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The 2009 Boston College Volleyball Media Guide is a production of the Boston College Media Relations Office and the Boston College Athletic Association, Chestnut Hill, Mass. 02467. All rights reserved. Edited by Mark Nugent and the Media Relations Office. Designed by Pack Network - www.PackNetwork.com Printed by Shea Brothers, Somerville, MA Photographs by John Quackenbos (Athletic Department Photographer), Marc Andrew Deley, Jet Commercial Photo, Garry Gilbert (BC Office of Publications), Lee Pellegrini (BC Office of Publications), Jim Abts, Boston Chamber of Commerce.

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The Eagles open their 18th season using Power Gym, one of the top volleyball facilities in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Power Gym, named after Frank Power, is attached to Conte Forum, where Boston College basketball and hockey teams compete. Frank Power spent 32 years as a scout, recruiter and assistant to six different men’s head basketball coaches. He also served as head coach of men’s basketball during the 1962-1963 season.

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Last season the Eagles compiled a 3-7 record in Power Gym including ACC wins over Maryland and North Carolina State. Recent renovations of Power Gym provide the Eagles with an even stronger and more appealing facility. Along with being repainted, Power Gym added a new storage closet, mounted cameras, banners, padding system and lights. BC hosts its first ACC game on Tuesday, September 22nd against the Maryland Terrapins at 3:00 pm.


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Seventh Season

Andrea Leonard enters her seventh season at Boston College, compiling an 80-107 mark over the last six years. In 2004, she led BC to its first 20-win season in program history and first postseason appearance in the Big East in 11 years. This also marked the first winning record by BC volleyball in conference play. Last season she guided the Eagles to an 8-24 overall record and a 2-18 mark in the Atlantic Coast Conference.

2009 EAGLES

In 2006, Leonard helped Allison Anderson earn first team All-ACC for the second consecutive year, 2006 American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) Division I All-Region East Team, as well as 2006 AVCA Division I All-America Honorable Mention. Anderson also was honored by being named to the U.S. Women’s National Volleyball Training Team in Colorado Springs, Colo. Leonard started the 2004 season with the program’s first win over Rhode Island in 13 years. The Eagles went on to win the first annual Big East Challenge with wins over Rutgers and Connecticut. BC also became the first conference team to sweep Notre Dame in regular-season play at home since 1984, snapping a 58-game Irish win streak. Leonard also coached BC’s first Big East Libero Player of the Year in Allison Anderson Prior to BC, Leonard finished a five-season tenure with the University of New Hampshire, where she led the Wildcats to several postseason appearances. Under Leonard’s guidance as an associate head coach in 2002, UNH went 23-11 winning the America East Conference Championship and made an NCAA tournament appearance. She has also played many roles as an assistant coach, serving as an AVCA Assistant Coaches Committee member, and as an AVCA CoChair. While at UNH, Leonard served as recruiting coordinator, academic coordinator and an NCAA Compliance coordinator while being associate head coach. During the summer of 2003, Leonard coached with Bring It Promotions and two teams from the U.S. in the fourth Annual Sibillini Tournament in Comunanza, Italy. Leonard’s Under-20 American team competed

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against teams from the Czech Republic, Slavia Bratislava, Slovakia, and Hungary and finished a strong third in the tournament. Prior to UNH, Leonard served as an assistant coach at Ferris State University. Leonard is a 1991 graduate of Northern Michigan University. A fouryear scholarship player, Leonard was a setter and an outside hitter. In her junior and senior year, NMU took home the Greater Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Championship, and made the NCAA Elite Eight (1993).


Second Season Entering his second season at Boston College, Martel has built an impressive resume and has proven himself as one of the top up and coming coaches in the country. In his role with the Eagles, Martel deals with player training and works with the setters and serve receive offense while serving as the current recruiting coordinator and handles opponent scouting, game preparation and assists with the Eagle’s summer camp programs. Martel is also heavily involved in developing the Eagle’s community service and outreach programs. This past year, Martel set up the Eagles’ first “WE DIG PINK” campaign which raised over $2,500.00 for the Komen Foundation. Prior to Boston College, Martel was the head coach at Boston University where he guided the Terriers to one of the best finishes in the program’s history and a national ranking as high as 29th. During Martel’s time at the helm of BU’s program, the Terriers achieved a 29-9 record and placed two players on alltournament teams. Before his tenure at Boston University, Martel was an assistant at Suffolk University where he served as the offensive coordinator and recruiting co-coordinator and helped rebuild the program. While at Suffolk, Martel also coached the 2007 Boys’ High School scholastic team to a state tournament championship in the Bay State Games

Prior to his move back to Massachusetts, Martel was the head coach at Serra High School in San Mateo, California where he led their men’s volleyball program to a state tournament appearance in 2006. Martel started his coaching career at North Andover High School where he helped the Knights reach three state tournament appearances in 2002, 2003 and 2004. During his career, Martel has coached 12 players to all-conference teams. This past year, Martel was invited to work with the USA Olympic Development High Performance program where he served as a court coach and helped evaluate and train athletes in the USA Olympic team pipeline. Martel has directed and worked many camps and clinics, received his Increased Mastery and Professional Application of Coaching Theory Certification (IMPACT) and is a member of the American Volleyball Coaches Association. A graduate of Merrimack College, Martel received his degree in Communication and Business. He currently lives in Newton.

Raasch arrives at BC after spending the last three seasons as an assistant coach at Florida Atlantic University, and brings a diverse coaching background to the Eagles’ staff. A native of Wisner, Nebraska, Raasch has spent 18 seasons as an assistant coach at various universities including his alma mater, Graceland College in Lamoni, Iowa. As an athlete at Graceland, Raasch helped lead two teams to runner-up finishes at Collegiate Club Nationals. In 1990 he served as team captain and was named a Collegiate Club First Team All-American. Raasch stepped into the role as the assistant coach for the Yellow Jackets women’s team and spent two seasons with them before receiving his bachelor’s degree in physical education and health from Graceland in 1992. He then moved on to the University of Nebraska at Kearney where he spent six seasons. The Antelopes advanced to the Sweet 16 in 1994 and the Elite 8 in 1996. Between those two seasons, Raasch worked the 1995 season with the University of Nebraska at Lincoln. That season, the Huskers won the National Championship by defeating Texas, 3-1. Raasch was then hired as an assistant at the Metropolitan State College of Denver. During his five-year stay, the Roadrunners won three consecutive Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference Championships while qualifying for the NCAA tournament four years in a row. Prior to joining FAU, Raasch gained valuable head coaching experience at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio, spending two seasons at the helm of the women’s volleyball program.

Second Season Kelly Taylor is entering her second season with the Eagles, her first as an assistant coach. Taylor filled the post of Director of Volleyball Operations last year before switching over to her new position. Prior to BC, Taylor was the head coach at Bridgewater State from 2005-2008. During that time, Bridgewater State won two MASCAC regular season and tournament titles, and qualified for the NCAA Tournament three times. Taylor is an experienced teacher of the game, having run volleyball clinics and camps at Bridgewater State from 2003 to 2007. She is a member of the American Volleyball Coaches Association as well as the New England Women’s Volleyball Association. Prior to coaching, Taylor was a two-year defensive specialist/libero for Bridgewater State, where she is second all-time on the single-season digs list. Taylor is currently pursuing a Masters of Education in Intercollegiate Athletic Leadership as an extension graduate student.

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2009 EAGLES

Throughout his career, Martel has been heavily involved with club volleyball having coached SMASH Volleyball Club’s 15’s and 18’s teams to multiple tournament victories over the course of 2006 and 2007, including a first place finish at the East Coast Championships and Long Island Big Apple tournaments. He also coached for the North Shore Junior’s Volleyball Club where he led their top 18’s team to the best finish in club history and for Peninsula Juniors Volleyball Club where he led their top 18’s team to many tournament victories and a ranking as high as 35th in Northern California

First Season


Senior Associate Athletics Director/ Senior Women’s Administrator

Resident Assistant Athletics Trainer Second Year

Jody Mooradian was named Associate Director of Athletics/Senior Women’s Administrator in July 2003. In her position, she administers the sports of women’s basketball, field hockey, volleyball, cross country, track and field, men’s and women’s tennis, lacrosse, softball, and rowing. Prior to her current post, Mooradian served as part of the Northeastern University athletic department for six years. During her tenure at Northeastern, Mooradian served as Assistant Director of Athletics for Compliance, Associate Director of Athletics, Interim Director of Athletics and Senior Associate Director of Athletics/Senior Woman Administrator.

2009 EAGLES

Some of her duties at Northeastern included oversight responsibility for several areas, including the assistant director of athletics for compliance, the director of sports medicine, the assistant director of athletics for operations, coaches, strength and conditioning, and equipment. Mooradian was instrumental in developing and implementing Northeastern’s Core Values and Strategic Plan as well as developing a new policy and procedures manual for student-athletes. In addition, she served as the department’s liaison with University Counsel and Judicial Services as well as with Student Affairs. Mooradian also served as the Director of Athletics at Edinboro University of Pennsylvania from 1993 until 1997 and was a Compliance Assistant at UCLA. Prior to her career in athletics, Mooradian was an attorney for a private law firm and for the Cigna Insurance Company from 1987 until 1993. In addition, she was a District 4 New Hampshire State Representative from 1980-82. She is a member of the Board of Directors, Collegiate Women’s Sports Awards and is on the Executive Committee of NACDA (National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics). She serves as the Vice Chair of the ACC volleyball and field hockey comiiettees and is a member of the ACC women’s basketball committee, Comitteee on Committees and the Student Athletes Welfare Committee. Mooradian si also involved with the NCAA Peer xxx for NCAA Certification. Mooradian earned a Bachelor’s degree in Political Science from the University of New Hampshire (’82) and a Juris Doctorate from the Delaware Law School of Widener University (’86).

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Heather Carr is entering her second year as a member of the Boston College Sports Medicine Staff. She works primarily with volleyball and the women’s ice hockey programs. Carr came to BC after spending a year (2007-2008) at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, where she worked with the softball team. Prior to working at UMass-Amherst, Carr spent four years at Merrimack College where she earned her undergraduate degree in athletic training in the spring of 2007. There she worked primarily with spring football, women’s lacrosse and the men’s and women’s basketball programs. In addition to her work in collegiate sports, Carr has also worked with the New England Riptide, a member of the National ProFastpitch League. She also spent some time at Andover High School working with their varsity sports. Carr was a four-year varsity letter winner for the women’s soccer team at Merrimack. She served as team captain during her senior year. A 2003 graduate of South Kingstown High School, Carr grew up in Wakefield, Rhode Island. She now resides in Newton.


2009 EAGLES

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8

2009 EAGLES


2009 EAGLES

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2009 EAGLES Top Row L to R: Mollie Kolosky, Melanie Cimino, Clare Flood, Krystle Higgins, Manon Palandjian Middle Row L to R: Dani Moskitis, Rainey Hanley, Jordan Meredith, Val Mattaliano, Taylor Williams Front Row L to R: Morgan Fry-Pasic, Kristen Baader, Brennan Clark, Krissy Mussenden, Tsvetelina Dureva

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2009 EAGLES

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6-0 | Senior | Outside Hitter

2009 EAGLES

Long Beach, California Chadwick School

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6-2 | Junior | Middle Hitter Irvine, California Woodbridge

2009 EAGLES

KILLS:..........................................................................13 (twice) ATTEMPTS:....................................21 (vs. Stony Brook, 9/5/08) ASSISTS:............................................................3 (three times) DIGS:...................................................................2 (three times) SERVICE ACES:..........................1 (vs. Sacred Heart, 9/31/07) BLOCK SOLOS:............................................................2 (twice) BLOCK ASSISTS:....................6 (vs. North Carolina, 10/31/08) TOTAL BLOCKS:......................7 (vs. North Carolina, 10/31/08)

2007 60 2008 102

45 154

16 63

107 367

.271 .248

0.75 1.51

13

10 19

1 0

7 17

5 7

23 53


2009 EAGLES

5-9 | Junior | Defensive Specialist Kildeer, Illinois Stevenson

KILLS:...................................................... 17 (vs. UNH, 8/31/07) ATTEMPTS:............................................. 36 (vs. UNH, 8/31/07) ASSISTS:.........................................4 (vs. Stony Brook, 9/5/08) DIGS:...............................................15 (vs. NC State, 10/30/08) SERVICE ACES:.......................... 3 (vs. Northeastern, 8/30/07) BLOCK SOLOS:............................................................1 (twice) BLOCK ASSISTS:............................3 (vs. Holy Cross, 8/30/07) TOTAL BLOCKS:..............................3 (vs. Holy Cross, 8/30/07)

2007 66 2008 104

60 5

32 4

199 47

.141 .021

14

0.91 0.05

12 24

8 0

105 194

2 0

12 0


6-0 | Junior | Setter Long Beach, California Long Beach Polytechnic HS

2009 EAGLES

KILLS:......................................................3 (vs. Duke, 10/26/07) ATTEMPTS:..................................10 (vs. Rhode Island, 9/6/08) ASSISTS:..................................70 (vs. Wake Forest, 10/28/07) DIGS:.........................................15 (vs. Wake Forest, 10/28/07) SERVICE ACES:.........................3 (vs. Wake Forest, 10/28/07) BLOCK SOLOS:............................................................2 (twice) BLOCK ASSISTS:..........................6 (vs. Rhode Island, 9/6/08) TOTAL BLOCKS:............................6 (vs. Rhode Island, 9/6/08)

2007 67 2008 56

14 15

15 8

61 55

-.016 0.21 .127 0.27

15

493 371

16 9

127 80

14 1

23 16


2009 EAGLES

5-10 | Sophomore | Libero Mililani, Hawaii University Laboratory School

KILLS:................................................................1 (seven times) ATTEMPTS:.............................7 (vs. North Carolina, 10/31/08) ASSISTS:.........................................7 (vs. Stony Brook, 9/5/08) DIGS:..........................................................................27 (twice) SERVICE ACES:...................................................2 (four times)

2008 106

7

14

50

-.140 0.07

16

39

14

320

0

0


6-0 | Sophomore | Middle Hitter Wheaton, Illinois Wheaton Warrenville South

2009 EAGLES

KILLS:..................................................11 (vs. Colgate, 8/30/08) ATTEMPTS:..................................25 (vs. Rhode Island, 9/6/08) ASSISTS:............................................................2 (three times) DIGS:................................................5 (vs. Holy Cross, 9/20/08) SERVICE ACES:..............................4 (vs. Holy Cross, 9/20/08) BLOCK SOLOS:............................2 (vs. Florida State, 11/7/08) BLOCK ASSISTS:.................................4 (vs. Colgate, 9/13/08) TOTAL BLOCKS:.................................................4 (three times)

2008 97

133

96

396

.093

1.37

17

16

21

30

5

32


2009 EAGLES

5-9 | Sophomore | Outside Hitter Sofia, Bulgaria Victor Hugo

KILLS:.......................................14 (vs. North Carolina, 9/27/08) ATTEMPTS:..............................32 (vs. North Carolina, 9/27/08) ASSISTS:.................................2 (vs. North Carolina, 10/31/08) DIGS:..........................................6 (vs. Georgia Tech, 10/19/08) SERVICE ACES:...................................................2 (four times) BLOCK SOLOS:..........................1 (vs. Florida State, 10/12/08) BLOCK ASSISTS:...............................................4 (three times) TOTAL BLOCKS:.................................................4 (three times)

2008 73

110

84

360

.072

18

1.51

8

13

52

1

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6-0 | Sophomore | Outside Hitter Honolulu, Hawaii Kamehameha

2009 EAGLES

KILLS:................................................. 25 (vs. Harvard, 9/17/08) ATTEMPTS:........................................ 52 (vs. Harvard, 9/17/08) ASSISTS:......................................................................3 (twice) DIGS:........................................................ 14 (vs. Yale, 9/12/08) SERVICE ACES:...........................................................3 (twice) BLOCK SOLOS:............................................................1 (twice) BLOCK ASSISTS:.........................................................2 (twice)

2008 88

274

140

877

.153

3.11

19

27

24

198

2

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2009 EAGLES

6-3 | Freshman | MH/OH Bakersfield, California Bakersfield Christian

6-0 | Freshman | Outside Hitter Madison, Wisconsin Madison West

5-10 | Sophomore | Outside Hitter San Diego, California Torrey Pines

6-1 | Freshman | Middle Hitter Inglewood, California Harvard Westlake

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6-0 | Freshman | MH/OH Glen Ellyn, Illinois Benet Academy

5-10 | Freshman | Setter Orlando, Florida Lake Highland Prep.

2009 EAGLES

6-2 | Freshman | Outside Hitter Belmont, Massachusetts Dana Hall

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2008 Boston College Volleyball Boston College Overall Individual Statistics (as of Nov 26, 2008) 2008 Boston College Volleyball All matches Boston College Overall Individual Statistics (as of Nov 26, 2008) All matches Overall record: 8-24 Conf: 2-18 Home: 3-7 Away: 1-14 Neutral: 4-3 Overall record: 8-24 Conf: 2-18 Home: 3-7 Away: Attack Set 1-14 Neutral: Serve 4-3 ##

Player

5 ## 1

Jordan Meredith Player Williams Taylor Jordan Meredith Tori Thompson Taylor Williams Melanie Cimino Tori Thompson Tsvetelina Dureva Melanie Cimino Mollie Kolosky Tsvetelina Dureva Brittany Pierpont MollieMoskitis Kolosky Dani Brittany Pierpont AlexandraFitzpatrick Dani Moskitis Marilyn Sullivan AlexandraFitzpatrick Brennan Clark Marilyn Sullivan Kristen Baader Brennan Clark Clare Higgins Kristen Baader BOSTON COLLEGE Clare Higgins Opponents BOSTON COLLEGE Opponents

5 8 1 13 8 9 13 4 9 6 4 3

6 10 3 15 10 11 15 7 11 2 7 2

Player

5 ## 1

Jordan Meredith Player Williams Taylor Jordan Meredith Tori Thompson Taylor Williams Melanie Cimino Tori Thompson Tsvetelina Dureva Melanie Cimino Mollie Kolosky Tsvetelina Dureva Brittany Pierpont Mollie Kolosky Dani Moskitis Brittany Pierpont AlexandraFitzpatrick Dani Moskitis Marilyn Sullivan AlexandraFitzpatrick Brennan Clark Marilyn Sullivan Kristen Baader Brennan Clark Clare Higgins Kristen Baader TEAM Clare Higgins BOSTON COLLEGE...... TEAM Opponents........... BOSTON COLLEGE...... Opponents...........

5 8 1 13 8 9 13 4 9 6 4 3

6 10 3 15

2009 EAGLES

sp

##

10 11 15 7 11 2 7 2

-

AUGUST 29 (Fri.) # 30 (Sat.) # # SEPTEMBER 5 (Fri.) $ $ 6 (Sat.) $ 12 (Fri.) % 13 (Sat.) % % 17 (Wed.) 20 (Sat.) ^ ^ 23 (Tue.) at 26 (Fri.) at 27 (Sat.) at

mp-ms

k

k/s

88 26sp mp-ms 108 3288 2698 32108 32102 3298 3273 26102 3297 3173 2683 3097 3156 2083 3013 1056 2067 2713 10106 3267 27104 32106 3228 15104 3232108 28 15108 32108 32108 32-

274 276k 274 153 276 154 153 110 154 133 110 77 133 15 77 2 15 6 2 7 6 5 7 0 5 1212 0 1356 1212 1356 Dig

3.11 k/s 2.56 3.11 1.56 2.56 1.51 1.56 1.51 1.51 1.37 1.51 0.93 1.37 0.27 0.93 0.15 0.27 0.09 0.15 0.07 0.09 0.05 0.07 0.00 0.05 11.22 0.00 12.56 11.22 12.56

sp

re

88 sp 108 88 98 108 102 98 73 102 97 73 83 97 56 83 13 56 67 13 106 67 104 106 28 10428 108 108108 108

31 re 25 31 24 25 1 24 5 1 3 5 0 3 1 0 0 1 17 0 34 17 23 34 6 23 18 6 188 18 155 188 155

dig

dig/s

198Dig 2.25 dig dig/s 136 1.26 198 2.25 101 1.03 136 1.26 17 0.17 101 1.03 52 0.71 17 0.17 30 0.31 52 0.71 157 1.89 30 0.31 80 1.43 157 1.89 3 0.23 80 1.43 89 1.33 3 0.23 320 3.02 89 1.33 194 1.87 320 3.02 12 0.43 1941.8712 0.43 1389 12.86 1533- 14.191389 12.86 1533 14.19

Overall Record: 8-24

West Virgina Kent State @ Colgate

W, 3-0 L, 1-3 W, 3-1

South Carolina Stony Brook @ Rhode Island @ Yale Hofstra Colgate HARVARD @ Northeastern Holy Cross Maryland* NC State* North Carolina*

L, 0-3 W, 3-2 L, 2-3 L, 0-3 L, 0-3 W, 3-1 W, 3-1 L, 0-3 W, 3-0 L, 1-3 L, 1-3 L, 0-3

e Attack 140

140e 140 68 140 63 68 84 63 96 84 16 96 8 16 3 8 7 3 14 7 4 14 2 4 645 2 476 645 476 bs

2 bs 4 2 4 4 7 4 1 7 5 1 3 5 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 00 27 6327 63

ta

pct

877 .153 ta 753 .1pct 81 877 480 ..1 15 73 7 753 . 1 367 .28 41 8 480 ..1 360 07 77 2 367 ..2 396 04 98 3 360 ..0 172 37 52 5 396 02 97 3 55 ..1 172 37 57 5 13 -..0 55 . 1 2 7 34 -.029 13 50 --..0 17 47 0 34 . 0 2 9 47 .021 50 --..1 4 54 00 0 47 ..0 3608 12 51 7 4 -..2 55 06 0 3434 3608 .157 3434Blocking .256 ba

total

12 Blocking 14 ba total 32 36 12 1 40 44 4 32 3 53 66 0 40 4 27 24 8 53 6 32 30 7 27 2 8 18 21 32 3 7 16 17 18 20 1 0 16 10 7 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 000 0 230 142.0 343- 234.5230 142.0 343 234.5

a

a/s

blk/s

be

bhe

0.16 blk/s 0.33 0.16 0.45 0.33 0.59 0.45 0.38 0.59 0.38 0.38 0.25 0.38 0.30 0.25 0.00 0.30 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.000.00 1.31 2.171.31 2.17

7 be 11 7 4 11 7 4 0 7 2 0 4 2 4 4 0 4 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 00 40 2640 26

2 bhe 5 2 1 5 0 1 5 0 0 5 17 0 4 17 0 4 2 0 1 2 1 1 0 10 38 3238 32

27Set 0.31 a/s 29a 0.27 27 14 0.31 0.14 29 19 0.27 0.19 14 8 0.14 0.11 19 16 0.19 0.16 8 0.11 549 6.61 16 6.62 0.16 371 549 6.61 0 0.00 371 6.62 23 0.34 0 0.37 0.00 39 23 0.34 24 0.23 39 0.37 0 0.00 24 10.36 0.23 1119 0 11.19 0.00 1209 1119 10.36 1209 11.19

Conference 2-18

Home: 3-7

OCTOBER 3 (Fri.) VIRGINIA* L, 0-3 5 (Sun.) VIRGINIA TECH* L, 0-3 10 (Fri.) at Miami* L, 0-3 12 (Sun.) at Florida State* L, 0-3 17 (Fri.) CLEMSON* L, 0-3 19 (Sun.) GEORGIA TECH* L, 0-3 24 (Fri.) at Wake Forest* L, 0-3 25 (Sat.) at Duke* L, 0-3 30 (Thu.) NC STATE* W, 3-0 31 (Fri.) UNC* L, 0-3

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sa

sa/s

se

24 Serve 0.27 28 sa 0.29 sa/s se 31 59 24 13 0.27 0.13 28 18 31 0 0.29 0.00 59 7 13 0.13 13 0.18 18 33 0 0.00 7 21 0.22 27 13 19 0.18 0.23 33 31 21 0.22 27 9 0.16 20 19 0.23 31 0 0.00 0 9 0.10 0.16 13 20 7 0 0.13 0.00 39 0 14 7 0.10 13 0 0.00 1 14 4 0.13 0.14 39 13 0 0.00 1 155 1.44 291 4 1.74 0.14 187 13 188 155 1.44 291 188 1.74Points 187 pts

pts/s

Points 3.48 306.0 pts pts/s 327.0 3.03 306.0 3.48 190.0 1.94 327.0 3.03 187.5 1.84 190.0 1.94 137.5 1.88 187.5 1.84 175.0 1.80 137.5 1.88 108.0 1.30 175.0 1.80 33.0 0.59 108.0 1.30 2.0 0.15 33.0 0.59 13.0 0.19 2.0 0.15 21.0 0.20 13.0 0.19 5.0 0.05 21.0 0.20 4.0 0.14 5.00.054.0 0.14 1509.0 13.97 1778.5- 16.471509.0 13.97 1778.5 16.47

Away: 1-14

Neutral: 4-3

NOVEMBER 7 (Fri.) FLORIDA STATE* L, 1-3 9 (Sun.) MIAMI* L, 0-3 14 (Fri.) at Virginia Tech* L, 0-3 15 (Sat.) at Virginia* L, 0-3 21 (Fri.) at Georgia Tech* L, 0-3 22 (Sat.) at Clemson* L, 0-3 26 (Wed.) MARYLAND* W, 3-1 * ACC Match # Colgate Classic $ Ram Classic Invitational % Yale Invitational ^Beanpot Classic


Total Kills 1,455 Kelsey Johnson 1,402 Deanna Herman 1,365 Rachel Bach 1,294 Dorota Niemczewska 1,142 Amy Laurence 1,111 Julia El-Hag 1,102 Katie Anderson 880 Kristen Roberts 762 Christine Morelli 751 Alison Shepp 715 Lauren Schwer 704 Taylor Williams

2004-2007 1993-1996 1999-2002 2003-2006 1996-1999 1997-2000 2001-2004 1992-1995 1992-1995 2003-2006 1999-2002 2006-

Total Digs 2,176 Allison Anderson 1,377 Lauren Schwer 1,332 Katie Anderson 1,030 Amy Laurence 1,012 Deanna Herman 1,007 Julia El-Hag 885 Kyleen Charlton 882 Dorota Niemczewska

2003-2006 1999-2002 2001-2004 1995-1998 1993-1996 1997-2000 1998-2000 2003-2006

2003-2006 2002-2005 2001-2004 1993-1996 1993-1996 2004-2007 2003-2006 20061996-1999 1993-1996

Total Blocks 451 Kristen Roberts 363 Rachael Bach 319 Abigail Hasebroock 300 Natalie Scott 269 Deanna Herman

1992-1995 1999-2002 2004-2007 1993-1996 1993-1996

Assists 3799 Verena Rost 3134 Kyleen Charlton 2583 Brittany Pierpont 2498 Karen Trine 2170 Jessica Brizzolara 1700 Katherine Tortorello

2002-2005 1998-2000 2005-2008 1993-1996 2001-2002 1997-2000

Kills 514 448 445 420 415 408 399 396 394 358

Kelsey Johnson.........................2007 Rachel Bach..............................2002 Kelsey Johnson.........................2006 Deanna Herman........................1996 Julia El-Hag...............................1998 Katie Andersen..........................2004 Rachel Bach .............................2000 Dorota Nieczewska....................2004 Deanna Herman........................1995 Julia El-Hag...............................1997

Assists 1286 Verena Rost...............................2004 1225 Verena Rost...............................2003 1164 Jessica Brizzolara......................2002 1113 Verena Rost...............................2005 1106 Kyleen Charlton.........................1999 1019 Kyleen Charlton.........................1998 1009 Kyleen Charlton ........................2000 1006 Jessica Brizzolara......................2001 1005 Brittany Pierpont........................2006 836 Katherine Tortorello....................1997

Digs 706 630 596 479 398 394 380 357 354 326

Allison Anderson........................2004 Allison Anderson . .....................2006 Allison Anderson........................2005 Cathy Quilico.............................2007 Lauren Schwer..........................2000 Lauren Schwer..........................2002 Katie Andersen..........................2004 Julia El-Hag...............................1998 Katie Andersen .........................2002 Claire Oswalt.............................1998

Total Blocks (BA+BS) 156 Kristen Roberts..........................1992 134 Kristen Roberts..........................1993 130 Abigail Hasebroock....................2007 126 Jessica Meyeringh.....................1992 117 Rachel Bach..............................2000 116 Nancy Legan.............................2000 116 Natalie Scott..............................1996 111 Jeanne Broussard.....................1993 98 Kim Carlson...............................2002 97 Audrey Eichler...........................2007

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1990............................15-20 1991............................3-23 (0-7 Big East) 1992............................12-25 (0-7 Big East) 1993............................9-23 (0-7 Big East) 1994............................16-16 (2-6 Big East) 1995............................12-24 (1-10 Big East) 1996............................13-19 (0-11 Big East) 1997............................7-24 (1-10 Big East) 1998............................12-19 (0-11 Big East) 1999............................13-17 (3-8 Big East) 2000............................13-17 (4-7 Big East) 2001............................18-11 (5-7 Big East) 2002............................14-18 (3-10 Big East) 2003............................17-12 (3-9 Big East) 2004............................20-12 (6-4 Big East) 2005............................9-22 (4-18 ACC) 2006............................12-19 (10-12 ACC) 2007............................14-18 (8-14 ACC) 2008............................8-24 (2-18 ACC) (Conference Results)

Service Aces 63 Jessica Meyeringh.....................1992 46 Karen Trine................................1994 45 Taylor Williams.........................2006 45 Verena Rost...............................2003 45 Kristin Sprinkel...........................1999 43 Verena Rost...............................2004 41 Karen Trine................................1995 41 Kelsey Johnson.........................2007 40 Allison Anderson........................2004 39 Allison Anderson........................2005 *Bold signifies current players (1992-Present)

2009 EAGLES

Service Aces 133 Allison Anderson 130 Verena Rost 124 Katie Andersen 124 Karen Trine 108 Deanna Herman 101 Kelsey Johnson 100 Dorota Niemczewska 93 Taylor Williams 91 Amy Laurence 89 Cathleen Carpenter


Boston College was founded in 1863 by the Society of Jesus to serve the sons of Boston’s Irish immigrants. It was the first institution of higher education to be founded in the city of Boston. Today, it is one of the foremost universities in the nation, with a coeducational enrollment of 14,500 undergraduate and graduate students. Boston College has drawn students from all 50 states and more than 80 countries. Boston College has grown not just in size, but also in stature and diversity. Today, it is ranked among the top 34 national universities by US News & World Report. Its Graduate School of Social Work is listed among the nation’s top 15, also by US News, while the graduate programs of its Lynch School of Education are among the top 20 and its Connell School of Nursing and Law School are among the top 30. In addition, eight undergraduate programs of the Carroll School of Management placed among the top 10 in the nation according to BusinessWeek, with accounting placing first in its category. Boston College is among the nation’s most selective universities, with nearly 30,000 applications

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received for its 2,250-member Class of 2013, and is numbered among the top American private research universities. After more than a century of growth and evolution, Boston College holds fast to the ideals that inspired its Jesuit founders. The University today remains focused on its mission of helping students to develop their minds and talents while providing them with the motivation and compassion to use those talents in the service of other “Deeply rooted in its Catholic and Jesuit origins, Boston College offers an education that is distinctive in spirit and content, that is doubly rich with the best of human thought and with the profound insights of faith,” writes Reverend William P. Leahy, SJ, who assumed the presidency of Boston College in 1996. “We believe that Boston College provides a transforming experience for young men and women.” A continued expression of this philosophy, based on the Jesuit principle of cura personalis, or care for the individual, is the faculty’s dedication to


teaching. BC faculty members have been honored for their teaching by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Education, while the University’s overall commitment to teaching has been ranked among the nation’s top 20, also by US News & World Report. A Boston College education focuses not only on intellectual development, but also on personal, spiritual and physical development. Students are asked to use their abilities, education and acquired skills to help others in need, whether in Boston or Belize. Each year, more than 5,000 undergraduates give some 375,000 hours of community service in the Boston area, while more than 650 students trade vacation for service during Spring Break. Nearly 2,000 students take part in retreats and spiritual formation activities annually. Today, the Boston College motto “ever to excel” also extends to a broad array of extracurricular activities and opportunities ranging from sports to the arts. Athletics is integral to the University’s focus on the development of the whole person in body as well as in mind and spirit. BC offers 31 men’s and women’s varsity sports, all of which compete at the NCAA Division I level, and annually has one of the highest graduation rates in Division IA.

BC offers a wide variety of resources that enrich intellectual and cultural life beyond the campus gates. Among these are the Jesuit Institute; Center for Ignatian Spirituality; Center for Catholic Education; Church in the 21st Century Center; Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life; Center for Human Rights and International Justice; Center for ChristianJewish Learning; Winston Center for Leadership and Ethics; Center on Wealth and Philanthropy; Center for Retirement Research; Sloan Center on Aging and Work; Center for the Study of Testing, Evaluation and Educational Policy; TIMSS and PIRLS International Study Center; Center for International Higher Education; Burns Library of Rare Books and Special Collections; Robsham Theater Arts Center; McMullen Museum of Art; Center for Child, Family and Community Partnerships; Center for Corporate Citizenship; Center for Work and Family; Center for Irish Programs; Urban Ecology Institute and Weston Observatory.

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Boston is a unique blend of historic charm and contemporary vitality, where cobble-stoned streets meet glass-enclosed shopping galleries, the Freedom Trail’s landmarks stand beside cutting edge restaurants and renowned performance theatres brush shoulders with trendy nightclubs.

With 21 distinctive neighborhoods, each with its own charm and personality, Boston is a diverse patchwork of culture and history. The compact layout makes it ideal to navigate on foot and has helped define it as “America’s Walking City.” Surrounded by natural beauty, Boston’s 48 square miles are encircled by a bustling harbor, tranquil Explore Boston and you’ll know why this East Coast hub attracts mil- coastline and a string of parks known as the Emerald Necklace. lions of visitors each year. It is a place where the richness of American history is complemented by the vibrancy of a thriving, modern city. Whether it’s learning the story behind the Tea Party of 1773, enjoying It is home to prestigious colleges and universities, is the backdrop a ride on the pedal-powered Swan Boats in the Public Garden or exfor critically acclaimed movies and literature, and counts Ralph Waldo ploring the unique shops and restaurants of Faneuil Hall Marketplace, your visit to Boston will be filled with unforgettable experiences. Emerson and John F. Kennedy among its famous sons. To learn more about Boston and what its neighborhoods have to offer visit www.bostonusa.com.

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Consistency. It s the mark of true excellence in any endeavor. However, in today's intercollegiate athletics, competition has become so balanced and so competitive that it is virtually impossible to maintain a high level of consistency. Yet the Atlantic Coast Conference has defied the odds. Now in its 56th year of competition, the ACC has long enjoyed the reputation as one of the strongest and most competitive intercollegiate conferences in the nation. And that is not mere conjecture, the numbers support it. Since the league's inception in 1953, ACC schools have captured 109 national championships, including 57 in women's competition and 52 in men's. In addition, NCAA individual titles have gone to ACC student-athletes 145 times in men's competition and 92 times in women's action. Volleyball made its debut in the ACC in 1980, with conference play beginning in 1981. Now in its 28th season, the ACC has enjoyed vast success both on and off the court. The ACC has had six AVCA All-Americans, including Georgia Tech’s Kele Eveland, who in 2003 became the league’s first player to earn first-team accolades, and Lynnette Moster, who became the ACC’s only three-time recipient of All-America honors in 2004. The conference has also produced 24 Academic All-Americans, eight Region/District Freshmen of the Year and 13 Region/District Coaches of the Year. A total of 165 studentathletes have been selected to the All Region/District team, while 74 have been honored on the All-Academic Region/District team. Since the inception of the AVCA Division I Coaches Poll in 1982, seven ACC schools (Clemson, Duke, Florida State, Georgia Tech, Maryland, North Carolina and NC State) have been ranked in at least one final poll. Two schools have finished in the top 10 in the nation when Florida State completed the 1995 season ranked sixth and Georgia Tech concluded the 2003 season ranked eighth. The ACC sent a team to the NCAA Championship Regional Round in three of the last five seasons. In 2002, North Carolina advanced to the Regionals, becoming the first ACC school to advance to the Regional Round since Duke in 1994. Georgia Tech made ACC history in 2003 when it advanced to the Regional Finals of the NCAA Championship, marking the farthest run of any ACC team in NCAA Championship play. The Yellow Jackets again reached the Regionals in 2004, falling to eventual NCAA finalist Minnesota in five games.

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The Atlantic Coast Conference was founded on May 8, 1953, at the Sedgefield Inn near Greensboro, N.C., with seven charter members - Clemson, Duke, Maryland, North Carolina, North Carolina State, South Carolina and Wake Forest - drawing up the conference by-laws. The withdrawal of seven schools from the Southern Conference came early on the morning of May 8, 1953, during the Southern Conference’s annual spring meeting. On June 14, 1953, the seven members met in Raleigh, N.C., where a set of bylaws was adopted and the name became officially the Atlantic Coast Conference. Suggestions from fans for the name of the new conference appeared in the region’s newspapers prior to the meeting in Raleigh. Some of the names suggested were: Dixie, Mid South, Mid Atlantic, East Coast, Seaboard, Colonial, Tobacco, Blue-Gray, Piedmont, Southern Seven and the Shoreline. Duke’s Eddie Cameron recommended that the name of the conference be the Atlantic Coast Conference, and the motion was passed unanimously. The meeting concluded with each member institution assessed $200.00 to pay for conference expenses. On December 4, 1953, conference officials met again at Sedgefield and officially admitted the University of Virginia as the league’s eighth member. The first, and only, withdrawal of a school from the ACC came on June 30, 1971, when the University of South Carolina tendered its resignation. The ACC operated with seven members until April 3, 1978, when the Georgia Institute of Technology was admitted. The Atlanta school had withdrawn from the Southeastern Conference in January of 1964. The ACC expanded to nine members on July 1, 1991, with the addition of Florida State University. The conference expanded to 11 members on July 1, 2004, with the addition of the University of Miami and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. On October 17, 2003, Boston College accepted an invitation to become the league’s 12th member starting July 1, 2005.


new soccer, field hockey and lacrosse facilities on the Newton campus, new Field Turf for Alumni Stadium, and an air-inflated bubble to cover the stadium turf to provide an indoor practice facility for all sports during the winter months. DeFilippo was instrumental in raising money to build the privately funded $27 million, 72,000-square-foot Yawkey Athletics Center, which houses the football program, the Office of Learning Resources for Student-Athletes, and a large function area for general University use. After football moved into the Yawkey Center, BC undertook a multi-million dollar renovation Conte Forum to provide additional locker room and office space for many of BC’s 31 varsity sports.

Since Gene DeFilippo became Director of Athletics in September of 1997, he has led the BC athletics program to an unprecedented period of innovation, growth, fundraising, athletic and academic success. He also led the program through one of the most significant periods in its history as it transitioned to full membership in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Under DeFilippo’s leadership, Boston College student-athletes’ achievements in the classroom have become an immense source of pride for the University and its supporters. Last year, 363 BC student-athletes maintained a grade point average of 3.0 or better, earning the Athletic Director’s Award for Academic Excellence. BC’s graduation rate for all student-athletes has consistently ranked in the nation’s top ten.

ment championships and entered the NCAA Men’s Soccer Tournament as the overall No. 1 seed. From 1993-97, DeFilippo served as director of athletics at Villanova University. He served as Associated Director of Athletics at the University of Kentucky from 1987-93, Director of Athletics at the University of South Carolina-Spartanburg from 1984-87 and Director of Administrative Services at Vanderbilt University from 1983-84.

DeFilippo renamed the Athletics Association’s fundraising arm (formerly Blue Chips) in honor of longtime Athletics Director Bill Flynn. Alumni, parents and friends of Boston College Athletics contributed $18 million in 2008-09, the third-highest total in BC Athletics history and 50 percent more than just four years ago. The 4,600 donors to the Flynn Fund prove that there is strength in numbers; nearly 700 alumni, parents and friends have given to BC Athletics for at least 10 consecutive years. Anne and Gene DeFilippo cemented their commitment to Boston College by announcing their pledge of $100,000 to endow a scholarship. The scholarship will be awarded annually to a female studentathlete who demonstrates outstanding academic achievement and financial need.

In athletics competition, DeFilippo has overseen some of the most successful seasons in Boston College Athletics history. During the 2008-09 season, the football team appeared in a school-record 10th consecutive bowl game and made a second DeFilippo initiated an impressive overhaul of BC’s consecutive trip to the ACC Championship Game. athletics facilities that includes new football practice In 2008, the men’s ice hockey team won its third facilities, a total renovation of Conte Forum, includ- national championship, and the men’s soccer team ing a new sound system, floor and video boards, captured both the ACC regular-season and tourna-

Years School Position 1973-74............... Tennessee................................................Graduate Assistant Football Coach 1975-79............... Youngstown State.....................................................Assistant Football Coach 1980-82............... Vanderbilt...................................................................Assistant Football coach 1983-84............... Vanderbilt...................................................Director of Administrative Services 1984-87............... University of South Carolina-Spartanburg........................ Director of Athletics 1987-93............... Kentucky........Assistant, Associate Director of Athletics-External Operations 1993-97............... Villanova............................................................................. Director of Athletics 1997-present...... Boston College.................................................................. Director of Athletics

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His coaching experience includes three years as offensive backfield coach at Vanderbilt (198082), which included the 1982 Hall of Fame Bowl. From 1975-79, he was offensive coordinator at Youngstown State University, during which time the team won two consecutive Mid-Continent Conference championships, 1978-79. In 1973-74, he was graduate assistant football coach for the University of Tennessee, coaching in the 1973 Gator Bowl and 1974 Liberty Bowl. A 1973 graduate of Springfield College with a Bachelor of Science degree, DeFilippo earned three varsity letters as a quarterback in football during his undergraduate career. He received a master’s degree in educational administration from the University of Tennessee in 1974. DeFilippo and his wife, Anne, are the parents of three children – Christine Eldred (recently married to Matt Eldred), a guidance counselor; John, assistant quarterbacks coach for the New York Jets, and Mary, marketing and sales coordinator for Fenway Sports Group.


2009 Boston College Women's Volleyball Media Guide  

2009 Media Guide

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