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diddo nick patrik

frank

grimm Patricia guggenberger

issa voulgaris nicole

qiu

hao kevin coson saint keegan

jean grey luttrell

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pomereu rafael kouto

daehyun kristian Florian

kim evju Mass

NU - Mode´ DESIGN ART & CULTURE MAGAZINE

Noir blanc

Lucas Goossens

The Exhibition Edition no.12 Photography christopher polack


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The beauty of black and white imagery is in the contrast. It provides a deeper look as it uncovers what’s hidden and highlights what shines. We’ve combined several outstanding individuals and asked them some dificult questions. This is what they had to say about their life, art and working with a neutral color palette.

-Fashion & Art Director Irina Romashevskaya

t h e

e x h i b i t i o n

e d i t i o n


emilyabay.com

textures emily abay

emily abay photography


N U - M O D E´ LATOYA P. HENRY EDITOR IN CHIEF & CREATIVE DIRECTOR FASHION & ART DIRECTOR Irina Romashevskaya FASHION EDITOR RENESSTA OLDS FEATURES & MUSIC EDITOR ALEXANDRA STEVENS Social Media & Web content Editor Arielle Chambers Interns Kyrsten Bates PHOTOGRAPHERS Christopher polack . BonnieHansen . Jus vun JD Barnes . Dmitry Nevlad . Jon Millner Florian Mass . Daniel Archer . Drew Wheeler valeria mitelman . Charles Diaz STYLING Raytell Bridges . Faisal Westheimer . Renessta Olds CAROLINE HEWSON . Carlos Mangubat . Sonya Matveeva Julian Burak . Takuma Watanabe . Sophia Schwan MAKE UP ARTIST & HAIRSTYLIST Campbell Ritchie . Janice Wu . Agata Helena Tas Tsipouras . Natalia Goncharenko Maryna Trofimets . Melvin Royce Lane Nat McDonald . Michelle Webb . Justin Arrellano Marissa Ocampo Rhoades . Crystal Ortiz Junko Arai . Aennikin

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Team Assistants Ali Pavlinovich . Milo Matthieu . Jaegger Pendoley Philippe Liezi . Satsuki Hirakata ADVERTISE ADVERTISE@NUMODEMAG.COM SUBMISSIONS & ENQUIRIES Zöe Payne INFO@NUMODEMAG.COM NU-MODE´ MAGAZINE PUBLISHER LATOYA P. HENRY BROOKLYN, NY 11238 T. 7 1 8 . 8 1 2 . 5 8 1 5 WWW.NUMODEMAG.COM WWW.TWITTER.COM/NUMODE Instagram @numodemag WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/NUMODEMAGAZINE a who

Special was a

thanks part of

to this

everyone edition!

LUCAS GOOSSENS wears Sheer Button Down Shirt Ninh Collection Neoprene Bomber Jacket Cody Ross Photography CHRISTOPHER POLACK styling RAYTELL BRIDGES


Contributors

christopher polack

Faisal Westheimer

Raytell Bridges

Dmitry nevlad

Christopher Polack is an Australianborn photographer, who set off his career by shooting BMX lifestyle for more than a decade. Inspired by the experience and industry know-how, Christopher soon started to focus solely on fashion and portrait photography. Having worked across disciplines from sports to advertising with a variety of mediums including film and print publishing, Christopher is actively collaborating with international brands and creative professionals to share his keen interest in visual storytelling. The Melbourne native is particularly drawn to the documentary aspect of his art – he is always striving to capture the spontaneity that unfolds in front of the camera. Christopher’s adventure-seeking personality allows him to transcend all the unexpected elements into visually and emotionally striking editorials. Considering traveling as a second nature, Christopher feeds his restless curiosity of the world by jet setting between time zones, immersing himself in vibrant cultures, and never compromising his youthful rock’n’roll spirit. In his own words: “shoot first, explain later.”

The clock strikes two and a concept arrives much like Count Dracula through an open window (minus the garlic). Westheimer’s creative direction is heavily inspired by tune anything from a Violin Concerto by Sibelius to a Tinnie Tempah limerick. With the upmost respect, given to the silhouette, Westheimer’s strengths lie with the combination of blue-blood structure and clean lines inspired by his SW3 beginnings. With attention to customised accessories and key pieces, Westheimer brings a touch of Anna Karenina drama to any image.

The man that has no imagination, has nothing” says Raytell. Creating art has always been a focal point of Raytell’s life. Growing up in the tumultuous neighborhood of East New York, Brooklyn (NYC) in the early 90’s, Raytell always dreamed of a world filled with fantasy. A world where even his most unorthodox thoughts could somehow become tangible. That they could one day be brought to life in some way, shape, or form. He began his excursion into fashion as a young model in his latter years of high school whilst majoring in commercial and graphic art. Which gave him the tools necessary to work both in front of, as well as behind the camera. Eventually finding himself unfulfilled, Raytell began to look for other ways to express his art in its most purest form, while still staying true to his first love, fashion. After a chance meeting with a critically acclaimed photographer, Raytell’s career as a fashion stylist was born. With only one year as a stylist under his belt, Raytell’s work has already been featured in dozens of magazines, music videos, and on various celebrities.

Dmitry Nevlad is a 20-year-old, fashion photographer based in Ukraine. Who worked in fashion photography since 2012. During this time he’s collaborated with Ukrainian designers: V O Z I A N O V, KAMENSKAKONONOVA, Yulia Yefimtchuk, X’U, Lara Quint, Hakoline, Bogdan KASS, Jean Gritsfeldt, Alexander Len, Denis Music, Dis/order, Chiffonnier, XPOM, MARTA HOLOD, Vika Baron.

Westheimer has been able to focus his energy solely on styling and developing his eye while fine-tuning his portfolio of advertising clients and editorial publications. An avid appreciation for art and film is expressed throughout his work drawing upon a unique interdisciplinary aesthetic.

www.raytellbridges.com

Portraits are what interest me the most in photography. I am a portrait photographer. I treat fashion photography like a portraitist… It is the atmosphere and the mood of a portrait, which brings clothes to life. I like two directions: women and thier beauty. Only a woman can temporarily stop time. After all, the woman in front of the camera lens is a real world that is impossible to perceive completely. The more you live in it, the more you realize that you have not known even the smallest amount of the truth, but the beauty is universal and it does not belong only to its immediate carriers, and is a part of a global universal harmony.

Bonnie Hansen

Jon Millner

jd Barnes

jus vun

Melbourne based fashion photographer Bonnie Hansen started her career in the fashion industry working in advertising. She decided to pursue her dream of getting behind the lens instead of being stuck behind a desk and has since proved herself as a professional fashion photographer.

As a visual and creative enthusiast, photography has always been a passion of mine. Photography for me is an outlet of expressing my creativity, and conveying a story that is unique to my perspective of the world we inhabit. Photography is personal and I seek to inspire and connect by telling a visual story.

“JD Barnes’ approach to his photography can be summed up in one phrase ““Today everything exists to end in a photograph.” He works from West St Studios in Greenpoint, Brooklyn.”

Jus Vun is an Australian photographer currently based in Tokyo, Japan andtravels to Brisbane, Australia and Paris, France. He has been to over 25 countries and his favourite color is black.

www.bonniehansen.net.au

thejamesbarnes.com

He is available for fashion, portrait & editorial assignments in Paris, Tokyo, Sydney and internationally.


12

Inside

this

Issue

Authentic Analog Art Pg. 12

Chess Novella Pg. 86

Nicole Coson Enigma Pg. 183

Waxing Gibbous Pg. 15

Je Vous Attendrai Pg. 96

The Flame Pg. 190

Mixed Beauty Pg. 22

Stadt Flucht Pg. 106

Bare Pg. 192

Arena For Thought Pg. 25

Constructing Expression Nick Frank Pg. 119

Bliss Pg. 203

Ecce Animal Diddo Pg. 32

Introduction Joe Pan Pg. 126

Portrait Of A Young Girl Pg. 210

The Edger Pg. 34

Qiu Hao Oasis Pg. 131

Defined Embodiment Pg. 214

Celia Pg. 45

The Moment Of Existence Pg. 138

Keegan Luttrell Examining Reason Pg. 216

Thank Me Please Pg. 55

Moonassi Pg. 140

Tales Of Grimm Pg. 220

Beautiful Blending Pg. 56

Most Astonishing Wonderful Pg. 151

Memento Pg. 224

Obscure Reality Pg. 63

Control Pg. 150

Raw Pg. 236

Black Is The New Black Pg. 70

Caliente Nights Pg. 170

Stocklist Pg. 244

Lochness Pg. 73

Minimalist Mastery Pg. 175


rafael kouto


JIRI GELLER www.jirigeller.com


12

editor’s

letter

Project Noir Blanc introduces a time when people focused on moods, words, and emotions. The objective is to concentrate on visual aspects, to acquire new information. Inspired by the idea that “Less Is More”, this exhibition edition is an exploration of reflections, fragments, and intent in monochrome. The objective is to concentrate on the visual, stripped of its distractions,

by

challenging

artists

to

reveal

their

inner

workings.

LatoyaP Henry Latoya P. Henry Editor In Chief

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .11


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NASTYA KALETKINA. NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .12

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Nastya

kaletkina

one

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Words arielle chambers

With technology improving at such a rapid rate, it is next to impossible to avoid the ready-to-use, mainstream filters or digitalization and photoshop. Photographer Nastya Kaletkina defies the odds of digitalization and accessible filtering, maintaining an authentic collection of work.

On her flickr account, Kaletkina features a series of dark images that encourage emotion from her audience. Subjects in the shots express feelings of distress, sadness and rebellion amongst other emotions. There is heavy play on double exposure and an interchangeability with black and white and vintage color. Settings of the images Kaletkina, born in 1990, is a Russian photographer. Her range from nature (lakes and fields) to domestics (rooms). talents are expanding internationally, as she is gaining rec- Each image, however, encompasses strong sense appeal. ognition in the states. She enjoys shooting with old analog cameras and avoids digital. Each picture displays a visible Kaletkina pushes the boundaries of conventional photograartistic narrative; the viewer can clearly see a story being told. phy and explores the art of it. She breaks away from the hegemony of technology today, and for that, she sets the standard.

P h o t o g r a p y NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .13


Design

designer Rafael Kouto interview

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .14


Design

Waxing Gibbous interview alexandra stevens Art Direction Adventice Editions Concept and Realization Bonaventure & Niederhauser Model Claude Baltensperger Styling Assistant Sherylin Birth

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .15


Design

“DRAG ME TO THE AFTER HOUR ON THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON 14/1.”

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .16

This collection takes inspiration from the evolution of the phases of the moon. It explores the phenomenon of the diffraction of light, from the deepest black to a blinding white. It will take you along a fantastic wandering, where you will meet shadows, dark silhouettes and stellar eclipses. A world of pale illusions looming and where silver shadows arise. A landscape unseen with human eyes, hidden in the night and coming to light imminently. The mask of darkness is now unveiled, light shining so bright that it becomes impossible to make out day and night. The collection is a vision of a fascinating ideal, where bodies are illuminated by the timeless moonlight and reversed in tone. They are not from here and now. Staring at the moon, dreaming about how pure and sublime this very faraway island out in space might be. This kingdom is much closer than one would think. Admiring reflective surfaces is like going on a journey straight within oneself. Now that this is uncovered, stop looking elsewhere! - Rafael Kouto


designer Rafael Kouto interview

Design NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .17


Design

designer Rafael Kouto interview

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .18


This issue of Nu Mode Magazine is entirely in monochrome. As someone who works in black and white, how do you feel about the absence of color?

The absence of color gives more freedom of interpretation to the viewer. There is too much unnecessary information in a color picture - that’s why I manipulate every picture into black & white. I [do it] in order to subtract and focus on the minimal, necessary information contained in it. Tell us about The Moon Parade, particularly the inspiration you draw from space and the cosmos. In your eyes, what is the relationship between fashion, art, and science? The relation is in the power of a designer or an artist to personally interpret everything he sees, by distorting and deconstructing secular scientific logics and phenomena.

Design

Rafael Kouto’s designs float somewhere in the chasm between fashion and art. A recent graduate of the Basel Academy of Art and Design fashion school, the young Swiss designer release his debut collection earlier this year. Drag Me to the After Hour on the Dark Side of the Moon is made up of futuristic silhouettes, wearable art that is designed to be gender neutral. The Swiss designer is taking advantage of the shrinking divide between men’s and women’s style by using loose cuts and intense draping to create unusual androgynous shapes. His lookbook features chopped up images of models in multi-dimensional masks and hats that often obscure their faces, their bodies enveloped in cocoonlike garments. Inspired by the phases of the moon, the collection mixes a wide range of silk screened prints and textiles, ranging from crinoline to taffeta. We got to chat with the up-and-coming designer about his creative process and inspirations.

What kind of person do you envision wearing your pieces? Who is drawn to your work? I see the wearer of my collection as embodiments of the evolution phases of the moon. Each one with a different and unique character, that depending on the influence perceived under the androgyny of the moon.

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .19


Motto

“There

is

nothing

Design

Your designs are gender-neutral – what do you believe is the importance in creating garments that cross/ignore gender boundaries? The importance is in the awareness of the duality and unity of masculine and feminine in the creative process. The fact that a designer and a customer [no longer needs] to psychologically imagine or identify himself with a specific gender, but just with the garment itself. In order to set a unity between psyche, body, and garment, [I use] androgyny. What kinds of materials and textiles do you usually work with? Tell us a little bit about your technical process. I’m attracted to technics, materials and fabrics that are completely opposite.

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .20

that

you

can

touch.”

New & old, analogic & digital, chiffon & plastic. What other designers and artists are you inspired by? [I’m inspired by] artists who know how to, in their work, match meaning and content of creativity, aesthetic, and performance, with the commercial aspect [of design.] Especially in fashion. Is there anything you’re working on now that you can tell us a little bit about? Any upcoming projects you’re allowed to divulge? My next collection is inspired by another inexplicable natural phenomenon.


designer Rafael Kouto interview

Design NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .21


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P a r t i a l l y S e v e r e d A Clarion Call 2012 Graphite and sumi ink on paper 55” x 34” Words arielle chambers

For so many, art serves as a form of liberation, an escape from reality, a freedom of expression. For artist Samantha Wall, art is just that. Now based in Portland, Oregon, Wall is an immigrant from Seoul, South Korea. She moved to the United States at four years old. Receiving her MFA from the Pacific Northwest College of Art enabled her to further her art career as she went on to be awarded the Joan Mitchell MFA Award in 2011: the year she graduated. Upon acceptance, Wall was selected to showcase her artwork in Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art’s First Look III exhibition. Wall has a series of collections available for convenient viewing on her website, samanthawall.com. “The women in my photographs are a catalyst for my drawings. An exchange of emotions and ideas between the model and myself shapes the outcome of each photo shoot, producing unpredictable and

SAMANTHA WALL. NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .22

idiosyncratic results,” Wall claims. The woman is clearly a muse for this artist. She places emphasis on multiracial women in order to depict her personal journey with multiraciality in Korea. “I... [capture] the figure between expression and release.” She furthers the explanation of her artistry by stating that her technique “with graphite, charcoal or ink, I amplify and enhance [the photo’s] distinctive quality, revealing an affective identity woven from my own emotions and that of the model.” Capturing the features of multi-raciality, Wall stems away from hegemonous views of beauty and portrays what she perceives to be beautiful. Her work is a reflective dimension of an alternative perception which leaves the audience transfixed on the images. Images available in her collection range from Albino women, to women with afros, to chinky-eye women. The variety keeps the viewer wanting more.


samantha

wall

one

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watch

a r t

i n d i v i s i b l e ‘WHAT I CAN’

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .23


art

ecce animal NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .24


artist

diddo

interview

masks, Cartier weaponry, and a 1979 bottle of Dom Pérignon morphed into an extinguisher. Unlike his past pieces, however, Ecce Animal differs in that it only exists, for most people at least, on the internet. As a privately commissioned piece, the identity of the skull’s owner remains a mystery, and it has never been publicly displayed. A non-disclosure agreement prevents Diddo from divulging much, so the internet has thus far been left to guessing in terms of the skull’s value and location. Despite disagreement or uncertainty regarding the mystery that is Ecce Animal, Diddo is undoubtedly achieving his intention of creating discussion. We got the chance to speak with the enigmatic artist about his daring creations, the links between the arts and science, and how to respond to the critics. What quote or motto do you live by? I find a lot of inspiration in Latin phrases. They must have a time-honed simplicity and truth to have lasted this long. And, the fact that they are in Latin lets you focus entirely on meaning, without the intrusive contextual baggage the words may have in English, for example.

art

It’s a symbol of death. Or life, depending on perspective. It represents both the mind and the body; sometimes it serves as a warning, other times as a reflection of mortality. From the Skulls of Jericho to the skulls of Damien Hurst and C. Allan Gilbert, the human skull has been used for centuries as an emblematic artistic vehicle. And just when we thought we had already seen every rendition imaginable, Dutch artist Diddo brings us skull art in its latest reincarnation. Ecce Animal is a sculpture of the human skull, lifelike in shape and size, molded entirely out of cocaine and gelatin. After spending months collecting from street dealers for the commissioned art piece, the accumulated powder was tested for purity and content. A full summary of the lab report is available on Diddo’s website, along with pictures of beakers full of chemicals, weirdly outdated desktop computers, and faceless figures in lab coats. When images of Ecce Animal first hit the internet, a lot of people were pretty pissed about it even being called art. Apparently for some, the concept of sculpture as a fine art just goes out the window as soon as drugs are involved. Fans of Diddo’s previous works were hardly be surprised by his latest endeavor, having already seen designer gas

Arena for Thought

INTERVIEW ALEXANDRA STEVENS

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .25


artist

diddo

art

In reality though, there’s no single phrase I particularly live by. Life seems a little too complicated and fluid to follow one set of wagon ruts. I’m mostly inspired by everyday human behavior, particularly behaviors that seem irrational or antiquated. The world is fixated on the consequence of our actions, but for me, the behavior that causes those actions in the first place is much more interesting. I guess the best way to describe how I try to approach life is to see the world as a newborn would. Strip away the context and forethought and simply try to enjoy what is amazing and intriguing in the everyday. This helps me to reassess my ideas again and again. Many of your creations require extensive testing or chemical processes. How would you describe the relationship between science and art, particularly in your work? The world of science fascinates me. I can completely lose myself in learning about certain scientific phenomenon. I believe science creates the foundation for my thinking; it’s an ever-growing human language that reveals the patterns in our universe. [Humans] have a relatively short lifecycle, so it makes sense that we need a uniform system to simplify things and pass on discoveries in an easily understandable format. This allows us to progress from one generation to the next. I feel that these systems generate perspective, offering humans clarity and purpose. At the same time, I realize everything can only be based on the information we have gathered so far. It is quite clear we don’t really know that much about why we are here - I like to think that there is more to it than simply surviving long enough to procreate. Within my work, science adds another layer of information. It generates depth and enhances a view or statement. It can [simply] be a tool, or an integral part of the art piece or story I’m trying to project. At the same time, I re-

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .26

interview

ally like working with scientists, as they have such a different way of seeing our world. How do you respond to critics who question the validity of your work? Can you prove that a piece like Ecce Animal is truly made out of cocaine and not just another replacement substance? I think it is good to be critical. I am a harsh critic myself. Executing an idea is a long, laborious, and often very expensive process for me. I am - probably to my own detriment - pretty obsessive in my pursuit of perfection. For me, execution, fabrication, and production is an art in itself. A ‘piece’ might be a grand comment on society. It may be well thought through hopefully it’s intriguing - but when it is time to turn it from concept into real world creation, I have a switch of mindset. I shift from the conceptual artist to a neurotic craftsman. I could invite critics over to “sample” Ecce Animal to give their “expert” opinions on the purity, but I don’t own it. And I’m sure if I did make that invitation, many more “critics” would suddenly be “going on the record” as well. As for proof, I worked with experts from a renowned laboratory, very talented and dedicated scientists. They were invaluable to the process, and all of their reports, findings, and results are published on my website. How does an artist such as yourself acquire the funds to produce works created out of extremely expensive material like gold, diamonds, and drugs? I don’t know how others do it, but for me it is mostly dedication, meticulous planning, and creativity. I take years to fund and complete my projects. Sometimes I look back and wonder how I actually managed to do it. My work is where my money, time, and effort go. It’s what I do.


art NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .27


art NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .28


artist

diddo

interview

Project womb

art NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .29


diddo

art

artist

vodka NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .30

interview


Despite the theme of luxury in some of my work, my own lifestyle is not overly luxurious. My biggest patron until recently has been myself, but thankfully things are changing. The commissioned work I have created lately was funded upfront, and happily that trend seems to be continuing. Having more money to execute my ideas hasn’t changed them, but it does get them out into the world faster. This issue of Nu Mode Magazine is entirely in monochrome. As someone who has also worked in black and white, how do you feel about the absence of color?

Explain the importance of the poetry that often accompanies your work. I like to see my descriptions as an artist statement. For me, the object itself is never the whole ‘piece.’ I’m not trying to communicate a single idea or induce a specific way of thinking. What I hope to provide with each statement is a focus. To establish

Ultimately, what kinds of questions do you want your art to bring up? The messages and questions differ from piece to piece. Recent work involves the idea that we are continuously bombarded by forces of propaganda, designed to influence the way we think and behave. Each of my pieces is a ‘thinking process in progress.’ Essentially, each piece is an exploration of these propagandistic narratives, and the truth they may be obscuring. My central message is simple: “question everything” and “think for yourself.” It sounds contradictory, but my work embodies my thinking, not my personal agenda. I’m not trying to make anyone agree with me, but if they do, I hope it is only after critical thinking of his or her own.

art

Color is an interesting phenomenon. Ask a scientist if black and white are colors, and he will probably say black is not a color, but white is. Ask an artist, and he will probably say black is a color, and white isn’t. I think withholding color can carry just as much meaning as using multiple colors. Color is simply energy in context. It is energy from one source, bouncing off another, zipping through your eye, where it changes again, before finally arriving in the brain, where it gains meaning. Color allows artists to drape visual input with meaning, coat it in context, and saturate it with additional content; unlocking associations that have previously been stored in the brain. Transmitting any idea visually – simply – should make use of the viewer’s own “onboard data” as much as possible. Using specific colors can unlock or repurpose experiences and memories the viewer already has. This way, the final idea isn’t just something that has been transmitted from one mind to another, but is created equally. Art is a partnership.

an ‘arena for thought.’ This arena offers people a way to explore and reflect on their own ideas. The object is an icon at the center of that arena. The statement is a gateway. I want to invite viewers to become part of the work, to be drawn into the thinking, but then come to their own truly considered opinion.

Is there anything you’re working on now that you can tell us a little bit about? Any upcoming projects you’re allowed to divulge? Yes, my next project focuses on Power Intoxication. Excessive appetite for power poisons the personality, and allows us to do unacceptable harm to others. It highlights the imbalance in equilibrium between our inner animal and its cage, society. George Orwell said it beautifully: “Always, there will be the intoxication of power, constantly increasing and constantly growing subtler. Always, at every moment, there will be the thrill of victory, the sensation of trampling on an enemy who is helpless. If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a human face - for ever.” I think we can keep that from happening.

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .31


poetry

ecce animal DIDDO

once we were animals. like any other, we lived in an environment of fear and want. then, we became ‘human’ and aspired to be better. we learned to control our environment but the fear stayed, because we never learned to control ourselves. it is bare

frightening to look at the face of our animal by comfortable excess; the spoils of its

side laid aggression.

but what exactly is it about this image that is so confronting? is it this division in our idea of self ? or is it a realization that though we have mastered the outside world, we will always remain subservient to our inner selves.

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poetry

diddo

ecce

animal

poetry NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .33


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PHOTOGRAPHY Daniel Archer STYLING Carlos Mangubat at Unsigned management


Shirt Jack London Turtleneck Jack London Pants Damien Yip for Authority Tote Bag Diesel Monk Strap Shoes Jack London


Top Jean Paul Gaultier Coat Marc Jacobs from Mister Hewitt Pants JackLondon Socks Pringle (worn throughout) Shoes Church’s


Hat Mister Hewitt Shirt Ralph Lauren Suspenders General Pants & Co


Shirt Aquila Pants Issey Miyake from Mister Hewitt Jacket Comme des Garรงon from Mister Hewitt


Blazer Jack London Top Package Apparel Pants Damien Yip for Authority Tie Bell & Barnett Sunglasses Rayban Shoes Aquila


Shirt Jean Paul Gaultier from Mister Hewitt Blazer (in hand) Jack London Pants Jack London Shoes Jack LondonHat Vintage from Some Like it Hot


Shirt Jack London Blazer Jack London Bandana Stylist’s Own Watch Emporio Armani


Blazer Bell & Barnett Coat Burberry from Mister Hewitt Shoes Saint Laurent Belt Stylists own Photography Daniel Archer styling Carlos Mangubat at Unsigned management grooming Tas Tsipouras model Blair Norfolk at Two Management


earring Venice dress House of cards


C e l i a PHOTOGRAPHY BONNIE HANSEN STYLING CAROLINE HEWSON


shorts Kara Liu top Blesse’d are the meek


Earring Venice top Kaliver pants Blessed are the meek sandals Sol Sana


playsuit Kaliver sheer bralette Kaliver denim earring Venice


jumper Nanushka skirt Leroy nguyen


bra Stella McCartney singlet Viktoria + woods skirt MacGraw earring Venice


Earring Venice top Kaliver pants Blessed are the meek sandals Sol Sana


earring Venice dress House of cards Photography BONNIE HANSEN styling CAROLINE HEWSON make up artist & Hairstylist Campbell Ritchie with ONE represents Makeup using Giorgio Armani Hair using O & M hair products Hair and Makeup Assistant Ali Pavlinovich model CELIA FLOWER JONES at CHADWICK MODELS


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poetry

moment

giselle

peppers

THANK ME PLEASE

p o e t r y

I did you a favor. I got up and left. For you.. mostly. I

couldn’t

have

been

brought

down

anymore.

I was an anchor in the sea, I had to come up to breathe. You might think I’m selfish cause it seems all about me… Yet you don’t make someone stay if they don’t want to be. They But When

say why I

it’s would can

better I just

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have say

include you I

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figuring don’t

exclude

out

clues

want

you.

- Giselle Peppers.

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .55


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Interview arielle chambers

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artist

Kristian

evju

interview

art

Dark River V (2013) 60x120 cm, pencil on paper on fibre board

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .57


Kristian

art

artist

Dark River VI (2013) 60x120 cm, pencil on paper on fibre board

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .58

evju

interview


Kristian Evju is an award-winning visual artist born in Kongsberg, Norway. Upon receiving a BA in painting and drawing from the Edinburgh College of Art and a Masters of Fine Arts from the Chelsea College of Art, Evju settled in London and is now a working artist in the area. Evju’s methods to art are unconventional. He does not sketch, but lets the tool, whether pencil or paintbrush, lead him. Graphite and acrylic serve as his main mediums. He then creates a beautiful whole. With the mix of pencil and paint, Evju’s style has captured the eye of many. His several solo exhibitions over the years contribute to growing international prestige, showcasing his talent. Displaying almost annually since 2008 (with 2011 as an exception), Evju has covered his hometown, Kongsberg, Oslo, Steinberg, Pietrasanta, Lahore and Neu-Ulm. He also has scheduled future plans for solo exhibitions in Aalesund and Notodden. From 2007 to present, Evju’s collaborative efforts are displayed as well through selected group expeditions. 2014 collections include Dark River and Velvet Bloom. With special attention to the narrative quality in his art, the five pieces in Dark River tell such a story that the reader has no choice but to be engulfed in translating the meaning. Entirely black and white, the artwork gives a vintage raw appeal. Birds are the

cohesive factor in the series and there is emphasis on womanhood. The unique blending of mediums to create realism makes Evju’s talents like no other. Define

Kristian

Evju?

A process loving maker of images, in constant search of good narratives, good design, and interesting interactions. Are there specific ideals you want to broadcast through the characters featured in your work? No, not consciously. Certain ideals will manifest, but I try to avoid any specific agenda. A few of your distinctive features are, the choice of color, placement and technique. For an artist what is the most difficult aspect when producing a character? I always search for some sort of limbic moment. A bit of quiet drama. It is hard to remain subtle enough - to fully trust the intelligence and depth of your audience.

art

Dark River ii (2013) 60x120 cm, pencil on paper on fibre board

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Do you create characters based on relationships and encounters or unknown characters from personal thoughts? A bit of both. It is an interesting balance between being an inventor and a thief. Nothing is forbidden. What foundation and you use to manifest

theories do a storyline?

I find Borges’ writings on poetic faith essential - it is not about truth - it’s about the narrative. I want the narrative to emerge rather than being pre planned. I don’t want to be the authority - I leave that up to the viewer.

art

Tell us the vision behind ‘Dark River’? How would you sum up this series with four words? !! The project Dark River started as a series of musings about the bewildering river of information that informs our sense of reality. I wanted to make collage-like drawings that could be read a bit like movie trailers. An instant immersion into a larger than life narrative, but as limbic moments rather than chronological retelling or documentation. In four words: Associative Exploration of Dramatic Narratives. Your definition you reflect it

of beauty and how do through your characters?

Beauty is problematic, but there is an essential autonomy in the way we piece together our personal aesthetic, and I try to be quite instinctive and reactive when dealing with it. It is closely tied to the question about ideals. Which al and

series holds an ideological significance

emotionfor you?

Emotions come and go, and I try to avoid any didactic agenda or ideological scheming. I think

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .60

there is something serene about the Dark River series, but at the moment I am too involved in the making of Velvet Bloom. It is always the series I am working on that concerns me. Another want T

to

h

creative pursue e

a

medium but t

r

you haven’t? e

.

Do you find it’s important for your work to have a relationship to the rest of the world? My

work

would

not

exist

otherwise.

The impression you intend to leave with the viewer? If I somehow unlock or trigger interesting narratives, I am happy. Familiarity mixed with intrigue perhaps. List two mottos,quotes or idioms that encourage you. I am not a gatherer of mottos or quotes, but I like what Edison said about inspiration: “Genius is one and ninety-nine

percent percent

inspiration perspiration”

Being an artist can be quite introspective. And being a young, white male artist carries certain sets of ridiculous ideals and expectations, so I find this slightly sentimental quote by Charles Dickens a useful reminder: “Have a heart that never hardens, a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.”


artist

Kristian

evju

interview

art

Memoirs of the Other Rucola Ruby 2012 27x35 cm, pencil on paper Photography

Silvia

Griglio NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .61


Photography

Photographer

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patricia

voulgaris

interview


ear 2013 “fragments”

“I decompose, I enlarge, and so to speak, I retard,” Voulgaris explains her perceptual process. The very process is one that results in the photographic genius she encompasses. Her photographs, mainly in deeply contrasted black and whites or heavily saturated colors, require a long lasting study; her work is not easily understood by quick glance. Voulgaris explores geometrics and incorporates them into the image. Crisp, original and personal Patricia Voulgaris collections possess such emotion, such a story.

photography

Obscure. Abstract. Illusionary. Art takes many forms-in ways deeply personal to its creator. Patricia Voulgaris’s selected medium is photography. However, she fights against the realism of capturing the standard image. Instead she dives into an enigma, showing the audience not everything is, as it seems. Her up-for-interpretation, unique take on “what is”, makes her photographs ones to remember. It makes them masterpieces.

Obscure Reality

Interview arielle chambers

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Photography

Braid 2013 “fragments”

Who is Patricia Voulgaris? Where are you from and where are you located currently? She is a photographer from New York that graduated from the School of Visual Arts in 2013 with a BFA in photography. Her work has been exhibited in New York, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. She recently completed a residency at the Camera Club of New York and was chosen, as 2014 PDN’s “The Curator” grand prizewinner. Where do you gather inspiration for a series? I usually gather inspiration from looking at work that I admire. Specifically, contemporary photography and painting.

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Sum up your style of photography with four words? Abstract, Is to No

there a form

shapes, specific your there

shadow, practice subject is

light you use material? not.

The selections between colors versus monochrome, which do you prefer? Do you feel each attribute manifest a different outcome? Why? I do not have a particular preference. Each photograph has a different intention. Which, the viewer can interpret in multiple ways.


Photographer

patricia

voulgaris

interview

self 2013 “fragments”

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Photographer

patricia

voulgaris

interview

untitled 2013 “fragments”

Photography

Motivation Quote “A picture is a secret about a secret, the more it tells you the less you know” -Diane Arbus

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photography

space 2013 “fragments”

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Motivation Quote “I am interested in language because it wounds or seduces me” -Roland Barthes

self 2013 “Stillplane”

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untitled 2013 “fragments”


Photographer

patricia

voulgaris

interview

dissection 2013 “fragments”

photography

What contributed to your use of black and white? I’ve always been attracted to black and white photography, mainly for it’s ability to transform images graphically.

Name served

a as

few elements a muse for

that your

have work?

The work of Thomas Demand and constructive criticism from fellow peers.

Is there something you want your images to reflect?

Places and spaces you would like to visit?

I hope that flect on,

California,

viewers their

question own

and rememories.

The series “Fragments” could be describe as? A

graphic

memory.

The To

next

Italy, step keep

for

and

Iceland

Patricia

Voulgaris?

making

art!

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B

l t h e

N e w

c

k

B l a c k

d

e

s

i

g

n

i s

a

Words arielle chambers

Black will always be...the new black. Never faltering in its chic, mysterious, sexy aesthetic, it is by far the most dependable color. Clothing brand UY applies the theory of dependability for the power of black and solely carries the color. “Simple, affordable and unisex...We believe that UY is a life style.” Designers Fabian Woesthoff and Emre Demirtas collaborate in creating hand made, crafted in Berlin pieces, completely unique to the brand UY. UY has a collection of versatile, wearable pieces. The use of oversizing and universal cut of the wardrobe make the line completely unisex. Mesh tees, pullovers, bags, and accessories exist within the col-

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lection. Jersey cotton allows the tops to fall on the body softly, and give a free flowing aesthetic. Among the must haves are the clean and chic throw light cardigan. According to UY, it is “100% extremely soft jersey cotton,” with an “open constructed fit, draped shawl collar, long sleeves, and raw edges;” it is also slightly see through. However, the way it falls on the body makes this piece a necessary item in the closet-non restrictive to body types. UY validates every concept of the edgy-chic, black wearer. It caters to those who prefer simple, yet fashionable. Prices are affordable and clothing is practical. The brand is certainly one to look forward to being on the scene!


samantha

wall

one

to

watch

d e s i g n NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .71


EARRINGS VALENTINO BANGLE MISSONI VINTAGE BANDAGED BODYSUIT NIXI KILLICK FOOTWEAR TONY BIANCO


n

L e

o s

c s

PHOTOGRAPHY Christopher Polack STYLING Faisal Westheimer

h


EARRINGS + NECKLACE ROBERTA (HAWKEYE VINTAGE COLLECTION) SWIMSUIT GIANNI VERSACE


EARRINGS CELINE SWIMSUIT VERSACE BROOCH MARNI BANGLE AURÉLIE BIDERMANN


EARRINGS +EARRINGS GIVENCHY (HAWKEYE VINTAGE COLLECTION) SWIMSUIT MISSONI


EYEWEAR CHRISTIAN DIOR (VINTAGE) SWIMSUIT ROBERTA


EYEWEAR (CUSTOMISED) STYLISTS OWN BELT LOUIS VUITTON BANDAGE BODYSUIT NIXI KILLICK


EARRINGS DOLCE & GABBANA BUBBLE-WRAP SKIRT GISELE KAYA BELT HERMÈS


NECKLACE ROBERTA AVAILABLE AT HAWKEYE VINTAGE PLASTIC MERMAID TOP + SKIRT GISELE KAYA


SWIMSUIT STYLIST’S OWN EARRINGS + BRACELET ROBERTA AVAILABLE AT HAWKEYE VINTAGE


SWIMSUIT AMERICAN APPAREL FOOTWEAR TONY BIANCO Photography Christopher Polack Styling Faisal Westheime make up artist & hairstylist Janice Wu model Ashlee Anne Scotland at Giant Management


C h e s s

PHOTOGRAPHY Dmitry Nevlad STYLING Sonya Matveeva

Sixty four black and white squares. A game of light and shade. Chess, much like love, requires a partner. She is ancient yet always new, mechanical in the basis, but bringing victory only in the presence of fantasy; limited to close space. Boundless in the combinations; ideas without conclusions; art without a physical manifestation. Where her beginning, and where her end? an ac cent in a shooting is concentrated on character of queen, associated with a woman having boundless possibilities, that in the rules of “royal game�.


n o v e l l a

All clothing Lara Quint, Vika Baron all accessories Vika Baron


Photography Dmitry Nevlad styling Sonya Matveeva Make up artist Natalia Goncharenko Hairstylist Maryna Trofimets model Ella Zadavysvichka at Linea 12


Je

vous

attendrai Photography & Art Direction Jus Vun STYLING Takuma Watanabe


Turtleneck ALEXANDER WANG Bolero SAPHIR EAST One Piece SOMARTA Sunglass A.D.F Other Stylist’s own


Turtleneck ALEXANDER WANG Bolero SAPHIR EAST One Piece SOMARTA


Jacket,& Leggings AGURI SAGIMORI Shirt nuboax Ring & Bracelet AMBER SCEATS Other Stylist’s own


One Piece SAPHIR EAST Shoes SOMARTA×NORITAKA TATEHANA Ring & Bracelet AMBER SCEATS


Dress SAPHIR EAST


Necklace AMBER SCEATS


Dress THEATRE PRODUCTS Other Stylist’s own Photography & Art Direction Jus Vun Styling Takuma Watanabe Make Up Artist & Hairstylist Junko Arai Photography Assistant Philippe Liezi Wardrobe Assistant Satsuki Hirakata Model Yuan At Bellona Model Agency Tokyo


STADT FLUCHT TEL AVIV HAMBURG BERLIN

Photography

Florian

MaAs

We always see the world in the same angle, only the camera allows us to expand our view on it. It lets us break the restriction of our own eyes

and shows the world in a new and unexpected way that was hidden before.

In this book I portrayed the cities of Tel Aviv,

Hamburg and Berlin. Inspired by the photography of the new objectivity I tried to photograph these

cities in a way one might not have seen them before.

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Photographer

nick

frank

interview

Constructing expression nick frank INTERVIEW

IRINA

ROMASHEVSKAYA

Photography

It might come as a surprise that Nick Frank’s affair with photography began just a few years ago, and ever since then his dramatic architectural imagery had captivated audiences from around the world. Naturally, we had to ask a few inquisitive q

u

e

s

t

i

o

n

s

.

space & beyond

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .119


Photographer

nick

frank

Why

interview

photography?

It’s a holistic process for me. Aside from the creative part itself, I can pick my subject, pull the trigger, edit and release images completely on my own. Light,

Photography

Each Your

one

space

doesn’t

work

favorite

Probably my a perfect

Arca piece

Most

memorable

How

much

or

without

the

camera

Swiss Cube. of precision photo

shooting

other

color?

one.

accessory?

It’s such engineering. incident?

Nothing exciting really happens when you shot architecture. It just takes time. And it’s not like you have five models falling over each other on the runway. do

you

like

Photoshop?

On a scale of 1–10, where 10 is the maximum, I would give it a solid 10. It is the tool that helps me to convert objectively taken photos into a subjectively edited version of what I want to express.

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .120


La Defensé

Photography NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .121


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Photographer

nick

frank

interview

Photography

Words,

sounds

and

images.

What

came

first?

Sounds I guess, since most of us are almost blind at birth.

How

many

languages

do

you

speak?

2

The

1/3.

biggest

story

your

camera

ever

told?

I am currently working on a project about people living in the Olympic city of Munich. They are sharing stories about their way of life for the past 40 years, while I’m capturing their emotions with my camera.

What

do

you

never

leave

your

home

without?

One out of my collection of almost 30 baseball caps.

space & beyond NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .123


nick

frank

interview

Photography

Photographer

Your I

most m

p

What

do

H

o

In

what

I

c

a

t

G

r

what

e

n

c

most

value

n

e

s

t

you

like

would

e

is

i

characteristic?

you

country

What

To

marked

l

it

a

do

your

n

you e

faults

in

most e

you

feel

e

friends? y

.

to

live?

d

.

dislike? d

most

.

.

indulgent?

Probably a beautiful woman‌ But then again I am a man.

Concrete Canyons NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .124


NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .125


p

o

e

t

r

y

INTRODUCTION JOE PAN

Words IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA Poetry joe pan

Joe Pan’s first collection of prose and poetry, Autobiomythography, was named “Best First Book of the Year” by Coldfront. He is the publisher and managing editor of Brooklyn Arts Press, and serves as the poetry editor for the arts magazine Hyperallergic. His work “Ode to the MQ-9 Reaper,” a hybrid piece about drones, was recently excerpted and praised in The New York Times. Joe received his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and his work has appeared in such places as Boston Review, Brooklyn Rail, Cimarron Review, Denver Quarterly, Glimmer Train, H_ngm_n, and Phoebe, among other journals. He grew up along the Space Coast of Florida and now lives in Brooklyn.

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .126


poetry

moment

joe

pan

Thanat*OS

p

Milton’s Antihero

o e

Wine some

garden Brooklyn

notices

breeze

garden

thrush

Drunk

off

still

stroking garden

me

me

cork thrush

twitters,

lilts

under

clavicle

its

thrush

a

at

a

still own of

grub

Tucked

not

Revolt:

watching,

popping—

rugged rib. wander’s

into

Bless

path

a

fall, a

and

my

fed

by

simple

a

chain. levied

y

notices

thrush,

r

fat,

garden

t

This

sores.

dandelion— noon

cyclist’s

lamp—

tire

sings

heartbeat, moon—

bewitched

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .127


moment

joe

pan

Brooklyn Noir (What Dick Saw)

Hypn*OS

Go

In

p

o

e

t

r

y

poetry

tattle,

arrow

go

finger a

a

at

bars,

head,

cow

a

ring, bar, in

march

worm,

lie

shoe

a

skirt,

run

the

kimono bottle

chick, on

bet

the

off

a

in

Queens,

twin a

a

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .128

blues

a

‘cord,

the

gun,

blue

graveyard

sting,

soul

get

L

high-stakes

is

hut

a

and

a

jon

fare,

healer,

a

rounds,

born

a

cinch

a

downtown

fin

tourist, flirt, a

go

again—

lose.

memory

of

Winter,

wed

name

heart

the

diner,

two-bit

sisters,

TeeVee

divider,

a

girl,

under-tab

docks,

hooch,

make

shotgun, a

clef

a

front

roll a

Go

mouth,

rat

cop,

a

down—go

rounds.

a

contra,

pop

align

go

a

soporific

c

k

Ultimate of

a

d

cult.

is

off

i

Dove s

Wind

i

c

leaping,

to

If

Ramses.

Winter

fickle

screaming

bed,

,

slumbers

of

poor.

l

terrain

Ingrid?”

&

days.

a

somnambulant.

cream,

Tibet

is

Time

a

sleeping,

Mind

so

Diffenderfer

Mine

“Ice

Lacking

Helen

mates,

some

&

Sick,

winter

old,

rain

ambulance

riddles.

dreams

lumbers

us.


Plane over LaGuardia

p o e t r y

A

mermaid

an

idea

loose

circuit,

in

in

a

equine,

a

pond

nibbler

gelatinous

of

of

brain,

lightning— data—

concussed

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n g i s e D NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .130


designer

qiu

hao

interview

Q i u h a o o

a

s

i

s D e s i

IRINA

ROMASHEVSKAYA

g

INTERVIEW

n

Qiu Hao’s extensive design work has been featured in numerous international magazines and lately his art pieces have been gathering attention as well. This multi-talented artist continues to surprise us, proving time after time that neutral extremely

color broad

palette spectrum

has of

an

possibilities.

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designer

What

qiu

is

the

hao

subject

of

your

work?

and

Why

do

you

To

express,

design? to

reality.

What

control,

moves to

you

make,

to

create?

to

destroy.

Which profession would you choose if you weren’t blessed with a creative spark? It’s hard to choose. I would probably die if life had no creativity in it.

D

e

s

i

g

n

Fantasy

interview

What The one’s

does world world

existentialism

we is

live in belongs different. What you

Line,

color

mean

to

you?

to everybody, but everythink is what you see. or

proportion?

They inspire each other, help each other; sometimes they fight against each other. Your Never

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .132

quintessential had

one.

I

think

life

fashion is

always

more

important

moment? than

fashion.


images courtesy of qiu hao

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QIUHAO 2013 spring summer Collection photography likai

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designer

qiu

hao

interview

D e s i

love

leather. And

Are I

you wake

clothing

material:

I

to

continue

an up

and

wool develop

bird

seven

What Cannot

discover

early

around

cotton,

in

or leather’s

or the

Artful

it,

but

I

fashion

functions.

an

owl?

morning

everyday.

is describe

leather?

n

I

functional

g

Most

beauty? know

it

or

when

I

see

fashionable

it. art?

I never think in this way. Art and fashion are two different ways of expressing something I cannot explain using words. It’s not about being an artist or a designer. It’s about completing QIUHAO. Your H Who I

favorite o

n are

e your

don’t

virtue? s

t

favorite

y prose

read

. writers? prose. QIUHAO 2012 spring summer Collection NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .135


designer

B

is

hao

your

o

present

r

e

interview

state d

of o

mind? m

.

What B

is

your

l

favorite

a

c

color? k

.

D

e

s

i

g

n

What

qiu

What Cannot

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .136

is share

it.

your It’s

meaningless

motto? to

others.


QIUHAO 2014 Autumn/Winter Collection photography yu cong

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .137


ART

T h e

M o m e n t

E

x

i

s

o f

t

e

n

c

e

qiu hao. NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .138


Words Irina Romashevskaya

Qiu Hao’s last year’s first solo art exhibit titled The Moment of Existence, centered on the philosophical movement of existentialism and the idea of one’s individual freedom and self-expression. The common thread between art and philosophy is the fact that both begin with wonder. It’s that initial ‘what if ?’ that starts creative juices flowing. Asking powerful questions, and armed with a slew of non-traditional art supplies, rice paper, lambskin, horse hair and silk, Hao recreates a unifying idea of the human spirit and takes that initial ‘what if ?’ to ‘and then.’ All phases of human existence get examined, questioned and felt through: Is happiness attainable? Is it possible to be truly free? What does it mean to feel, to know or to believe? And when those questions get answered another

‘why?’ arises: How do you express an emotion in color or capture a fleeting moment? Can individual perspective of someone’s world be only subjective? Is there a possibility of a universal truth? The resulting outcome of this artistic survey is an exciting blend of Eastern and Western aesthetics, a study of contrasts: spirituality opposed to knowledge, neutral palette versus colorful expression – minimal concept given a world of meaning.

ART NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .139


s

s

i

Artist Daehyun Kim interview

n a

ART

INTERVIEW IRINA ROMASHEVSKAYA

With a flair for all things black, this Korean artist and designer participated in a variety of projects over the years, from his commissioned illustrations for The New York Times to his design collaborations with Lomography. Blending tradition with modernity, Daehyun Kim or Moonassi, as he prefers to be called,

M o

o

creates art that inspires curiosity and brings a smile to your face.

Detached 탈脫, 29.7 × 42 cm Pigment liner and marker on a paper, 2014 NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .140


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Be(a)cause of you 29.7 × 42 cm wPigment liner and marker on a paper, 2014 NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .142


Artist Daehyun Kim interview

What do you like about your chosen occupation? As a designer, there is always an answer. As an artist, there is no answer. Tradition did you

or

modernity? develop your

How style?

I choose traditional techniques just as a tool, not as a destiny, in order to illustrate modern life.

In the morning, I’m a pessimist. During the day – a realist. And in the nighttime – optimistic fantasist. Why

do

you

like

Looking ing my

at black color is like closeyes. It’s full of possibilities.

ART

Are you an optimist, pessimist or realist?

black?

As an artist, do you doubt yourself often? I doubt myself ist as much as

everyday as an artI am aware of that.

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Artist Daehyun Kim interview

Do you agree with the statement that the eyes are the window to the soul? I agree with it, but the window is painted black. So when we see through the eyes, our soul is imprisoned in a vacuum. You

favorite

pastime

ART

Being Trains,

activity? alone.

plains

or

automobiles?

A

bus.

The most important event of your life? Birth

and

death.

Your

favorite

dish?

Kimchi.

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(Yes,

I’m

Korean).


You’re sur real 정말이지너는, 29.7 × 42 cm Pigment liner and marker on a paper, 2014

Attached 착着, 29.7 × 42 cm Pigment liner and marker on a paper, 2014

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Obscure 꽃꽂이, 42 x 29.7cm pen and marker on paper, 2014 NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .146


Artist Daehyun Kim interview

Your

most

marked

Inconsistent Who

is

characteristic?

and your

contradictory. favorite

René

painter? Magritte.

What historical figures do you most despise?

What the

to your greatest

mind of

ART

There’s no one I love enough to despise. would be misfortunes?

A misfortune always brings a good topic for a pleasant conversation. What is your idea of earthly happiness? Eating

when

I’m

hungry.

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Artist Daehyun Kim interview

Excerpt

ART

The series is my life-time project. There is no specific background story or a theory about the drawing. Each drawing is created based on my daily thoughts and feelings. I draw to meditate on myself and others, and to be able to see the whole story of the series in the end. - Daehyun Kim

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Pain-proof 위장고독, 42 x 29.7 cm pen and marker on paper, 2014 NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .149


Top Etal. Wide Leg Pants Etal.


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A s t o n i s h i n g W

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Photography Drew Wheeler STYLING Julian Burak


Jacket Etal Intimates Hopeless Lingerie Shoe MarsĂŠll


Top Stylist Own


Top SCTT BNDCTN


Intimates Hopeless Lingerie


Jacket Blaire Archibald Top Stylist Own Intimates Hopeless Lingerie.


Jacket BLK DNM from Swensk Intimates Hopeless Lingerie


Top Etal Bottom Etal Intimates Hopeless Lingerie Shoes Stylist Own


Top Etal Pants Etal Photography Drew Wheeler styling Julian Burak make up artist Nat McDonald hairstylist Melvin Royce Lane model Holly Watson at Pride


C o n t r o l PHOTOGRAPHY Jon Millner Designer Clarissa Arocena

A

future

inspired

by

space,

time,

and

control.


Photography Jon Millner designer Clarissa Arocena Make up artist Marissa Ocampo Rhoades hairstylist Crystal Ortiz model Emma Claris


CALIENTE PHOTOGRAPHY CHARLES DIAZ fashion editor RENESSTA OLDS

Top Rue 107 Skirt S.I.L.K.


NIGHTS

Shirt Robert Graham


Damian Shirt Robert Graham Nadiya Blouse Cluny Earrings Laruicci


Damian Shirt Robert Graham Nadiya Dress Maria Bianca Nero Earrings, Ring & Bracelet Laruicci PhotographY Charles Diaz Fashion Editor Renessta Olds Make up artist | Hairstylist & Grooming Karlos Enrique Matias Models Nadiya Khan at Fenton Moon | Damian Josef


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Photographer

kevin

saint

grey

interview

Mastering everything minimal and reductionist in color and black and white, Kevin Saint Grey’s work is one of a kind.

stealth

bomber

Photography

The Los Angeles based photographer masters the art of detail and precision. Saint Grey incorporates everything minimal to create breathtaking images. He has an evident fascination with architecture and landscape, as displayed in his 2006 Mono series. 2008’s collection, Nocturnes, focuses on sky and is completely monochromatic. Though true, images greatly showcase the vastness of the sky through shots of the sun setting and moon rising. Zero (2011) incorporated paper into his fine photography. He utilized black space in conjunction with the whiteness of the paper to create floral, delicate imagery. Saint Grey returned to his architectural niche for the 2009-2011 series, Stealth Bomber. He emphasized lines of buildings by photographing at extreme angles. Images in the Chroma (2006) series played with color and light. Saint Grey recently developed collection; Dystopia (20102013) explored photographic reductionism. By method of camera movement during exposure, he created a composition of lines. These intentional blurred lines created such a movement, such photographic genius, and such enigma.

Minimalist Mastery

Something is to be said about a beautiful perspective. All too often, photographs can be consumed with commotion-lack of focus, lack of artistic premise, lack of quality. However, internationally award-winning fine art photographer Kevin Saint Grey avoids common chaos of today’s photography and maintains his style: the art of monochromatic and chromatic images, reductionism, and abstraction.

V

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Photographer

kevin

saint

grey

interview

Life Quote “You don’t take a photograph, you make it.” - Ansel Adams.

Photography

For how

each you

project, gather

describe inspiration?

For me, I find inspiration in space – the space between subjects and the relationship between subject(s) and space. I strive to find a natural harmonic balance between the two. With my architectural work, there is an additional component of geometry, lines in particular, and I am always looking for new ways to incorporate them into an image. For example, my “stealth bomber” series is photographed with steep angles causing lines and geometry to become the main focal point. Inherent qualities, a vigorous

which make Photographer?

A sense of adventure (more specifically, a willingness to get out into the world and explore) and imagination (the desire to interpret the world through their eyes). Describe your photography style approach? My approach is very slow and methodical. I spend a lot of time composing an image trying to find a strong balance between space and subject. Then, it is a matter of the light and weather cooperating and most of the time, it involves revisiting the same location many

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times and waiting for the perfect moment. How tion scape

do you find a connecbetween architecture, landand abstract characteristics?

Regardless of the subject, I am always looking for the relationship between space and subject. Most of my work involves isolated subjects so I do not approach photographing them any differently. What use of

contributed color and

to lack

your thereof?

Most of the time when composing a scene, I envision the final edited image in black and white. I am not opposed to color – I just don’t see a scene in my head in color very often. Name some locations, sights and objects that have served as a muse for your work? Living in Los Angeles, I have fairly easy access to a multitude of different scenes (architecture in downtown, beaches along the coast, desert to the southeast, mountains to the north) but I find the most inspiration in the contemporary and sleek architecture of downtown LA and the beaches along the coastline.


dystopia I

dystopia X

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Photographer

kevin

saint

grey

interview

Life Quote “Out of clutter, find simplicity.” - Albert Einstein

seem to filled pieces.

have What

rich, drives

mothat?

Photography

You tion

A lot of my work utilizes long exposure techniques allowing me to capture the movement of clouds. The moving clouds coupled with a static subject can give the image a sense of motion.

Exactly ing

what with

are your

you conveyphotographs?

In most of my images, I am attempting to convey harmony and balance.

Is there a should seek

hidden within

component we your images?

stealth

Due to the minimalistic nature of my work, I do not try to hide anything from the viewer. I try to compose my images in a way that presents only the necessary and any extraneous, unimportant, or distracting elements are left out.

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Photographer

kevin

saint

grey

interview

Photography

touch

Is the motivation behind each project meant to stimulate intellectually or emotionally? In my architectural work, with the emphasis on lines and geometry, I try to stimulate intellectually. I am always attempting to present geometry in a new way. However, I try to connect with the viewer on a more emotional level with my landscape work.

Define your statement “Painters decide what to put into a work. Photographers decide what to leave out.” Painters begin with a blank canvas and add to it to get a completed work. However, a photographer begins with the entire world as a possibility through the viewfinder. It is up to the photographer to decide what is important (subject), what they want the viewer to focus on (composition), and the best way to present it (post-production).

How ceive

do

you want viewers Kevin Kwok’s

to perimages?

temple ii

In my images, I strive for balance and harmony and I hope that comes across when others view my images.

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spirit captures Ink on paper 73x53cm

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Artist

nicole

coson

interview

nicole coson E

n

i

g

m

a a r

INTERVIEW

LATOYA

P.

HENRY t

Daunting yet mystifying, Nicole Coson foundation stems from her cultural background and study. Gathering influences, from Southeast Asian Folklore, apparitions and mythological beings, her objective is to captivate, while challenge her audience with a visual dilemma of figures that are unknown but quite familiar. Shrouded in mystery, Conson selection of color combined with shadow and light forms a sense of intensity. Illuminating the illustrated hidden

characters deep

beneath

that the

are shadows.

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Artist

nicole

Introduction: For those unfamiliar with Nicole Coson, please give us a brief introduction?

a

r

t

I am a Filipino artist based in London. I was born in Manila and lived there until I was 18, which was also when I moved to London, England to study fine art in Central Saint Martins. Having graduated in June, I have had the opportunity to be a part of two group shows and one solo exhibit since my degree show last May. Determination: What drives you most in life, either to inspire or disturb you? How do these emotions affect the direction of your art? I’m inspired as long as I’m searching for something. Gaining knowledge is what it’s all about. Monotony is disturbing. Inspiration: You focus on the mysteries surrounding ethereal beings, are these characters fictional or based on personal encounters? I utilize a multiplicity of references, religious iconography, Southeast Asian folklore, nature and ghosts that stalked my youth, presenting the audience with a pictorial dilemma, as the depictions and referents wander back and forth between time and space. In my practice, I seek a constant shift of positions between the familiar and the unfamiliar, questioning the importance of obvious signs of origin.

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coson

interview

Strategy & Technique: List a basic strategy on how you acquire materials to process a new series? Aside from brushes and ink, are there additional methods you combine with the listed materials to achieve the overall vision? I use a technique called monotype printmaking and an etching press to produce my work. I begin with a plate of metal on which I lay an even coat of black ink. From here, I use scraps of cloth and my fingers to wipe away the ink until an image appears with the help of solutions such as white spirit. I then place the wiped plate through an etching press with a piece of paper on top of it, transferring the image on the plate onto paper. So it is a reductive process, I work from dark to light. I invoke the subjects that are just beneath this thin layer of black ink, where they emerge from the void. Statement: You’ve mentioned that ‘I wish to put the viewer face to face with something alien, but to lead them to draw no conclusions, resulting in a feeling similar to the unsettled nervousness of Freud’s Uncanny.’ How do you feel when you’ve accomplished these specific reactions from the viewers and what was the most memorable response? Once, at the opening of my solo show last august, this older woman was frantically insisting that she had seen a “dog” in one of my works. She must of gargled one too many glasses of wine as she clutched onto my arm with a face like she’d seen a ghost. But in this case she saw a dog. I guess you can say I got pretty close to that, since she seemed very distressed.


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spirit captures Ink on paper 73x53cm

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Artist

nicole

I trust in the human yearn to see himself in other things that display signs of life. The works are made so they are detailed enough only for us to grasp the essence of the subject, it is from there the individual can build everything else, like a scientific exploration of the extent us humans can recognize another. Selection: One distinctive portion of your art is the selection of color. In what way were you influenced to choose a monochrome pallet and how does this selection of color effect the presentation of your art?

I mainly needed my work to evolve; I had yearned to work with a more mechanical medium. Which was pretty much on the opposite side of the spectrum. Instead of being armed with a loaded brush I wanted to dabble with reprographics. I loved the idea of these machines once having a sole purpose, either to document events (cameras) or to spread knowledge (printing presses) being transformed into an artist’s tool. This is where I believe the static nature of reality can get a little mixed up. To me, monotype printmaking, being the “painterly of most printmaking techniques”, as it’s most often described, sits where at the unmediated mark of painting and the reprographic intervene.

t

Evolution: Over time we evolve, has the practice of your work change over time? What have you gained through this experience?

was a good reason. Our studios were made to suit our medium. The wall based/ pictorial artists, 2D, were given a studio, which was a maze of temporary walls. But even then there was barely enough space and I couldn’t stand painting in small booths like everybody did. So I packed all my stuff, and took to the printmaking workshops in the old Byam Shaw site. Now, 90% of the work I do is from what I learnt in my two years of being a printmaker. I took what I knew from painting and mixed it with printmaking techniques. That’s one reason.

r

Working without color, contributes in making the subjects depicted appear more interchangeable as well as appear photographic. In order for the subject to remain not invested nor trapped in a singular identity, to instead float freely as it shuffles between instances of recognition and unfamiliarity.

interview

a

Firstly, I am ever so slightly color-blind, and I’m more comfortable with working in black and white.

coson

I used to primarily paint. In university (Central Saint Martins), the year group was divided by “dimensions”, it sounds silly, but there

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Artist

Inspirational

nicole

Motto

coson

“Keep

a

r

t

Identity: Describe your work’s most important influence? How do you identify with the outcome? An artist I always admired was Pakistani artist Huma Bhabha. I saw her show titled Unnatural Histories two years back at MoMA PS1 and I found it excitingly baffling. Her sculptures of strange and distant gods that exist within a cultural limbo claim ethnic authority and difference without belonging to a determinable culture. Beautiful sculptures that I still haven’t stopped thinking about. Spirit Captures: The series ‘Spirit Captures’ was influenced by your cultural heritage, how difficult was it to translate your personal expression? Are any additional challenges you faced during the development stages to create a successful series? What was the time duration on the ‘Spirit Captures’ series? My cultural heritage is difficult to summate. Being from the Philippines, which is a country busied by its own identity crisis (Chinese, Spanish and American influences), it is difficult to even suggest what I do as “distinctly Filipino”. As a result, an attempt at translat-

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On

interview

Keeping

On.”

ing Filipino culture often comes across as lost or “inauthentic” somehow. I guess what I definitely picked up from the Philippines was its relationship to mythology. Belief of monsters or creatures in provincial areas persist despite its obvious contradictions to the prevalence of Catholicism. Pagan beliefs coexisting with the fear of God fascinated me. Unlike say, Norse mythology, these stories infiltrate our contemporary lives in a different way. The supernatural realm blends in with our familiar world like alternate dimensions existing on the same plane. Similar to when something “you think you saw” infiltrates actual memory. Intentions: Professionally what do you aim to achieve as an artist and what is your artistic outlook on life? I attempt to find and am still searching for strategies to be taken by the non-western artist in order to create work that can freely speak without prescribed screens of ethnicity and anthropology that may precede it. It is only from this initial interaction that I feel an artist may be granted the chance of individual utterance.


spirit captures Ink on paper 73 x 53cm

ghost of human-likeness Ink on paper 32.7 x 45 cm

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poetry

moment

arielle

THE FLAME

My Not I

I

reached vessel path

to

into to

Mistakenly allured In the movement, the I waded in

warned in her blazing your

me, fire, demand. furnace, heartdamnation.

and warmth, the the

invested mystery flame.

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mother always to play never listened to

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radiant power. you

I

liked

My Our One As

were

masochism

mother your should

- Arielle Chambers.

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infatuation,

of

The

consistent

in

red, presence. fixation. your

your with

souls continuous danced my

I

My About I

wrath

always

heat.

consistency. your

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chambers


p o e t r y NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .191


Jean

de

pomereu

interview

Photography

Photographer

B words ALEXANDRA STEVENS

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A

R

E


Photography

“It’s really a land stripped bare,” he describes. “It’s the quintessence of wilderness; it’s where you see the skeleton of the earth. There’s no cover. No clothes, no skin, you really just see the geology.” When I began to question Jean de Pomereu about his fascination with the Arctic, he was quick to interject. “My photography is on Antarctica, which is the South Pole, with the Arctic being the North Pole,” he corrected gently. “But that’s just a technicality.” Antarctica is the only continent in the world with no indigenous human culture, and no permanent human residents. A select bunch of durable mammals call Antarctica home all year around, enduring temperatures that have reached as low as -89 °C. Much unlike it’s northern sister, Antarctica didn’t see human life until the early 1800’s. The Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration began at the turn of the 20th century with frequent expeditions out of Europe, led by figures like Captain Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton. Some explorers brought along photographers, the first to visually document unexplored territory.

Their aesthetic at the time was driven by eras of Romanticism and Classicism, in which a defining aspect was photography with human reference. “They would try as much as possible to have something in the frame that was human - a person, a ship, an object,” de Pomereu said of early Antarctic photographers, like Herbert Ponting and Frank Hurley. De Pomereu has, among many other projects, spent several years re-editing the work of these early photographers, helping re-release old photos to be displayed and examined. The first Antarctic images relay a strange, haunting landscape; tiny human silhouettes perch atop peaks of ice, huge ships so dwarfed by icebergs that they look like toys. “We know what human size is, so we can use these references to understand the vastness,” said de Pomereu. “[Their style] was totally legitimate, and it led to some astoundingly beautiful images. But actually, the [real] Antarctic experience is to the contrary. When you arrive there, there is no perspective, no objects of scale. You don’t know how far things are, there’s no references for size or distance. NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .193


Photography

You’re in this abstract environment, and as someone coming 100 years later who has been in touch with abstraction as we all are these days, I can go there and say, ‘Actually, what’s really fascinating is precisely the absence of any objects.’ I’m just coming in at a different time, I’m not comparing qualitatively. [In the late 19th century] they hadn’t been confronted with abstraction in art; they didn’t know what it was.” Abstract Antarctica looks much more surreal than Romantic Antarctica. Remove the people, the ships, the ice picks, and you’re left with monochromatic shapes. Some of de Pomereu’s photographs are no more than jagged lines, cracks in otherwise untouched expanses of ice. Others show craggy peaks, the ice the same color as the sky, differentiated only by shadows and valleys. At first glance the images feel unfinished, like seeing a blackand-white sketch of a favorite cartoon character. Then, slowly, the eerie stillness presents itself. The white horizon seemingly stretches on into infinity, patterns emerge in the frozen sea, like the whorls in marble, or the tops of cloud cover from 30,000 feet. Look long enough and you can almost breathe in the windchill, the silence, the isolation.

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“To me, going to Antarctica is like going to an inner temple,” said Jean de Pomereu. “For example, in Christianity, you have a cathedral. You have the outside of the cathedral, which has statues, and ornamentation. Then you go inside, and it’s a little bit more bare. Then you go into the crypt, which is what’s below the heart of the church, and there’s nothing left. It’s almost like an empty room. You’re drawn in, as a pilgrim. You’re drawn into the heart of the church.” De Pomereu began experimenting with photography in his teenage years, drawn to abstraction and minimalism in visual art. “I’ve also been very drawn to wilderness, in terms of deserts, mountains, and places which are, in French you say dénuder, which is ‘stripped bare.’ Places where less is more, places which are unencumbered,” he explains. When he was first given the opportunity to go to Antarctica as a science writer in 2003, he felt it was only natural to take his camera along. For de Pomereu, science and art are simply two sides of the same coin, and Antarctica would become his frozen arcadia.


Photographer

Jean

de

pomereu

interview

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Photography

Photographer

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Jean

de

pomereu

interview


“Suddenly, I was in a place which responded to both the wilderness element I longed for, and visually, I could make abstract art,” de Pomereu said of his initial reaction to the world’s last true frontier. “[Antarctica] was abstraction on a grand scale, minimalism on a grand, grand, scale.”

De Pomereu describes Kazimir Malevich’s su-

Photography

The most intense and ambitious Antarctic project he’s been involved in thus far was an art installation funded by America’s National Science Foundation. The government agency funds the United States Antarctic Program, which awards grants to artists, giving them the opportunity to bring their talents to the South Pole. In 2006, the USAP sent installation artist Lita Albuquerque to Antarctica to create an oversized map of the stars. 99 bright blue spheres in seven different sizes were shipped south along with a crew of five; two documentary makers, an astronomer, Albuquerque, and De Pomereu. Albuquerque and the astronomer worked together to lay out a select few constellations in correct cartographic sequences, each blue sphere representing a star - the bigger the sphere, the brighter the star. Each “star” was harnessed into ice so they didn’t roll away in the wind, and the entire project was installed by the five-person group. The result was a striking scene, called Stellar Axis: Antarctica. It looks and sounds like sci-fi; like an imagined reality, created with editing software from the comfort of someone’s basement. But people in heavy red coats appear in some of the shots, the lines connecting the stars look like the unmistakable shuffle of human feet through unbroken snow.

premacist movement, an early 20th century art movement which focused on geometric forms and restricting colors as taking representation of out art. De Pomereu is inspired in his own art by artists like Malevich and Mark Rothko, attracted to pared-down, minimalist shapes and structures. Except when de Pomereu is required to shoot digitally for documentary work, he prefers medium format analog as a fine arts photographer. He does no additional editing after the images are developed, leaving his landscapes in their natural light. There seem to be three Antarctic experiences: the explorers, the artists, and the tourists. De Pomereu has now been to Antarctica five times, as a science writer, photographer, and documentarian. One trip was spend entirely on an icebreaker, others spent traversing the land on snowmobiles, another expedition moved along the coast to visit five penguin colonies. Though more people today are able to visit Antarctica than just scientists and explorers, almost everyone who goes only sees the Antarctic Peninsula, a strip of land that branches northward towards South America. Both the most accessible part of the continent and the most populated by wildlife, the peninsula’s size and scale are, as de Pomereu suggested, comparable to that of Florida to the remainder of contiguous America. There are only 46 known emperor penguin colonies on 5.4 million square miles of land, so photographing wildlife means beelining for very specific places within an enormous land mass. De Pomereu describes the Antarctic Peninsula as resembling Alaska in many ways; romantic, sublime, vibrant in color.

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Photography

“It’s the sort of image of Antarctica that is the prevalent one, which is of wildlife, and big mountains, and glaciers and icebergs and fluorescent blues,” he said. The Antarctic Peninsula is the Antarctica that appears in the glossy pages of National Geographic, the Antarctica that takes center stage in documentaries bursting with ultra-saturated blue skies and whales. This colorful, magnificent landscape is the prominently displayed image of an entire continent. What de Pomereu seeks, however, is the remainder of Antarctica, shrouded in fog and vast mystery, away from the wildlife and cruise ships. The continent that he captures actually represents the majority of the continent in terms of similar surface area - the 98%. “It’s much more austere, much more minimalistic in it’s topography,” de Pomereu describes of the uncharted remainder. “It’s what I call ‘the topography of absence.’ What draws me to Antarctica is the heart of the continent, which is about removing yourself from civilization, from the world of man. It’s also about removing yourself from the biotic world, from the world of animals, and en-

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tering a space that, in a way, is akin to the moon. It’s completely bare, and it’s very, very, peaceful.” Wildlife in Antarctica is the exception. Barely any space is left unoccupied by a colossal sheet of ice, and there are rarely more than a couple thousand people at once on the entire continent. Away from habitats and research stations, it’s completely silent, except for the wind. De Pomereu compares that stillness to the cacophony of the populated Peninsula, pungent with bird droppings and the squeaks and caws of penguin activity. “People don’t see that in the photos,” de Pomereu explains, “but that’s the reality. [Penguin colonies] are amazing places, and [penguins] are amazing animals, but it’s not the peaceful, removed environment that characterizes Antarctica for the most part. The best way to characterize Antarctica is not by saying ‘it is this, it is this, it is this,’ but instead by saying ‘it isn’t this, and it hasn’t got this.’ It’s all about negatives. It’s characterized by this absence of everything we have in the world we live in; society, animals, buildings.”


Photographer

Jean

de

pomereu

interview

Photography NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .199


Photography

Photographer

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Jean

de

pomereu

interview


Photography

Construction consists of temporary scientific stations, and vegetation is limited to the small selection of tundra that grows on isolated sections of the continent. The only means of survival in Antarctica is to live off the sea; every thriving mammal and plant species is marine-based, and is confined to life along or near a coastline. “People go there to do work, but they don’t live there. They don’t have families there it’s [almost] like an outer space station. It’s a place where you go, do your work, then come back.” Each time he goes back he’s met with a vastly different journey; most of the landscapes he finds are experiences shared with only a few other human beings, a rare phenomenon for anything these days. What truly sets Antarctica apart from any other place on Earth is that topography of absence, the blankness of endless white. De Pomereu quotes researcher and environmental Stephen Pyne, describing Antarctica as a vast, distorted mirror. “When you get there, to the heart of Antarctica, you’re faced with an overwhelming blankness,

with nothingness. All that’s left is yourself; you take back what you bring into it. There is no culture there that imposes itself,” de Pomereu explains. “If you go to India, it’s like a steamroller of smells and visions, with little room for input. It’s all coming your way. You go to Antarctica, and there’s nothing there. It’s simply a reflection of yourself, and what you bring into it. It’s kind of a metaphysical journey, as it were, and I try and represent that through my work and photography.”

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Irina

b

romashevskaya

l

Photography IRINA

i

bliss

s

s

& story ROMASHEVSKAYA

I always came to the beach to collect my thoughts. But today felt special. Staring into the void, waiting for a miracle I sat on a big rock. The birds flew over me and I wondered if a storm was coming. Looking for a glimmer of light to appear on the gray horizon signaling a safe passage, I dove deeper into my thoughts. I must’ve sat there for an hour before realizing it was getting late. The sun was setting, and birds’ cheerful chirping was coming to a close. Despite nature’s persistent warnings, two seagulls were playing in the wind. They were so peaceful and content in their intricate dance, I couldn’t take my eyes off them.

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Irina

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romashevskaya

bliss


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“Just let go and give into the wind, “ it seems the seagulls were saying. “Feel the wind pass through your fingers and hair. Enjoy the moment of absolute bliss.” I opened my arms and raised my face to the darkening sky. It felt so natural and refreshing to forget the worries and just breathe in. With every passing moment, I felt smaller and less significant on that big rock until my entire being was consistent with the wind’s heavy breathing and my heart was being whisked away by a much bigger force. Nothing could stop this euphoric feeling of freedom and belonging to something much bigger than it’s possible to imagine. Life conquers all, I thought, and with that I walked away changed and appeased.

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Irina

romashevskaya

bliss

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Irina

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romashevskaya

bliss


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Portrait of a young g i r l PHOTOGRAPHY valeria mitelman styling Sophia Schwan

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Hat HutFreu(n)de Necklace and ring Sabrina Dehoff Top Odeeh


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Hat HutFreu(n)de Top Kilian Kerner


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Hat HutFreu(n)de Rings Maria Black Top & Other Stories

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Hat HutFreu(n)de Top Michael Sontag Bracelet Sabrina Dehoff Photography Valeria Mitelman Styling Sophia Schwan make up artist & Hairstylist Aennikin models iveta at pearl management kira at izaio


Defined Embodiment

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petteri

hemmila

one

two

watch

words Latoya p. Henry

They say sex sells; and with the right accessory any outfit could be redefined, I’m slowly buying into the concept of vital closet items, aside from the perfect handbag or shoes. On a constant hunt for the accessory that sharpens a look. Behold, the emergence of a designer who constructs essentials that charges the inner sex kitten, abandoning the overabundance. Petteri Hemilä bold graphic style and sharp versatility are the embodiment of his accessory collection. Hemilä Autumn/Winter pieces are infused with leather, luxury, beauty and detailed craftsmanship, revealing pieces that are ever so simple yet conspicuous. The Finnish-native designer elaborate combination of metal rings, bracelets, distinctive leather chokers, cuffs and clutches, compliments the look of the wearer. The simplicity of Hemilä’s collection unveils the designer’s aesthetic to concentrate on the specifics of each piece, resulting in a product that is timeless.

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examining reason

art

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .216

INTERVIEW

Keegan Luttrell’s work is not just thought provoking. This multi-media artist bravely questions the laws of the physical world, or simply pokes at today’s social and cultural norms to uncover the underlying issues. It is why perhaps that her art draws you in, forcing your own existential concerns to be reexamined. . What

is

art?

Art is experience. It is awareness. It is this unifying thread between individuals that heightens our perception of our existence and makes us question the unknown, or rather, what we thought we knew. What

was

your

first

art

piece?

There were so many first pieces growing up in a family of artists. I just kept drawing and painting. And then I discovered photography. My first serious body of work was a photographic comparison of the North vs. the South. My mom was from New Jersey, my dad was from Tennessee and as a teenager I was conflicted about where I was from.

IRINA

ROMASHEVSKAYA

What’s the first artwork you ever sold? My first real sale was to a couple of collectors in Tennessee, who came to my solo show and bought a rather large painting. It now hangs in a room next to an Alexander Calder piece. What orable

was

your most museum

memvisit?

Opera for a Small Room by Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller at the Australian Center for Contemporary Art in Melbourne. It is an interactive sound installation that tells a very haunting narrative. It brought me to tears. So did seeing Ann Hamilton’s The Event of a Thread at the Armory. Both shows caused me to stop dead in my tracks. Is it best to let art speak for itself or does it need to be interpreted? Backstory is always good, but I try to look at a work of art before I read the wall text or find out what it is trying to say to me. Having the answer there takes the fun out of it.


artist

keegan

luttrell

interview

art

Morph

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .217


keegan

luttrell

art

artist

parachutes k in

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .218

interview


What

is

your

philosophy?

What is your idea of perfect happiness?

Fail. Keep failing, fail harder, and try to forget the demons that can plague art making. I don’t always follow this – and then my work suffers and stops. If I let myself go, wonders happen.

A sun-filled studio,a cup of coffee,a cat sleeping on a chair, a good playlist, and an open mind.

What do you

Not getting everything I want to have completed in my life done in time.

kind like to

artistic

of questions ask your viewers?

I’d like them to look at my work and see the beauty in destruction and the tenuousness of the world we live in. My work is about making chaos relatable. I want people to have a jarring experience that challenges them to question their role in the world today. What you absolutely can’t live without?

What

pleases

you

aesthetically?

It changes. I like a subdued color palate for the most part, and I do like a strong composition. For a while I was interested in seeing a lot of elements within a space or a frame, lately my tastes have been more minimal. Finish the er underestimate The

sentence: the power

is

your

greatest

fear?

If you could change one thing about yourself, what would it be? Worry

less.

Which do “

words or you most L

i

k

phrases overuse? e

art

These days it is my journal. I began journaling again this year after a long hiatus, and it has helped me get ideas out for my work as well as helped me work on myself as a person.

What

What do you consider your greatest achievement? The life I have lived so far – with all the places I’ve traveled to and lived in, the people I’ve met and stories I re-tell – are all a collection of my greatest achievements.

Nevof … camera.

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .219


artist

t

&

a

designer

l

e

r

grimm

interview

s

i

o

m

m

r

t

g

issa

IRINA

ROMASHEVSKAYA

a

INTERVIEW

Issa

Grimm’s

and

Band

illustrations

are

both

delicate

and

dark. Having illustrated for Halston, Kate Spade Grimm skills

creating

of

continues

in

her

not

communicating painting

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .220

Outsiders

a

New

only

much

among

to

York

design

mere

bigger

a

few

perfect home

tools

ideas,

picture

others, her

studio, for

but

behind.

f


NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .221


art NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .222


artist

&

designer

issa

How would you characterize your work? Haunted,

gloomy,

Pencil, P

and

ink e

Do

or

n you

whimsical. marker?

c

i

dream

l

in

. color?

No. But I often dream of characters, fairytales and clothing that I will use in my illustrations. What was your first fashion memory?

What

Givenchy

quilted

makes

box

you

purse. tick?

What is the most expensive fassion item you’ve ever purchased? Vintage

Fendi

Describe

handbag.

your

perfect

day

Up by 6:30 am. Overcast. Hard workout, meditation, sketch or sew all day with headphones on. No emails or calls. Sushi and tea with my husband; walk in the park with our dogs. It’s perfect, because it rarely happens. What you I

n

natural most like s

What

o

u

are

c

gift to i

a

your

would possess? n

favorite

c

e

.

names?

Arizona – where I am from. Sloan – my niece.

Music. Little Dragon, James Blake, Circa Survive, Daft Punk, Imogen Heap, M.I.A., Gorillaz, Crystal Castles are some new and old favorites. I also grew up listening to metal and underground rap that still inspires me today.

What

What

The quality you most like in a woman?

brings

you

joy?

is

your

Humility What

is

Your

I

don’t

designer

and

model?

favorite

occupation?

I respect patternmaking and tailoring above all other fashion careers.

Creating and drawing clothing; theatre arts, singing, traveling and being married to my best friend. favorite

t

Vintage

accessory?

to, Ann Demulemeester, Dries Van Noten and Rei Kawakubo. Hanne Gaby Odile, Daphne Groeneveld and Lindsey Wixon are my favorite models.

r

Favorite

interview

a

FRUiTS magazine, a Japanese street style book. Before there was the Internet, this was my only source of fashion inspiration outside of my small conservative town.

grimm

and your

dignity.

favorite have

flower? one.

Impossible to choose: Yohji Yamamo-

NU-MODE´ THE exhibition EDITION 2014 .223


M E M EN T O PHOTOGRAPHY CHRISTOPHER POLACK styling RAYTELL BRIDGES

Lucas wears Suit Ninh Collection Sheer Button Down Shirt Ninh Collection Shoes Prada Lydia wears Dress Houghton


Lucas wears Oversized Button Down Shirt w/ Mandarin Collar Fingers Crossed Rubber Overcoat Robert Geller Neoprene Shorts Cody Ross Shoes Prada Lydia wears Clear Rain Coat Ă˜DD Sleeveless Dress w/ Front Slit Pola Thomson Shoes Call it Spring


Suit Ninh Collection Sheer Button Down Shirt Ninh Collection Shoes Prada


High Waisted Trousers Houghton Sheer Top w/ Leather Skirt Kaimin Shoes Call It Spring


Lucas wears Leather and Wool Jogger Pants Cody Ross Sweat Shirt w/ Neoprene Detail Cody Ross Boots Timberland Lydia wears Clear Rain Coat Ă˜DD Sleeveless Dress w/ Front Slit Pola Thomson Shoes Call it Spring


Sweatshirt Cody Ross Mesh Jogger Pants Cody Ross Shorts John Varvatos Boots Timbaland


Sleeveless Fairy Dress Kaimin Vest w/ Lace Peplum Skirt Audra Shoes Audra


Sweat Shirt w/ Turtleneck Detail Cody Ross Neoprene Shorts Cody Ross Shoes Prada


Sheer Button Down Shirt Ninh Collection Trousers Ninh Collection Neoprene Bomber Jacket Cody Ross Shoes Prada Hat Vintage


Oversized Button Down Shirt w/ Mandarin Collar Fingers Crossed Rubber Overcoat Robert Geller Neoprene Shorts Cody Ross Shoes Prada


Blouse w/ Flared Cuff Pola Thomson High Waisted Trousers Houghton Photographed exclusively at milk studios nyc Photography CHRISTOPHER POLACK styling RAYTELL BRIDGES make up artist & Hairstylist Agata Helena at Creativemanagementmc2, using Tom Ford & Oribe Models LYDIA HUNT & LUCAS GOOSSENS at Wilhelmina Photography assistant Milo Matthieu


r

a PHOTOGRAPHY JD Barnes creative direction RAYTELL BRIDGES

w


All Jewelry Luc Keifer Hat Giovannio


Photography jd barnes creative direction RAYTELL BRIDGES make up artist Michelle Webb Hairstylist Justin Arrellano Model Pilar at One Management assistant Jaegger Pendoley


stocklist

Venice Venicejewellery.com.au

Versace www.versace.com

Fingers Crossed www.thefingerscrossed.com

Pringle of Scotland bulletin.pringlescotland.com

Hopeless Lingerie hopelesslingerie.com.au

Sabrina Dehoff www.sabrinadehoff.com

Kara Liu Karaliu.com

Celine www.celine.com

Robert Geller www.robertgeller-ny.com

Church’s www.church-footwear.com

BLK DNM www.blkdnmcloseup.com

Odeeh odeeh.com

Kailiver Kaliver.com

Marni www.marni.com

Cody Ross www.priestessnyc.net

Ralph Lauren www.ralphlauren.com

Marséll www.marsell.it

Maria Black www.maria-black.com

Blesse’d Are The Meek blessedarethemeek.com.au

Aurélie Bidermann aureliebidermann.com

ØDD odd-style.com

General Pants & Co www.generalpants.com.au

& Other Stories www.stories.com

Sol Sana sol-sana.com

Givenchy www.givenchy.com

Pola Thomson www.polathomson.com

Aquila www.aquila.com.au

SCTT BNDCTN scottbenedictine.tumblr. com

Nanushka nanushka.hu

Christina Dior www.dior.com

Call It Spring www.callitspring.com

Issey Miyake www.isseymiyake.com

Stella McCartney stellamccartney.com

Louis Vuitton www.louisvuitton.com

Kaimin www.kaimin.co.uk

Viktoria + Woods viktoriaandwoods.com.au

Dolce & Gabbana www.dolcegabbana.com

Timberland shop.timberland.com

Comme des Garçon www.comme-des-garcons. com

Alexander Wang www.alexanderwang.com

MacGraw macgraw.com.au

Hermés www.hermes.com

John Varvatos www.johnvarvatos.com

Damien Yip for Authority authorityclothing.com.au

Saphir East www.saphireast.com

Leroy Nguyen leroynguyen.com

Hawkeye Vintage Hawkeyevintage.com

Audra www.audraofficial.com

Rayban www.ray-ban.com

Somarta www.somarta.jp

House of Cards houseofcardsthelabel.com

Agent Provocateur www.agentprovocateur.com

Jack London shop.jacklondon.com.au

Emporio Armani www.armani.com

A.D.F a-deg.com

Valentino www.valentino.com

American Apparel www.americanapparel.net

Kenzo www.kenzo.com

Saint Laurent www.ysl.com

Aguri Sagimori www.agurisagimori.co.jp

Missoni www.missoni.com

Ninh Collection www.ninh.co

Diesel www.diesel.com

Burberry us.burberry.com

Amber Sceats ambersceats.com

Nixi Killick nixikillick.com

Houghton Houghtonnyc.com

Jean Paul Gaultier www.jeanpaulgaultier.com

Lara Quint www.laraquint.com

Noritaka Tatehana noritakatatehana.com

Tony Bianco www.tonybianco.com.au

Prada www.prada.com

Marc Jacobs www.marcjacobs.com

Vika Baron Vikabaron.com

Theatre Products www.theatreproducts.co.jp

Bond Hardware www.bond-hardware.com

Minimarket www.minimarket.se

Karl Lagerfeld www.karl.com

Etal shop.etal-melbourne.com

HutFreu(n)de www.hutfreunde.de

Maison Martin Margiela maisonmartinmargiela.com

Nike www.nike.com

NU-MODE´ the exhibition edition 2014 .244

Luc Keifer luckiefferparis.com Giovannio giovannio.com

Michael Sontag www.michaelsontag.com Robert Graham www.robertgraham.us Maria Bianca Nero www.biancanero.com Laruicci www.laruicci.com Rue 107 rue107.com Cluny clunynyc.com Lanvin www.lanvin.com Parkchoonmoo www.demoo.com Diane Von Furstenberg www.dvf.com By Malene Birger www.bymalenebirger.com COS www.cosstores.co Correll Correll www.correllcorrell.com


jack henry new york

www.jackhenrynewyork.com


N u - M o d e´ take home the experience


numodemag.com

Basketbrawl Photography Christopher Polack No.10


N u - M o d e´ numodemag.com

Nu-Mode´ #12 "Noir Blanc" The Exhibition Edition  

The beauty of black and white imagery is in the contrast. It provides a deeper look as it uncovers what’s hidden and highlights what shines....

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