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APA Referencing Guide It's important to note right off the bat that the American Psychological Association prefers the author-date format when it comes to writing out references. The sixth edition of the APA Referencing Guide states that the source must be acknowledged in the text. Direct quotes require a location reference, including page or paragraph numbers.

In-Text References The APA Referencing Guide states that writers should use quotation marks when writing out direct quotes. Page numbers must also be included along with it. For example: Gulick (1914) states "the western world during the Middle Ages had more frequent recourse to Roman versions of the tale of Troy, but with the revival of learning Homer sprang almost immediately into his rightful position..." (p. 14). Indirect quotations do not require quotation marks, but still must be cited correctly. While page numbers are optional here according to the APA Referencing Guide, it's usually useful to readers if they're included. For example: Most readers in the middle ages would have studied Roman accounts of the Trojan story (Gulick, 1914, p. 14).

Secondary Source Citations Things get a little more hairy when writers are trying to cite material that was borrowed from another source. Authors in books and other materials obviously cite other authors. Material cited in one source can be in turn cited later. The reference is merely more complex. For instance: Locke stated that he used "the plain historical method" to study human intellect (as cited in Perry, 1914, p. 11).

Works Cited Pages This all might sound very strange to those who are paying close attention only to the fact that last names are used throughout these references. The referencing material has its own system for ensuring that readers are familiar with all the cited material. References need to be applied on a works cited page that is independent from the rest of the paper.

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Apa referencing guide