITOR JOHN-MARK JOHNMARK@NUMODEMAG.COM CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS TRAVER RAINS . JULIE DICKINSON . GAVIN THOMAS . DANIEL RAMPULLA . LPH ANNE HØJLUND NICOLAJSEN . JEFF ORGINA . MARGARET NOWAK . MICHAEL CLEMENT SVENJA PITZ . TONI SMAILAGIC . VAN SARKI . MERJA YEUNG . CARLOS TEIXEIRA CLARENS TYSON . ANDREW AKIMOV . MARTA ZGIERSKA & MACIEJ RUKASZ . ROBERT KENNY SUBMISSIONS & WEB ENQURIES INFO@NUMODEMAG.COM PUBLISHED BY NU-MODE´ MAGAZINE BROOKLYN, NY 11238 T. 7 1 8 . 8 1 2 . 5 8 1 5 WWW.NUMODEMAG.COM


NU-MODE´TEAM Latoya Henry is a fashion stylist & photographer who enjoys eatting ice cream in the dark.... www.l-ph.com

Founder & Editor In Chief Latoya P. Henry

Renessta has a lifelong love of fashion and style. A native New Yorker and current resident of Brooklyn, she has established a vast network of insider contacts within the garment district and multiple showrooms. Additionally, as a former FIT student, Renessta has also cultivated relationships with up-andcoming designers and established industry professionals. www.reneeostylelab.com Fashion Editor Renessta Olds

J.M. is a dance choreographer, journalist, creative director, and producer. When not working, he enjoys kissing, sushi, and Star Wars. www.houseofjohnmark.com

Fashion Features & Music Editor John-Mark

Kai-Lee is a 29 year old fashion, food and vintage enthusiast living in Brooklyn. Since arriving in NYC 2 years ago, she has worked on shoots for Marie Claire Spain, Lee Jeans, USA networks, music videos, commercials as well as numerous editorials. When she’s not on set styling a shoot she enjoys cooking, brunching, thrifting and discovering different parts of NYC... one borough at a time. kaileeparker.carbonmade.com

Market Editor Kai-Lee Parker


CONTRIBUTORS Traver is a designer and photographer… Raised by horses and trained by NYC.

www.TraverRains.com

Traver Rains

Irina Romashevskaya is a Brooklyn based artist, writer and photographer amongst other things. A frequent traveler, Irina likes to explore new opportunities and is always on the lookout for an adventure.

www.irinaromashevskaya.com

Irina Romashevskaya Carlos Teixeira a 28 year old Fashion Photographer was born in Arouca, Portugal. He first became interested in photography around 2002, while attending a course in communication, marketing and publication. He has been published in several national magazines and organizations such as Umbigo mag,  Edit mag, Slave mag, Votive mag  Teixeira has Collaborated with various agencies featuring Portuguese models. He Likes to have contact with all the details of production in order to be surprised with the final result.

www.brownansel.com

Carlos Teixeira Drew Krason is a 22 year old fashion photographer from Minneapolis. He is inspired by shapes, textures, urban landscape, and motion. After first picking up a camera in a high school photo class, he knew there was something special about photography. Once he later graduated college with a degree in mechanical design, he heard the photography world calling his name louder than ever. He is now a freelance photographer doing what he loves. In his spare time, he also enjoys traveling, house music, and freshly baked croissants.

www.drewkrason.com

Drew Krason


CASH IN HAND REDUX 1988 PHOTOGRAPHY MATT WEBBER

WWW.WEBER-STREET-PHOTOGRAPHY.COM


EDITOR’S LETTER

T

he inspiration behind issue is the connection to my hometown New York City. Some people come here and extend themselves in hopes of the big apple dream, sometimes certain cases lead to people becoming drifters and fading way from their dream when moving to New York. Often times, you find very young people sitting in the streets or lost on the corners of Union Square begging for change for the next meal or to go to their next destination. I’m inspired by consistent travellers who in some cases don’t have specific dreams to travel to other places and are everyday hard working people who have had their livelihood taken away from them and they have no choice but to become consistent drifters, feeling lost without a place to go, they rebel against society and follow their own way of survival hence “Vagabond” This issue examines Vagabond through the eyes of the Artist, whether they are photographers or fashion stylist. Selecting this theme shows how each artist expresses Vagabond.

Latoya

LATOYA P. HENRY EDITOR IN CHIEF


CONTENTS THINGS WE LOVE PG.10

A PERSONAL LOOK AT THINGS THE NU-MODE´ ENJOYS

YUMIKO KAYUKAWA PG.13 CHRIS BIRKMEIER PG.21 LUNACY PG.26 PHOTOGRAPHY ANDREW AKIMOV

BARCELONA PG.45

PHOTOGRAPHY CARLOS TEIXEIRA

CUT ME SOME BANGS PG.54 PHOTOGRAPHY &STYLING CLARENS TYSON

DISAPPOINTED PG.198

PHOTOGRAPHY MARTA ZGIERSKA & MACIEJ RUKASZ

CHEMINEAU D’ÂGE PG. 206 PHOTOGRAPHY MERJA YEUNG STYLING KATARIINA KAATRASALO

NUTE NICHOLSON PG.214 VICTOR CRISOSTOMO GOMEZ PG.225 SCARLETT ROSE PG.234

PHOTOGRAPHY JULIE DICKINSON STYLING KAILEE PARKER

GILDED REPLACEMENTS PG.245

BRIAN PARILLO PG.62

PHOTOGRAPHY VAN SARKI STYLING KEATING SHERWIN

CARTY SEWILL PG.73

A DESTINATION TO REMEMBER PG.254

YOUNG BRITISH GRADUATES PG.81 PHOTOGRAPHY JEFF ORGINA

ANDROIDS DREAM PG.97

PHOTOGRAPHY CARLOS TEIXEIRA STYLING JORDANN SANTOS

HELMET HAIR PG.104

PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT KENNEY STYLING JOANNA KULPA

SUTAN RAJA AMRULLA PG.114 PHOTOGRAPHY TRAVER RAINS INTERVIEW JOHN MARK

THE EMERGENCE OF NEW DESIGNERS TAKING ON INNOVATIVE DESIGN PG.126 EMERGING DESIGNERS CHANGING THE FASHION SCENE

WAITING FOR THE POSSESSION PG.138 PHOTOGRAPHY MARGARET NOWAK STYLING KEVIN DENOUAL, MARGARET NOWAK

THE SKIN I LIVE IN PG.153 PHOTOGRAPHY TONI SMAILAGIC STYLING ELEANA KANELLOU

DON’T LEAVE ANY TRACE PG.162 PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL CLEMENT

RICHARD MOON PG.173 SARA NAIM PG.182 A BERBER BEAUTY TALE PG.192

PHOTOGRAPHY ANNE HØJLUND NICOLAJSEN STYLING LOUISE MAS

PHOTOGRAPHY GAVIN THOMAS STYLING RENESSTA OLDS

ANDREA BOEHLKE PG.264

PHOTOGRAPHY DANIEL RAMPULLA INTERVIEW JOHN MARK

ANN CT BRAUNSTEINER PG.278 MUSTAFA MALUKA PG.288 PLEASE TOUCH THE GLASS PG.296 PHOTOGRAPHY SVENJA PITZ

THE CITY THAT CHANGED ME PG.318 PHOTOGRAPHY LPH STYLING LATOYA P. HENRY

CALIRE LAMPERT PG.336 YVETTE JONES PG.348 BLAISE KAVANAGH PG.352

A PERSONALGLIMPSE AT THE DESIGNER’S SPRING/SUMMER COLLECTION

FASHION REVIVAL PG.356

THE LASTEST STYLE TIPS & TRENDS FOR SPRING / SUMMER 2012

MEN TRENDS PG.358 PREVIEW THE LASTEST TRENDS FOR FALL 2012

WOMEN TRENDS PG.362 A PREVIEW ON THE HOTTEST TRENDS FOR FALL 2012


PHOTOGRAPHY TRAVER RAINS STYLING SUTAN AMRULL NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 ..9


THINGS WE LOVE YUNA Yuna is a Malaysian born songwriter who began writing her own songs at 14. She has performed in many acoustic shows and events and sings in both English an Malay. Recently releasing a video for her hit single live your life an being nominated for Nickelodeon Kids Choice awards Yuna continues to keep us hypnotized with her sultry sound. WWW.YUNAMUSIC.COM

ACRIMONY Considered to be a progressive designer boutique Acrimony carries a range of unique international designers. We specifically love Acrimony awesome blog that features a behind the scenes look of the boutique’s photoshoots, plans and of course the edgy pieces their boutique carries. BLOG.SHOPACRIMONY.COM

MISS TRISH

A fabulous mix of sexy affordable shoes for any fashionista. One item in paticular from Miss Trish spring/summer collection is The Lipgloss Shoe. WWW.MISSTRISHSHOES.COM

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .10


PHOTOGRAPHY BEN CLYMER

WILLIAM YAN

William yen features some of the most fascinating and inspiring individual’s in his daily travel. Unlike your conventional blog he provides his audience with variety of captivating street style, designer reviews, interviews and lifestyle.. WWW.WILLIAMYAN.COM

JUST KIDS BY PATTI SMITH This beautiful memoir is both insightful and entertaining. Smith shares her experiences in the nyc arts scene, particularly surrounding the chelsea hotel community from the 1970s through the 1980s. Smith and her friends were the definition of starving artist and their stories are beyond inspiring. Just kids is my favorite piece of non-fiction literature to date. WWW.PATTISMITH.NET

GARY CLARK JR American guitarist & actor musician Gary Clark Jr brings a thrilling sound to the music scene. Compared to Jimi Hendrix and is considered to be a leader in Austin Texas, Texas Rock. Gary Clark Jr has us tuning in to his vivacious sound. WWW. GARYCLARKJR.COM


YUMIKO KAYUKAWA INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Drawing and painting was a hobby that Yumiko developed as a child. She was a published manga artist just only in her teen thus this inspired her passion for painting. Combining American pop art with her native Japanese influences Kayukawa produces some astonishing results with her choice of colors, themes and composition. The inspiration for Kayukawa comes from all directions from her experiences to her personal fantasies. Although Yumiko is living in the US she has become passionate for her home country and hope to introduce the beauty of Japan’s secret culture to the world.


FRUIT OF HAPPINESS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .13


STARS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .14


When did you first discover you wanted to become an artist?

What are some challenges you have experienced as an artist and how were you able to overcome those obstacles?

The first year after I quit my daytime job was a challenge. Earlier, I had a full time job and would Drawing and painting were always my work on art in the evenings. I was nervous to surfavorite hobbies since I was a child. I was vive with only sales from my artwork. I booked a published Manga artist in my teens, but as many shows as I could and became a “paintI never thought I could make a living being machine”. Fortunately painting is my blood ing an artist. Luckily I had an opportunity to show at the Roq La Rue gallery in Seat- and it’s a joy to paint all day. I missed things, like hanging out with friends, and other hobbies. But tle when I was 31. It was just like an acI have this passion. I can’t resist living life as a cident for me. I really enjoy the freedom I have for my art. Especially when compared painter. Today I’m trying to balance my life more. with Manga. It’s a joy to show my work in It’s still difficult to manage. public. I think my “artist spirit” grew after I started my career. Do you remember your first experience showcasing your work? What was it like and how did you Would you consider yourself a fine artist? feel? I’ve never thought about it before. I’m just Yes I do remember. It was big for me. It was very a painter who loves painting. I think people different from what I knew before. In Japan art who see my work can tell. openings are a very formal affair. In the US it’s just like a rock concert. People are very casual, and there are so many of them. I’m 5”3, and I felt Tell us what is the most difficult process of like I was drawn in to a Tsunami of people. I’ve bringing your idea to life? never seen a big crowd at an art show opening before. I could tell that art here is for anyone. AnyI feel frustrated at times with the painting one can enjoy and buy art. I think it’s a wonderful process. It takes a long time to create a sin- thing. gle piece. I have so many ideas, but I will never be able to paint them all. “Sakura No Kuni” is a remarkable painting. What was the inspiration behind this painting How long does it take to construct a paint- and is there a particular emotion you wanted to ing? express through your painting? It depends on a size and details, but usually The theme of the piece is my vision of Japan from it takes about 50 hours for 10x10 inches a foreign country. As I live in the US now, I can and 300 hours for 30x40 inches piece. see the shape of Japan clearly from the outside. It’s small, old and fragile, but also it’s breathing, and alive, like a cherry blossom.


“As I live in the US now, I can see the shape of Japan clearly from the outside. It’s small, old and fragile, but also it’s breathing, and alive, like a cherry blossom.”


BOATING

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .17


RAINFROG

Do you base your work off of personal experience or dreams and sequences? My inspiration comes from many directions. Sometimes it’s from my experience, cultural themes, or just my fantasy. Do you think your work has transitioned over the years and how do you manage to keep a beautiful balance between American pop culture and traditional Japanese motifs? I can tell that newer pieces have more details and stories in them. Year by year, I can see more about Japan from overseas, and I have more passion for my home country. At the same time I’m learning about the real America, not just from Hollywood films. Both American and Japanese cultures are giving me inspiration. What are something’s we should expect from some of your future pieces? My recent works are fantasy story based on Japanese myth or custom, I would like to introduce Japans hidden culture to the world.

WWW.SWEETYUMIKO.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .18


FERRY BOAT


CHRIS BIRKMEIER INTERVIEW JOHN-MARK PHOTOGRAPHY JESSICA ZERBY

The trailer for the Chicago-based independent feature, In Bloom, sent chills down my spine. The film, which began years ago in Birkmeier’s mind as an undergraduate screenwriting project, has blossomed into a masterful work of art. The story highlights queer youth culture in present-day Chicago. It is very real and very personal for Birkmeier. Though the story is fictional, Birkmeier admitted that many chunks of dialogue were derived from actual conversations had between him and his previous partner during the most tumultuous parts of their relationship. Personal touches like this one are what have helped bring independent cinema’s mise en scène to life in a beautiful symbiosis of authentic emotions and rich entertainment. Due to his high-quality body of work and refreshing enthusiasm, we at Nu-Mode´ are committed to supporting CM Birkmeier as he sets out on the road to join the ranks of great American filmmakers.


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .21


“ IN BLOOM ”

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .22


Are you the first of your family to work in film? static. But the result was the sun came through the actors at the perfect moment, I am the first in my family to work in the ‘indus- and we have a perfect lens flare, and perfect try.’ I was raised watching Star Wars, Indiana framing, and it never would have happened Jones, Jaws, and Alien. My dad was always a big if we would have tried the dolly. The shot fan of movies as a kid and would show me these would’ve been useless and we would have films... and I was just obsessed. I don’t really missed that perfect moment. know where the drive to be a filmmaker came from... I think those films just spoke to me as a kid and I really, really wanted not only to watch Tanner Rittenhouse has played the princithem over and over again, but to make other pal role in a great majority of your work. people feel the way I felt watching them. And I What factors have influenced your decision figured the only way to do that was to make mov- to cast Tanner time and time again? ies. I thank my extremely supportive parents for letting me go wild with it at a young age, and I I met Tanner my freshman year at Columbia guess the fascination with film never faded. and we just hit it off. In high school, I never had any friends who wanted to be actors. It was always just casting my friends who were What was the greatest challenge that came up available, and although I loved them, they during the production of In Bloom? weren’t ‘actors’ haha. So I cast Tanner in a short film called ‘Terminus’ about a breakup The greatest challenge was probably... knowing at the end of the world... maybe a precursor when to compromise. That’s a really hard thing to In Bloom? - And he was absolutely amazfor a filmmaker to do - especially a ‘writer/direc- ing. I realized I had to keep working with tor’ who has this very specific idea of how some- him. We have a really great relationship, thing should look or be said. But honestly, I think there’s a great friendship and a deep trust the compromises absolutely made the film won- between us. I know that I can rely on him to derful. I couldn’t be happier. I think the biggest tell me when something is bullshit, and how challenge was also the greatest thing I took away he can make it better, and on the other hand from the process - that you have to absolutely he knows when to trust me. It’s a great balbe open to mistakes and fuck ups and the little ance that makes for a really incredible perpieces of ‘realism’ that you can’t get on the page. formance. Plus he’s just a really fun guy. It’s And more than that, it’s about realizing ‘fuck, we not all movies with us. We’ve been through a don’t have enough time to do this shot, what else lot together. can we do?’. The best example, and one of my favorite shots in the movie, was when we were shooting during the sunrise. I had this elaborate, In Bloom tackles a lot of serious issues. 4-minute shot, all in one slow dolly, and I had When working with the actors on set, how absolutely wanted that shot for two years. It was do you navigate the sensitivities of the subTHE MOVIE in my head. THE SHOT. But we ject matter? got there, and it was absolutely impossible. We didn’t have any of the right equipment. So we In Bloom was my first time working with had to just lock down the camera, and shoot several actors that WEREN’T Tanner, so


“There was never any ‘don’t go there, don’t ask these questions’ because I wanted everything to be laid out on the table.” honestly, as a director, I was incredibly nervous about the whole thing. But it went very smoothly. As for navigating sensitive issues... there just had to be complete openness about things. If there was something in the script that the actors didn’t understand, I would usually have a real life experience to back it up and say ‘this is why this character is doing this’ or ‘this is how it felt when this happened to ME’. And I think there was a lot of respect because they knew, everyone knew, that we were dealing with some stuff that was very close to my heart, so everyone really went about it very respectfully. There was never any ‘don’t go there, don’t ask these questions’ because I wanted everything to be laid out on the table. The only thing that I honestly felt uncomfortable doing was shooting the two sex scenes. That’s never not going to be strange, with a camera in their faces, a big crew standing around, and I’m giving explicit descriptions to straight men about the... workings haha. But they did masterfully and it worked out perfectly. How has your residence in Chicago influenced your filmmaking? My residence in Chicago has absolutely influenced my filmmaking. I applied to USC, UCLA, NYU, all the major film schools. Got rejected by all of them. And was bitter about it. But now I couldn’t be happier because this city is so amazing and unique and the Midwest mentality is just something you don’t get in NY or LA. I’m glad I have my roots here, because I think this city is definitely up and coming, especially because you don’t need to be in NY or LA to make films anymore - not with the way video is taking off and not with the way the Internet is changing the way we work. Chicago will always have a special place in my heart.


Be sure to check out the Liberum Pictures vimeo for the In Bloom trailer and a fascinating archive of behind the scenes shorts. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .25


LUNACY PHOTOGRAPHY ANDREW AKIMOV

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .26


ALL GARMENTS ELNURA BADALOVA


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .29


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .30


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .33


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .34


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .37


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .38


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .41


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .42


PHOTOGRAPHY ANDREW AKIMOV MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST OLA KOMI MODEL TOMA BARKOVA


BARCELONA PHOTOGRAPHY CARLOS TEIXEIRA


VEIL DANIELA BARROS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .45


BODYSUIT HUGO E FERNANDO CAPE HUGO E FERNANDO ANKLE BOOTS NUNO BALTAZAR

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .46


BODYSUIT HUGO E FERNANDO

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .49


DRESS HUGO E FERNANDO CAPE HUGO E FERNANDO ANKLE BOOT NUNO BALTAZAR

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .50


SWEATER DANIELA BARROS PANT DANIELA BARROS ANKLE BOOT NUNO BALTAZAR


BODYSUIT ANDREIA OLIVEIRA SAIA LUIS BUCHINHO PHOTOGRAPHY CARLOS TEIXEIRA MAKE UP ARTIST MARIA ANGELES MODEL MARTA MALANOWSKA AT ICONMODELS BARCELONA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .53


CUT ME SOME BANGS PHOTOGRAPHY CLARENS T YSON STYLING CLARENS T YSON

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .54


DRESS RACHEL ZOE NECKLACE ORIGAMI NECKLACE BY L’ATELIER BRACELETS L’ATELIER


DRESS RACHEL ZOE NECKLACE ORIGAMI NECKLACE BY L’ATELIER BRACELETS L’ATELIER


JUMP SUIT GUCCI RED BELT GUCCI NECKLACE ST YLIST OWN BAG ZARA FUR VEST GUESS BY MARCIANO

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .57


SUIT ZARA PANTS ZARA NECKLACE ST YLIST OWN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .58


FUR LEATHER JACKET GUESS BY MARCIANO


FUR VEST BCBG DRESS H&M NECKLACES BIJOUX OUI EHFAR BRACELET AND RING ST YLIST OWN PHOTOGRAPHY CLARENS T YSON ST YLING CLARENS T YSON MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIR ST YLIST MEGAN BEDYNSKI MODEL EMI AT SPECS MODELS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .61


BRIAN PARILLO INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

A sense of space that’s the most important thing former Connecticut born fine art photographer Brian Parillo looks for in his photographs. He draws inspiration for his work from music, Pop art and architecture. The now California based artist specializes in fine art mixed media with a focus on natural lighting and shadow. He captures impeccable imagery at an abstract angle of iconic structures in LA and Conveys a sense of drama through a cinematic approach. Parillo has a fascination for architecture and the materials used which includes wood, steel or concrete because they create a mood. He is a big follower of the California mid century movement and thinks that one of the most interesting aspects of shooting architecture is building drama from one angle to the next. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .62


ENGAGED


ROOSEVELT

Did you always imagine that you wanted to become a fine art photographer? No I didn’t...In the beginning more than anything I just wanted to try to figure out a way I could make a living with photography. Only after realizing that when you extract the pressures of solely concentrating on finance and begin to just enjoy and play, I was then able to put my attention towards more creative outlets of photography. From that point on it developed into what I feel is a healthy obsession. No matter what was happening in my life I found out quickly that I was able to silence out static thoughts and just get lost for the duration of a shoot. I then starting thinking in terms of series and shooting with that intention, I began developing different galleries of work. I was very lucky early on getting shows, being published, and interviewed. Who has been a major influence on you and your work? My family and friends inspire me. I don’t have any hero’s of photography. I also think that there’s somewhat of a danger in giving to much reverence to anyone who’s in the same field as you. I never wanted to be like any other photographer and I never studied other photographer’s work, so I think when you come from that place there’s a bit more of a purity in your approach to your process. If anything I was probably more indirectly influenced by certain film directors. I watched a lot of old films growing up and I can remember always being a bit nerdy when chatting about specific shots in certain films. I was impressed by how a shot was lit or the angle it was shot from.


I also wasn’t a student of photography, so I never followed a formula. I think that if you’re not careful to much formula or technique can be stifling. In any creative expression I think there’s a balance between the analytical and the natural feeling you bring to something. I rely more on the ladder. I’m aware of the importance of understanding technique but for the most part I just learned how to achieve what it was I wanted to say by practicing. What do you think is the biggest misconception about photographers? I have no idea... When shooting still imagery what has been your biggest task? In general I don’t shoot random images so keeping shots in line with the current series I have can be a bit challenging. At the same time, I enjoy being able to jump from one series to another depending on my mood. The black and white series primarily relies on weather and light. Los Angeles typically has sunny flat skies and I gravitate more towards moodier overcast days so during our rainy season or a random cloudy day I can usually get shots that have a good amount of contrast. I also have a mixed media gallery of work that deals with photographing flowers in poured paint. I mention that it’s poured only because poured paint creates an entirely different effect then dried brushed paint and can be very difficult to work with because of the minimal amount of control you have dealing with it. The biggest task with working in this series is having the paint react in the way you envisioned it to or in an interesting way that

surprised you. Often it just turns out to look like a big mess or the flower didn’t take to the paint well. Because of all the factors involved I’d say I have about a 30 percent success ratio with them. They’ve been a good exercise in patience. Hollywood & Architecture are phenomenal series, how were you inspired to photograph from various angles and what would you say was your biggest challenge when photographing? The Hollywood and Architecture galleries are very similar to one another and I treated them as such for quite a while. I eventually separated them into two different series when a writer mentioned that my black and white work was reminiscent of the silver screen era of film. I liked that. So around that time I started shooting as many iconic structures in Hollywood that defined that period of time from a vintage perspective. So the main difference is the Architecture shots to me feel more contemporary looking and the Hollywood shots have more of a throw back look to me. The angles I shoot from are just to inspire me while I’m shooting. The attempt is to give a building a feeling of movement. It’s probably what I try to achieve the most. The challenge is to not repeat the same idea over and over again. It’s easy to get stuck working in the same direction so I push myself to go in other directions or I’ll step away from one series of work I have and I’ll jump into an entirely different series. That helps keep things somewhat fresh. In general what I try to achieve and what I gravitate towards in most art forms is a clean separation of the elements while there are still relationships happening within. There’s something harmonious I feel when that occurs. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .65


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .66


FLEXIBLE


Which do you prefer film, digital or both and why? Film is a more pure medium. It has far greater depth and its visibly more contrasting by nature. It’s softer and because of its dimension it holds up as the winner of the two I would say. However, high definition digital files see everything with pristine clarity. It sees more than the naked eyes sees, for my purposes that works. I want to see the details and lines of a structure. To me it creates a sort of wow effect. So, I shoot digitally but I do have a few great film cameras and one of which I’m sure I’ll revisit at some point but in the meantime I’m a slave to the speed of the turnaround that the digital world allows. Do you rely on natural & artificial lighting or do you prefer computer manipulation? I work mainly with natural light but occasionally I’ll shoot an interior with a tripod using long exposures and in accord with whatever exists as the ambient light of the room. I’m looking forward to experimenting with setup shots and artificial light but for the time being I rely on naturally lit settings. I also adjust light in my post process as well. However there’s a point where you try not to cross where the work can look too manipulated or just distasteful to me. I think what the risk is that you can get into territory in an editing process where the image doesn’t feel organic and it looses its human quality. My general rule for software editing is use restraint unless you are goingfor the surreal where the image is suppose to feel like something beyond the human experience.

THE DREAM


“My general rule for software editing is use restraint unless you are goingfor the surreal where the image is suppose to feel like something beyond the human experience.”

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .69


WHIPPED

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .70


How do you usually decide on a location to shoot? I don’t have a formula. I tend to just chase light and watch the weather. I work from both home and a studio and when things look appealing to me light wise I’m pretty quick out the door. What has been the biggest hurdle you’ve had to overcome to achieve your goal? I think the biggest hurdle in anything creative is just taking a risk by actually making the choice to try something. Most of us judge our ideas and think there probably not good. I had so much fun shooting my flower series and to think now that if I had ever talked myself out of going to a park one day literally with a big salad bowl filled with paint and then stuck a flower in that paint to photograph it; I would have missed out on a whole period of my life that truly brought me a lot of joy. I’m not using salad bowls anymore and that series has developed into a different process but it had to start from somewhere and I’m grateful I followed my instincts on it. The truth is I’ve worked on several series that don’t speak to me at all now but the experience of shooting them led me to other more valuable experiences. I’m an extremely picky person, which makes the judging hurdle difficult for me to get over. I know what I like immediately. I can’t be talked into or out of anything but more importantly I’ve learned to get out of my own way and just try. Are there any new project or exhibitions that we should look forward to in the near future from Brian Parillo? I’m working with a very talented director out of New York that splits his time between there and here in LA. He shoots short films about artists and their creative process and I’m the subject of his next project. His style is unique because his cover is more cinematic looking then traditional documentary style. He has an incredible eye and what seems to be a very natural and strong sense of composition. I’m looking forward to it.

WWW.BRIANPARILLOPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


CARTY SEWILL INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Contemporary Californian artist Carty Sewill uses acrylic ink, moleskine notebooks and psychedelic colors to create a dramatic appeal. Although his pictures are created entirely by hand it’s amazing how the artist manages to develop paintings with a three dimensional aspect. All of his work is based around things that he finds the most intriguing, stating that it’s boring to view the same consistent palette and how the world should explore a different array of colors. Though the artist does not have a specific theme for his work Sewill continues to captivate his audience with immaculate paintings.


WARHOL

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .73


MLK

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .74


When did you discover your talent for art? I honestly don’t remember. I was a huge fan of comics and cartoons as a kid and my earliest memories of drawing involved how to guides in Wizard magazine and duplicating Calvin and Hobbes. I guess it just took off from there. What is a typical day like for Carty Sewill? Get up, smoke a cigarette, do a bit of socializing, take care of a couple responsibilities/ work, get some food, smoke, smoke another cigarette, and then paint until an irresponsible hour. Tell us which piece of your work represents you the most and why?

“Painting with an average palette gets a tad boring eventually. The world needs more teal, magenta, and purple.”

What do you think is the biggest misconcepIn all sincerity I couldn’t pin it down. I don’t tion about artist? really know what I’m doing. I just like to They’re easily generalized. paint. I guess you could say it’s a bit sarcastic and overly sentimental, which seems about right. At what hours do you usually feel the most creative and do you compose your best ideas Some of your images contain a vibrant use during those time periods? of colors. Do these colors represent a mesI would say probably around 11pm to 6am. sage you are trying to relay through your That’s usually around the time I end up sitting work? down and concentrating on my work. I guess it’s merely because I know I won’t be bothered Again I don’t really know if there’s all that during those hours. As for ideas, those seem much of a message. Painting with an average palette gets a tad boring eventually. The to just pop into my head whenever they please world needs more teal, magenta, and purple. and leave seconds later. I usually keep an idea book handy in case of any awesome breaks out in my head unannounced.


DAY COPY


GUIT COPY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .77


Do you have an artistic outlook on life? I hope so. If there was one artist you could have a discussion with from the past or present, who would it be and what would you talk about? It’s definitely a toss up. I’d love to talk to the young Andy Warhol, which seems like such a cliché answer, but nonetheless I’m sure I’d enjoy the conversation. Though I’m not sure we’d have much to talk about. I would, however, much rather watch Matisse paint. Where would you like to see your work in the near future? In Galleries.

CARTYIS.ME NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .78


ABBIE


YOUNG BRITISH GRADUATES PHOTOGRAPHY JEFF orGINA


CHARLOTTE WATERSS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .81


RIONA TREACY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .82


KATRINA FERRARI


NANO AOSHIMA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .85


SMWALKER

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .86


UNA BURKE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .89


KORLEKIE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .90


MINKY MOUSE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .93


LIANNA SHEPPARD PHOTOGRAPHY JEFF orGINA MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST ENZO VOLPE AT MODELS 1 MODEL VICTORIA DOYLE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .94


ANDROIDS DREAM PHOTOGRAPHY CALOS TEIXEIRA STYLING JORDANN SANTOS


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .97


VEST AUTOPSY PANTS AUTOPSY SINGLET PATRIK MOHR

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .98


SMOKING BLAZER ROBERTO VERINO BLOUSE AUTOPSY PANT AUTOPSY


SINGLET PATRIK MOHR LEGGINGS AUTOPSY MITAINE AUTOPSY


DRESS MAX MARA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .101


COAT AUTOPSY SKIRT AUTOPSY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .102


DRESS PH PHOTOGRAPHY CALOS TEIXEIRA STYLING JORDANN SANTOS MAKE UP ARTIST XANA LOPES HAIRSTYLIST RUI ROCHA MODEL FRANCISCA PEREZ AT BEST MODELS PORTUGAL


HELMET HAIR PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT KENNEY STYLING JOANNA KULPA


VEST MANDULA PLEATED SKIRT BCBG MAX AZRIA SEQUIN SKIRT FRENCH CONNECTION BRACELET THE HUDSON BAY COMPANY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .105


JACKET OBAKKI RING BCBG MAX AZRIA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .106


DRESS RAG & BONE, GRAVIT Y POPE TAILORED GOODS


CAPE & LEATHER GLOVES VINTAGE, VPC BUSTIER BCBG MAX AZRIA SHORTS OBAKKI BOOTS FLUEVOG SHOES


CAPE & LEATHER GLOVES VINTAGE, VPC BUSTIER BCBG MAX AZRIA SHORTS OBAKKI BOOTS FLUEVOG SHOES NECKLACE THE HUDSON BAY COMPANY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .109


SUEDE TOP DANIER LEATHER LEATHER VEST RUDSAK SKIRT ACNE, GRAVIT Y POPE TAILORED GOODS BELT BCBG MAX AZRIA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .110


SEQUIN DRESS VINTAGE, VPC


BUSTIER & SHORTS OBAKKI SUEDE NECKLACE AS BRACELET THE HUDSON BAY COMPANY BOOTS FLUEVOG SHOES


BUSTIER & SHORTS OBAKKI SUEDE NECKLACE AS BRACELET THE HUDSON BAY COMPANY BOOTS FLUEVOG SHOES PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT KENNEY STYLING JOANNA KULPA ART DIRECTION MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST LIZ DUNGATE MODEL LUCY BORN AT LIZ BELLA AGENCY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .113


SU

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .114


UTAN

“RAJA”

AMRULL

INTERVIEW JOHN MARK PHOTOGRAPHY TRAVER RAINS STYLING SUTAN AMRULL

The winner of last season’s RuPaul’s Drag Race, Sutan Amrull or “Raja” is a man of great charisma, nerve, and talent. With his artistic edge, intellectual dexterity, and knowledge of fashion, Sutan’s “Raja” has broadened the horizons of drag. In June of 2011 Sutan even released a single, “Diamond Crowned Queen,” a dance track infused with Sutan’s hot rocker style. In addition to mastering all things creative, Sutan carries himself with the power and grace of a super model. With booking requests from practically every gay club in the United States, nailing Sutan down for an interview was no easy task. “Raja” is in great demand, but for his feature in Nu-Mode Magazine I wanted to focus on capturing Sutan beyond his drag personality. While “Raja” is certainly something to be adored, she is founded in Sutan Amrull’s hard work and resilience. He has been hustling the entertainment industry since the 1990’s. Aside from traveling the world as a makeup artist for seven seasons of America’s next Top Model, Sutan worked as a makeup artist for Pamela Anderson, Adam Lambert, Dita Von Teese, and countless other celebrities.


What would you say has been the highlight of your career thus far? I am the type of person who is starved to travel. I remember when I worked for MAC cosmetics for ten years they definitely opened my eyes to so many different things… Traveling to me is the most important and the most gratifying thing. Especially while I worked on America’s Next Top Model, I also did a photo shoot on the Great Wall of China. Not even some of the most accomplished makeup artists can add that to their resume. Working on Top Model was a great highlight. You have done a lot of work with your editorial’s photographer, Traver Rains. How did the two of you come to be such strong collaborators? Traver, I first learned about when him and Richie [Rich] were doing Heatherette. I never realized that we would be so close as friends and that we would ever collaborate as artists. It’s been a really cool experience. Traver’s a great guy who is very patient and easy going. It’s easy to collaborate with someone like him. I love Traver with all my heart. He’s very talented, and another reason I love him is because he has his own way and he’s uncompromising about it. That’s what I probably admire about him the most. He doesn’t necessarily follow trends. He just goes with what Traver does. To me that’s what a true artist does.

“Traveling to me is the most important and the most gratifying thing. Especially while I worked on America’s Next Top Model, I also did a photo shoot on the Great Wall of China.” think people really realize that there is that type of community or that group of people. I’ve been here most of my life and I’m so proud of the friends that I have here, because you immediately associate the arts and creativity with being a New York thing or fashion with being a New York thing, but there’s a great group of people here that have awesome ideas. We just kind of go about it in a different way. We’re a lot more leisurely about it. It’s less frantic. I love it. I think people would be surprised if they got to dig into the culture here in Southern California. It’s sunnier so our ideas come out differently. [laughs] When’s the last time you were in New York?

It is so nice when you find those collaborators that you connect with on all levels. The last time I was in New York was for a club opening only a few months ago Yeah, and I think in L.A. especially, I don’t NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .117


I’ve made a lot of good friendships there. I try to go as often as I can. When I go there to stay and I have my own routine that I like to get into when I’m in the city.

Having explored so many roles in the entertainment industry from makeup, to drag, to music, and acting, what creative frontiers have you yet to conquer that currently peak your interest?

I am an illustrator and I really love fine arts. I’m actually thinking about writing a chilI’m pretty sure the first time I ever dren’s book. It’s always been a big dream of saw you was late one night you were mine and now I have an audience that would getting Halal from a cart outside the be interested in it. So I’m thinking about doStandard Hotel. ing that. I’ve always loved fashion so I’m thinking about doing an accessories line and [laugh] That was probably me... any- since I’m a makeup artist as well, I’m thinktime I’m at the Standard for Lebain, ing about doing some beauty products. Why it’s definitely a time for lots of intoxi- not try it all? It seems to be the trend lately of cation. reality stars branding what they do. Now is the time to do it. There’s no better time that the present to actually do that. Strike it while It’s quite the party. the iron is hot. I’ve always loved New York’s nightlife. It always has that electric feeling. That’s what I love about New York. It’s too bad it is so damn expensive to live there. I remember while I was living there, I was kind of in transition [after] Top Model. I had just finished my little stint with them. I was with them for, you know, seven seasons and it was kind of at the end. I was like, “God, what am I doing here?” I realized that I was broke and it was winter. I was like, “Wait a minute, I’m broke AND cold? I got to get out of here.” I’ll be broke and warm. I can go lay out. I can go on a hike for free. I can go do yoga for free. I’d rather be broke and warm. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .118

While the iron is hot now, I admire that you’ve been navigating and working the industry for many years. I’m just taking the knowledge that I’ve had over the past years and putting it to use, but the great thing is that now there are people paying attention. The hardest part of the job is keeping that momentum going and keeping people interested, without it feeling temporary or flighty. I want [my work] to be lasting and something that people will remember. Life is fragile and temporary. If you’re going to live a life, you should try to leave a legacy.


“I’ve always loved fashion so I’m thinking about doing an accessories line and since I’m a makeup artist as well, I’m thinking about doing some beauty products. Why not try it all?”

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .121


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .122


There is a great beauty in Sutan’s reaction to his fame. While many new television personalities might bask in the adoration and attention of millions of fans, Sutan seems more focused on his newly developed ability to make an impact. A true artist, Sutan’s excitement lies in the privilege to give his work a platform, to be recognized but more so to share. Celebrities may speak in a humble tone, but the truth is in their actions. While Sutan is undoubtedly enjoying the fruits of his fame, when speaking about his work and his art, his tone is genuine and endearing. A creative man with limitless possibilities, Sutan Amrull is the most fabulous of innovators. JM


WWW.SUTANAMRULL.NET


PHOTOGRAPHY TRAVER RAINS . MONIKER MGMT PRODUCTION MONIKER MGMT GROOMING & STYLING SUTAN AMRULL LOCATION HOME OF JOHN CUNNINGHAM & LIZZIE O’GRADY A VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO HSMPR & REGGIE CAMERON NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .125


THE EMERGENCE OF NEW DESIGNERS TAKING ON INNOVATIVE DESIGN WRITTEN BY IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA

In the world of fashion that is ruled by critics demanding creativity and fueled by buyers vying for commercial value, a designer’s job is not an easy one. What does it take for someone to become a successful designer and stay true to one’s own original aesthetic in the sea of copycats and cookie cutter designs? What does it take to stand your ground and bend the rules? Let’s meet a few designers that seem to have both successfully combined art and fashion and are well on their way to a commercial success.

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .126


DRESSEDUNDRESSED MENS SPRING . SUMMER 2012 PHOTOGRAPHY BUNGO TSUCHIYA


MASHA MA

A graduate of Central Saint Martins, Masha Ma has made her early mark in fashion by participating in various design competitions and winning CCDC “Best International Innovation” design award in 2009. Masha’s designs have already caught the eye of fashion magazines such as Vogue, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, L’Officiel, Marie Claire and many more. Her collections have been viewed during London and Paris fashion weeks and last year she was shortlisted for 2 awards consecutively: WGSN “Breakthrough Designer” of the year and Lycra Style “Emerging Talent”. What separates Masha Ma’s designs apart from others is that her designs are unmistakably feminine yet tailored. And her SS12 collection is a clear example of that. Pure and sophisticated, conceived of neutral colors and clean shapes, her clothes just seem to have a life of their own. Transparent fabrics mixed in with solids convey both femininity and structure. Ruffles and crisp collars, exposed zippers and pleats, minimalist cuts and rich embroidery, the clothes are deconstructed yet beautifully draped with a lot of movement: the yin and yang perfectly balanced. Undoubtedly, this British designer has a great future ahead of her.


WWW.MASHAMASTUDIO.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .129


WWW.AOIKOTSUHIROI.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .130


AOI KOTSHUHIROI

Aoi Kotsuhiroi is an accessories designer based in Paris. Her collections are both designed and produced in France. Rings, bracelets and chokers, or as she calls them –“body objects”, are all hand-made and one of a kind sculptural jewelry pieces. I found myself strangely drawn to the unusual use of materials and unique shapes. Gothic inspired yet sophisticated and modern, each piece is a work of art. The materials Aoi uses to create her standout jewelry line include: vintage fabric, wood, antique beads, stone and crystals, horn, exotic leathers of crocodile and buffalo, silk thread, horse and sometimes even human hair. The pieces represented by Aoi are uniquely beautiful. I couldn’t help but notice the resemblance of her work to the late Alexander McQueen’s heritage. The well-deserved comparison is best explained by achieving that hard to come balance of combining art and fashion in a way that pleases the eye but makes you wonder. Or perhaps it’s the warmth that comes from the use of natural materials and artifacts and the age-long history that belongs to them.


ANNE SOFIE MADSEN Ann Sofie Madsen hails from Denmark, where she studied at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Design. Along with her notable career as a designer, Anne Sofie is renown for her work as an illustrator having numerous works published in the magazines and 2 books to be going to print later this year. With a few shows under her belt and some stellar experience at both McQueen and Galliano she’s the one Danish designer to watch. Using some of the best of materials and couture sewing techniques she creates note-worthy garments that are both artistic and wearable, made to measure and ready-towear. With ever so subtle details and effervescent prints her SS12 capsule collection is a dream within a dream. Conceptual but feminine enough to attract attention of a wider audience, the collection is about a modern woman-worrier on her way to win the world with her charm. And she has some hefty techniques for that. Lacings and appliques, prints and quilted leather, pleats and spaghetti straps - these are some of her favorite weapons. The collection leaves you satisfied but makes you wish for more, which is perfect because Anne Sofie’s webshop is scheduled to open this spring. I definitely can’t wait.


WWW.ANNESOFIEMADSEN.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .133


WWW.DRESSEDUNDRESSED.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .134


DRESSEDUNDRESSED The creative Tokyo duo of Takeshi Kitazawa and Emiko Sato is responsible for both men’s and women’s clothing and accessories collections. The collections are meant to compliment each other by way of their androgynous quality, which makes the process of borrowing your boyfriend’s clothes a whole lot easier. Both collections are cut close to the body, minimal, graphic and with an attitude. Unparalleled Japanese craftsmanship and thought after textiles make every piece highly desirable. No wonder this designer team has gotten positive reviews and is already commercially successful selling at a numerous stores in Japan and now expanding towards Europe. This duo appears to be on the right track to success.


JOSEPH TURVEY

Joseph Turvey is another British designer in this group, who recently finished his studies at London College of Fashion. Having originally studied womenswear design, Joseph’s interest in traditional cutting techniques and unconventional use of fabric laid ground for his first menswear collection. His constant exploration of traditional menswear tailoring techniques and textile surface design led to some unexpected and intriguing results. One can describe his SS12 collection as clean cut and highly creative with just enough of British sensibility to it. Neon pinks, corals and yellows paired with touches of black, gingham plaid and see-through mesh, Joseph Turvey designs are neither timid nor safe. Each outfit is complete with colorful wide-strap sandals. Among the collection’s highlights are graphic T’s with artist’s own silk-screened illustrations.


FLASHESPAST.BLOGSPOT.COM DESIGNER’S ILLUSTRATIONS ARE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE AT HIS E-STORE

WWW. JOSEPHTURVEY.BIGCARTEL.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .137


waiting for the possession PHOTOGRAPHY MARGARET NOWAK STYLING KEVIN DENOUAL & MARGARET NOWAK NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .138


ALL GARMENTS TOP SHOP & H&M


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .141


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .142


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .145


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .146


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .149


PHOTOGRAPHY MARGARET NOWAK STYLING KEVIN DENOUAL & MARGARET NOWAK MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIR STYLIST MELISSA WONG MODEL BROOKE AT OXYGEN MODELS LONDON NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .150


THE SKIN I LIVE IN

PHOTOGRAPHY TONI SMAILAGIC STYLING ELEANA KANELLOU


ALL GARMENTS VALENTINA KOVA’S

VINTAGE COLLECTION

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .153


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .154


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .157


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .158


PHOTOGRAPHY TONI SMAILAGIC STYLING ELEANA KANELLOU MAKE UP ARTIST & MODEL SAMANTHA JARAMILLO AT JMA MODELS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .161


DON’T LEAVE ANY TRACE PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL CLEMENT

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .162


ALL GARMENTS RETRO CLOTHING BY ACADEMY LONDON


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .165


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .166


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .169


PHOTOGRAPHY MICHAEL CLEMENT PHOTO ASSISTANT VIBEKE PEDERSEN RETOUCHING FLORIAN HESS MODEL JAMES. M & P LONDON

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .170


RICHARD MOON INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Made his start as an artist creating collages of various found images. The material he uses in his paintings are from the earliest days to the 20th century. Slightly transitioning his work by diversifying his content Moon has developed a new direction for his paintings creating etchings that he felt suited his style of work. Richard Moon loves to influence what the viewer might think by introducing elements into works with a familiar feel to them. He has a way of manipulating what is familiar with the unusual or bizarre. This way he hopes to jolt the viewer’s memory to drawing associations from what they are looking at. As an artist he has a diverse approach and intends to remain true to himself and his vision.


HIPSTER 2008

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .173


THE WINDMILL 2005

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .174


What was the title of the first painting you sold change the scale and also to work with alterand how was that experience? native mediums, such as etching. Etching is a relatively new venture for me and one that To be honest I can’t quite remember what the I felt suited my working methods perfectly. I first painting I sold was, but the first one I sold currently have a show on etchings in the Royal that meant anything to me was a copy of a De- Academy Cafe Gallery until April 18th. gas painting: The Orchestra at the Opera House (1870). When I was very young I taught myself to draw and paint in the traditional manner, by Your paintings have a fascinating mix of copying from old masters. The sale was impor- vintage characters, tell us what exactly reptant to me because it was the first time that I’d resents you best in your paintings and do you sold through a gallery. I’d taken the painting to try to make a statement towards your audia local gallery and they sold it, which seemed ence with your work? like a step forward, since before that sales had only been to friends. The use of vintage photographic source material has always been a characteristic of my work. I think the reason for this stems from my What motivates you most in life, whether it’s to interest in time. I am an obsessive diary writer, inspire you or disappoint you? which is a way of ‘capturing’ time. I think the idea behind this also feeds into my work, esI am motivated most by my inquisitive nature. pecially when one considers that my source If I weren’t always asking myself questions material generally comes from vintage phoabout everything around me, life would become tography, such as Daguerreotypes. I’ve always incredibly dull. I suppose that’s what drives me found Daguerreotypes fascinating for the same on as an artist. It’s not only an attempt to unreason: they are a glimpse of time; a snapshot derstand my own nature better but also a way of an instant, though in some cases these into communicate some of that inquisitiveness to stants are almost 200 years old. So I suppose others. something of my interest in time comes out in these paintings. How has your style of work transition over time?

There is no particular statement or message that I am trying to put out to my audience with this work. But it’s always important for there There have always been certain constants in my to be an implied message, or narrative. In that work, such as the old fashioned look, or a par- way the viewers can bring some of their own ticular ‘absurd’ aspect to them (some of them imagination to the work. more than others). But more recently I have both been trying to diversify the content of the work and the medium in which they are made. Do you think there is a slight dark side to This has led to me changing my supports from your work? canvas to wood, which allows for sanding down and other alternative methods of application, to Yes there is but it’s always on the cusp of flipping over into humour. That’s the thing with


THE PROTEGE 2008


THE PERFORMANCE 2011

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .177


“Picasso regarded himself as the last in the long line of great masters, and I think he was right in the sense that contemporary life doesn’t allow for that kind of person any more.”

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .178

X


Do you think most viewers interpret your work in a different sense than you portray it to be?

‘darkness’ in painting. It’s always a bit corny, so there has to be that aspect of humour about it too to stop it from becoming too wrapped up in I encourage the plurality of interpretations. the Romanticism of that darkness. Painting shouldn’t have a specific ‘meaning’ as such, but it should suggest ideas that the viewers can form for themselves. That’s As an artist what is the most important thing what keeps art interesting. If it were just like a to focus on, your technique or the content? statement or a fact, the viewer would soon become bored. So ambiguity is one of arts most Both are equally important. However It’s imimportant qualities. portant to understand and perfect technique just as long as one doesn’t get bogged down in it. If you were not an artist what else would you The mistake that many artists make is to conconsider? tinue improving the technical aspect of their work to such an extent that there is nothing else I think my first choices would all be creathere to appreciate. It is technical skill, and that tive, such as being a musician or a writer, but is all. I would find an artist that painted in a I guess that’s still being an artist. So perhaps clumsy manner but had something ambiguously a historian? I have a great interest in history, intriguing about the work far more interesting which is shown in the use of old photos as than a very highly technically skilled painting source material for my work. with uninteresting content. Your work touches base with a combination of Do you think the future of art is progressing historical elements. Do you consider yourself and is there an outlet for the new generation of artists to make a shift in the art world? a surrealist or an idealist? I suppose in certain paintings there are elements that one could consider as having surrealist sensibilities, but that has less to do with wanting to become part of that historic genre than the fact that contemporary life is showing signs of losing meaning, or some kind of grounding. As technology is creating a smaller world, cultural diversity is beginning to disintegrate. This lack of cultural identity creates a situation in which meaning and truth has become elusive. This lack of meaning produces a certain absurdity in art, which I believe is apparent in my work. The surrealists had that too. In that sense I’m not an idealist but a realist, or perhaps a nihilist.

Picasso regarded himself as the last in the long line of great masters, and I think he was right in the sense that contemporary life doesn’t allow for that kind of person any more. But it doesn’t necessarily mean that the art of today is inferior. There’s much more competition now and no dominant style, so this leads to a much richer diversity. The downside to this is that too much diversity drains meaning. I think that’s why there are no ‘isms’ left around now and the reason why no one writes manifestos. One way that artists can deal with that is to make work which itself is concerned with that very prospect. There is much cynicism in contemporary art, but that cynicism can ironically be used in a positive manner.


SLEEPWALKER 2006


WWW. RICHARD-MOON.CO.UK NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .181


SARA NAIM INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Born in Damascus, brought up in Dubai. Photographer Sara Naim captures captivating imagery of sound, vibration and landscapes. Considering her style of photography formless the photographer expresses her love for capturing awkward yet interesting moments. Known for her exquisite series entitled Beethoven- Moonlight Sonata, which the photographer translates sound into image. Sara Naim’s work has been displayed in several galleries in London, Dubai, Germany and New York. Now preparing for her very first solo exhibition in July at The Pavilion Downtown Dubai Gallery, Naim shares with us her challenges and accomplishments while establishing herself as a esteem photographer reaching out to a vast audience. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .182


UNTITLED 2010


BEETHOVEN 2010


As a child growing up did you always want to become a photographer? No. In my late teens I was interested in photography so I went onto an art foundation at Chelsea College of Art and Design, it wasn’t until five minutes before BA acceptances were due I decided photography was the one. How would you describe your form of photography? Most of it is actually about the formless. Perhaps visualizing the intangible from corneas and sound vibrations to skin cells and light rays. I also have my more everyday work that’s less conceptual, and more about these awkward, interesting moments between people and landscapes. Are there any photographers that inspire you and how have they made an impact on you and your work? There are many to name a few, Paul Graham, Ryan McGinley, Mark Borthwick, David Benjamin Sherry, Logan White, Frankie Nazardo, Sophie Van Der Perre, Gier Moseid, Guy Archard, Oleg Tolstoy, Peter Funch, Lydnsy Welgos. The more photographers you look at, the more you know. I’m not sure how exactly they’ve impacted my work but I’ve created images based on what I’ve seen, understood and experienced. These artists make a difference to me and my work in some way. What would you say sets you apart from other photographers? I’m 24 and I’ve been to about 40 countries.

“I’m 24 and I’ve been to about 40 countries. I think it’s opened up my experiences to be less subjective and more objective.”

I think it’s opened up my experiences to be less subjective and more objective. That applies to my photography too, which helps a wider audience to relate. Beethoven – Moonlight Sonata is a fascinating piece. What inspired you to photograph the translation of sound into an image? I love music and I love photography, so I wanted to see how I could almost complicate the two senses of hearing and sight. I also knew of Beethoven’s story of composing ‘Moonlight Sonata’ for his blind lover Gucciardi, who asked to see the moonlight. He then composed a piece about the moonlight’s reflection off Lake Lucerne. I wanted to mimic what Beethoven had done giving vision through sound. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .185


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .186


A MORNING FIGHT 2011


GIDA 2011


In your personal opinion, what would you say makes photography an art? There is nothing about it that makes photography not an art. What type of emotions were you going for when you shot “Land Scapes” and how was that entire experience? ‘Land Scapes’ is a collection of images, mostly from New Zealand. I really connected to that place, and my self when I was there. I think greenery gives you that. The motive of the series is to visually create that connection. Are there any challenges with landscape photography? Sometimes you’re on a mountain looking at something so interesting, but the photograph would be so much better if you were on the mountain opposite to you. So I guess being at the wrong place at the right time. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .189


One place in the world you would love to photograph and why? Syria. It’s my country and I’m not there during what is hopefully going to become a revolution. I would love to photograph it but at the moment you cannot enter the country with a large camera. It’s a time in Syria’s history that needs to be documented as evidence of people’s resistance, determination and hopefully glory.

Are you looking forward to any new projects? I have my first solo show coming up this July at The Pavilion Downtown Dubai’s Gallery 1. I’m preparing for that, as well as applying for my MA. A final word of advice to aspiring photographers? Always look at other artists work, constantly disseminate your work to publications/blogs/artists that you like. Get yourself a website/blog, and work for a photographer that you respect! That’s all I did in New York for 6 months and I learnt more than I did during 2 years of university! Happy Photography x

WWW.SARA-NAIM.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .190


WHEN THE LIGHTS 2011


A Berber Beauty Tale PHOTOGRAPHY ANNE HØJLUND NICOLAJSEN STYLING LOUISE MAS


Berber is a term for a poplulation originating in North Africa from about 1.500 BC. Since then they have migrated from the Atlantic Sea to the Siwa Oasis in Egypt and from the Mediterranean to the Niger River, without belonging to any country. They where/are nomads. Their name is derived from the Arab word “barbari” which means “foreign” or “uncivilized”. Today this population ranges between 55 and 75 million people. These people take their clothes and decorating very seriously. Their colorful scarves and jangling jewelry have also become a symbol for nomads we know from Europe – “Gypsies”. In “A Berber Beauty Tale” makeup artist and stylist, Louise Mas, uses elements from the “Berber” culture. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .193


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .194


PHOTOGRAPHY ANNE HØJLUND NICOLAJSEN STYLING & MAKE UP ARTIST LOUISE MAS AT DIVA MODELS MODELS REBECCA BIRKHOLM AT DIVA MODELS MALENE ANTHONI AT DIVA MODELS LOUISE JULIE AT DIVA MODELS NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .197


DISAPPOINTED.

PHOTOGRAPHY MARTA ZGIERSKA & MACIEJ RUKASZ

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .198


COSTUME ZWIERZĄTKA, MAŁE ZWIERZENIA


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .201


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .202


PHOTOGRAPHY MARTA ZGIERSKA & MACIEJ RUKASZ COSTUME ZWIERZĄTKA MAŁE ZWIERZENIA PERFORMANCE BY PAWEŁ PASSINI MODEL SEAN PALMER . ACTOR

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .205


CHEMINEAU D’ÂGE PHOTOGRAPHY MERJA YEUNG STYLING KATARIINA KAATRASALO

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .206


DRAPEDTOP GUESS


WHITE PLAIT DRESS KAMILLA MIKAMA SHIRT TIIA VANHATAPIO NECKLACE TED BAKER


WHITE DRESS PHILOSOPHY BLUES ORIGINAL

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .209


WHITE PLAIT DRESS KAMILLA MIKAMA NECKLACE TED BAKER

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .210


VEST H&M HAT H&M


SHIRT DESIQUAL TROUSERS H&M SHOES MINNA PARIKKA


BLACK DRESS ANNA GAV BRACELET ANNA GAV PHOTOGRAPHY MERJA YEUNG STYLING KATARIINA KAATRASALO MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST TIMO KARVINEN MODEL MARITA RUISHALME

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .213


NUTE NICHOLSON INTERVIEW DREW KRASON

Nute Nicholson has turned his attention from fashion photography to pouring his passion and energy into large-scale mixed media abstract painting. The Virginia bred photographer known for his clean graphic style of fashion and commercial photography found his true visual voice while living and working for a number of years throughout Europe with some of the most prominent fashion houses and magazines. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .214


Nute started working for a paper in his sophomore year in college as a staff photographer. After graduating he worked for a public relations firm for two years but eventually headed to Miami to start shooting fashion. He stayed in Miami for two and a half years and what successful. While in Miami he made a connection with and English agency and thought it was a good time to be a photographer because the pay was good for catalog work. While working with the Models and Photographers Nicholson got to know them quite well and most of them were going to Europe so he decided to pack a bag try it for six months. Nicholson knew that if he wanted to be published Greece was the place to go although he had been lucky to have an editorial published in Miami.

he ended up working in Spain dividing his time between Barcelona and Madrid for one year which lead Nicholson to start finding what he wanted to do as a photographer and developing a style which was very graphic, Living in Greece was a learning experience it detail oriented, and immaculately designed. all started the moment he stepped off the plane He put a lot of time and energy into everywhere he would have a taste of culture shock thing; the next step was going back to Milan because of the pollution and congestion. since he was now considered an “A” Market. (A Market being New York, Paris & London) Nicholson’s original play to stay six months Basically there were no breaks you were became two years and within that time he started there to work. working on a more editorial feel for his work. Eventually he came back to New York but returned to Greece where he booked some work At this time Nicholson has definitely moved in Milano, which he thought was a good out of the fashion world. After returning to experience. New York he started painting because he had He also got the opportunity for a one-month contract with Harpers’s Bazaar in Istanbul that turned into three months. After this he returned to Greece, then went to Hamburg, Germany and while there he worked on a couple catalog jobs and did testing with some agencies.

trained in painting and did some part time work while in college doing sign making. Nicholson has always been connected with art his whole life because both of his parents were involved in art.

About three years ago he did a piece in Brooklyn and truly enjoying the processed These experiences placed him in a new level and and so did the people that viewed it. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .217


MIXED MEDIA ON CERRMIC 9 X 23 INCHES NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .218


MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS 23 X 73 INCHES


You’ve mentioned that you love to view different paintings from various arists. Who are some artists that grab your attention when viewing their work and how has this affected your transition from fashion photography into art? Right now I have somehow fallen under the spell of this “ group “ from South Africa, Die Antwoord, if you look at the cosplay around the music it is an amazing production of very talented Artist, True Contemporary Art. Fashion gave me a key to lots of doors and lots of places, some of those places were the best Museums and galleries in the world, for me I don’t like to name specific paintings or artist.

“The whole run aspect is based off finding a line, and pushing this line into different scenarios and compositions.” What are you trying to portray through your work and is there a particular message you are sending to the audience through your photographs as well as your paintings.

With my fashion work, I smeared the lines a bit; You are currently working on a series of I was interested in the “Avant designers “ Things that people looked at, originals. With the Painting paintings entitled “El Capatino” could you share with me a few of the details and right now they are simply created to be seen and I like it. the inspiration behind the series. The series has a working title of “ Run” El Capatino is 8 x 22 foot mixed media painting that was worked up in Yosemite National Park. The whole run aspect is based off finding a line, and pushing this line into different scenarios and compositions. Basically creating something (an art work) based on a single Unimportant theme.

Have you ever considered combining both your photography and paintings together? YES, in the mix

Nicholson’s transition from photography to abstract artist is almost complete and I said almost because he still takes time to go out and shoot images once Art for the sake of art no other reason. El or so a month he said he does this because “I just Capatino was chose by Elizabeth Dunbar, shoot what interest me, there will be a time when who was a curator at the Whitney Museum I come back to these images to do something with them”. However, at this time he is solely commitand The Kemper Museum of Contemporary to be in VAST National Exhibition, ted to painting and Right Now working on his which was really an honor to be selected, series entitled “Run”, producing one or two pieces unfortunately the piece is too damn big to of his paintings a month and is shopping for a space to exhibit his work in the near future. While fit in the gallery. shaking hands and kissing babies type thing.


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .221


NUTE NICHOLSON “EL CAPATINO” YOSEMITE NATIONAL PARK

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .222


WWW.NUTENICHOLSON.COM


VICTOR CRISOSTOMO GOMEZ INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Based in Lima, Peru Victor Crisostomo Gomez is an internationally known self-taught fine art painter whose style of painting has a contemporary edge. His work features the people and cultures of his native country, which he brings to life through intense color. The way he renders his portraits gives them a dream like quality, explores symbolism and draws a sense of harmony. His work has been compared with a treasure chest that is full of mysteries and surprises. Ultimately in his paintings victor seeks to combine the strength and richness of the Indian Heritage with the challenges of the urban world.


AMERICAN HORSE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .225


ALONE TOGETHER

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .226


How did you discover painting was your passion and how did you decide focus on the mysteries of Indian culture? Our wonderful existence, the freedom of choosing the infinite ways like the universe, full of roads to follow. Some have had a very special touch with Mother Earth, who is valued and respected for a long time by those who love it and somehow have been in contact with her, for example the native Indians who respects and values their culture, as well as many songs and dances that seek to acknowledge the value and life on earth. My heart and my mind is filled with joy, to see so much of the good on the earth comes from the powerful and positive energy of those who love life, protect and know how to live with it in peace. I am so sad that arrogance, selfishness and human ambitions have decimated the presence of wisdom on Earth, to expropriate their land and culture, however I know that the hearts of many vibrate with excitement and hope with it’s music and dances. Some people have the belief that a better life on the planet is in the respectful combination of technology and the love of life. This is the type of love you can feel and sense in my work. How would you define your style of work? My work arises from the life that is around me. The life/picture happens like an inevitable determination. My intention when I imagine a work is what happens in an unavoidable and fluid relation between bottom and shape what I mean is between how and what? It’s a unique act without sequence to think about the feeling and feel the thought. My work is fluctuating

reason and emotion on the other hand the source, where the inspiration proceeds, starts with the creative impulse. It can be the most amazing and unexpected thing sometimes you recognize it at first sight, but on other occasions it stays hidden and it belongs to life’s mystery. In certain cases even the author doesn’t know or he’s only aware of this when the work is done, I’m a painter, I’m dedicated to study different languages of the sensitive relations, the colors, the shapes and sizes, etc. Creativity comes when there are new meanings in shapes, colors one and others have own life they are related and create new worlds, they vibrate and get us, make us feel that truth that shake us, this is what Art makes. Your paintings have such powerful emotions. What is the most difficult task to capture the true essence of the Natives? The simplicity of life is a life philosophy that I have been following and keeping in my mind. Far from the great complexity of words and thoughts, the world is really simple, just do it man looks complex. In this era we have all fallen more than once. Sometimes all it takes for spontaneous happiness is a word ... The culture of the native Indians, living in union with Mother Nature are Masters. They know how to live like no one from the humility, simplicity and wisdom that give us the Trees, the Sun, Sea, Stars, the Moon, Animals and any living being on our planet. Compared to these people who are so wise yet do not know anything, I feel like a small drop in the ocean.


What draws you towards Indian heritage? The mysticism of the Indians who taught that everything within the wheel of the universe, except man, know about its harmony with all other things. Man is born with only a fragmentary perspective of the world. To achieve harmony you must try to understand his own reflection in the four powers of the medicine wheel. The Indians were taught at birth that every person is endowed with at least one of the four great powers: wisdom, innocence, enlightenment or insight. The purpose of spiritual existence of man is to get the remaining gifts and become a whole person. How do you feel when the audience interprets your work differently? The greatest satisfaction for me is in the process of doing. If I connect to one person who looks at a picture, and receive opinions or praise, it is very gratifying because it finishes closing the cycle that begins when confronted with a blank canvas, but again, what moves me to have chosen this way is the act of painting. I feel that I’m getting to paint something from me, I am communicating with those who go to see my finished work.

CLOUDE FOREST AMAZONICA

represents an interesting challenge, because you have to find the right proportions and harmony among the various parts that make up an object. It is not simply to make jewelry for the customer’s satisfaction, because the require perfection. Sometimes you put so much heart to a work that you do not want to discard it.

In your opinion, what is the biggest challenge for most artists today and do you think the attitude towards art is much stronger present Have you ever considered working on other as- than it was in the past? pects of art besides painting? If so what exactly and why? In this globalize world nothing seems to be difficult beside there are new challenges. I beI like to make gemstone jewelry and utilitarian lieve in the fact that I can come in the market objects with some very sober and sharp designs. that is more competitive, not only in Art but in Although I also work combinations of metals, all sense to share and show our work. I hope eg silver with fine woods, malachite, tagua and one-day Latin America and the world realize colorful stones such as topaz, garnet and rare the great artistic inheritance that our ancestors varieties of quartz, The truth is that each piece left us.


“If I connect to one person who looks at a picture, and receive opinions or praise, it is very gratifying”

SUNRISE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .229


PORTRAIT OF A WARRIOR

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .230


CRADLE OF LOVE


HOLDING UP THE SKY


What was the largest painting you have ever created and how long did it take to construct? I like the difficulty and challenge. It is a competition between you and the canvas to say what I want. And I like the fact that in the great works, it feels like you can walk in to them. The largest painting created is called “Holding up the Sky” and it took me a year to finish Do you have any projects and exhibitions you are looking forward to in the near future? My work is displayed on my website and various virtual galleries Today however you can find some of my recent works exhibited in “Exposures International Gallery of Fine Art” in Sedona, Arizona A word of advice for aspiring artist? The most important and valuable thing is vocation, patience, dedication, and not give up because of obstacles. The recognition comes along and don’t forget that in every work you send messages of faith, expectation, never stop dreaming, don’t be influenced by what publicity orders, think about positive ideas that you can achieve what you want. One-day people will appreciate you like an artist and your work will be in Art Galleries.

WWW.GCRISOSTOMO.COM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .233


SCARLETT ROSE PHOTOGRAPHY JULIE DICKINSON STYLING KAILEE PARKER

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .234


DRESS WINK EARRINGS ESHE CRYSTAL GLASS BY CRUX


TOP WINK FLORAL PANTS WINK BRACELET GOLD CHARM BRACELET


TOP WINK

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .237


SHEER DRESS WINK FRINGE TOP WINK

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .238


SHEER DRESS WINK FRINGE TOP WINK LEOPARD HEELS NINAS


SILVER LIGHT WEIGHT EARRINGS SUGAR SCOUT COUTURE BLOUSE JOSE DURAN


SKIRT WITH FLOUNCE JOSE DURAN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .241


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .242


FEATHER NECKLACE CRUX SKIRT WITH FLOUNCE JOSE DURAN

PHOTOGRAPHY JULIE DICKINSON FASHION EDITOR & STYLING KAILEE PARKER MAKE UP ARTIST SHUHEI UCHIDA HAIRSTYLIST AMY GIFFORD MODEL SARA E. AT MUSE MODELS


GILDED REPLACEMENTS PHOTOGRAPHY VAN SARKI STYLING THE SHERWIN ASSOCIATES


GREY PIN STRIPE SUIT BESPOKE TATTERED LED ZEPPELIN TEE VINTAGE CAMPUS BOOT MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA ALL JEWELRY HEIDI GARDNER DESIGNS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .245


ON CHRIS: BRONZE SPANDEX BOTTOMS MEMBERS ONLY SUEDE VEST VINTAGE ON MARISSA: VELVET OPERA CAPE WITH DOLMAN SLEEVES VINTAGE HELENE SIDEL CUTOFF JEANS LEVIS 501 SHELL PINK & IVORY DEMI BRA LA PERLA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .246


WHITE FRINGE HALTER TOP DANCE COSTUME ST YLISTS OWN BLUEBIRD PUSH UP BRA LA PERLA CHECKED SHIRT PENDLETON VINTAGE DENIM RAG & BONE


ON MARISSA: QUARTER LENGTH OCELOT COAT WITH ORANGE FOX TRIM VINTAGE ON CHRIS: SILVER FOX PATCHWORK COAT VINTAGE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .249


ON MARISSA: WHITE ON WHITE FLORAL TEDDY LA PERLA TROPICANA FLORAL SILK KIMONO ST YLISTS OWN ON CHRIS: GEOMETRIC HEART CHAMBER PRINT SILK GENTLEMAN’S ROBE VINTAGE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .250


ON CHRIS: GREY PIN STRIPE SUIT BESPOKE TATTERED LED ZEPPELIN TEE VINTAGE CAMPUS BOOT MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA ON MARISSA: RED SATIN DRESS KAREN MILLEN PAINT SPLATTERED LACE UP BOOTS VINTAGE HOSIERY WOLFORD


RED SATIN DRESS KAREN MILLEN PHOTOGRAPHY VAN SARKI STYLING THE SHERWIN ASSOCIATES MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST JOHN OLAVARRIA MODELS CHRIS LUSK AT Q MODELS & MARISSA IRWIN AT WILHELMINA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .253


A DESTINATION

TO NOWHERE PHOTOGRAPHY GAVIN THOMAS STYLING RENESSTA OLDS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .254


ON KAYLEY: FUSCHIA EARRINGS CRUX DRESS CANDELA ON AUBREY: NECKLACE FOREVER 21 DRESS CODY SAI PURSE ST YLIST OWN


DRESS WOOD WOOD BELT MJÖLK BRACELET SABRINA DEHOFF


DRESS WOOD WOOD NECKLACE SABRINA DEHOFF SHOES MINIMARKET

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .257


BLOUSE WINTER KATE PANT L’AUTRE CHOSE BOOTS ST YLIST OWN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .258


BLOUSE CANDELA SKIRT CHARLES HENRY BLACK BEADED NECKLACE CIRCA SIXT Y THREE RING DELPHINE CHARLOTTE PARMENTIER BRACELET DELPHINE CHARLOTTE PARMENTIER


DRESS CHARLES HENRY EARRINGS CRUX NY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .261


NECKLACE FOREVER 21 DRESS CODY SAI PURSE ST YLIST OWN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .262


TOP GRAEME ARMOUR PANTS JOSE DURAN BROOCH DELPHINE CHARLOTTE PARMENTIER SHOES CARLOS SANTANA PHOTOGRAPHY GAVIN THOMAS FASHION EDITOR & STYLING RENESSTA OLDS MAKEUP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST MEAGAN HESTER MODELS KAYLEY PRECHEL & AUBREY WILDER AT MAJOR MODELS


ANDREA B INTERVIEW JOHN-MARK PHOTOGRAPHY DANIEL RAMPULLA

While she may have been a finalist on Survivor: Redemption Island, she is not your run of the mill reality TV star. This Wisconsin farm girl is well equipped with a captivating presence, grounded personality, and a fearless determination. The qualities will undoubtedly contribute positively to her pursuit of an acting career in New York City Interviewing her felt like talking to an old friend and her natural beauty was a breeze to shoot. Along with being easy to work with, she brings a wealth of experience to the table. She is quick, witty, and lovable Nu-Mode´ Magazine is proud to present Andrea Boehlke.


BOEHLKE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .265


To kick things off, how about a bit of the Andrea Boehlke origin story? I grew up on a farm where there were pigs and horses in a small town in Wisconsin of about 1500 people. It was in High School that I was introduced to Community Theater. After graduating I decided to go to the University of Wisconsin and I received a BFA in Acting there and I’m really glad that I did. I love the theater and it just kind of worked out that I got to move to New York after Survivor. It’s kinda crazy to me that I moved from a farm, you know, where all my neighbors are my relatives and now I’m in New York. Even just that move is pretty intense, it’s really exciting, too. Do you think that your dad being a comedian had an influence on your personality? Definitely, my dad is such a jokester. We don’t take things super serious where I’m from, because he’s always pranking people. So, we learned to deal with a lot of humor and not take life so seriously… My dad is so outgoing that wherever we go, he’d talk to strangers and meet new people and that’s how I am. Every time I ride the subway, I make a new friend! So his qualities definitely have an effect on me. How long have you lived in New York? I moved out here in July … I’d been to New York two other times. Originally, I thought I was going to go to LA or Chicago because it’s closer, but once I came out here for the Survivor finale and again for a showcase class, I just fell in love with this city. I’m really happy that I’m

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .266


here and I think I’m going to be here for a while. It’s so amazing and there’s so much to do here. I love that you can get on the subway and go wherever. How did you come to try out for Survivor? Everybody in my family is a big Survivor fan. My mom and dad both sent in tapes. I didn’t know that they watched the tapes! I was bored two years ago and they had the cameras set up… It was all really silly to me. I made a crazy tape! I was in a bikini in the snow riding my horse and I did a somersault off my horse and I [even] ended up catching pigs. I was playing the farm girl aspect. I did this thing in my swimsuit in the snow where I was like, “I need to get out of here, I hate the cold!” After the tape was sent in I received call a week later to go to LA. I did interviews there for a week. Months went by and I found out in June that I was going in August to do the show. So, it was a long process, but exciting.

wanted you to send in certain stuff. Like, I knew they wanted me to play the farm girl. So, they asked me to “send in plaid stuff.” You wear your own clothes, but they tell you what to bring. I’d never wear cowboy boots on an island, was I in cowboy boots? Yeah! [laugh] You can pretty much tell how it goes down. Is it weird to go on YouTube and find montage tribute videos of yourself underscored by Evanescence? It’s weird. It’s flattering, but there’s some crazy stuff

How long did the show tape for? The island itself if you make it to the end, you’re only there for 39 days. I say only, but a day feels like a week out there! I ended up staying 37, but there was the travel time there and back, which added a few days. Did you have some say in the outfits that you wore on the show? You send in your own clothes, but they

ALL GARMENTS VINTAGE RENA REBORN


“strangely, a lot of casting directors watch Survivor. They’ll be like, “Oh my gosh, you’re the Survivor girl!” It’s good because you can have a relationship”


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .269


It’s weird to Google yourself and see a collage of It’s why I came to New York. I was trained your face. On Facebook, there are people prein theater however I would not pass up TV or tending to be me! You get weirdo’s, but also fans film. that really love the show and are supporters. As far as being a reality personality and trying to do legit acting work have you had to Do you like interacting with fans? fight a stigma at all? I do, there are a lot of great people. When I meet people on the street and they’re like, “Oh my God! You’re from Survivor!” I’m a people person and I don’t mind talking for hours if they’re interested.

It’s there, but strangely, a lot of casting directors watch Survivor. They’ll be like, “Oh my gosh, you’re the Survivor girl!” It’s good because you can have a relationship, but then I’m like, “Oh, but I can actually act, too!” It feels like I have to work a little harder because I have to get rid of the stigma, but it helps. I What kind of work do you see yourself in when can’t say that it hurts because I got my agent it comes to acting? through Survivor. I’m in this theater company because I met Vinny from the Sopranos at a I’d like to do stage, off Broadway and Broadway. Survivor charity event and I met this director, NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .270


because I met Vinny. Survivor has opened a lot of doors for me, but now I have to work harder to prove that I can act as well. What has been your greatest memory in New York? I worked as a hostess at the Standard but I’m not there anymore. Being from Wisconsin, I never saw celebrities, so Justin Bartha from The Hangover comes in but I didn’t recognize him, I’m a huge flirt so I’m just flirting with this hot guy and when he leaves, everybody’s like, “That was Justin Bartha from The Hangover!” I felt so stupid cause he probably thinks I’m like, “Ooooooh, the guy from The Hangover!” and actually I’m just a huge flirt! Do you think you would’ve flirted less if you knew it was Justin Bartha from ‘Hangover’?

“It gets really stressful out there and emotionally you’re just in a whole different world!” Are you the first in your family to live in New York? I’m the first in my family to move. I have a huge family and everyone is pretty much in the same location. Survivor is a very athletic experience. Are you a hard-core dieter? I’m always watching what I eat. I eat pretty healthy. I was on the Survivor diet too!

Oh yeah, I wouldn’t have flirted with him! But, so far the most exciting thing with my acting is I just got called back for a motion picture. It’s a Brooke Shields movie. I love auditions, so it’s Was that hard for your body to adjust too? nice to get a call back and start building relationships with the casting directors. Yeah. I mean it’s been over a year, but right after I wanted to eat everything I saw. That’s fantastic. What’s something that you think a lot of people don’t know about you? People in the city, surprisingly, don’t know I’m from a small farm town. People back home think it’s strange that I live in New York. They’re really on opposite sides of the spectrum. I love it. I don’t think I’d be happy going back and taking over the farm. I can always go back there and ride horses all day long and catch pigs, then I can be here and get fancy, go out to events and premieres.

Did you get homesick while on the island? I tried not to think about my family because I knew I would be. 37 Days is like a vacation, it’s not that bad. So, I tried not to think about my family too much, but when I did, yeah, I would. It gets really stressful out there and emotionally you’re just in a whole different world! You can cry in a second because you hate all these people you’re with.


It must be exhausting?

What was the greatest physical challenge?

Yeah, it’s exhausting physically and mentally. There was a challenge I actually won and I was hanging upside down by my legs. I think I was hanging for almost 50 minutes. I couldn’t feel What was the biggest personal challenge be- my legs. My face was turning blue. I couldn’t ing on Survivor? wiggle my toes. I was afraid I was going to be permanently damaged because of this chalI think that the biggest personal challenge was lenge. I knew I could win because it was about adjusting to the elements, not eating, and men- being stubborn and I’m pretty stubborn. It was tally being so alone out there. You’re with all hard not to cry. There was another challenge these people, but people are really mean, and where I was really close but I didn’t win. everything’s so competitive and your mind feels like it’s in this crazy funk and you almost It was a stair challenge. It was a huge staircase forget who you are. You know you’ll get over and you were taking these boards and turning it and once it was done I felt like I grew as a them in to pegs and memorizing this pattern. It person. I felt like, “Well, if I can do that, I can was 110 degrees; I was 3rd; I was winning and do anything, really.” I messed up and fell behind. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .273


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .274


Have you ever been in love? Not really. I dated a guy for a year and a half, so I thought I was. You know how you’re dating somebody and at the time you think you are in love. I’m pretty independent, that’s the longest relationship I’ve ever had. What’s your greatest fear? My greatest fear is losing people that I’m close to, but I think that’s everyone. When I was younger, I lost my sister in an accident and it took me years to get close to people again. For years in high school, I wouldn’t let my friends get closer than arms length. Now I have really close relationships with friends and family and I’m always scared I’m gonna lose someone. Are you afraid of failure? I’m not afraid of failure. I know I’m going to fail a lot before I get where I want to be. Each chapter in my life seems to be falling in place. You definitely have a lot of drive and resilience. I’m wondering if you’ve always been this way or if it’s more of a recent development? I think recently its picked up a lot! I think since Survivor happened and once I made the move to New York I think I’m in a good position to take opportunities and seek more adventures. I’m hungry for more, I’m more driven than I would’ve been if I’d stayed in Wisconsin. I’m still figuring everything out, but I feel a lot of power because I’m in this big city, taking everything that comes at me.

“I’m not afraid of failure. I know I’m going to fail a lot before I get where I want to be.”


PHOTOGRAPHY DANIEL RAMPULLA INTERVIEW & ART DIRECTION JOHN MARK STYLING YANI LOPEZ MAKE UP ARTIST SEEVON CHAU HAIRSTYLIST NATASHA CHAMBERS PRODUCTION ASSISTANT TAYLOR BORMAN A VERY SPECIAL THANKS RENA REBORN


ANDREA BOEHLKE . @ANDREABOEHLKE . ON TWITTER NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .277


ANN CT BRAUNSTEINER INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Ann Ct Braunsteiner was born in Austria and grew up around photography. Her first creative work was a book published in 2008. Originally a Biochemist and Biotechnologist Braunsteiner decided to start new chapter in her life by moving to New Zeland in 2009 to start over as a serious artist in photography and painting. Over the last two years she has build up a body of work that has increased her exposure. Ann CT Braunsteiner’s greatest ambition as an artist is to have her own exhibition and excel as an abstract artist.

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .278


FACE NO.4 2011 ACRYLIC & CHARCOAL ON PAPER


NEVER 2012 ACRYLIC & CHARCOAL ON NZ VINTAGE MAP


What was your first attempt to be creative and what did you gain from your first experience? My book ‘Das Lachen der Schmetterlinge’ [The laugh of butterflies], I published late 2008 and as a result being represented at the world’s most prestige and largest book fair in Frankfurt am Main/Germany.

decision and changed everything. I can’t really say it was a difficult one, nonetheless a decision with lots of consequences, lots of management. And sometimes it felt really scary, moving pretty much to the other side of the world, a different language, no friends. But I had the opportunity to start a completely new chapter in my life.

I even worked for a while as a Biochemist What is your greatest ambition as an artist? and Biotechnologist, mostly to understand the new country, the culture and the econI find it is important to myself not ruling out any- omy. From there on it developed, I started thing as an artist. Success or failure either way I with different ideas most of them already keep a realistic outlook on this. more and more into the creative direction and in the early 2010 it turned out to be a Over the last 2 years I built up a body of work, in- fulltime artist. Publishing a book and comcreased my exposure locally here in Nelson [New ing to New Zealand strengthened my ‘I can Zealand], run my website and 3 different blogs on do this’ attitude. It is an amazing journey tumblr, a mostly image based social network. that has just begun. For 2012, my greatest ambition is to receive an artist in residence and having my own show. I need to have my own milestones, realistic but still ambitious as well as seeing and taking chances which come often unexpectedly, like for example your inquiry for an interview in your magazine. Again I have the chance for exposure to a new audience. This is amazing for me as a rather young artist.

Is there something or someone who motivates you? Definitely the strongest motivation is that I don’t want to go back to an 8 to 5 job. I do enjoy the freedom of working according to my personal preferences.

Furthermore I get a great part of motivation from my partner. Who is currently studying You transition from a Biochemist & Biotechnol- in Wellington and majoring in design with ogist into a full time artist is a major transition. philosophy as a minor, he is also an artist. Why did you decide to become an artist fulltime So there is a constant academic, visual and and was it a difficult decision? open input forum for discussion, a healthy balance to my otherwise rather solitary life. I like the word transition, you using here. I don’t During the academic year we live in differthink it was a certain decision or just one decision ent cities, I live by myself and work from to become a full time artist. There were so many home. This is a challenge, but we both do little decisions on the way and still are, but look- what we want to at this point, so we really ing backward on it, moving from Austria to New can encourage and push each other. Zealand in 2008 most certainly was a major NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .281


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .282


ROOMS TO LET 2010 MIXED MEDIA/COLLAGE ON CANVAS


Your work has an intriguing mix of energetic expression. Where do you usually find your inspiration? I think the inspiration comes to a major extent from memories, but something in your surroundings triggers it. Over the last 2 years, there are 3 inspiring artists that shape my curiosity. Robert Irwin [American Artist, mostly known for his dot & line paintings and installation work] Rudolf Arnheim [German born author, art and film theorist and perceptual psychologist] Haruki Murakami [Japanese writer and translator] All of them working on the idea of ‘perception’, one way or another. Do you have a difficult time expressing yourself on the canvas? Indeed it can be. I have done paintings within a SEBASTIAN CHARCOAL &ACRYLIC ON PAPER 2012 minute while others are taking their time. I still Do you tie together both your artwork along paint over works I did in 2010. with your photography or do you prefer to keep them separate? Would you consider your work abstract?

They are tied together, because I consider my photography as artwork. They both run Yes, I do. Mostly abstract expressionism. through a similar process. Sometimes an image is done within minutes or sometimes I have to do the reprocess again and again. Still very What is your medium of choice? different media have very different results. So yes, I like to keep them separate that way they At the moment: acrylics, charcoal, soft pastels, can always add to each other and develop their black pen, fountain ink pen and fixation spray own specific signature. Do you experiment with different materials or Your past pieces have similar themes to your do you prefer to work within certain limits? newer ones. Did you decide at some point to be a little more specific with the details of No limits, I explore different materials and me- your work or did your ideas just evolve? diums, however, I have limits on how I want to express a certain theme and what I want to do. Personally I think, your question is a great

feedback on my work I’ve done over these two


MY TIME THIS TIME 2012 ACRYLIC & CHARCOAL ON NZ VINTAGE MAP

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .285


A FAMILY PORTRAIT AUGUST 2011 ACRYLIC & CHARCOAL ON PAPER

years. Showing my unique way, making you think if there are similar themes or an evolvement within the technique. I would say it is both. One of my main themes is the human mind is expressed through feelings, memories and language. Stories behind form what we perceive in the first place by looking at someone’s layers. I hope I learn with every piece how to deepen this experience and how to make it more intimate. I think you could consider that as an evolvement. What is one memorable response you have from your work? Certainly my ‘anon’s’ & The triptych ‘family portrait august 2011’ I got so much feedback on these particular paintings and I still do. It felt like a breakthrough, being recognized as an artist. NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .286


“The human mind is expressed through feelings, memories and language. Stories behind form what we perceive in the first place by looking at someone’s layers.”

WWW. ANNCTBRAUNSTEINER.COM


MUSTAFA MALUKA INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Renowned artist Mustafa Maluka was born in Cape Town, South Africa but currently resides and works in New York and Helsinki. Maluka creates an eclectic mix of men and women in pop art portrait paintings with a combination of dense and vibrant color schemes. Maluka’s paintings touches base with culture, geography, Sexual orientation, race and his own personal experiences. The artist focuses his inspiration on current events such as politics and global issues that play a major role in society today.


EXODUS OF PAIN 2009 OIL ON CANVAS 61 X 45,5 CM

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .289


IT’S NOT A FAILURE IF YOU NEVER EVEN TRIED 2011 ACRYLIC & OIL ON CANVAS, 183 X 133 CM

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .290


Who or what inspired you to paint? I fell in love with art through studying art history, I thought being a Painter was the coolest thing in the world. Is there a specific style you identify most with? Not really. The world of visual culture is so broad and rich, I’m inspired by images and ideas from everywhere. Being aware of my mixed African, Asian, Polynesian and European ancestry probably opened my mind to various influences very early on. I leave it to others to put me in a “style” box. In your opinion, what makes a strong painting? The thing about painting is that it’s highly subjective. Different people like different things. How do you decide on a subject for your paintings and are the people in your paintings based off of imagination, or are they actual subjects you worked with? My works analyze the different experiences of those who, like myself, through external factors like accent, culture, geography, sexual orientation or race among other things, find themselves contextually dissonant. Some of my characters are immigrants, refugees, others are rebels, freaks and the luckier ones are citizens of the world whose home is not a specific place. My characters are seemingly on an endless quest for home, yet at home everywhere and nowhere. My works are informed firstly by my own experience being born as a 2nd class citizen “outsider” in the country I was born in and later about

INSIDE THE TRUTH MACHINE 2009 OIL ON CANVAS 61X46CM

my experiences in other countries I’ve lived in and called home. Through these experiences, I’ve developed a critical and sometimes subversive strategy that is characteristic of my artistic practice. You’ll find an almost sarcastic view of the world through some of my images and in the titles of my works.

I avoid painting celebrities or people I know personally. These kinds of people come with their own baggage that would interfere with the narratives and issues I’m trying to unpack through my paintings. Are you constructing pieces to mold a specific kind of audience and capture a certain kind of reaction? If the viewer gets any kind of emotional response from a piece, then I’ve succeeded.


DANTE 2001 ACRYLIC & OIL ON CANVAS, 183 X 133 CM


WHY DO YOU TEAR ME FROM MYSELF 2009 OIL ON CANVAS, 61 X 64 CM

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .293


I REMEMBER THE LAST TIME MULTICULTURALISM FAILED IN EUROPE 2011 ACRYLIC & OIL ON CANVAS 183 X 133CM

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .294


Who are some contemporary artists you think are doing excellent pieces today? I avoid all art websites and magazines entirely, so I’m not actually a good person to ask this question. The last paintings I bought for my personal collection were by the painter Andre Ethier. I would say he’s doing interesting work. Would your life change if you would no longer able to express your emotions through your work?

“I would have to be in jail or dead for that to happen. I grew up in a country that had an oppressive, militaristic government and we resisted using every means available.”

I would have to be in jail or dead for that to happen. I grew up in a country that had an oppressive, militaristic government and we resisted using every means available. If I’m ever placed in a similar position again, art will be my weapon. Do you plan on branching of into another direction with your work? In the late 90’s, I was known more for my large photographic prints and video art, in the early 2000’s I did quite a bit of online interactive artwork that incorporated many elements of my paintings. Through this entire journey wherein I’ve lived in 6 different countries, I’ve always painted. Painting is the only constant in my life. What’s next for Mustafa Maluka? I’m always busy working towards my next solo exhibition. Words of encouragement to aspiring artist ? Do the Work. Actions speak louder than words.

HOME AGAIN, HOME AGAIN. 2009 OIL & ACRYLIC ON CANVAS 182.9 X 133.1CM

WWW.MUSTAFAMALUKA.COM


PLEASE T O U C H THE Glass! PHOTOGRAPHY SVENJA PITZ STYLING RAWFITTING


DRESS HELMUT LANGE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .297


DRESS LORIS AZZARO VINTAGE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .298


DRESS BCBG MAXAZRIA


DRESS LORIS AZZARO VINTAGE


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .301


DRESS BCBG MAXAZRIA SHOES MODEL’S OWN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .302


DRESS HALSTON VINTAGE


DRESS HALSTON VINTAGE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .305


DRESS BCBG MAXAZRIA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .306


DRESS HALSTON VINTAGE SHOES MODEL’S OWN


DRESS VERO MODA


DRESS HELMUT LANGE SHOES MODEL’S OWN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .309


DRESS MANGO MOMENTS SHOES MODEL’S OWN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .310


DRESS MANGO MOMENTS


DRESS LORIS AZZARO

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .313


DRESS VERO MODA

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .314


DRESS MANGO MOMENTS


DRESS HELMUT LANGE PHOTOGRAPHY SVENJA PITZ MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST ANIKA RESS MODEL PIA AT MODEL WERK

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .317


THE CITY THAT CHANGED ME PHOTOGRAPHY LPH STYLING LATOYA P. HENRY

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .318


FLORAL METAL CUFF NECKLACE MARTINE ALI CROP KNIT FRINGE SLEEVE TOP AMY CLAIRE HIGH WAIST PANT AUGUSTIN TEBOUL


PONY HAIR NECKLACE WORN AS HAT BJORG EMBROIDERED SHOULDER JACKET AUGUSTIN TEBOUL DRESS FACTORY BY ERIK HART


PONY HAIR NECKLACE WORN AS HAT BJORG EMBROIDERED SHOULDER JACKET AUGUSTIN TEBOUL DRESS FACTORY BY ERIK HART PATENT SHOES WALTER STEIGER

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .321


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .322

NECKLACES EBONY FLEUR CROPPED SHIRT WILLIAM OKPO PANEL LEATHER SKIRT DSTM ANKLE LACE BOOT UNITED NUDE


NECKLACE DLC BROOKLYN SHEER DRESS LINDSAY JONES CHINA BONES STONE CUFF BRACELET MARTINE ALI


SILK KIMONO BLOUSE VEDA NECKLACE DLC BROOKLYN LINEN PANT LINDSAY JONES CHINA BONES STONE CUFF BRACELET MARTINE ALI


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .325


PONY HAIR NECKLACE BJORG CABLE PRINT TOP CODY SAI SILK SKIRT CODY SAI SPINE CUFF BRACELET BJORG

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .326


PRINT PLUNGING V JUMPER FACTORY BY ERIK HART STONE NECKLACE WITH HORNS WANDERLUSTER SPINE CUFF BRACELET BJORG


NECKLACE EBONY FLEUR MALOU JUMPSUIT HENRIK VIBSKOV PATENT SHOES WALTER STEIGER

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .329


KNIT DRESS DRESS AMY CLAIRE BELT WORN AS HEADBAND AMY CLAIRE PATENT SHOES MARC BY MARC JACOBS

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .330


SUNGLASSES VINTAGE GOLD CAGE FINGER RING CHRISHABANA FRACTAL SKULL RING CHRISHABANA STUDDED LEATHER JACKET AUGUSTIN TEBOUL FLORAL SHEER DRESS LINDSAY JONES CHINA BONES BOOTS DR MARTENS


SUNGLASSES VINTAGE CHILDREN OF GOD NECKLACE CHRISHABANA GOLD CAGE FINGER RING CHRISHABANA FRACTAL SKULL RING CHRISHABANA STUDDED LEATHER JACKET AUGUSTIN TEBOUL FLORAL SHEER DRESS LINDSAY JONES CHINA BONES

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .333


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .334


I LOVE TO BONE NECKLACE CHRISHABANA GOLD CAGE FINGER RING CHRISHABANA MATISSE LEATHER JACKET VEDA SKIRT WITH CHIFFON NOMIA ANKLE LACE BOOTS UNITED NUDE PHOTOGRAPHY LPH STYLING LATOYA P. HENRY MAKE UP ARTIST AND HAIR STYLIST NICOLE NVCB MODEL KATYA TOLSTOVA AT MUSE MODELS


CLAIRE LAMPERT INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

Fashion designer and online vintage boutique owner Claire Lampert draws a lot of inspiration from menswear and also childrenswear because of their functionality and less fussy detailing. Lampert is a New York based designer who originally started her career as a designer committed to exploring sustainability. She has worked for the award winning sustainable fashion label Bodkin and she recently collaborated with designer & New York boutique owner Greg Armas for Assembly NY in which they recently presented their first collection together this past Fashion Week. An important process in her design is the use of textiles and color. At this time Claire is keeping an amazing balance between designing at Assembly NY with Greg Armas and running her on-line boutique Where I Was From with photographer Darroch Putnam.


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .337


When did you decide fashion was something you wanted to be a part of? I come from a design family, my father is an architect, and grandfather was a furniture designer, and they always encouraged me to be creative. I knew I wanted to do something in a design field. In high school when I first travelled to Europe I started to be curious about fashion. I didn’t really know what was possible, so I went on to study architecture in college, and started traveling overseas more, which reignited my ideas of fashion. At that point I moved to NYC to attend FIT How would you describe your style of design and what has been one way you have stayed true to your creative concepts? I try to be sustainable in my design. I value making things that people will want to own for a long time. I am very inspired by vintage pieces that are still relevant, and I love utilitarian detailing. I don’t typically follow trends, but stay in tune with myself and what I like. I draw a lot of inspiration from menswear and also childrenswear as it tends to be more about the functionality of a garment and less about fussy detailing. I love to start my design process with textilescolor and textures are very important to me.

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .338


What is one trait you think that most designers have in common? Hmm, I not sure about this one. You and Darroch Putnam recently started an online vintage boutique named “Where I Was From�. Tell us how did that idea come into play and what is the difference with your online boutique compare to many others? Well Darroch and I met a while back when were both working at La Garconne. He is a very talented photographer, and we wanted to collaborate on something where we had complete creative control. A lot of different ideas came into play, but the vintage boutique really stuck because we both find vintage very important and influential in our work, so this was an opportunity to take another step with the pieces we were already using to inspire us elsewhere. How do you keep a balance between designing and running a boutique and is it difficult working on two things that are very time consuming? I love what I do, so it is not difficult to keep the balance generally speaking. I love being at my


studio working on both things, and also spending time roaming through vintage stores and also traveling for vintage. The work I do for the boutique doubles up as design research, so the lines cross quite a bit. This was the only way I could start this… Design is still my number one, but it made perfect sense to do both at the same time. When do you usually feel the most creative and what sparks an idea for your designs?

“I am surrounded by extremely inspiring people most the time, so when I am able to leave my environment and put things in perspective”

I feel the most creative when I have just returned from a trip, and also if I have had a few days with nature. I am surrounded by extremely inspiring people most the time, so when I am able to leave my environment and put things in perspective this is when I find myself most creative. letely different cut. We incorporated classic fabrications-thick black wool, vegetable dyed denim twill, ivory suiting wools, wintery rib You and boutique owner of Assembly New knits and softer draped fabrics for tops and York Greg Armas recently collaborated on As- dresses. It’s a nicely rounded collection, comsembly Fall 2012 collection. How were you ap- plete with hand-knit sweaters from Peru. proached to begin working with Greg Armas? Well I had just finished doing the fall line for La Garconne Moderne, and I had heard Assembly was considering doing a women’s line, so I put it out there that I was interested in designing with him, and he contacted me and the rest is history!

Do you consider yourself to be an environmentalist? I wouldn’t label myself that, but I am environmentally minded in pretty much all things I do.

How would you describe Assembly’s latest fall Who is your favorite fashion icon and does 2012 collection? this person inspire some of your ideas? It’s simple and slightly androgynous. It was all about classic pieces with interesting detailing, and emphasis on various fit options. We did several pant silhouettes each offering a comp-

I love Japanese design so much-Yohji Yammamotto, Issey Miyake, Kenzo, Comme Des Garcons. I recently read My Dear Bomb by Yohji Yamamotto, and was very inspired by


ASSEMBLY FALL . WINTER 2012 NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .341


WHERE I WAS FROM PHOTOGRAPHY DARROCH PUTNAM NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .342


WWW.WHEREIWASFROM.COM


his values and how personal life and work meet. In addition, I am surrounded by so many amazing people that I have met over the years, and am inspired daily by their work. What is a typical day like for Claire Lampert? I spend a lot of time at my studio in Brooklyn, I’m there almost every day of the week. I use this space for design and for the boutique. We shoot all of our stills there. It is such an incredible space with tons of natural light and plants lining the windowsills. I moved into this studio back when I was working on Bodkin, and can’t really imagine leaving anytime soon as it is such a creative haven and surrounded by my favorite vintage stores Horizons, Malin Landaeus and Stella Dallas. I also go to Assembly a few times a week to meet with Greg and discuss our ideas. What are some things you love to do most during your relaxation time? I love to be in nature so much. I also have quite a collection of plants, so I am always on the look out for more of those. I’m sort of obsessed with interior design, so I’m usually commissioning my boyfriend to build us new things for our apartment, and going to the Brooklyn flea to find treasures. I’m also fortunate to live within blocks of my closest friends, so we spend a lot of time together cooking and sitting outside (one of them has an amazing outdoor space, which I am continually spoiled by). How would you describe your personal style? I am pretty much my own customer, so the things I design or style on the site you will also see me wearing. I like clean lines, mostly solids and NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .345


“Love what you do, and make sure you are happy with it…” beautiful textiles. I also typically have some sort of utilitarian piece on mixed with weird art mom vintage Robert Clergerie shoes. One statement piece everyone should have in his or her closets? A really great pair of shoes. For me, that would be my Martin Maison Margiela Kitten-heel boot... Are there any new projects you are looking forward to in the near future? Yes! Always starting new projects... One of the many things that defines a successful designer? Love what you do, and make sure you are happy with it…that goes for all things.

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .346


WWW.CLAIRELAMPERT.COM


YVETTE JONES WRITTEN BY RENESSTA OLDS

Nu-Mode´ Magazine talked to Yvette Jones about her latest collection for Chic Designs by Yvette and this is what she had to say... I incorporate a lot of my art background in many of my jewelry designs as well as trends and fashion. My design inspiration for these particular pieces was from an art and design technique known as Mixed Medias; by definition its where one uses two artistic medias such as my chose of sterling silver and ultra suede and transforming its shape and color into a collage that are combined in a single composition. I find the necklace from my Mixed Metias Collection to be a collage in a sculptural sense as well as being a unique versatile piece where it can be worn on either side due to different colors appearing on the opposite side and being bold in color.


FRESHWATER PEARL COPPER NECKLACE

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .349


“My Classic Copper & Freshwater Pearl Collection: Luminous pearls yet bold in color; adds a sophisticated look in a different way with antique copper”

SILVER & YELLOW SWAROVSKI CRYSTAL PENDANT NECKLACE ON STERLING SILVER CHAIN

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .350


WWW. YVETTE-JONES.COM


BLAISE KAVANAGH WRITTEN BY IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA


I

t’s fair to say that Blaise Kavanagh’s Spring/Summer 2012 collection is well balanced and smart. Full of day to night looks and ranging from tailored wovens to easy to wear knits, it gives any woman plenty of options to choose from. Pants and skirts in a variety of lengths and silhouettes, silk and cotton blouses, linen sweaters and hand tailored jackets - these are some of the choices for Spring/Summer 2012. Each piece is complemented by subtle details of either hand crochet neck trims or contrast piping added for freshness, with beads, sequins and gold tassels thrown in the mix. Always sophisticated, polished and ladylike, Blaise Kavanagh’s collection couldn’t be complete without an impeccable dress selection. From straight to A-line, floor to knee length or just above the knee, this year his dresses come in neutral and bright colors alike, in materials of stretch cotton, linen or silk blend knits and rayon jerseys. Each dress is a standout piece whether it’s fitted at the waist with sunburst seaming, or cut at the waist and pleated, worn alone or accompanied by a belt in white or gold. Subtlety and elegance, not to mention the use of quality European fabrics of natural origin such as cotton, linen and silk, make this collection a perfect choice for a vacation anywhere from the Hamptons to St.Tropez. I.R

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .353


NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .354


“My inspiration every season is really the women I seek to dress...to be able to give them functional versatile wardrobe options that they can wear every day with ease� Kavanagh


WRITTEN BY RENESSTA OLDS

If you are anything like me, a girly girl who waxes poetic and dreams of the days returning when women wore beautiful dresses and gloves every day, then you should be in fashion heaven this spring! The runways were a washed in gorgeous 20’s and 50’s silhouettes with hand embellishments in the softest, palest ecru’s, lilacs and mint greens and the most delicate silks, chiffons and laces. From Louis Vuitton, Milly, Tracy Reese and Carolina Herrera I was at the edge of my seat watching as one confection after the other sashayed down the catwalk.

GUCCI

A FASHION REVIVAL. THE 20’S AND 50’S


LOUIS VUITTON

DIANE VON FURSTENBURG

MILLY

If you also are like me, who now has to figure out how to satisfy my longing for these dresses or at least dresses that looks similar I have provided some style tips.

CAROLINA HERRERA

STYLE TIPS. 1. Raid your mother, grandmother, aunt or any of the other fab women in your life that may have held on to theses pieces. You may find some gems there that may only require a hem, a stitch or a good cleaning. 2. Raid your favorite thrift/ goodwill shop, consignment, and vintage shop. With so many in every major city and quaint town you are bound to find a great piece! 3. Check out H&M and Forever 21. They are sure to have pieces inspired by the originals and the revival of these trends that won’t break your pocket. If you have a little bit more to splurge, check out 50 Dresses by Tess Vigil. Her “Pretty Blue Flowers Dress” retailing at $85 and available at www.chouchounette.com, is shaping up to be a spring hit! Whatever avenue you use to take it from the catwalk to the sidewalk stay fashionable while doing it! R.O

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .357


WRITTEN BY JOHN MARK

Fall/Winter 2012 Fashion Week this February was the craziest of times for the Nu-Mode´ magazine staff. All in all, the NuMode´ staff attended nearly 60 shows and events. Features Editor, JohnMark, had a particular eye for the men’s trends that stuck out most. From the runway to the street, these are the motifs he’s thrilled to see.

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .358

RAG & BONE

FALL 2012 PREVIEW MEN TRENDS


LANVIN

TRUSSARDI

Whether it rested upon their shoulders or as a lapel on their chest, this season’s models braved the PETA protesters with a hearty touch of fur. Synthetic or real, the timeless aesthetic remains the same. Fur is here to stay. J.M.

LANVIN

LOUIS VUITTON

FUR ACCENTS


YOHJI YAMAMOTO

NICHOLAS K

Eyes were kept well under cover from paparazzi flashes are direct sunlight with this seasons brimmed hats. The highly-stylized head wear gave homage to policemen, cowboys, and classic English gardeners. Whether your intention is for occupational function or a dress up fetish, dark shady hats are the way go. J.M.

ROBERT GELLER

YOHJI YAMAMOTO

THE HAT BRIM


SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

BURBERRY PRORSUM

Some call it a purse. Some call it a man-bag. I like to call it a man-clutch. The FW 2012 runway put a masculine swing on this classic woman’s accessory. While most men may find the man-clutch to be unrequited, I welcome it as a solution to the unfavorable appearance of bulky pockets on a well tailored dress pant.. J.M.

VALENTINO

SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

THE MAN CLUTCH

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .361


WRITTEN BY LATOYA P. HENRY

For this fall 2012 the key element that grasped my attention was the use of wintery whites, lacquered leathers and intricate prints highlighted with extreme exaggerated silhouettes. While most of the time we get lost in translation, when the fall season arrives by draping ourselves in only black. The key element is to explore other foundations by adding some pizazz to your fall look. Here are a few trends we just can’t get enough of.

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .362

MI U MIU

FALL 2012 PREVIEW WOMEN TRENDS


J W ANDERSON

COSTUME NATIONAL

Adding some shine to your fall look goes a long way. It’s a great way of dressing up with out actually dressing up. Pair your glossy leather pant or skirt with an embellished collared shirt and you’re ready for business. LH

ACNE

MARNI

SLEEK LEATHERS


A DÉTACHER

VERONIQUE LEROY

With an oversized silhouette this fall season. While the slouchy coat may not be an essential trend that everyone favors. One of the key elements that is perfect about this trend is the ability to maintain a chic appeal during seriously freezing temperatures. LH

COMME DES GARCONS

CELINE

PUMP UP THE VOLUME


PROENZA SCHOULER

AGANOVICH

Who says you can’t wear white after Labor Day. Wanting to keep your look minimal and sharp, play it up this season with wintery whites from head to toe and make a statement with out question. LH

ALEXANDER MC QUEEN

J. MENDEL

SNOW WHITES

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER ISSUE 5 .365


SPECIAL THANKS Gloria Li Chen, CJ Swanton & Eduardo Morales, Ebony Fleur, Brittany Casper, Martine Ali, Meghan Folsom, Cody Sai, Matthew Scheier, Samantha Kallen, Felicia Kwong, Sofia Sarabia PHOTOGRAPHY ROBERT KENNY WWW.ROBERTKENNEYSTUDIO.COM

NU-MODE´ VAGABOND SPRING/SUMMER.ISSUE 5 .366


STOCKLIST GUCCI

WOLFORD

GUESS BY MARCIANO

WALTER STEIGER

HENRIK VIBSKOV

BCBG MAX AZRIA

EBONY FLEUR

CODY SAI

BIJOUX OUI EHFAR

UNITED NUDE

LINDSAY JONES CHINA BONES

MANDULA

ACNE

FATORY BY ERIK HART

FRENCH CONNECTION

MAISON MARTIN MARGIELA

AMY CLAIRE

THE HUDSON BAY COMPANY

HEIDI GARDNER

MARTINE ALI

FLUEVOG

LA PERLA

NOMIA

RUDSAK

HELENE SIDEL

DLC BROOKLYN

CHARLOTTE WATERS

KAREN MILLEN

WANDERLUSTER

RIONA TREACY

RAG & BONE

WILLIAM OKPO

KATRINA FERRARI

WINTER KATE

WOOD WOOD

NANO AOSHIMA

L’AUTRE CHOSE

CARLOS SANTANA

SMWALKER

CANDELA

SABRINA DEHOFF

UNA BURKE

CIRCA SIXTY THREE

AUTOPSY

KORLEKIE

DELPHINE CHARLOTTE PARMENTIER

MEMBER’S ONLY

MINKY MOUSE

CHRISHABANA

LEVI’S

LIANNA SHEPPARD

VEDA

PATRIK MOHR

CRUX

AUGUSTIN TEBOUL

MAX MARA

WINK

GRAEME ARMOUR

ROBERTO VERINO

NINA

OBAKKI

DANIELA BARROS

JOSE DURAN

CHARLES HENRY

HUGO E FERNANDO

SUGAR SCOUT COUTURE

BJORG

NUNO BALTAZAR

TOP SHOP

DSTM

ANDREIA OLIVEIRA

H&M

MINIMARKET

LUIS BUCHINHO

ANNA GAY

ZARA

RACHEL ZOE

DESIQUAL

HELMUT LANGE

L’ATELIER

MINNA PARIKKA

LORIS AZZARO

TED BAKER

ARELALIZZA

HALSTON VINTAGE

PHILOSOPHY BLUES ORIGINAL

KAMILLA MIKAMA

VERO MODA

ACADEMY LONDON

TIIA VANHATAPIO

HELMUT LANGE

FOREVER 21


NUMODEMAG.COM

Nu-Mode´Magazine Issue 5  

Fashion Art and lifestyle publication spring/summer 2012 issue entitled Vagabond. Featuring Sutan "Raja" Amrull, Andrea Boehlke, Nute Nichol...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you