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NU-MODE´ FASHION ART & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE EXCLUSIVE ISSUE 6

SPECTRUM

David Valenci Filligar MOLLIE GONDI LARS ANDERSSOn Tom Hines Lui hon alexander peverett enrico Boccioletti lovejet kreaux Catalpa// nyc coverage

JUL/NOV 2012


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N U - M O D E´ EDITOR IN CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR LATOYA HENRY LATOYA@NUMODEMAG.COM FASHION EDITOR RENESSTA OLDS RENESSTA@NUMODEMAG.COM MARKET EDITOR KAI-LEE PARKER KAILEE@NUMODEMAG.COM FEATURES & MUSIC EDITOR JOHN-MARK JOHNMARK@NUMODEMAG.COM CONTRIBUTING EDITOR IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS COLIN ROSS . GREG MANIS . RICHIE LUBATON . DOMINIK TARABANSKI . NADIA DEL DÒ . GREGORY KEITH ELIZABETH T JONES . PATRICK LIEF . MERJA YEUNG . ARTUR CABRAL . VLASTA PILOT ANNA THIESSEN . TOPHER SCOTT . NIKOLAI DE VERA . DANIELA RETTORE SUBMISSIONS & WEB ENQURIES INFO@NUMODEMAG.COM ADVERTISE ADVERTISE@NUMODEMAG.COM PUBLISHED BY NU-MODE´ MAGAZINE BROOKLYN, NY 11238 T. 7 1 8 . 8 1 2 . 5 8 1 5 WWW.NUMODEMAG.COM


CONTRIBUTORS

COLIN ROSS Colin Ross gave up the family business of making sweeties in Scotland to move down to London where he mainly wears kilts, builds things and takes photographs. WWW.COLINROSSPHOTO.COM

GREG MANIS Born and raised in Northwest Georgia, Greg’s photos tell the tale of his upbringing with a raw yet romantic passion.

Greg has had his work published in books, variousmagazines and shown in galleries around the world. Look for his work in a town near you. GREGMANIS.COM

ELIZABETH T JONES I am a Chicagoland transplant now living in Brooklyn. Through my exploration of dance film I came under the spell of the decisive moment of the still image. I now like to bring my choreographic sensibilities into my photography and fashion films. When I’m not photographing models and friends, I’m photographing chickens. WWW.ELIZABETHTJONES.COM

DOMINIK TARABANSKI

I’m a photographer. I was born at 40 thousandths of Jarosław, a few dozen kilometers from the Ukrainian border. I am living in Cracow and studying photography at Lodz Film School’s Cinematography Faculty. I am also a lecturer at the Academy of Photography in Cracow.

NIKOLAI DE VERA “Nikolai De Vera is a fashion photographer based in New York. After finishing degrees in Linguistics and Japanese Studies he pursued his passion in art through photography. His influences come from his travels and being born and raised in the Philippines. He is currently obsessing over K-Pop.” WWW.NIKOLAIDEVERA.COM

My interest is in people and, regardless of the moment in life thatI witness them in, the ultimate form of my reflections is the photography. I want them to express my opinion on, and the attitude towards the topics I cover. My dream is for them to be a universal language with an impressive, a comment stimulating reflection that is active even when I am asleep. I do believe that one picture can tell more than a 1000 words. WWW.TARABANSKI.COM


INSIDE THIS ISSUE EDITORS LETTER PG 8 KATHRYN MACNAUGHTON PG 10 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY LUI HON PG 16 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY

NEW WAVE OF EUROPEAN DESIGNERS PG 156 IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA NELE PG 166 PHOTOGRAPHY NADIA DEL DÒ STYLING PATRICK LIEF

LARS ANDERSSON PG 23 INTERVIEW JOHN MARK

REFLECTIONS PG 174 PHOTOGRAPHY ALESSIO MIGLIARDI STYLING ALBERTO CANEGLIAS

GIRL INTERRUPTED PG 26 PHOTOGRAPHY RICHIE LUBATON STYLING ALEENEDA THAMMAVONG

ICE CREAM IN THE SKY PG 186 PHOTOGRAPHY TOPHER SCOTT STYLING ALYSSA LESSER

MISTER YAKUZA PG 36 PHOTOGRAPHY ARTUR CABRAL STYLING CATARINA BOTAS & SARA ABREU

SIX LEE PG 194 COVERAGE JOHN MARK

LE NIGHTINGALE PG50 PHOTOGRAPHY LPH STYLING LATOYA P HENRY FROM ST PETERSBURG WITH LOVE, ART AND MUSIC PG 58 ALEXANDER PEVERETT PG 64 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY 非(HI) PG 72 終OWARI PG 76 PHOTOGRAPHY NIKOLAI DE VERA STYLING VICTOR GONZALES

109 PG 198 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY ROGÉRIO CAVALCANTI PG 204 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY I’M ME PG 208 DANIELA RETTORE STYLING CLEO CASINI BIOCHIME PG 220 PHOTOGRAPHY MERJA YEUNG STYLING JOUNI MERVAS KREAUX PG 228 INTERVIEW IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA

FROM BETWEEN EVERAFTER PG 82 PHOTOGRAPHY GREGORY KEITH STYLING YUKO NAKAO

LOVEJET PG 238 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY

ENRICO BOCCIOLETTI PG 92 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY

NEON FLUX PG 238 ELIZABETH T. JONES STYLING PE’A MONIQUE

WINSTON CHMIELINSKI PG 98 JUST COOPER PG 99 TOM HINES PG 100 INTERVIEW LATOYA P HENRY TOO FAST FOR LOVE PG 102 PHOTOGRAPHY GREG MANIS STYLING ALLISON MILLER AT AGENT OLIVER AN AMERICAN MODEL IN SHANGHAI PG 112 A PERSONAL DIARY FROM JOHN MARK’S TRAVELS FILLIGAR PG 118 INTERVIEW IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA THE ROYAL CONCEPT PG 124

POPS OF COLOR PG 246 PHOTOGRAPHY ANNA THIESSEN BEAUTY SAGE PG 254 ORGANIC BEAUTY ROUX MAISON PG 257 ECO CHIC THE BLUES PG 258 ADD A POP OF COLOR ROMANTIC TEASE PG 260 PREVIEW OF THE HOTTEST HAIR TREND ACCESSORY WOMEN TRENDS PG 262 PEEK – A – BOO & PALE DESIRE

PONTOONS PG 125

MEN TRENDS PG 264 BOLD BRIGHTS & NEUTRAL TASTE

YOUNG HEARTS PG 126 PHOTOGRAPHY COLIN ROSS STYLING AMANDA SHERLOCK

PROJECT PG 266 UP CLOSE AND PERSONAL WITH PROJECT NYC

TOO YOUNG TOO FAST PG 134 PHOTOGRAPHY DOMINIK TARABANSKI STYLING GABI GNAT RUBY PG 142 PHOTOGRAPHY VLASTA PILOT STYLING SUNNY VALENTINE

INSIDE CATALPA//NYC PG 273 COVERAGE FROM THE HOTTEST NYC MUSIC FESTIVAL NU-MODE´ BOUTIQUE OF THE MOMENT PG 294 GAMINE CONCEPT BOUTIQUE STOCKLIST PG 295


PHOTOGRAPHY ALESSIO MIGLIARDI MODEL SARA AT WOMEN MANAGEMENT

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IMAGE COURTESY OF WIX

EDITOR’S LETTER

Observing my everyday surroundings from a mixture of colors, to the people I meet and the people I say goodbye too I decided that spectrum would be the perfect title for our beauté issue this season. The inspiration behind “Spectrum” is beauty in an array of all colors, shapes and forms. We are an abundance of different variations, so when you dig further into this issue you will find a creative balance of inspirational and influential figures from some of our favorite new bands and artist. Spectrum is the definition of the world we live in today, a world of beauty, pain, sadness, sorrow, love and laughter. NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 8

Latoya

Latoya P. Henry Editor In Chief


Spectrum Issue

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NU-MODE´ FASHION ART & LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE


KATHRYN MACNAUGHTON INTERVIEW LATOYA HENRY

“DOPE”


ILLUSTRATOR & GRAPHIC ARTIST BASED IN TORONTO, CANADA KATHRYN MACNAUGHTON INTERTWINES A MODERN FORM OF ARTISTIC EXPRESSION BY COMBING ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONISM AND MIXED MEDIA. MACNAUGHTON SETS HER ATTENTION ON SHAPES, PATTERNS AND PORNOGRAPHIC MATERIALS TO CREATE SUBLIME GRAPHIC IMAGERY. How did you get your first start as an artist and how did you decide that illustration and graphic art was something you wanted to pursue? I’m not really sure! I think the first real commission I ever got was from Report on Business magazine. I went to Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto. I originally was enrolled in environmental design but after taking a class in illustration in first year my professor suggested I major in illustration, so I did and here we are! Do you have any creative rituals or routines you follow when creating a new piece and how do you bring an idea into reality?

“RUN FOR YOUR LIFE”

What would you say is the biggest misconception of your art and I think I always have to visualize the piece first. If I can’t it can your work be easily misinterpreted? usually ends up not working. I will then look through my vintage magazines to develop ideas and find textures. I’m really not sure. The only thing that throws people off is that they think my work is hand crafted. Most people think I have Then I’ll probably draw some elements and start scanning originals, but my work is all pieced together digitally. materials and drawings onto the computer. I then start fiddling with composition. Which medium you would love to pursue creatively but haven’t had the chance to explore? Would you consider your work as a form of Pop Art combined with Abstract Expressionism? Music! I’ve been dying to use Reason. I got the program a while ago but haven’t had a chance to fiddle around with it. I also would I guess so! Those are my two favorite art movements and really like to learn how to play instruments like the piano and they have been such a huge inspiration to my work. drums. Is there a message you’re trying to communicate to your audience through your art?

Are there any artist that inspire you and your work, If you had the opportunity to collaborate with any of them who would it be and why?

It depends. When I’m commissioned to do a piece I’m usually the one trying to convey someone else’s message, so it varies. When I’m creating personal work I really like my work to be funny and light hearted. It such a satisfying feeling when some looks at my work and has a huge smile on there face.

So many. My biggest inspiration is David Hockney, Robert Rauschenberg, Basquiat, Guy Bourdin. Some new guys I love are Micah Lidberg, Jonathan Zawada, Merijn Hos, Parra and Jesse Auersalo. I’m not sure who I would love to collaborate with.... probably Guy Bourdin. I like working with photographers. NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 11


“WHEN I’M COMMISSIONED TO DO A PIECE I’M USUALLY THE ONE TRYING TO CONVEY SOMEONE ELSE’S MESSAGE, SO IT VARIES. WHEN I’M CREATING PERSONAL WORK I REALLY LIKE MY WORK TO BE FUNNY AND LIGHT HEARTED.”

“WARRIOR WOMEN”

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“SKULL CASSETTE”


“EYE WEEKLY”

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“SECRET 7 SHOW”

Your work is a combination of pornographic material, women, shapes and patterns Have you ever thought of venturing into any other themes? Oh yes! I love using those themes and I never want to stop using them, but it’s really nice to venture out and try new things. The Steinbeck novels I did were quite refreshing! “Eve Weekly” is a very fascinating piece, what was the emotion you were try to evoke through this image and how were you inspired to create a combination images that examines different forms of life? Eye Weekly is a magazine in Toronto. I was asked to illustrate a piece for the article called Dating Diaries. The stories were hilarious. People would write in anonymously and describe

there most unforgettable first dates. I had to create a piece that best described the events that happened on the date. The one thing you consider to be the most difficult task as an artist? Sometimes I’ll second guess myself when taking risks. I think it’s really important to push the boundaries. Are there any future exhibitions we should keep an eye out for from Kathryn Macnaughton? I’m in a group show this weekend at Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami. But I’ll keep you posted on things coming up in the future! NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 15


LUI HON INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY

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FEATURED ON POPULAR DESIGN SHOW PROJECT RUNWAY AUSTRALIA. DESIGNER LUI HON APPROACHES DESIGN BY CONSTRUCTING FUNCTIONAL AND TIMELESS PIECES EMPOWERED BY BEAUTY, STRENGTH AND SERENITY. HON’S ABILITY TO DESIGN STRUCTURAL, TECHNICAL AND TEXTURAL GARMENTS CAUGHT THE ATTENTION OF HENRY ROTH WHO TOOK HON’S PORTFOLIO TO ICONIC DESIGNER HELMUT LANG, ENCOURAGING THE BEGINNING OF LUI HON. How are you usually inspired and is it difficult to find inspiration? I often find my inspiration through my current stage of mind. It can be from a simple string of music, movie or a person story. Anything that raises my goose bumps and I needed to get it out from my vessel. I tend to see fashion as an expressional channel. With this channel, I can use it as my motion-feeling tool. Do you usually combine your personal heritage into your style of design?

Was there a specific essence you wanted to capture with the female form?

I am not sure that I have intentionally combined my personal heritage into my design. But I am definitely influenced by my family upbringing value and philosophy to my design For me the female form is made up of a series of approach. complications compared to the male, therefore making it more interesting to work with – this collection I have Who is the ideal person you are designing for? taken a more tailored approach. The woman with strength, tenacity toward their live and the One of your favorite pieces from your spring/summer serenity and liberation in their soul, are offend attracted to me. Prism Of Light collection and why? Do you feel your style of design is a form of artistic expression?

All the fringe pieces are special to me as it’s my first attempt to apply them for a bit of fun – and the freshness of the different dimension of the label. The The style of my design is a hybrid form of expression through fringe captures the movement and the light when worn. the impeccable people I have met throughout my journey. I’ve noticed the majority of your collections consist Whispering Roots and Prism Of Light contained an of two classic colors, black & white. Have you ever exquisite set of pieces. What was the inspiration behind thought of exploring with a range of color? these collections and how long was the designing process? Lately I tend to dash in a strong color at a time that can The strength, by understanding the self-value and be work hand in hand with black and white. It needs to comfortable with in.


“WITH THE RECENT OPENING OF OUR ONLINE STORE WE HOPE TO BREAK INTO THE RETAIL SECTOR, WORLDWIDE. I SEE L U I H O N BEING ACCESSIBLE TO THE CONSUMER WORLDWIDE”


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have the similar quality from black and white, strong and We know the fashion industry could be sometimes cutthroat, how do you keep motivated? yet compromising at the same time. Do you concern yourself with the latest trends? It is good to acknowledge the trend and not being jeopardized by it. One specific fabric you enjoy working with and why? There are more than one fabric I enjoy working with, they are wool and leather. The both materials have moldable character. The scene of these raw materials is so stimulating to work with. Any place you could travel in the world to gather inspiration where would it be and why? New York. I heard the place is fill with energy.

Just focus on the positivity of the creative realm can be explored, that will be good enough. Where would you like to see L U I H O N within the next two years? With the recent opening of our online store we hope to break into the retail sector, worldwide. I see L U I H O N being accessible to the consumer worldwide and we hope to launch into the American Market. Any advice for aspiring designers? Fashion is a business - Create the strength in the legs to uphold the beauty – Luka Maich, Director, L U I H O N.


LARS ANDERSSON INTERVIEW JOHN MARK


There is a power in the dark minimalism of Swedish designer Lars Andersson’s work. With long draped knitwear and a palette of black and grey, his garments are simple, but still manage to provoke a wealth of emotions. Standing on a backlit stage, the models at his presentation this past February appeared mysterious, strong, and slightly post-apocalyptic, like nomads and warriors. At our pre-show interview, I greatly appreciated Lars Andersson’s laid back and approachable personality. A jeans and t-shirt kind of guy, Lars Andersson could be both your next door neighbor and one of the greatest emerging designers in knitwear to date.

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“THE CLOTHES ARE MINIMAL IN MY OPINION. I THINK WHEN YOU WEAR THEM, SOME OF THEM MAKE QUITE A STATEMENT.”

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What was your inspiration for this collection? I went on a road trip through California, drove from southern Cali up to Portland and came across this little museum of Native American art and I bought two books there by Edward S. Curtis and they’re amazing, they’re really amazing. His photographs are super good and even though I didn’t really look at the knit, there are specific things like, ‘Ok, I want to do that poncho or that poncho.’ That was sort of like a feel. I like the whole draping, you know, I like wraps. So, with that in the back of my mind I started knitting. I ordered my yarns quite early on in the season… I don’t draw, so everything came out sort of organic. Have you come under scrutiny due to the fact that you don’t draw? So far, so good. If people look at my previous work, they always love it. That’s how I have to judge what I will do in the future. Yeah, I think that it’s easy to see what you have done and trust that you have fantastic vision. If you were to describe your aesthetic in just a few words what words would you say? My personal aesthetic, jeans and t-shirt. I’m very simple. Is that reflected at all in your clothes? The clothes are minimal in my opinion. I think when you wear them, some of them make quite a statement. If you wear those big coats people are gonna notice you for sure, but they’re still very minimal in their cut. The fabrics are always amazing, it’s all about the feel of the fabric and the cut of it. I don’t do frilly, I like clean shapes. I like jeans and t-shirts because it’s easy, it’s feels right for me as a person. I think that what I design for men and women is something that I would desire to be, it’s something that I’m longing for. This ideal person, that I romanticize. I like people to dress up in the clothing. I think it’s fantastic that you genuinely love the clothes that you’re making and that they’re something that you would like to wear as well. If I were skinnier and if had a trendier style I would totally wear my clothes. Are you saying you don’t feel trendy enough to wear your own clothes? I think you’re the ideal person to wear one of my designs. We’ll, if you’re offering… we’re very excited for you Lars. Congratulations.

LARS ANDERSSON FALL 2012 PRESENTATION PHOTOGRAPHY DREW KRASON


GIRL, INTERRUPTED PHOTOGRAPHY RICHIE LUBATON STYLING ALLEENEDA THAMMAVONG

DENIM SLEEVELESS SHIRT CHEAP MONDAY BLACK DRESS CHEAP MONDAY BATHING SUIT TOP CHEAP MONDAY ; RING H&M LACE UP BOOTS VONG


MESH DRESS MINTAGE BATHING SUIT TOP CHEAP MONDAY

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LEATHER COAT HARD ON LEATHER RING H&M ; NECKLACE MINTAGE WHITE SHEER DRESS FUNKTIONAL AT SKOUT LACE UP BOOTS VONG


NECKLACE MINTAGE WHITE SHEER DRESS FUNKTIONAL AT SKOUT


DRESS UNDERNEATH ERYNE BRINIE AT SKOUT OWL HAT ST YLIST OWN ; JACKET MINTAGE TANK TOP COLCCI AT SKOUT LACE UP BOOTS VONG


SWEATER RALPH LAUREN SHORTS MINTAGE ; RING H&M LACE UP BOOTS VONG

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DENIM SLEEVELESS SHIRT CHEAP MONDAY BLACK DRESS CHEAP MONDAY BATHING SUIT TOP CHEAP MONDAY ; RING H&M LACE UP BOOTS VONG


MESH DRESS MINTAGE BATHING SUIT TOP CHEAP MONDAY ACCESSORIES H&M AND MINTAGE


HAT BRIXTON RAIDERS SHIRT MINTAGE DENIM IT! ACCESSORIES H&M AND MINTAGE


MESH DRESS MINTAGE BATHING SUIT TOP CHEAP MONDAY ACCESSORIES H&M & MINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHY RICHIE LUBATON STYLING ALLEENEDA THAMMAVONG MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST BRE TERANISHI MODEL RILEY AT ELITE MODELS

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Yakuza mister

PHOTOGRAPHY ARTUR CABRAL STYLING CATARINA BOTAS & SARA ABREU

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WATCH JACOBS & CO ; BRACELET MASSIMO DUTTI SWEATER H&M PAISLEY PRINT PANT ZARA BELT ALDO


SHIRT SISLEY JACKET H&M PANT ZARA TIE GIOVANNI GALLI ; BELT ALDO

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BLAZER ZARA SHIRT H&M JEANS LEVIS NECKLACE H&M ; BOOTS ALDO


BLAZER ZARA SHIRT H&M JEANS LEVIS NECKLACE H&M


SCARF VINTAGE SHIRT H&M PANT ZARA WATCH MASSIMO DUTTI ; BRACELET H&M

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POLO KNIT SHIRT H&M SUSPENDERS ZARA PANT GIOVANNI GALLI TIE VINTAGE ; BELT GARDENIA WATCH MASSIMO DUTTI

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TANK TEZENIS VEST BLANCO PANT GIOVANNI GALLI


POLO KNIT SHIRT H&M SUSPENDERS ZARA PANT GIOVANNI GALLI TIE VINTAGE ; BELT GARDENIA WATCH MASSIMO DUTTI

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BLAZER ZARA TANK TEZENIS VEST BLANCO PHOTOGRAPHY ARTUR CABRAL PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT FILIPE FERREIRA STYLING CATARINA BOTAS & SARA ABREU MAKE UP ARTIST MELISSA ARAUJO MODEL VIKTOR CLEAR AT ELITE LISBON

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Le Nightingale

PHOTOGRAPHY LPH STYLING LATOYA HENRY


HEADBAND JULIA CLANCEY BODYSUIT ASOS WOOL & LEATHER SKIRT SOH

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BLOUSE JUMA STUDDED CHOKER MODEL’S OWN

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WOOL HAT HOUGHTON DRESS ABIGAIL STEWART


NECKLACE BANANA REPUBLIC DRESS TITANIA INGLIS

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When did you decide that you wanted to model?

What do you feel is the most difficult part of being a model?

Hmm let me see, being a black model because you only see one light skin, one medium brown and one dark skin model on the board. It would What do you feel is the biggest misconception be great if they can have more than that. Black about models? people have many different shades and I’m sure that you can get many different looks from That everyone doesn’t eat. I’ve been skinny my them. Why is it not evolving? entire life and personally I feel that it’s genetic. Fashion evolves, everyone changes every Sometimes people think that I am either anoseason so why can’t the looks of the models rexic or bulimic but I’m not. change too. If you could work with any designer who Do you feel it is harder for ethnic models to would it be and why? break into the industry when compared to other models? Mara Hoffman, a friend of mine modeled her pieces for her. Hoffman’s designs are legit and Of course it is, hands down. I really love them. I would also love to work with Sophie Theallet because of the fairy like How do you stay in shape and what are some themes she chooses. I am the type of person skin methods that you use to achieve beautiful that loves fantasy plus I’m very childlike. skin? That’s pretty cool. I decided when I was in high school but I didn’t pursue it until I graduated.

What’s your favorite thing to eat? Anything. I don’t have to choose because I’m so skinny. Laughs What do you like to do during your down time? I do research and play chess. What type of research? Spirituality and purposes to help me evolve because I believe in evolution a whole lot. Whether scientifically or spiritually it happens in both aspects of humankind. So that’s what I like to do. How long have you been living in New York City? A decade it will be 11 years in December.

I stay away from too much sugar because it breaks me out but if I do decide to indulge I drink a lot of water. There’s no other way around it. For my complexion I wash my face with clean and clear which has salicylic acid, which helps. I also apply an astringent to remove dirt and sweat. To keep in shape do you follow any diet or exercise programs? To be honest I don’t have to do either. I’m not trying to brag but I’m naturally lean so it doesn’t make sense to follow these methods. What is one piece of advice that you can off aspiring models following in your footsteps? Don’t ever give up! Eventually your dream will come true; you slowly have to build up your image. The best thing to do is research the people that you will be working with, look at their portfolio carefully and you will never be misrepresented.

-Interview Latoya P Henry WOOL HAT HOUGHTON DRESS ABIGAIL STEWART PHOTOGRAPHY LPH STYLING LATOYA HENRY MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST NICOLE NVCB MODEL SAFARA NIGHTINGALE


FROM St. Petersburg WITH LOVE, ART AND MUSIC...

WRITTEN BY IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA PHOTOGRAPHY IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA


Saint Petersburg - the city of White Nights, the splendor of the Tsars and the October Revolution - has inspired and nurtured a number of world-famous Russian musicians, artists and writers. The city has also attracted a variety of internationally known artists and architects from the early 1700’s when the city was founded by Peter the Great. The idea behind Peter’s grandiose plan was to create a western city that would introduce Russia to the West and at the same time familiarize Russians with Western culture. The result of over three centuries’ worth of work is a thriving metropolis and one of the most beautiful cities in the world, rich in history, culture, music and art. St. Petersburg, the northern capital of Russia, has always been known for its exceptional art museums, but in contrast to Moscow, the contemporary art scene was always something of a miss here. Thankfully, a new generation of artists has been developing in the ever changing and turbulent Russian society. On the one hand, there are new art galleries springing up all over and on the other, a couple of old beacons of art life that have withstood the test of time continue to support artists from all walks of life. One of these old beacons is the art center known as “Pushkinskaya 10”. This year the art center celebrated its 23rd anniversary featuring a wide variety of performances, concerts and gallery openings. The center is proudly independent and non-commercial, and frankly, it’s a miracle it was able to survive without any government help all these years. The atmosphere of the center is quite bohemian and it consists of several buildings that were occupied by freethinking artists in the early 90’s. To this day a few of them still live in studios in the center that provides an affordable live and work-in options. “Pushkinskaya 10” also runs an international residence program for artists and art researchers alike, giving them an opportunity to work in a vibrant cultural environment. Each floor of its 4 buildings is painted or decorated with murals, sculptures and paintings. The name of this year’s anniversary “The Holiday of the House” speaks for itself: you feel right at home visiting galleries from one floor to the next and discovering not only new contemporary art, but experiencing Russian art history as well. Performance art is fast becoming a popular artistic form in Russia, where traditional theater and the Stanislavsky technique were once the preferred form of acting expression. There are numerous art performances staged throughout the major areas of town, and they are definitely enjoying some well-deserved attention. The festival at “Pushkinskaya 10” started with a very compelling performance by the theater group of Rezeda Kuchkarova and Evgenia Andrianova called “I understand you, I don’t understand you”. This play revolved around the idea that “our speech is not always clear, but our hearts are always pure” and presented an archaic verbal and body language that precisely delivered the message in a unique artistic way. We are who we are, and no matter where we come from, our language and our words cannot separate us; there is always something else that connects us all- our heart and our soul. NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 59


The other noteworthy performance during the festival came from a young theater group known as “Light people” and was titled “To be”. This stage performance was based on the topic of mottos and stereotypes in today’s culture. “Listen to the elders”, “ Be like everyone else”, “Live by the rules” – these are the slogans presented to us in a modern world, where individual empowerment is limited by the rules and stereotypes imposed by mass media and society. Only after breaking these stereotypes does an individual have a chance for personal and creative freedom. St. Petersburg’s music scene is just as rich. Starting with Tchaikovsky, Rimsky-Korsakov, Mussorgsky, Shostakovich and Stravinsky, the city on the Neva River became a birthplace to world-class music of various types. Music festivals are held here every season of the year, from April to February, and cover a wide range of music from baroque to contemporary. One of the better known festivals is The Stars of the White Nights Festival that runs from mid May to mid July and features performances in classical ballet, opera and music. The city is also an emerging meeting ground for jazz bands from all over the world. For 15 years now Jazz Spring Concert Series has been running every April. There are also a number of newer jazz festivals gaining recognition in the past few years – for example, Petrojazz, known for its jazz and world music in June, and the Festival of Guitar Jazz. A little known fact about St. Petersburg is that it was also one of the places where Russian rock originated in the 80s. Numerous bands formed here: Aquarium, Alisa, DDT to name just a few, and probably the most famous one of all – Kino with Victor Zoi as its creator, song writer and lead singer. This year St. Petersburg celebrated the 50th anniversary of his birth and mourned his untimely death in a car accident in the 90’s. The most characteristic part about St. Petersburg (back then the city was named Leningrad) as a rock music center was the deep connection between music and other types of art – literature, theater and cinema. Not only did it give Leningrad bands an edge and separated them from the more commercial approach of Moscow’s bands; it also influenced their lyrics and symbolized the troublesome times. Kino, with its simple, thoughtful lyrics connected with the Perestroika generation more than any other band. Their music was the medicine to the wounded soul of the 80’s youths who saw a hero in its lead singer and found answers to questions in the lyrics of their songs. NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 60


“A “CULTURE CAPITAL” OF RUSSIA, ST. PETERSBURG STANDS IT’S GROUND PROVIDING ITS VISITORS AND RESIDENTS ALIKE WITH UNPARALLELED EXPERIENCE IN ART, CULTURE AND MUSIC, BUT THERE IS SOMETHING MUCH BIGGER THAT SETS IT APART FROM ANY OTHER LARGE SOCIETAL CONGLOMERATE” Victor Zoi and his legendary rock band “Kino” have influenced a number of rock bands in the past three decades. U-Piter was formed in 2001 with one of the former members of Kino and a couple of musicians from other popular Leningrad’s bands: Nautilus Pampilius, Aquarium and Petlya Nesterova, compiling the “super group” that continues to attract attention both in Russia and abroad. Splean, Pilot, Kukryniksy, Televizor and a few other bands were formed in the late 80s and early 90’s, and are enjoying steady commercial success. A number of lesser-known bands formed in 2000s (for example, Serdimontana, Spirit and Opportunity) and are on their way to a successful musical career. Numerous classic, punk, folk, metal, acoustic and indie rock bands are being formed today in St. Petersburg, and there always will be something special about them. The majestic surroundings of this northern city and its aura will eternally guide towards light, beauty and pure creativity. As a “culture capital” of Russia, St. Petersburg stands it’s ground providing its visitors and residents alike with unparalleled experience in art, culture and music, but there is something much bigger that sets it apart from any other large societal conglomerate; it’s the city’s soul, the quiet voice that speaks to you from every corner of this magnificent metropolis built on the idea of melding between two cultures, European and Russian. So come and experience it for yourself: whether it’s the White Night season or a snowy winter, Saint Petersburg has plenty to offer and will welcome you with open arms and enchant you with its beauty. You will come home with a different point of view of what Russian culture is all about and perhaps break a stereotype or two. -Irina Romashevskaya NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 63


ALEXANDER PEVERETT INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY

“4HP”

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INVESTIGATING WITHIN A RANGE OF TRANSITIONAL GENERATIVE ART AND COMPUTER GRAPHICS THAT NEARLY RESEMBLE A COSMIC KALEIDOSCOPE. MULTIDISCIPLINARY ARTIST ALEXANDER PEVERETT CREATES EXTENSIVE EYE OPENING PROPORTIONS THAT FOCUS ON SYNTHESIZED ELEMENTS AND VARIOUS PATTERNS. THOUGH HE DOESN’T REALLY DEAL WITH IDEAS OR DEFINITIONS BEHIND HIS WORK. PAVERETT MANAGES TO MANIFEST AN ECLECTIC COMBINATION OF FASCINATING DIGITAL ABSTRACT MEDIA, WHICH COMPELS HIS AUDIENCE.

Tell us when was your first experience with art?

I can’t really remember my first encounters with art, it might have been watching Sesame Street pre-school or hearing some music pre-birth, but I do remember my first experience of using computers to make images and sounds.When I was 5 years old my brother and father brought home a Sinclair ZX Spectrum computer at plugged it into the TV. I was too young to understand coding my own programs but I was fascinated by the colors and “graphical alphabet” across the number keys. Just using this simple block-based character set and limited range of colors I could build multicolored on-screen patterns and controls the images I saw on TV. It wasn’t long before I got into BASIC and started programming short pieces of software for generating images and sound and a few failed attempts at games. Was it a challenging decision choosing the style of art you wanted to explore? No, not at all, I never really made any conscious decision to be an artist or to choose any particular style and I work in a lot of disciplines, I’m still exploring as much as I can. I think being a child at a time when the VCR and a home computer were just two of my many toys available to me influenced me a lot. These technologies were really friendly and just objects to play with and aid exploring my imagination, just like my Lego blocks, Star Wars figures or Plasticine was. So, it’s weird when I’m involved in discussions that make a distinction between digital and non digital tools or art forms. I have always been playing with these toys, tools and technologies to create new things. It’s more of a challenge for me to think about why my images and videos end up the way they do, what influences and experiences are particular to me and contribute to my aesthetic and stylistic decsion making and why are certain creative tendencies not a part of my work when they appear to be important to other artists. But, I don’t think about it consciously when I am in the process of making a piece.

“NEW10”

Is there a difference between a people who study art versus someone who is self taught? I guess the biggest difference is being financially able to attend a place of study. In my experience some great and some terrible artists come from both backgrounds. I do think it is vital for an artist to pursue their own path and not to be completely lead by others. In some academic circumstances unconfident young artists may become molded by the dominant institution and the opinions of its educators. This may be beneficial in creating the type of artist that will fit into pre-existing art movements and commercial networks connected with the institute and its profile, but might not necessarily in creating artists they produce great unique works of art. In the same way that the Internet seems to have a normalizing effect on art, leading to the rapid production and reproduction of similar works and techniques, it’s influence is just too dominant for some people. What are the difficult aspects of art is it developing an idea or relaying the message? The kind of work I make doesn’t really deal with ideas or messages that could be better communicated through spoken and written languages and I never use my work as a way of communicating a literal thought or opinion. I used to work hard to remove myself from the work as much as possible, creating lots of generative work, but have chilled out on that as I have got older and can see a lot of myself in the work I make. I’m really inspired by Optical Art, Perceptual Art, pioneering Computer & Video Art and some artistic movements of the late 60s, 70s and 80s and tend to agree with any tradition that believes that an artwork solely communicates something of


“I DO LOVE VIVID EMOTIONAL AND SENSORY EXPERIENCES FROM ART OR LIFE THAT GIVE YOU A HEIGHTENED AWARENESS OF YOURSELF IN THE PRESENT MOMENT”

art as a pedestal for the elevation of the artist to a position of adoration, I’m far more into art works and art forms as a part of everyday life or situations and the basic act of creativity. Maybe looking at the artist, the tools or the ideas too much distracts from the art. Maybe creative expression, through the use of the technologies of the time, has always contributed significantly to civilization and could be seen as a more fundamental part of the human experience than politics or organized religion. I used to study Balinese Gamelan and when I spent some time in Bali I was really into the ways art and music were a part of Balinese society. Actually, I studied gamelan for accompanying shadow plays and I remember learning that the audience was traditionally split during performances, the women and children would watch the story from in front of the screen but the men would watch the puppeteer and musicians working behind the screen.

itself and creates its own unique dialogue with each spectator. My thoughts and ideas about a piece of my work end at the work and a new interpretation begins from there. For this reason, the titles I come up with for each work are just labels to help me catalogue the things I make and although they may have some personal meaning to me I don’t intend them to have any Could you tell us a bit about the technique you use and how great influence on how the work is perceived. long does it take to construct a painting? The most difficult aspects of art for me are buying the time to invest in making more work and being in a financial situation that allows me to support my creative pursuits and maintain the technologies in my studios, aside from these really practical issues making art is kind of a luxury and is serious fun.

Is there an emotion you are trying to evoke through your work? The computer graphic paintings and video works I make could be seen as analogous to the electronic and computer music I compose. Simply speaking, It is mostly about style and composition, synthesizing elements, selecting components, choosing textures and arranging them in repeating or varying patterns and configurations. I am aware that by selecting certain components and arranging them in a certain way the work may evoke particular emotional responses within people but this isn’t my main intention and I never pursue that kind of emotional control over people. Especially in music and cinema I find that this is often manipulative and sinister. I do love vivid emotional and sensory experiences from art or life that give you a heightened awareness of yourself in the present moment and these kind of instants influence the kind of work I try to make. I try to avoid making art that functions as escapism from reality or that creates deceptive illusions of fantasy. In what way do you feel art and technology plays a major role in today’s society? I don’t have much of an opinion on this, people have made art and used tools for such a long time now it is kind of primal and continuous. However, doing a lot of electronic music for the last couple of decades I have really grown weary of the “rock star” idea and am really uncomfortable with the misuse of

This depends on each work, sometimes the process flows naturally and reaches a satisfying point of completion really quickly, other times it takes a lot longer. Sometimes I go back to unfinished works or ideas I started 10 or 15 years ago and finalize them, or use them as a starting point for something else, kind of collaborating with an earlier version of myself. One of my computer graphic paintings could take me less than an hour or several years of non-continuous sessions. I have a number of different systems and methods of working and some are faster than others, most of my computer graphic paintings are “hand made” using a mouse or light pen but over the last few years I have been programming generative software systems to mimic my own way of drawing and sometimes include these works. A lot of it is done by feel and an awareness of my own sensibilities, without really consciously thinking about how these sensibilities may have been formed or how they could be applied. In my studio I use a lot of different home computing platforms and software packages from the last 40 years of electronic image making, but for my computer graphic paintings I mostly combine different pixel based drawing software. For other projects I use programming languages like BASIC, MAX/ MSP/Jitter, QC and Processing. For your video art series “Thirty-six Visions of Mount Fuji” has such an alluring affect. How did the concept come together and why did you choose Mount Fuji? For most of the last 10 years I had been living in Sendai city in northern Japan, until the natural disasters and ongoing nuclear crisis. In 2010, after buying a Fairlight Computer Video Instrument, I built a small Audio/Visual feedback system using the CVI, some cameras, lenses, prisms and modular synthesizers and


ART OF PARTIES

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“PROFESSIONALLY MY GOAL IS REALLY SIMPLE, I WANT THE WORK I MAKE TO SUPPORT A LIFESTYLE DEDICATED TO MAKING MORE WORK.”


“SPA”

WWW.ALEXANDERPEVERETT.COM


started documenting a set of real-time experiments. The more successful pieces that I recorded all had strong triangular forms and very natural fluid movements, so when it came to editing and cataloguing them I chose the title as a kind of play on words and homage to the famous “Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji” (富嶽三十六景) by Katsushika Hokusai. I’m also quite aware how my experiences and feelings about Japan have probably found their way into my work and my approach, so in retrospect the piece took on new meaning for me and became some kind of response to certain locations in Japan, but not actually Mount Fuji. How often do you spend creating new pieces and what is your studio space like? I’m making new work everyday. The different personal studios I have maintained have been a mix of digital and analogue electronic creative technologies, various home computers, drum machines, synthesizers, video hardware and anything else that I get really into using and that produces the right kinds of results. My current temporary studio, since leaving my home and studio in Japan, is just a corner desk in a room my daughter uses as a playroom. So, at the moment all the technologies have become simplified and I am working a lot just from within my macbook, but applying techniques learnt from other hardware. So if you had the option to collaborate with any artist who would it be and what would you want to create?

Professionally, what’s your goal as an artist and where would you like your work to be in the near future?

Oh, too many to mention. I really love collaboration and there are so many artists I respect and would like to work with but it’s always hit and miss to see which combinations of people work Professionally my goal is really simple, I want the work I make to support a lifestyle dedicated to making more work. It well creatively. would also be nice to see some of my images used in different functions like clothing or in a wider variety of locations, Right now, there are a couple of things I’m really into doing. living spaces, galleries and public spaces. Honestly, I’m alFirstly I am very keen to collaborate with clothing designers and see my computer graphic paintings and patterns on clothes ways active and really into producing the work and just want to continue progressing what I have always been doing. being worn by people. I would also love to make a extended duration movie, I am not really into a lot of cinema and think the potential for making non-narrative motion pictures, that are unlike story driven theatre, has not really been fully explored yet. Also, I’d imagine that working with people like Steina and Woody Vasulka or Yaacov Agam would be a really inspiring learning experience for me.

Are there any new pieces in the works or exhibitions are your looking forward to? I’m excited about a lot of things this year. I’m currently editing together a 24 hour video work, preparing some pieces for an exhibition at the online Fachs & Asendorf Gallery, collaborating on a video with Roger-Tellier Craig for the Plink Flojd project, making some limited edition prints of my work, releasing a series of 12” records on Skam records, co-managing the ICASEA electronic music label with Tom Knapp & Satoshi Aizawa, setting up my own digital art company and continuing to make my computer graphics, electronic music and video art everyday.

What motivates you? Too many things to mention, that’s such a difficult question. Like I said, I’m totally into just making things and although it’s not always the easiest way to make a living I feel being creative is a worthwhile human activity. I love a lot of things other people make and get motivated by seeing great art, watching great video art, listening to incredible music but also travel, nature and experiencing different cultures and linguistic systems. All this good stuff just blends together and excites me, and I never really get “ideas” from these things but a kind of restless energy that I want to be making more stuff. Maybe being productive is a compulsive habit. I also agree with Jim Henson when he said “my hope is to leave the world a bit better than when I got here” and I hope making art is just one way we can do this. NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 71


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Venturing into a world of lost moments in time, with a strong sense of loneliness. Japanese contemporary artist é?ž digitally paints a scene of serene tranquility, the artist é?ž who prefers not to release their identity states that they focus their attention on younger men because they are much more suitable to express loneliness because women are considered to be emotional and powerful. The artist expresses their feelings through digital paintings that convey an intense sea of depression, illness, and fragile nature, while developing a frightening but alluring character. As you observe further into the artist mesmerizing paintings you find an enigmatic bizarre dream-like sequence of lost hopes, which pulls you closer into a state of sadness yet beautiful emotions.


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終OWARI

PHOTOGRAPHY NIKOLAI DE VERA STYLING VICTOR GONZALES

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ACCESSORIES WORN THROUGHOUT AYAKA NISHI


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PHOTOGRAPHY NIKOLAI DE VERA STYLING VICTOR GONZALES MAKE UP ARTIST IMANE HAIRSTYLIST STEFANI ANNALIESE MODEL LEILA AT ELITE NY


FROM BETWEEN EVERAFTER

PHOTOGRAPHY GREGORY KEITH STYLING YUKO NAKAO


LEATHER TOP BARKSDALE DRESS ROBIN BROUILLETTE SHOES ZARA EARRINGS TED ROSSI BRACELET ANTON HEUNIS

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TOP DOHO SKIRT SUMI TACHIBANA LARGE NECKLACE ROBIN BROUILLETTE NECKLACE TED ROSSI CORSET ST YLIST OWN EARRINGS PHILLIPE PHERRANDIS CUFF & RING TED ROSSI

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JACKET SUMIE TACHIBANA DRESS BARKSDALE NECKLACE (FROM THE TOP) ALLEN SCHWART BADGLEY MISCHKA ANTON HEUNIS


TOP TROUBADOUR EARRINGS & RING ANTON HEUNIS


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DRESSSUMI TACHIBANA HAT ABIGAIL ALDRIDGE LARGE NECKLACE DOHO CUFF & RING TED ROSSI

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NECK PIECE SUMIE TACHIBANA HAT ABIGAIL ALDRIDGE


JACKET BARKSDALE DRESS DOHO NECKLACE DOHO RING TED ROSSI PHOTOGRAPHY GREGORY KEITH ST YLING YUKO NAKAO MAKE UP ARTIST KELLY BUDD HAIRST YLIST SASHA BAY

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ENRICO BOCCIOLETTI INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY

“CONNIE K. FORD, 81 WILLIAMS LANE, WICHITA, KS 67202”, IMAGE FILE, 2011

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TOUCHING BASE WITH LIMITLESS POSSIBILITIES ENRICO BOCCIELETTI FINDS A COMMON BALANCE BETWEEN ART AND MUSIC. EXPERIMENTING WITH A METAPHORIC ATMOSPHERE BOCCIELETTI DEVELOPS A STIMULATING METHOD TO SYNTHESIZE TWO MAJOR COMPONENTS. Enrico Boccioletti share with us when did you notice music & art was your passion? Hi, this is nice. I can recall, as an adolescent, when you can’t cope without trying to copy everything you find interesting. Involvement out of emulation and transference. Do you think modern society understands an artist perspective, way more than they have in the past or is it a façade? I just think new possibilities emerged while others ceased to make sense. It is not a matter of more vs. less rather than better or worse, but more about something which has to do with a switch of meaning in the changing of contexts. images meant to be experienced fast (fashion pictures found online), through a diverted use of retouching software. To Are you trying to capture a certain response from your negate a subject in the digital image becomes a means for a audience? If so what kind of reaction are you hoping for? physical presence to be there, as fake algorithm-generated identities. Absence is then the most effective way to make I am trying to be inclusive in matters, which can hardly be presence emerge. by nature. I’m not aiming to anything in particular, and in particular I don’t expect any answers. I try to raise questions, How would you describe “Death In Plains” sound and more likely. would you put your style of music in a particular genre? Describe your style of creativity in three words? Immaterial-to-material (and back). When and how were you inspired to put together the “Contentaware” series?

What I got with the Death In Plains experience is music, which doesn’t want to be addressed as music mostly. Again this has to do with presence and perception and the idea of something, which “is performed”, and performing, and translated from a form into something else.

Contentaware is conceived as a work in progress series of DIP’s has been as much image as it has been music, rectified readymade’s in the digital realm, a quick work over this being its strength and its frailty at the same time.


“DOMENICA ZETTICCI, VIA SANTA MARIA DI COSTANTINOPOLI, 34, 46040-SAN FERMO MN / NICOLETTA PADOVESI, VIA RAFFAELE CONFORTI, 129, 67030-BAGNATURO AQ”, IMAGE FILE, 2011


“I’M WORKING MOSTLY ON HOW WE PERCEIVE OURSELVES THROUGH AWARENESS OF TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGE AND FLOWS OF DATA AND INFORMATION”

Milen Zula Christine Koetsstraat 196 2036 AB Haarlem

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“N/SURF”, INSTALLATION, 2011

There is a mystical combination of your music and art together. When brainstorming an idea for a song along with a visual display how do you find a common balance between music and art, where one does not over shadow the other? They are delicately interconnected in some way I don’t have complete control over, it just happens to be. As if they were, a little trivial to say indeed, different varieties of the same species. Do you think the style of your work has changed over time?

You have a show coming up in July at Circolo Magnolia with Toro Y Moi And Casa Del Mirto. What are you looking forward too with your overall performance? Funny you’re asking me, I’m not actually doing that show anymore. I am doing a few last appearances as DIPs throughout the summer. Are there any new projects you are looking forward to and what are your hopes for the future?

Changed a lot over time and will change again. Anything alive does nothing more than keep changing mostly, isn’t it?

I’m in the making of various projects at the moment, and more to come soon. I’m working mostly on how we perceive ourselves through awareness of technological change and flows of data and information, and transit between the physical and the immaterial.

If you could venture into anything else besides music & art, what would it be and why?

Any words of encouragement for aspiring musicians & artist?

Can I have “being a cat in a comfortable flat” please?

Surf the internet and enjoy stuff (:

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WWW.SPCNVDR.ORG


“COLORSPACE TRICERATOPS”, 3D SCULPTURE, IMAGE FILE, 2012


WINSTON CHMIELINSKI WWW.WI-CH.COM

IT’S JUST IT’S EXACTLY THIS 2007-2012

Conspiring a series of collective paintings artist Winston Chmielinski engulfs his audience with immense proportions while cultivating an abstract form of his subjects. Chmielinski fine details inside of his work is something astonishing, fusing an innovative style of conceptual paintings and experimenting with a variation of color, shape and form, the artist evokes the inner beauty of his subjects while manifesting a luminous fantasy. Based in New York City Chmielinski has accumulated international success, his work has been exhibited in Berlin, London, Paris, New York City and Miami.


120 X 90CM, 2012, CHROMOGENIC COLOR PRINT ON SILVER HALIDE COLOR PAPER, EDITION OF 6 C-TYPE PRINT

JUSTIN COOPER Renowned photographer Justin cooper captures more than just a beautiful image, he photographs an enticing aesthetic, balancing the connection of elements from the past and present. Cooper incorporates an artistic desire within his images transforming his photographs into an authentic visual experience. Though Copper prefers the sitter to be passive to the camera, or caught in its gaze, he manages to introduce extraordinary silhouettes within his photographs. Cooper’s work has taken him from Sydney to Hong Kong, New York, London and Paris, where he is now based. His images feature regularly in publications throughout Europe and Australia.

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TOM HINES

Developing the perfect image while telling a story through his work is one way to describe fashion photographer Tom Hines. Based in New York City, Hines strives to avoid falling into the category of overly saturated beauty images and approaches his photographs with a mystical form of abstract surrealism. While obsessed with the dialectic of a scene, Hines captures something more than just an ordinary photograph. He reveals a hidden message, something of substance that gives you the urge to seek deeper within his vision.

When did you decide to become a photographer and why? I’ll give you the long answer. I realized I was predisposed to be an artist when I was a kid. I had other interests, but nothing was as compelling as Art. Photography is a mode of artistic expression, among many other things. I was given a consumer grade Polaroid as a kid. I shot pictures of my pets and my bike. Looking back, this wasn’t art making, not in the willful sense. My desire to document my possessions was driven by something other than artistic intent. Later, when I was a teen, I refurbished my dad’s Nikon and shot pictures of my friends. At this stage my motives were still unclear. It was as much a social catalyst as an artistic medium. In high school I built a darkroom in my basement. This was when photography as a medium began to compete with other modes of art making. Photography gave me so much of what I wanted from art. That said, it was toxic in those days. The chemicals made me sick. I’m not one of those people who’s going to tell you there’s only been one medium all my life. I basically quit photography when I couldn’t stand to be around dark room chemistry anymore. I came back to photography as an adult living in New York City, where I could effectively out source my darkroom obligations. Describe your style of photography? I’m the sort of artist who is preoccupied with relatively abstract territory, particularly that of Style and Idea. It’s an ongoing meditation. It’s also the side on which I try to err when I’m shooting and editing. Some photographers are hedonists, some are obsessed with beauty, this list goes on. I’m obsessed with the dialectic of a scene. Pleasure and beauty are parts of my equation, but there’s necessarily more to an argument or investigation. Which medium you prefer working with black & white or color and why? It’s all color to me. I often make black and white images, I recognize the rhetoric of the mode, but everything is calibrated to the way one’s eyes see. When you look at a print, even one that’s B&W, you experience it via your color eyes. What are you currently working on? To live in New York, rather to pay the rent, commissions are obligatory. I love shooting clothing for a living. Beyond that, I have an ongoing photo collaboration with Michelle Lueking that stretches into most traditional subjects and modes. We love to shoot rock bands, make videos, shoot non-models, do research, the whole photographic lifestyle kind of thing. We’re curious. FULL INTERVIEW ISSUE 3 NUMODEMAG.COM

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LAKE & STARS SS2010 LOOKBOOK INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY

WWW.TOMHIMES.COM


TOO FAST FOR LOVE PHOTOGRAPHY GREG MANIS STYLING ALLISON MILLER AT AGENT OLIVER

SILVER RING WITH TURQUOISE LOSSELLIANI DOUBLE SILVER RING WITH GREENSTONE, SKULL PEARL LOSSELLIANI FADED GOLD CHAIN SPIKE BRACELET WITH SPIKES CANDACE ANG SILVER CUFF WITH EAGLE LOSSELLIANI SILVER BRACELET WITH PEARLS, GOLD SPIKES & TURQUOISE LOSSELLIANI WORN THROUHOUT


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FLANNEL SHIRT TOPSHOP CUSTOMIZED DENIM ZIPPER SHORTS AMERICAN APPAREL FISHNET STOCKINGS AMERICAN APPAREL

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BUSTIER TOPSHOP ; NECKLACE LOSSELLIANI JEANS ASHISH ; THIGH HIGH BOOTS REPORT SIGNATURE FISHNET STOCKINGS AMERICAN APPAREL NECKLACE WITH BULLETS CANDACE ANG


LEATHER DRESS TOPSHOP BELT VINTAGE FISHNET STOCKINGS AMERICAN APPAREL SHOES CHINESE LAUNDRY

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NECKLACE LOSSELLIANI BODYSUIT TOPSHOP SHORTS VINTAGE ; BRACELET LOSSELLIANI

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BRA TOP URBAN OUTFITTERS DENIM VEST LEVI’S ; DENIM SHORTS VOLCOM FISHNET STOCKINGS AMERICAN APPAREL ; SHOES CHINESE LAUNDRY PHOTOGRAPHY GREG MANIS STYLING ALLISON MILLER AT AGENT OLIVER MODEL MOLLIE GONDI AT Q MODELS NYC

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AN AMERICAN MODEL IN

Shanghai

WRITTEN BY JOHN MARK PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN MARK & FRIENDS

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As I sat in the makeup chair, getting ready for the runway show, all I could think about was how much I wanted a haircut. I had been working in China for two weeks and had only seen one other person with similar hair. My gold curls were something of a novelty to the Chinese and many castings started with the old point-and-laugh. I was not accustomed to this attention, nor was I comfortable with it. However, it’s a small burden to bear and one can only complain so much about appearances before sounding self-indulgent. I would just barely venture to call myself a professional model. For me, working as a model in the fashion industry has supplied me only with supplementary income and I have always felt slightly out of place at castings. I hardly possess the resilience or the vanity to survive in such an industry, but I have. Recently I’ve had a bit of luck and graciously found myself in the echelon of traveling models. A three month contract in China, for me, was a grand adventure. I had mostly worked as a model in the United States, so the model apartment and travel model culture was something different that excited me. I packed very light for China, as I wanted to be able to carry my luggage and a coffee at the same time. One medium sized roller bag and a backpack was enough to hold my worldly possessions. It was also a good choice, because even though I did not bring many clothes, models who were on their way out, were constantly giving away old clothes they couldn’t fit in their luggage. More often than not, these hand-me-downs were a bit nicer and more fashionable than your non-model douche bag big brother’s. My second night in Shanghai I went out with the Latino models Dario, Alberto, and Bernardo. I decided we were like the Sex and the City girls. We went to a club called Hollywood where they had a “Sexy Disney” party. Clubs in Shanghai love tacky themes, but the “Sexy Disney” remains to this day, the furthest stretch toward the uncomfortable I’ve witnessed in party themes. At Hollywood, if you arrived to the club early, they give you food. So we arrived at ten and ate potatoes, steak, and mozzarella with tomato. Male models scarfed down the free dinner like they hadn’t eaten all day. Probably because they hadn’t. After midnight the club started to fill up. Management had supplied the models and VIP’s with large plush Mickey Mouse gloves and sexy tight t-shirts. Somewhere on the other side of the world, Walt Disney rolled in his grave.


Every morning an agency booker would call me ten minutes before I needed to be down on the street to await pickup for castings. Most of the time, I was already up and ready. On some rare occasions, it was the call that woke me and made me cry. The majority of a Shanghai model’s time is spent in the model van. With a population of nearly 24 million, Shanghai is organized in 16 different districts, with an urban sprawl that seems to go for miles and miles. At times we drove for as much as an hour from one casting to another and we continued to be surrounded by skyscrapers and concrete the whole journey through. The MTA in New York City makes going to six castings in two to three hours a very achievable task. In Shanghai, six castings can last as long as nine hours. This is not solely due to the travel time, but also the patience with which Chinese clients like to gaze upon the models. After the staring they may ask you to “make some pose” or “show the book.” While being a western model is Shanghai gave me the confidence of being in demand, it also gave me the gift of spending countless hours on Shanghai’s slow moving highways and awkwardly long staring contests with Chinese clients. My diet in Shanghai consisted primarily of friend noodles, bananas, bread, sushi, and Tsingtao beer. Not a great diet for a model, but I got away with it. Across the street from my apartment was a tiny Chinese lady who ran a frying wok outside of what can only be described as a step above a shack. Lots of oil, lots of sodium, and lots of fresh noodles and vegetables made my body smile on a nightly basis. The noodle frying woman also worked as a dumpling selling woman during the day. When did she sleep? I will never know. The only logical explanation would be that she’s a robot created in a basement lair below Shanghai’s Jing’an Temple. If I had to spend all day and night working at a dumpling/noodle shack, I would probably do so in crazy costumes. I would be Darth Vader, making you stir fry with squid for 18 Chinese Yuan. There would never be any confusing my noodle shack with the one down the street, because it would be the only one with Shanghai’s infamous Jedi of the Wok. While working in China, I mostly booked runway shows and TV Commercials. I blame the length of my arms and the tenacity of my curls. Many of the Chinese sample garments had sleeves that were too short for my mantis limbs. Disproportionately long arms is a reality I have had to accept in my modeling career. Every model’s got their something. I give thanks that my something is not a violent bi-polar disorder or an inability to walk in heels.


“IF I HAD TO SPEND ALL DAY AND NIGHT WORKING AT A DUMPLING/NOODLE SHACK, I WOULD PROBABLY DO SO IN CRAZY COSTUMES. I WOULD BE DARTH VADER, MAKING YOU STIR FRY WITH SQUID FOR 18 CHINESE YUAN.”

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The language barrier was a frustrating, but mostly entertaining hurdle at most castings and jobs. There is also a different kind of vigilance required when working in a foreign country. For example during one runway show, with quick changes and an inattentive dressing assistant, an arrogant model named Peter was, due to time constraints, forced to walk the runway in dress shoes two sizes too small, giving him a horrific limp that made my night. Smoking cigarettes is a widespread habit for models in China. The vast majority of models in China who smoke can only be explained with the assumption that half do it because they are addicted and the other half do it to look cool. All the really cool models smoke. So if you want to look cool, all you have to do is buy a pack and a lighter. The tobacco industry in China is huge. In addition to sales from corner stores and smoke shops, thousands of Chinese people make their livelihoods selling cigarettes from portable kiosks outside bars and clubs. A standard pack costs $1.60 USD. No copious government tax means cancer has never been cheaper. Though in truth, smoking is also a very social habit in China. Club pass out free cigarettes to models on a regular basis and if a host passes you a cigarette it can be considered rude to refuse. Traveling models say a lot of hellos and a lot of goodbyes. Models are always coming and going as their contracts start and end. Saying goodbye is always easier when you don’t really think about it. I thought I would have a hard time making friends with the other models in my agency, but that was not the case. While I did not share some of my coworker’s devout affinity to hard drugs and after party clubs, there is a depth than comes with a model well traveled. Living, partying, and going to castings with the same models every day, I became very close to them very quickly. Ultimately, traveling models are all hustlers and nomads. No matter how many friends they make, they travel to the airport alone. A new contract, a new city, and another apartment of unfamiliar faces. Some models I met, have been away from home for years. They come from cities with economic conditions that cannot support them so they put their sense of home in their suitcase. It’s a lifestyle that can breed happiness or dark dysfunction. During my three months in Shanghai I feel in love with some and fought incessantly with others. Shanghai’s models were a strange breed of skinny and courageous young adults who at the very least have an insatiable ability to live in the present. While New York City is my home and my fashion week, my time in Shanghai gave me a thirst for more international adventures. Anther country, another challenge to adapt, an opportunity to grow, and of course, show the book and make some pose. JM


FILLIGAR PHOTOGRAPHY DAVID KEPNER INTERVIEW IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA


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“ONE THING THAT’S ABSOLUTELY BROTHERS JOHNNY, TEDDY AND PETE MATHIAS AND THEIR CHILDHOOD FRIEND TRUE IS WHEN PEOPLE COME OUT CASEY GIBSON ARE BEHIND THE CHICAGO TO SEE US PERFORM, WHETHER IT’S BASED ROCK BAND FILLIGAR. RELATIVELY FIVE PEOPLE OR FIVE HUNDRED, NEW TO THE MUSIC SCENE, THIS ROCK QUARTET ALREADY HAS AN IMPRESSIVE WE DON’T TAKE ANY OF THAT FOR RESUME HAVING BEEN PERFORMING WITH GRANTED. WHEN PEOPLE COME TO THE LIKES OF THE BLACK KEYS, JONATHAN THE CONCERT, THEY SPENT THEIR TYLER AND THE NORTHERN LIGHTS, B.O.B, THE COOL KIDS AND MANY OTHERS. THEY TIME WATCHING US PLAY AND IT WERE CALLED “ONE OF THE TOP 8 LIVE ACTS MEANS A LOT TO US.” IN AMERICA” AND ARE CONSIDERED process is a lot easier, we are able to be around each other a “A BREATH OF FRESH AIR, IN A GENRE lot more often, share ideas and collaborate. THAT IS GROWING STALE”. THEIR LAST ALBUM THE NERVE WAS NOMINATED FOR BEST ROCK ALBUM AT THIS YEAR’S INDEPENDENT MUSIC AWARDS. WITH A WIDE VARIETY OF MUSICAL INSPIRATION RANGING FROM THE CLASSICAL ROCK TO R&B, HIP-HOP AND COUNTRY, THE BAND PRODUCES THEIR UNIQUE TAKE ON INDIE ROCK. THEY CONTINUOUSLY TOUR, PERFORM AND REHEARSE ENJOYING EVERY BIT OF A BUSY MUSICIAN’S LIFE. When and how did you start in the music business? What is your background? Johnny Mathias: I’d say we started our band about 10 years ago with Pete and Casey as the founding members of the band: Casey, who was encouraged by his parents to play piano, and Pete, who played snare drum. I always looked up to Pete and finally got some courage to start playing with them. What began as a something of a hobby in the basement gradually developed into a professional endeavor about 1 or 2 years ago. Music has always been about having a good time and hopefully this is how it’s going to remain for us.

CG: It is definitely a very collaborative project for us. Someone has an original idea or just something that sparks. We show it to everybody and if it takes off, then we work on it. Johnny is responsible for a good amount of lyrics, but we all pretty much work on it together. These days most of the writing is done when we are on tour, during the sound check or basically whenever we have a moment to try out something new. As soon as we’ve called enough material, we all sit down and decide how to finish it. It’s always four of us in a room. A lot of times after we write a song and then play it night after night, it completely evolves over the time. And that’s something that we didn’t used to do before. But now we pay more attention to the fact how these songs evolve on the road or during live performances. We look at our audience’s reaction, at what works and what doesn’t. And as soon as everything is in its place, then we go to the studio to record it. What inspires you the most?

Pete Mathias: One thing that’s absolutely true is when people come out to see us perform, whether it’s five people or five hundred, we don’t take any of that for granted. When people come to the concert, they spent their time watching us play and it means a lot to us. That’s what keeps us going the most. The biggest inspiration to us is when somebody comes up and Casey Gibson: As Johnny mentioned earlier, Pete and I consider ourselves the founding members of the band. I started says, “Hey I really love your song, it speaks a lot to me”. playing piano when I was just 5 years old. When Pete and I JM: A lot of our music has been written to perform in a live were freshmen in high school, I remember looking up to the setting, especially recently. Live shows can really teach you older guys in school that had a band. We assumed that kind of lifestyle was cool and made a decision then and there to start a what works and what sort of sound you want to have. As Pete said, all live shows are important, the crowd is important to band of our own. That was about 10, 11 years ago. Playing in us. a band was our hobby for a long time and only after college it became something that we all wanted to do professionally. Do you listen to other contemporary bands? Do you get inspired by other musicians? How do you come up with the ideas for new songs? Would you consider it to be a collaborative process? CG: We listen to a lot of music, old and new, trying to find an influence in everything, not necessarily just rock music either. JM: We do all of that. The way we’ve worked together has There are elements of electronic music that we try to apply to changed over the years. Given that now we have the opportuwhat we are doing, hip hop, R&B; country music is also one nity to be together all in the same room and at the same time. of our major influences. We look at what other artists are Before that we had to negotiate the fact that each of us would doing and try to incorporate that into our own work. be in a different place, going away to college. Now our work


WWW.FILLIGAR.COM


What do you do in your free time when you have it? CG: We used to play hockey but it’s hard to find a space for it now. On our days off we like to go sightseeing, sample local cuisine. We are very lucky that we get to travel a lot and get to places we’d probably never seen have we not been in this band. We like to go to local baseball games, trying to get a sample of the local fair. We always go out after the show as well - to the bars and the clubs - we like to see what the nightlife is like in Ohio, Nashville or wherever we are. What do you get to do on the road? What kind of food do you like to eat? Do you get a chance to cook? CG: We like all kinds of food; we are not picky eaters, food allergists or vegetarians. PM: When we are on the road we head up to all the diners that serve local food. JM: I just got some Ramen. We like all kinds of spicy food. PM: Teddy, our bassist, is a great cook actually. When we have a chance and space for it we cook a lot of pastas, grill and so on. You mentioned you read a lot while traveling. What kind of books do you read? PM: I’m more of a non-fiction person, while Casey and Johnny would rather pick up a novel to read. CG: I definitely like to read biographies of rock musicians. I just read “Life”, a biography by Keith Richards, “Chronicles” by Bob Dylan, a biography about Led Zeppelin that’s pretty famous for being falsified. PM: I like to read for the sake of learning. “How to modify your amplifier” is a book that I enjoyed recently. I also like to dig into fiction, into things that don’t go away with anything and bring nothing but the good dreams. Do you have creative outlets outside of playing in the band? CG: Yes. Teddy, who’s not here right now, is our creative graphic designer who does all of our concert posters. He is also responsible for our website design. In my spare time I write music for commercial TV ads. It’s nice to clear the palette and write something I’m not completely comfortable with like electronic music or jazz. Pete has studied world percussion for a long time. We pretty much all have our side things to keep us busy. What are your plans in the near future? JM: We are in a process of writing and recording a new album. The details are yet to be determined. We are working on it this summer and probably releasing it in the fall. We’ll definitely do more touring; we are a touring rock band by nature and love playing shows. In the foreseeable future there will be more projects, more exciting ideas. I might even get a haircut. I.R. NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 123


THE ROYAL CONCEPT

One of the latest breakout bands generating a very popular buzz with their latest single “Gimme Twice” has taken the international market by storm. Officially acquiring their first start in 2011 at Sweden’s biggest music event “The Peace and Love Festival” Swedish band The Royal Concept instantly received an international record deal with Universal Republic/Island Records. Due to release their album this fall The Royal Concept finds inspiration for their songs from personal experiences and translates it into a fascinating vivacious sound of hypnotic guitars, amplified drums and bass, that entices you to jump out of your seat and loose control to their euphoric melody.

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PONTOONS Indie-rock band originally from New York City and Hoboken, New Jersey was formed by friends Tom Hunt and Mark Aznavourian in 1991. The Pontoons have played together throughout the Northeast from 1993 until their last performance at CBGB on Valentine’s Day 1995 and unfortunately coming to an end in 1997. While reuniting in 2009 the Pontoons have successfully made a remarkable come back this past winter by releasing their first hit single “Antidote”. Over a two year span the Pontoons produced ten incredible tracks for their debut album “Slow” Scheduled to release October 1st Later this year. Their style consist of a hypnotic yet angelic sound with a hint of almost 90’s grunge, we are very excited to tune into Pontoons album this fall.

PONTOONSMUSIC.COM


Young

HEARTS PHOTOGRAPHY COLIN ROSS STYLING AMANDA SHERLOCK


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PHOTOGRAPHY COLIN ROSS ASSISTANT TOMAS JUSKAITIS STYLING AMANDA SHERLOCK HAIRSTYLIST ENZO VOLPE AT HMS CREATIVE USING FUDGE HAIR CARE MAKE UP ARTIST NATALYA NAIR AT CAROL HAYES USING MAC ART DIRECTOR LUKE PATTINSON MODELS OLIVER, DAVID VALENSI & ROLAND LEPP AT AMCK


TOO YOUNG TOO FAST PHOTOGRAPHY DOMINIK TARABANSKI STYLING GABI GNAT


JACKET DOMINIKA NAZIĘBŁY PROJECT TIGHTS WOLFORD SHOES MARTENS BONNIE

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SHIRT VINTAGE ; JEANS LEVI’S SOCKS URBAN OUTFITTERS RINGS ALLSAINTS, URBAN OUTFITTERS, ASOS SHOES H&M


IT’S A SHORT STORY ABOUT GIRLS, ABOUT YOUNG GIRLS, YOUNG AND FAST. IT’S A STORY ABOUT FUN AND EMOTIONS, ADVENTURES AND RESPONSIBILITY, DAYS AND NIGHTS, RESTRAINT AND TEMPTATION, FRIENDSHIP AND HATRED, SUN AND MOONLIGHT, EXPERIENCE AND FIRST STEPS, SMILE AND TEARS... IT’S A SHORT STORY ABOUT GIRLS, TOO YOUNG AND TOO FAST. JUSTYNA & MARTA

TOO YOUNG TOO FAST BY DOMINIK TARABANSKI


T-SHIRTS AMERICAN APPAREL TIGHTS WOLFORD RINGS ALLSAINTS, URBAN OUTFITTERS, ASOS

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SWEATER CHEAP MONDAY T-SHIRT AMERICAN APPAREL SHOES MARTENS BONNIE PHOTOGRAPHY DOMINIK TARABANSKI STYLING & MAKE UP ARTIST GABI GNAT HAIRSTYLIST MARCIN HET PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT SZYMON AT DAYLIGHT STUDIO MODELS JUST YNA FASZCZA & MARTA PAWŁOWSKA AT D’VISION


FLOWERY TUXEDO BLAZER TRUTH & PRIDE


RUBY

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BLUE ONE PIECE SWIMSUIT AMERICAN APPAREL LEATHER SLEEVELESS JACKET TRUTH & PRIDE EARRING TOPSHOP PHOTOGRAPHY VLASTA PILOT STYLING SUNNY VALENTINE MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST SUNNY VALENTINE MODEL RUBY AT NEVS LONDON


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NEW WAVE OF EUROPEAN DESIGNERS WRITTEN BY IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA

Are you looking for a new outfit or just curious about fashion trends for the next season? These four European designers are going to surprise and enchant you with their style. With just a few years in the industry they are grounded and commercially viable, have their own shops, and ready to shape the future of fashion in the 21st century.

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COMEFORBREAKFAST FALL/WINTER 2012 LOOKBOOK


MJÖLK Lars Stoten of MjÜlk is a Scandinavian designer with a multicultural flare. Having been born in Denmark, brought up in London and schooled in Japan, Lars Stoten and his luxury menswear label are currently based in Brooklyn, New York. Coming from a long line of dressmakers and pleaters in his native Denmark, Lars initially worked in costume design and custom suit making, gradually transitioning into ready-to-wear. What started as a small clothing label turned into a successful line of high-end clothing, accessories and shoes, available in his online based shop along with a variety of small objects, artwork and prints, all part of his cooperative with like minded artists and designers. Signature boxy suits that Lars became known for are complemented by shirts with whimsical prints; denim jackets and pants worn alone or paired for a head to toe look and deconstructed knits from the finest Australian yarns - these are the things that make this label a perfect example of that hard to achieve balance of combining traditional tailoring with modern age sportswear. His superb sense of color and outstanding choice of high-end materials puts this label on every fashionably conscious man’s wish list.


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COMEFORBREAKFAST The Italian duo of Antonio Romana and Francesco Alagna comprise the independent mens and womenswear label of Comeforbreakfast. What started with a basic line of cool graphic T’s in 2009 turned into a well rounded collection for fall 2012 consisting of hip sportswear basics as well as classically tailored pieces with accent on oversized fit, texture and subtle prints. Their love for all things mesh from previous seasons is substituted by finely knit sweaters worn in a variety of ways. The silhouettes for fall 2012 are more structured than ever before, but with the same androgynous sensibility. The fine details of classic menswear tailoring, blended with innovative cutting techniques and traditional materials of cashmere and silk, produce an exceptional line of oversized jackets with leather detailing, drop rise pants, dresses, skirts and blouses, all complemented by knit textures in a muted palette of greys, beiges and black. Layering also plays an important part: finely knit sweaters are mixed in with each style or worn as an undergarment. The expanded and finely tuned collection for fall 2012 is completed with shoes in matte brown, black and shiny silver. The Milan based Comeforbreakfast brings originality and quirk to the century old tradition of Italian clothe making yet stays true to that “Made in Italy� aesthetic.


D.EFECT The team behind Lithuanian brand D.Effect produces a clothing line that is already a known brand both in Lithuania and Europe all together. Launched with their first womenswear collection in 2009, the label had continuously received exposure in various European magazines, which made it commercially viable, and is now on its way to conquer the American market as well. Using the idea that “outer garments can be worn instead of a dress” D.Effect presents a wide range of clothing conceptual enough to be modern and edgy and suitable for a variety of age groups. The “imperfectly perfect” collections of D.Effect are made out of mostly natural fabrics with silhouettes ranging from sculptural and structured to loose and deconstructed. Unconventional cutting techniques combined with traditional tailoring produce unexpected results, creating “the effect of the defect” and producing a clothing line fit for a woman that’s not afraid of her own individuality. The collection is entirely designed and produced in Lithuania and is available for purchase at the company’s e-shop.


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JULIE EILENBERGER Danish designer Julie Eilenberger was already featured in the third issue of Nu-Mode magazine. The fact that her collection is gracing our pages for the second time is just a token of her unparalleled talent and will to amuse her customer from one season to the next. This year’s fall collection is no exception to that rule: the idea behind it is designer’s fascination with the history of stripes, from the middle ages when wearing stripes was something of a taboo, to the modern times when stripes became a popular design element. Julie’s constant search for an identity produced a fall line that’s grown up, compared to the previous seasons, and more commercial. Her interest in the unusual never ceases to amaze: black, brown and white stripes with occasional hints of mint and pale blue are sometimes paired with knits and fur in neutral tones, creating a rich experience in the most minimalistic way. Always personal and emotional, Julie Eilenberger is definitely a womenswear designer; her sense of nostalgia and irony always present in every collection, separate the woman she wants to dress from the rest: she’s confident and eccentric, aware of her surroundings and willing to experiment. Julie Eilenberger’s label is currently based in East London.


LEATHER DRESS DIOR

NELE PHOTOGRAPHY NADIA DEL DÒ STYLING PATRICK LIEF


BLOUSE DIOR CORSARGE YUMMI TUMMIE YELLOW SKIRT TIBI

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GLITTER SHIRT GINATRICOT PANTS MANGO


BLAZER SEBASTIAN ELLRICH SHIRT GINATRICOT PANTS STRADIVARIUS VINTAGE SHOES ZARA


KNITTED SWEATER BENETTON PANTS GINATRICOT

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WHITE DRESS TIBI PHOTOGRAPHY NADIA DEL DÒ STYLING PATRICK LIEF HAIRSTYLIST & MAKE UP ARTIST ANJA FICHTENMAYER MODEL NELE AT PLACE MODELS HAMBURG


REFLECTIONS

PHOTOGRAPHY ALESSIO MIGLIARDI STYLING ALBERTO CANEGLIAS

DRESS ALBERTO CANEGLIAS COUTURE


DRESS ALBERTO CANEGLIAS COUTURE NECKLACE ATELIER VIBI BRACELET ATELIER VIBI

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DRESS ALBERTO CANEGLIAS COUTURE EARRINGS ATELIER VIBI


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DRESS ALBERTO CANEGLIAS COUTURE EARRINGS ATELIER VIBI PHOTOGRAPHY ALESSIO MIGLIARDI STYLING ALBERTO CANEGLIAS MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST SILVIA SADECKA USING M.A.C COSMETICS MODEL SARA AT WOMENMANAGEMENT


ICE CREAM

IN THE SKY PHOTOGRAPHY TOPHER SCOTT STYLING ALYSSA LESSER


CLOTHING, JEWELRY & SHOES WORN THROUGHOUT ALYSSA LESSER

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PHOTOGRAPHY TOPHER SCOTT STYLING ALYSSA LESSER MAKE UP ARTIST CASSANDRA SUAREZ HAIRSTYLIST YVETTE RODRIGUEZ FIRST ASSISTANT BRITTANY BRUCE MODEL ALEKSANDRA SEMECHKINA AT FENTION MOON


SIX LEE WRITTEN BY JOHN MARK

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Six Lee’s futuristic schoolboy style goes pastel with his new S/S 2013 line, “We’re all together, looking at the world in color.” Inspired by the anatomical art of Argentinean painter, Juan Gatti, the collection is a fascinating hybrid of classic English tailoring with innovative embellishments. While I normally find a heavy use of pastel color revolting in menswear, Six Lee manages to execute the pale palette with the right combination of fantasy and wear ability. Particular stand out pieces are the navy jumper with a fitted and layered torso as well as a cropped baby blue blazer from the future of fashion. The fit of the clothes may have a bit of growing to do, but Six Lee possesses the conceptual genius that we at Nu-Mode´ support unwaveringly. With menswear in particular, it is rare that you find a collection like Six Lee’s, with the equal rights to walk the runway and trend on the streets. “We’re all together, looking at the world in color” is the wardrobe of a timeless romance... and I got to say, I’m in love. - John Mark


“AS A OVERLY ROMANTIC PERSON, SIX LEE GETS INSPIRED BY THE MOST DIVERSE GENRES OF MUSIC AND FILMS. THE EMOTION HE PUTS INTO WRITING POEMS OR PRESSING FLOWERS, WILL BE FOUND IN EVERY SINGLE PIECE FROM HIS HANDS.” - SIX LEE

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109 INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY

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DISCOVERING A CERTAIN IDENTITY FOR YOUR COLLECTION COULD BE QUITE A CHALLENGE BUT CHARISMATIC DUO IOANA DUMITRESCU AND MARINA MOLDOVAN PROVES THAT BRANCHING FROM A T-SHIRT LINE INTO A FULL WOMENSWEAR COLLECTION COULD BE DONE WITH EASE. RECENTLY RELEASING THEIR SECOND WOMENSWEAR COLLECTION ENTITLED “PHYSICAL EDUCATION” CONSIST OF FLATTERING PASTELS, CLEAN SHARP LINES, SOPHISTICATED SILHOUETTES WITH A BIT OF WHIMSY AND VOLUMINOUS FLOOR LENGTH DRESSES, BUT THAT IS NOT THE ONLY THING THAT DRAWS YOU CLOSER TO 109, THEIR RECENT MOTION LOOKBOOK TAKES A FURTHER LOOK INTO THE DESIGNERS INSPIRATION SHARING A STORY ABOUT A WOMEN WHO WANTS TO BREAK FREE OF HER SAFETY NET AND EXPERIENCE THE WORLD BEYOND. How did you both meet and when did you decide to come up with 109? We got to know each other better back in ’08 at the seaside and we discovered that in the areas in which we did not have similar ideas and views, we successfully managed to challenge each other. A few months later, we were sitting in the kitchen of Ioana’s apartment and sketching the plan for what was to soon become 109. The name 109 is there a specific meaning? Absolutely none, besides the fact that 109 is the number of the building where we work. And it sure looks good on paper, right? I mean, at the time we came up with it, we didn’t have much of a background so we went the safe way. But now, forus “109” means so much more than three numbers in a row. Designing a collection could be a bit tedious at times, what are some of the most important details you try to focus on? Indeed. The thing about what we do is that we always keep in mind to do something that is an accurate reflection of the way we see things and the way we would want them to be. And most of the times our perspectives on life is ironic. That’s what makes it special and fun. It’s about not taking yourself too serious. Does your style of design reflect your personal fashion taste or do you try to keep your personal style separate from your collections? We find it really hard to separate these two. Once you start doing that, it means your main focus is on business and not on design. Personal style is defined not only by clothes, but also by way of

life, mentality and activities, which will automatically reflect in your work, no matter what that is. Designing is just one of the easier ways to express yourself. Are there any specific people, place or things that had a major impact on you and your career? I’m not sure I can pinpoint exact people or moments, but certainly the journey one is on has an impact on them, so I think everything I’ve seen and known so far has made an impression on me, and I am the sum of all those things and that finds a way of reflecting itself in the way I express myself as a designer. Describe to us what is your style of design? The definition of our style in only 3 words would be: relaxed, comfortable and ironic. Contrasts also play an important role in the process. It’s like when a bad mood meets a good one but none is to


“PHYSICAL EDUCATION IS ABOUT THE WOMAN WHO IS SICK OF PRETENDING TO BE WHAT SHE’S NOT AND IS TIRED OF RUNNING ON THE SAME TREADMILL EVERYDAY, GOING NOWHERE.”


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be ignored. That’s why we prefer to combine sharp details with soft and lazy cuts. You’ve designed both womenswear and graphic t-shirt line for men and women. Tell us a bit about the two and how do you try to separate your tee line from your womenswear? The first line designed under the 109 brand was a line of graphic T-Shirts; we didn’t really know where that would take us, but as soon as we went on designing the seasonal main lines, we realized we wanted to hold on to our tee line and actually create a platform for it, which we call 109+1. This platform enables us to work with creative people, so that each year we come up with a tee line that is the fruit of our collaboration with someone outside 109. What was the inspiration behind your Physical Education spring/summer 2012 collection? A hot summer day in Bucharest with its scorching sun, that literally melts you. The motion lookbook for your spring/summer 2012 collection, directed by Hypno was remarkable. What was the concept behind the story and how you did you and Hypno pull together such a fascinating story? Physical Education is about the woman who is sick of pretending to be what she’s not and is tired of running on the same treadmill everyday, going nowhere. So she takes a moment to be herself, which means exploring every side of her personality regardless of what anyone would say or think about it. It’s about privacy, playing with yourself in all ways, rage and frustration. Stuff that usually invades our minds but we try to keep it away or under control. Your garments have such a sharp and minimalistic appeal. Did you ever consider designing Menswear line in the near future? I guess this is a question that will always pop up. Even for us. Menswear is a whole different story, indeed challenging and interesting, but right now we try to focus on building a solid image for our 109 womenswear line. Any exciting projects in the future from 109 that we should keep an eye out for? Right now we are working on a T-Shirt line inspired by book covers in collaboration with a few artists.


ROGÉRIO CAVALCANTI INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY


CREATING THE UNCONVENTIONAL WITHIN THE LINES OF THE CONVENTIONAL PHOTOGRAPHER ROGÉRIO CAVALCANTI EXAMINES A MEDIUM OF EXTERNAL LIMITS BY CREATING A UTOPIA WITHIN HIS EDITORIALS DEVELOPING SOME OF THE MOST PROPELLING STORIES. CAVALCANTI DEFINES AN UNSPEAKABLE DISPOSITION BEHIND HIS PHOTOGRAPHY, COMPOSING A UNIQUE SEQUENCE OF DRAMA AND DREAMS. Did you always think you would become a photographer? I identified always with images in a general way. Like imagining and creating images of my world in particular! I did not even know that I could be a photographer. When did you start photography and what was your very first camera? I started shooting professionally ten years or more, but I was always involved with picture in some way. My first camera was a Pentax K1000 that I loved. Was fashion always your calling or were you interested in other types of photography? In the beginning fashion was my calling, I would start a fashion shoot in a different way. When I got a shoot and had One of my favorite pieces from your collection was an no money to test mode, I would shoot everything in sight or in editorial you photographed for U-Mag it had an intergalactic front of me. feel to it. What was the inspiration behind this story and was it difficult to obtain this sort of atmosphere? My other interest was my involvement in movies and due to a fashion editor and friend I won a bag of films it was a dream Thank you. I love this test. I may not have said this before, but all the effects that appear in my pictures are made on time! The to win and eventually I started travelling for my work. treatment of image is essential, to create the effects. Describe your photographic vision. What kind of mood do This test for example, was all done with effects on time, with you try to portray within your images? filters, and projections shines all at once! I loved this test and I like all things involving drama! The mood I love to portray I did it in partnership with one of the most talented stylists of Brazil, Daniel Ueda after conversations with him. Further is dramatic love, dreams and freedom. testing was also done with clothing stylist Lucas Birth based in London. The majority of your work has sort of a surreal appeal approach. Where and how do you usually find inspiration What are certain things to consider when photographing a to create such interesting images? beauty or fashion story? My inspiration sometimes comes from dreams, conversations, It all depends on what about you are shooting. The important ace of times, nothing, you, me, something on the street, a thing is for the photographer to know what he is doing. broken object, or a puddle of water. Research is mandatory and intuition is always welcome! NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 205


ROGÉRIO CAVALCANTI FOR U- MAG

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“EVERYTHING IN LIFE HAS PROS AND CONS. BUT I BELIEVE THAT THERE ARE MORE PROS!”

Are there specific photographers that play a major role on you and your work? Yes. I Love various photographers but there are so many options to choose from that I can’t only direct I my attention to only one.

Do you have any personal opinions on the present state of fashion photography and what are your thoughts on the future of fashion photography? Photography like that had no borders and I think it comes to going on a few!

If you could collaborate with anyone from the past or the present who would it be and why?

Are there any essential steps you could share with emerging photographers?

I confess I would like to be a photographer’s assistant to Paolo Roversi because we both started photography as teenagers.

Love what you do! Be honest about your ideas, values and dreams.

What are some of the pros and cons of being a photographer? And have you faced any challenges along the way? Everything in life has pros and cons. But I believe that there are more pros! Yes I have faced challenges but life is difficult and I love what I do!

WWW.ROGERIOCAVALCANTI.COM


I’M ME PHOTOGRAPHY DANIELA RETTORE STYLING CLEO CASINI


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KREAUX INTERVIEW IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA


SOLOMON CORTES IS A NEW YORK CITY BASED AMERICAN SONGWRITER, MUSIC PRODUCER, COMPOSER AND PERFORMER. HE HAS PRODUCED, WRITTEN FOR AND COLLABORATED WITH A NUMBER OF AMERICAN AND INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS INCLUDING GRAMMY WINNERS SINGER MYA AND PRODUCER DEVO SPRINGSTEEN, U.K. MERCURY PRIZE WINNER RAPPER DIZZEE RASCAL AND KOREAN GOLDEN DISK WINNER BOY GROUP SHINEE AMONG MANY OTHERS. HE WAS ALSO FEATURED ON MTV’S SHOW “MAKING THE BAND”. WITH THE DEBUT ALBUM TITLED L.I.T.T., LIFE IMITATING THE TRUTH, HE IS ENTERING A NEW ARTISTIC ENDEAVOR UNDER THE NEW NAME OF KREAUX. Solomon, tell me about your background. I know you were born in Post, Texas. Do you have special memories growing up? Anything that might have influenced you later on in your career? Music definitely played a major part in my family. I remember my dad always singing disco in the car. Mom also sang while getting ready and styling her hair; she sang Sinatra, Bing Crosby and Supremes - each song accompanied by her hairdryer. Family dinners were something of a musical experience as well, everybody sang: my mom, sister and my dad. Did you sing along with your family? When did you start singing professionally? I definitely participated in my family’s sing-alongs, but singing is something that interested me professionally only recently. Did you play any instruments as a child? I am a self-taught musician and have played various instruments with my favorite instruments being piano and guitar. I learned to play guitar through books and tutorials, and piano - with a cheap Casio keyboard. What did you study in college?

project and debut album came to me in the most organic way. All of my previous experiences came into one and shaped my own vision as a recording artist. I consider all of my projects as a mixed art form. My studies in philosophy infuse my lyrics giving them a deeper meaning and my interest in visual arts creates an original concept. How would you describe your own musical style? Which artists influenced you the most?

I enjoy reading and writing and studied philosophy in college. To this day philosophy is something that interests me a lot and I draw my inspiration from a variety of musical genres ranging influences a major part of my work. from punk and industrial to alternative rock, electronic and even country. How did you come up with an idea for your own album? What were your influences? I would characterize my own musical style as dark, alternative, funky and solefull. My favorite bands are Depeche Mode and Having been producing, composing and writing songs for Nine inch nails. other artists across the globe, the idea for my new artistic NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ 229


“I ENJOY BEING AS CREATIVE AS POSSIBLE, BUT SOMETIMES IT’S HARD TO REMAIN MY FOCUS.”

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Did you collaborate with any other artists in the creation of your debut album? Or is it a predominantly sole project? L.I.T.T, Life Imitating the Truth, is for the most part my own creative quest. However, my fiancée DJ Stiletto and I like to collaborate from time to time. We share a similar music taste and enjoy working with each other. She had inspired the lyrics to some of my songs. Solomon, you are definitely known for your provocative clothing style as much as for your collaboration with Grammy winning artists. You have also recently appeared in a global campaign for Uniqlo. How would you describe that experience? Is fashion something that interests you professionally as well as music? Fashion has invariably been my key interest throughout my life. I know how to sew and enjoy customizing and making my clothes. Hopefully, my interest in fashion and styling will very soon transform into a launch of my own clothing line. Grammy winning producer Devo Springsteen called you the “ultimate artist”. Are there any other artistic areas that interest you? I like photography, I’m interested in acting and planning to write and produce films. To me films are the quintessential multi-faceted art form consisting of music, script, stage and costume design. What is the hardest thing for you as an artist? I enjoy being as creative as possible, but sometimes it’s hard to remain my focus. What can we expect to see from you in the near future? My goal is to continue to record new songs, go on tour and perform. I’d like to create as many conceptual projects as possible. I’m interested in developing broader, more shared and engaging experience where every art form serves as an essential part to an overall artistic outcome.


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LOVEJET INTERVIEW LATOYA P. HENRY

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MAKING THEIR TRADEMARK COLLABORATION BETWEEN EMOTIONS AND ENERGETIC BEATS. LOVEJET DEFINES A STYLE OF SUBSTANTIAL INFLUENCES, CREATING A GENUINE FORM OF MUSIC THAT SUBMERGES YOU INTO AN ABYSS. Tell us who is Lovejet and how did you get started with music? Lovejet is a raskal Little Prince in love with music. When I was a little child, I started to compose music and I discovered that my feelings are best expressed in notes rather than in words... Some time ago... How would you describe the style of your sound? Lovejet discovers and marks the world with a trademark of emotions and energy beats, where emotional feelings are the fil rouge of music, creativity and artistic relationships, from sounds, to words, to graphic. The result is a sonorous and visual polyphony of electronic music world, moving to satisfy and to astonish the body and the spirit.

anthem track of Modugno “Volare” (Nel blu dipinto di blu), First of all, my main interest are kids: if kids like my songs I am winner of the Sanremo Festival in 1958. fulfilled, because I like to think that my kind of melodies are like a fairy tale, like when mom tells it to the Little Princess before When I wrote the instrumental version, I supposed that the best voice for the track was an Italian voice, warm and going into a better world... melodic, reminding me some of the Sanremo classical history. Who are some of your musical influences? I think Margherita did a great Job, and I am really looking forward to the next single with Meg, soon. Also making the Well, I think this year I saw the consecration of producers like video was really funny: I spent all the weekend for the Four Tet, Floating Points, Jamie XX, Todd Terje... footages, with some friends all together on the hills. Their style is the most innovative in each musical gender. You A playful experience. can hear their songs fixing perfectly on a dance floor or in the easy listening way, when you are alone or when you are in the Do you prefer originality or conformity when producing a car with your friends. new track? The most emotive voices I heard recently are Kimbra, Lucy I can’t really answer this question. Honestly I never think Rose, Birdy, Lips, Lana del Rey. about nothing when I produce. I sit down and then I do what my feelings are telling me to do. But for sure my longtime heroes are Daft Punk, Madonna, Blondie, Prince, The Trio Lescano and Giorgio Moroder The result of the track could be original or not, I don’t care You recently released an amazing video for “Fly Oh Oh” fea- about what my mind is saying to me, I let the heart decide. turing Meg. How did the collaboration between you and Meg That is the reason I can’t start a track today and finish it the come together and what was the inspiration behind this track? next week. I am describing a journey, a short experience of life, I couldn’t wait or continue it at another time, because it wouldn’t be real for me! This track is my personal interpretation of the longtime italian


Lovejet’s sound, is produced by you or do you have other producers involved and what does your production process consist of to create your sound? Lovejet is my philosophy and my lifestyle, Love is the passenger, Jet is the air transport, the fastest transport for human being that is for sure. So, my mission is to reach out to as much artists as I can, those people who produce the music in the same way I feel. Describe the definition behind your songs? Positive vibes, simple beats, playful sounds, dance beats The most characteristic elements you can find in my tracks are: Simple, Free, Loveable, Playful, Erotic, Sensual, Parisienne, Cheeky, Soft, Light, Warm, Primitive, Romantic, Happy, Groovy, Naive... This is the Lovejet representative mood board.

“DESCRIBE A GOOD EXPERIENCE OF YOUR LIFE, A JOURNEY TO THE SEASIDE, A CLIMB IN THE HIGH MOUNTAINS, A DAY ON THE LAKE, EVERYTHING WILL BE INTERESTING, FOR SURE.”

What has been your biggest struggle as a musician? I want to kill the definition of the music by gender or labels, and start to be considered for the mood of the music. Because I don’t have a proper type of gender on my own. Today I am pop, tomorrow sperimental, and the day after tomorrow techno and then, on Sunday, I wake up chill out. I only focus my interest on the mood and on all the feelings of the song. That is the only aspect I am looking for in each artist when I listen to demos and music. Lets talk about your famous track “All I Need”, what was the inspiration behind this song? The answer is in the title of the track... I should say, what is all you need?

out in October, also with All I Need, Fly Oh Oh included in it and ten more unreleased tracks. Some of them were made many years ago, others are newborn. There is all my recent life described in it. Twelve different periods and moods. Everyone could choose their favorite, because I don’t really have my favorite one right now. As I told you before, it depends on the mood of your journey and on what do you need. I think this is the most important thing I am doing with the label now and I hope I will express the total imprint of my music style and what is the definition of ‘labels’ for me.

I am also receiving really good demos from other artists and I will organize a various artist compilation for the end of the summer. After that, a single by each of them will A journey spent into the magnificent world of Paris, with a sense of follow. Lovejet is opened to everyone. happiness and Love, and for sure the pretty girls have an important Words of encouragement for aspiring musicians? role in it. Everything is shown in the video clip and in the musical part.

Was there a certain essence you were trying to capture through the “All I Need” video?

Turn off the television or the radio for the music chart of the week.

Just sit down and produce what your heart is telling to you The essence is on the Parisian look of the actresses. They look so simple, as pure as common people are, and the smile gives the rest. in that moment. This is the key to express what love is, and what the beauty is for Describe a good experience of your life, a journey to the me. seaside, a climb in the high mountains, a day on the lake, Are there any projects we should look forward to from Lovejet in everything will be interesting, for sure. the near future? Some little stories of your life translated in music are always a good result. I am working on the debut album “Party on the moon”, it will be


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PHOTOGRAPHY ELIZABETH T. JONES STYLING PE’A MONIQUE MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST CANDICE CRAWFORD MODEL SHEI AT FENTONMOON

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POPS OF

Color

PHOTOGRAPHY ANNA THIESSEN

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OCC COSMETICS SKIN AIRBRUSH FOUNDATION OCC COSMETICS LIP TAR ‘TRAFFIC’


OCC COSMETICS SKIN AIRBRUSH FOUNDATION OCC COSMETICS LIP TAR ‘TRAFFIC’


OCC COSMETICS SKIN AIRBRUSH FOUNDATION OCC COSMETICS LIP TAR ‘ANIME’’

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PHOTOGRAPHY LPH MAKE UP ARTIST NICOLE NVCB MODEL TATJANA SINKEVICA AT MUSE NYC


BEAUTYSAGE Have you ever seen a commercial advertising a new facial crème promising to make your younger, tighter and wrinkle free in 2 weeks? Or a commercial for a new lipstick that promises to last all day and make your lips fuller? I know that I have and I am sure you have too. Are these claims actually true?BeautySage. com is a new online store that works in conjunction with YouBeauty.com to bring women of all ethnicities products that actually work! Founded by renowned doctors Mehmet Oz and Michael Roizen, YouBeauty.com has redefined the way we look at beauty. Taking an unprecedented scientific approach to merging beauty and health as a lifestyle, in only ten months YouBeauty.com has helped almost ten million women unlock and achieve-their individual beauty potential. During a spring day gathered around a table sat a group of beauty and fashion editors viewing a power point presentation of BeautySage.com. YouBeauty.com combines quizzes and articles to find the best scientifically proved beauty products for you. BeautySage.com brings these products to the customer for purchase. BeautySage.com makes sure that every product does what it says: •

If it has a scientific claim, BeautySage make sure it’s legitimate.

If it claims to be organic and natural, it’s on the brand to prove it.

If there’s potential risk associated with an ingredient, we let you know.

A standing ovation for BeautySage.com for making the world a little bit safer or at least, the cosmetic aisle.


ROUX MAISON Finding the absolute solution to keeping your favorite garments in the best fashion after an occasional wash could be a difficult task at hand. Discovered Nashville, TN Roux Maison has formulated an eco-chic line to specifically cleanse your favorite pieces while maintaining the fabrics shape, color and texture. Made from 100% pure essential oils Roux Maison provides four options that are Hypo-Allergenic, a convenient travel size and remnant free. Available in two delicious scents which we personally love, sweet tea and ambrosia. Designed to effectively remove bacteria, odor, body oils, salt and sunscreen with out leaving an irritating scent behind.


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STELLA MCCARTNEY FALL 2012


PRABAL GURUNG

ANNA SUI

Go big bold and blue! One trend that was spotted on the runways this past fashion week is all the rave for this coming fall season. If you’re a risk taker or interested in spicing up your look, highlight your makeup pallet with electric hues. From Stella McCartney who went for a natural look with an accent of blue mascara to Prabal Gurung who featured a magnetic color blocked eye, to an intense statement lip at Jeremy Scott and even a spin on the classic cat eye at Anna Sui, there are so many options to choose from for this season. Whether you prefer a subtle look with a pop of color or a courageous edgier option, this is one beauty trend that is worth taking a risk for this season. - Latoya P. Henry JEREMY SCOTT


ROMANTIC TEASE PREVIEW FALL HAIR TREND ALERT! For a definite way to achieve a teased accessory hair look. Test out Rodarte’s Fall 2012 hair that hit the runway. The models looked sweet and sensual with their hair slightly teased pined in a sixty’s do, bedazzled with gold metallic stars to add a touch of romance and excitement to the overall look.


RODARTE FALL 2012 IMAGE COURTESY OF GETTY IMAGES

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WRITTEN BY RENESSTA OLDS

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EMILIO PUCCI

SUMMER 2012 WOMEN TRENDS


VERSACE

PRADA

DOLCE & GABBANA

PEEK-A-BOO

Midriff and washboards abs were exposed on the runway for SS12 in a trend being coined AB FAB and its not for the faint of heart or us ladies with a one pack! From Dolce & Gabbana to Emillio Pucci toned tummies look fab in 2 piece ensembles. Good news though your bottom should cover your belly button giving a partial reprieve. R.O

Love, Love, Love feminine silhouettes with embellishments, lace and sequence. Combine this with peach, mint green and lilac palettes and I’m in heaven! One of the hottest trends for SS12 Pale Fire showed up on the runways of major designers DVF and Phillip Lim 3.1 to one of my favorites catalog designer, J. Crew and they all had me dreaming of mint juleps and summer brunches. R.O

VERA WANG

3.1 PHILLIP LIM

J. CREW

PALE DESIRE


WRITTEN BY KAILEE PARKER

D SQUARED 2

SUMMER 2012 MEN TRENDS


VERSACE

ROBERTO CAVALLI

DSQUARED2

BOLD BRIGHTS

ACNE

ERMENEGILDO ZEGNA

BAND OF OUTSIDERS

This has got to be the most popular trend for spring... BRIGHT COLORS! From teenage boys to the sophisticated 45 year old male, everyone can be seen utilizing bright colors. If you are not as adventurous the wear an ensemble full of color, you can add pops of color in your wardrobe through your shoes, belt, sunglasses or knapsack. Personally, the way I love to see brights on a man this spring has to be in the form of a cropped bright pant, like these from D’squared. K.P

NEUTRAL TASTE

This spring, today’s man can opt to keep their wardrobe simple by wearing neutral tones. One the runway this year we saw designers such as Kenzo, Maison Martin Margiela and my personal favorite Acne send models down in shades of sandy brown, tan and linen. For the man who wants to stay on trend but isn’t ready to embrace the crazy neon trend this spring...This is perfect for you. K.P

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NU-MODE´EVENTS

PROJECT NYC WRITTEN BY LATOYA P. HENRY

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NU-MODE´EVENTS

MOODS OF NORWAY

DEL TORO SHOES


Launching in 2003 PROJECT held their annual trade show on July 22nd - 24th in New York City. The PROJECT show provides a link for buyers, and press to meet with new designers and discover exciting new brands. This year’s event held an impressive listing of designers that included Moods of Norway, Ben Sherman, Del Toro Shoes, Billionaire Boys Club, Adidas SLVR, Nudie Jeans Co and many more. Jeff Staple explained that he wanted to work with PROJECT to interpret the democracy of fashion happening in the U.S right now. “What we’ll showcase are literally fashion archives of this world”. Each piece came from the streets but these items are now some of the world’s sought after and highly coveted objects. Collectively Project included a pop up concept shop entitled Made by PROJECT to connect the user with the maker and explore further details about the manufacturer. The Blogger PROJECT returned, powered by DELL provided laptops for influential bloggers who were specifically chosen to develop content with the best brands within the fashion market, each blogger shared details about the occurring event and the designers who are involved with PROJECT. Sandbox studio was also a significant part of PROJECT setting up a full studio that included their Make up Artist, Hairstylist, Stylist models and photographers. They managed to capture the entire event and granted exhibitors with the opportunity to professionally have their product photographed. As a result, swaag.it released their new app sharing live feed of photographers for their fans to follow.

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“IN BRINGING THE THEME OF DEMOCRATIZATION OF FASHION TO LIFE, I WAS INSPIRED BY THE IDEA OF ‘FASHION FOR ALL’. NO MATTER YOUR BACKGROUND OR STYLE, FASHION OFFERS EVERYONE THE LIBERTY TO CHOOSE HOW TO EXPRESS YOURSELF AND THE MEANS TO DO SO”. – BRIAN WARE

ERNEST ALEXANDER

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BILLIONAIRE BOYS CLUB

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INSIDE CATALPA//NYC SOME OF THE BEST MOMENTS CAPTURED BY OUR PHOTOGRAPHERS AT THE HOTTEST MUSIC FESTIVAL ON RANDALL’S ISLAND NEW YORK CITY

PHOTOGRAPHY SHAWN ENGLER

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ZOLA JESUS PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

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What does forty performers, three stages, and the livest crown in New York City all have in common? Catalpa Music Festival. During the weekend of July 28th – 29th we had exclusive access to some of the most exiting musicians ever. At the Catalpa Music Festival Nu-Mode´ rocked out through the rain and shine. Kicking off our first day of Catalpa, Zola Jesus embraced us with her epic voice blowing away the crowd through the crazy storm that hailed over us, while the audience stood in awe. Zola Jesus kindly thanked the audience for sticking it out through the terrible storm and the audience returned the love with plenty of applause, cheers and whistles. In between performances we caught up with the crowd to view how they were enjoying the surrounding festivities.


Located a few paces away from the main stage we decided to check out what was inside of this space like pod. Once we lined up and got a closer peek we discovered it was the Heineken club. Inside there was a projector screen displaying different graphics on the ceiling in Heineken’s signature green, a cozy couch area for some of us non dancers who want to enjoy the music without with out feeling a need to dance. As the crowd started to pick up inside the club everyone danced to hot tunes from deadmau5 & Daft Punk while enjoying an ice-cold beverage from Heineken. Heading outside of the dance club we wanted to figure out what Fallen Tree Silent Disco was all about so we grabbed a pair of headphones then plug ourselves into, what I must say was the best and hope-fully not the last experience with Fallen Tree’s Silent Disco. We all danced together through the mud to the sound of Rihanna in a huge dance circle made by the crowd. One by one the crowd took turns at their best breakdance moves, backflips and tumbles. It was incredibly hilarious but extremely fun. Back to the main stage we watched on as Hercules and Love Affair turned the festival into a lively dance scene. Getting the crowd pumped up to pulsating beats while the dancers hyped up the audience with their exciting enthusiasm and erotic moves. Shortly after we rushed over to Umphreys McGee, we had no idea what to expect but we wanted to find out. Five minutes before Showtime there was a huge crowd waiting in an amazing silence, for the delightful band to appear.

FALLEN TREE SILENT DISCO PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

Once the band stepped on stage the audience went wild. The serious bass kicked in I was shell shocked at their performance Umphreys McGee’s sound was an angelic mix of soul and funk. Slowly as the night started to set in we headed over to the main stage to view TV on the Radio and The Black Keys, what a way to end the first night of the festival two spectacular performances from incredible bands leaving the audience thirsty for more.

PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA


HERCULES AND LOVE AFFAIR PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

UMPHREYS MCGEE PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

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TV ON THE RADIO PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

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CITY AND COLOUR PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER

THE BIG PINK PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER


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PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER

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NU-MODE´EVENTS Finally day two, a perfect day of weather. Cold war Kids took to the stage with an energetic performance, warming up the crowd and keeping us well engaged. For the first time watching Matisyahu perform was truly something everyone should experience once. During Matisyahu’s performance my one moment of humor was the jumping beach ball, the artist ask “Hey what’s up with the beach ball, we are not at the beach and it’s a distraction plus the beach ball thing freaks me out, first blow up dolls now beach balls could you please take this away, this is a concert” Driving the crowd insane with pleasure, fun and excitement Matt + Kim playing their signature tunes, Kim was going wild standing and playing the percussion, the crowd love ever moment of it and so did we.

COLD WAR KIDS PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER

Sprinting across the grass to AraabMuzik performance, the audience was getting down to his impeccable mix of Dubstep, Hip Hop and Reggae all combined creating this moment of bliss for the crowd. Another performance which was one of our favorites that had the entire festival going on a rampage was Girl Talk, there are no words to describe how has impeccable performance. Anything you could think of in a fantasy club land was on the entire stage, a few members from the audience going berserk on stage, confetti, zebras, monkeys, toilet paper remarkable light displays his performance was so engaging that even the photographers in the pit bust a move or two. As the show was coming to a slow end we shared a moment with A$AP Rocky and his team. The audience could no longer await the arrival so the chanting and screams of A$AP began. Flying out on stage, where everything is purple A$AP Rocky gave the audience what they had patiently awaited the ladies screamed with eyes full of tears of happiness as his performance came to an end, he thanked everyone for their support.

MATISYAHU PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA

In conclusion I would say Catalpa saved the best for last Snoop Dogg arrived on stage and the entire festival sang along with Snoog Dogg performing all of his classic hits. So until next year so long Catalpa it was a pleasure spending time with you this weekend a moment full of laughs, fun, good drinks, great food and sensational artist. We will anticipate your return next year… MATT + KIM PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER

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MATT + KIM PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER

ARAABMUZIK PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA


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A$AP ROCKY PHOTOGRAPHY FONSECA


GIRL TALK PHOTOGRAPHY SHAWN ENGLER


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GIRL TALK PHOTOGRAPHY SHAWN ENGLER

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SNOOP DOGG PHOTOGRAPHY SHAWN ENGLER

RAGE PHOTOGRAPHY SHAWN ENGLER

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SNOOP DOGG PHOTOGRAPHY SHAWN ENGLER


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SNOOP DOGG PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER

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A very special thanks to the entire team at Tell Your Friends PR we really appreciate you for having us.

PHOTOGRAPHY COCO ALEXANDER


NU-MODE´ BOUTIQUE OF THE MOMENT

GAMINE Art and fashion compliment each other impeccably in everyway. Recently labeled as one of the hottest contemporary boutiques based in Brooklyn, NY. Art & concept store Gamine offers a personal selection of fresh, unique local and international designers such as Vish, Butterscotch of Brooklyn, Azabala, Eyglo and many more. Their boutique also serves as a project space, granting artist with the capability to share and collaborate one another. Ideally we listed Gamine as our boutique of the moment because they cater to two separate territories, designing their shop to be an extraordinary visiting and networking experience.

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PHOTOGRAPHY VLASTA PILOT

STOCKLIST

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DIESEL CHEAP MONDAY THEORY ANNE MICHELLE FOREVER21 VPL MARC JACOBS WILD ROSE WILFRED MEXX SEPPÄLÄ FILIPPA K ADIDAS JACOBS & CO MASSIMO DUTTI GIOVANNI GALLI SISLEY ALDO GARDENIA TRUTH AND PRIDE ALYSSA LESSER KIKI DE MONTPARNASSE VICTORIA’S SECRET CHINESE LAUNDRY VOLCOM PATRICIA FIELD REPORT SIGNATURE ASHISH BADGLEY MISCHKA TROUBADOUR ABIGAIL ALDRIDGE MAURO GASPERI COSTUME NATIONAL KRIZIA PHILLIPE PHERRANDIS

GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI ICEBERG N.21 MOSCHINO HTC 1.DARK LEVEL JIMMY CHOO DEMALDE´ ALBERTO CANEGLIAS COUTURE ATELIER VIBI CANEGLIAS COUTURE VONG MINTAGE FUNKTIONAL EYRNE BRINIE COLCCI RALPH LAUREN MINTAGE DENIM-IT BRIXTON RAIDERS MAUEL BOZZI FRAV CO/TE C’N’C COSTUME NATIONAL ILARIA NISTRI P.A.R.O.S.H ALII SERMONETA GLOVES MARIA LA ROSA 7 FOR ALL MANKIND BORSALINO ANGELO MARANI TRUE RELIGION SINEQUANON ALLEN SCHWART BANANA REPUBLIC

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Nu-Mode´ Magazine Issue 6 "Spectrum"  

"Spectrum" Cover by Colin Ross. Interviews with Filliagar, Lui Hon, Kathryn Macnaughton, Lovejet, Enrico Boccioletti, Kreaux. Also an exclus...

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