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Vol. 15 Iss. 5 | January/February 2011

Claregalway Pharmacy: Fighting Flu Page

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Claregalway GAA Update Page

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Frost Damage to Garden Plants: What to do Page 21

Claregalway Drama Festival Page 2

Local News, Health & Sport www.nuachtchlair.com


Claregalway Drama Festival

Annual 3 Act Festival of Drama The Annual Festival of Drama returns this March, opening on Thursday 10th when local group Compántas Lír present Brian Friel’s “The Loves of Cass Maguire”, and running for nine nights, closing on the 18th March. The festival provides an opportunity to take some time

out and enjoy an evening of fine drama as groups from all around Ireland present a wide variety of plays. Doors open at 7.30pm and shows begin at 8pm sharp. Refreshments are served at the interval and there is a nightly raffle with great prizes, as well as a draw on closing night with fantastic prizes on offer. Why not

stay on after the play and enjoy a drink & a chat in the ‘Festival Club’ bar? Tickets are very competitively priced, nightly (€10) & season tickets (€60).

For more information contact: Festival Director: Seamas McNulty 091 798 862 Festival Secretary: Sheila Hession 086 898 1731

Thursday 10th

Compántas Lír

The Loves of Cass Maguire

Brian Friel

Friday 11th

Prosperous Drama Group

November

David Mamet

Saturday 12th

Dunmore Amateur Dramatic Society

The Good Father

Christian O’ Reilly

Sunday 13th

Garrymore Drama Group

The Beauty Queen of Leenane

Martin McDonagh

Monday 14th

Glenamaddy Drama Group

Dancing at Lughnasa

Brian Friel

Tuesday 15th

K.A.T.S, Galway

Portia Coughlan

Marina Carr

Wednesday 16th

Corofin Drama Group

The Righteous Are Bold

Frank Carnry

Thursday 17th

Doonbeg Drama Group

Say Cheese

Bernard Farrell

Friday 18th

Shoestring Theatre Group

Moonshine

Jim Nolan

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January/February 2011


January/February Editorial

It is devastating to think that the country is losing about 1,000 people a week, because they are unable to find work here. We are educating our young people for emigration. They will be the lost generation. Unemployment among those aged between 15 and 24 is one of the biggest challenges facing the country. There is simply no work for them and they have no choice but to emigrate. Enemployment has to have a negative effect on their welbeing. The novelty of being unemployed wears off after a few months drawing the dole. The majority of people want to work but if the jobs are not there, they just don’t have the option and having too much leisure time brings on other social issues. Recent figures released by the Economic and Social Research Institute have revealed that net migration is set to remain at 50,000 people

a year between now and April 2012. These figures are worse than the days of the eighties when net migration peaked at 44,000 in 1989. Also, the people who emigrate lose their right to vote in the General Elections. Surely, a postal system could be put in place in order for them to vote. After all, its not their fault they have to emigrate? The elections are up and running now and it is your chance to ask the candidates what they are going to do for unemployment, health and traffic when they come knocking on your doors. The traffic continues to be a nightmare in Claregalway as does the lack of a Secondary School. I was talking to people recently and we were talking about local facilities and lack of them. One issue that came up as well as traffic and the school was the provision of a village retirement centre for Claregalway.

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This would mean giving our elderly a place to live rather than go to a nursing home. The retirement village would have separate accommodation for the elderly, thereby giving them independence but it would also have medical staff insitu and other recreational facilities. I believe every village/town should have a retirement centre. We hope you enjoy our

combined Jan/Feb issue of Nuacht Chlair and your comments and feedback are much appreciated. We especially welcome articles in Irish and Polish and any local pictures for publication. Until next time, Josette

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Constituency Office, Briarhill Business Park, Briarhill, Galway. Tel: 091-764807 Fax: 091-764974 E-mail: noel.grealish@oireachtas.ie

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January/February 2011


Poetry: When He Fell I spotted him from across the street Was not sure whether to say hello or not So I did what comes easiest, I put my head down And walked quickly away trying hard To bury the thoughts in my head The faster I walked the faster the thoughts I should have stopped to say hello to Bury the past once and for all But I couldn’t, with racing heart and shaking legs I stopped, took in a breath, gathered myself Wanted to be home, away from people’s prying eyes looking into my head and reading my thoughts I felt naked in the middle of the city Wanted to cover myself in a blanket To protect the fragility of my mind

To forget, to pretend I didn’t see him To start the day again, wake up from this nightmare I turned around, walked back to where I spotted him, yellow fingers clutching An empty cup, no blanket to keep him warm I reached out my hand, he took it And as I felt his skin on mine The past seemed to flutter away I placed €20 in his hand, kissed his cheek Turned away, and prayed that one day my brother Would come home. Fiona Place

Clúidín na mBabaí Community Pre-School through Irish (No previous knowledge of Irish necessary)

G.A.A. Clubhouse, Claregalway (adjacent to the Community Centre) Mon-Fri (inclusive) 9.15am – 12.15pm Free ECCE places available for September 2011

Contact Lisa: 087 207 0558 The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

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VOTE

1

Derek Nolan

jobs, reform, fairness

Your Labour Candidate for Claregalway & Carnmore Galway needs a Labour TD in the next Government, now more than ever

www.dereknolan.com 086 3777 624 6 | www.nuachtchlair.com

January/February 2011


Claregalway Pharmacy: Fighting Flu

Flu is an infection caused by the influenza virus. The virus mainly attacks the breathing passagesincluding the nose, sinuses, throat & lungs. The virus spreads easily through the air – when someone nearby breathes in the spray of tiny droplets from a sneeze or cough. Typical symptoms of flu include a high temperature, chills, a headache, aching muscles, a cough, a blocked nose, loss of appetite and feeling tired. These symptoms are usually more severe than with the common cold. In general, the body’s immune system usually fights off the infection within 5-6 days,

although some people may feel weak for longer. People at high risk from complications of flu include those; aged 65 or over, living in a nursing home, who have heart or lung disease (e.g. asthma), who have diabetes, who have kidney failure, who have an illness or medical treatment that could weaken their immune system (e.g. cancer or those taking steroid tablets for a long time). Swine flu is particularly dangerous during pregnancy. The flu vaccination is recommended

The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

for people in any of the at risk groups. It is based on a form of the influenza virus; it prepares the immune system for an attack by flu, but doesn’t actually cause the infection. Treating the flu at home would involve getting plenty of rest, keeping warm and drinking plenty of fluids. Paracetamol will help reduce a high temperature and help to relieve flu symptoms such as headache. Other products are also available from your pharmacy. A virus, not bacteria,

causes flu, antibiotics won’t help. Your GP may sometimes prescribe an antibiotic to prevent or treat secondary bacterial infections especially in high-risk patients. John Duffy MPSI. Special offer20% off false nails and Bourjois.

Claregalway Pharmacy is open late Monday to Friday until 8pm & 7pm on Saturday. 091 799 754.

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Life Coaching from YellowWood.ie

“In every complaint there is a hidden desire” I heard this quote from Colin Brett as part of a lecture on Life & Business Coaching. I scribbled this quote down immediately as I could sense that this could be used as a powerful tool for people in difficult situations. While no one likes complaints, especially the baggage associated i.e. stress, embarrassment, the personal attachment and verbal abuse, there is another way - you can control how you react or not re-act. Changing the way you view a complaint could have enormous benefits, not just for you but also for your customer. The customer wants you, the business owner, to acknowledge that they have a hidden desire. By asking the customer what they want, you are in a position to listen to your customer’s desires. It is an opportunity to make the best of the situation and also increase customer satisfaction. There is a danger that if you do 8 | www.nuachtchlair.com

not engage with the customer, you will not only lose their custom, but they could potentially lose you future custom. The power of verbal referral is the most powerful sales tool, a satisfied customer will tell 5 people. Yet this could be used to have the opposite effect. A research study conducted by TARP research back in 1999 discovered that on average an unhappy customer will tell 10 people about their experience. In turn, these 10 people will each tell a further 5 people, meaning that a total of 50 people will have heard about their bad experience. It is also important to note that this does not include the massive percentage who will not tell you of their complaints.    So, back to the customer, when you get lemons, make lemonade. By changing your perspective on how you view complaints, you have the opportunity to look at the person complaining as doing you a huge favour. Remember to be sincere. Nobody is perfect, no business is perfect, but

there is always room to strive for excellence. In business this could be used to turn a potential

hazard into a solution by using your newly improved customer service technique.

Notes Introduce yourself and ask the customer for their name. Listen to the customers hidden desire (complaint). Take notes & reflect details of the conversation back to the customer. Acknowledge the customer’s dissatisfaction. Inform the customer of possible remedy or future action. Ask the customer if these actions or remedies are desirable . Request to contact customer to ensure remedies & actions are completed. Contact customer with your actions. Optional extra: Offer a token of appreciation.    The following could be viewed as the ultimate learning situation: Many business owners pay hundreds of euro to consultants looking to improve their business, yet the solution could be right before their own eyes. In many ways the customer just wants to be valued and treated with respect. I would thoroughly recommend reading a book called “Crowning the Customer” by Feargal Quinn. About the Author William Corless is the Managing Director of YellowWood, a provider of coaching, training and business solutions for more info log on to www.yellowwood.ie January/February 2011


Memories of Our Village Lane

Nuacht Chláir Sponsors The Nuacht Chláir is compiled monthly voluntarily by a small committee and distributed free of charge. The Nuacht Chláir team would like to sincerely thank our sponsors and advertisers, without whom this publication would not be possible.

Hughes Supermarket I remember well our village lane Where we walked in youthful years, And also too the joy and pain Of times that were Austere.

I remember mornings fresh and sharp, Stones ringing to hobnailed boots, Again was playing that Immigrants harp – “Adieu the nations golden youth”.

Between cold grey stone walls, Went people of olden ways, Some still wore Western shawls And spoke a Tongue of other days.

Where now the Boys we hurled Against – in our fields playing spots, Are they buried around the world, Are the fields just building Plots?

Where our forefather’s feet once trod, With the skill they had known Tilled and worked the fertile sod – Our fields with crops were sown.

Behind the hearse that took our dead We followed; words of grief unspoken, By mourners with lowered heads – All knowing their hearts were broken.

When from high storms lashed, Inside barns safe from rain Corn with flails was thrashed And saved the golden grain.

Cows looked out at our corteges With a sad and mournful eye And we then of tender ages, Believed they also said Goodbye.

On the road with cattle and sheep, To the Fair as dawn was nigh, While the world was fast asleep, We walked to Athenry.

For the dead we’d never see again, Though maybe young in years, Knew well our village older men Too, were holding back the Tears.

Oh, that acrid smell of smoke Where the Blacksmiths anvil rung, Into the heart of burning coke – He thrust his metal tongs. The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

Claregalway Pharmacy Raftery’s Centra Claregalway Hotel Claregalway Dental Surgery JPK Garden Centre Glynn’s Centra, Carnmore MPG Food Ltd.

For information on Sponsorship packages see www.nuachtchlair.com/ advertising-sponsorship

Edward Coppinger www.nuachtchlair.com | 9


Treacy Unable to Contest General Election

Long serving Fianna Fáil Dáil T.D. for Galway East Noel Treacy T.D. has today confirmed that he is medically unfit to contest the upcoming general election. Deputy Treacy is nominated for the Fianna Fáil selection convention in Loughrea on Sunday evening. However he has now informed the local organisation, the party headquarters in Dublin and his colleagues in the Parliamentary Party that he is unable to contest the election due to illness. It is public knowledge that Deputy Treacy has been under medical care for the past year.  He 10 | www.nuachtchlair.com

underwent surgery last summer and commenced treatment earlier this month. This therapy will continue throughout February and into March. After detailed discussions with his medical team, he has been advised that he cannot fight a general election campaign during his treatment.  This has forced him to withdraw from this weekend’s selection convention. “I do this with a great sense of regret and reluctance as all of the expectations were that the general election would not happen before 2012.  I was looking forward to being fully

fit by then.  It would be unfair to the Fianna Fáil Party who have consistently nominated me, and the people of Galway East who have consistently elected me for three decades, to enter an election campaign in which I could not actively participate on a daily basis. “I wish to sincerely thank all of the officers, members and supporters of Fianna Fáil throughout Galway East for their steadfast loyalty to me, during ten different elections.  I look forward to meeting all of them at next Sunday’s convention in Loughrea,” concluded Noel Treacy T.D.

Fahey welcomes funding for footpaths in Claregalway

Galway West Fianna Fáil Deputy & Chairman of the Joint Oireachtas Committee on Transport Frank Fahey has welcomed confirmation from the National Roads Authority that €100,000 will be allocated for footpaths outside the housing estates of Slí an Bhradáin and Church View, and outside Claregalway National School. The improvements will allow for continuous pedestrian access from Church View estate up to the junction of N17/N18, and it will provide a continuous footpath from Cúirt na hAbhainn to the Parochial House. Welcoming this news, Deputy Fahey said, "This new infrastructure will provide for comfortable pedestrian access to the village centre, as well as improved road safety conditions in the area. I would also like to acknowledge the enormous efforts of Councillor Malachy Noone in this regard. He first raised this issue with me many months ago, and I am delighted to be able to confirm that the NRA have responded positively to my protracted representations". It is hoped that Galway County Council will begin the works without delay. January/February 2011


Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,   With our water distribution systems nationwide leaking like huge sieve I should imagine that the instillation of water meters should be the at the bottom of the list for any sane thinking Government. Such meters would become totally unworkable with the next cold spell. “Good Europeans pay water charges”, so we must do the same? It will help us to save water they say, will it what? There is something very wrong in this

country if we have a shortage of water seeing that for the most part we are getting drenched by it or in our Wellingtons bailing it out of our houses. Surly it is years of neglect and lack of prioritisation by various Local Governments which has caused most of our water problems. During the Celtic years County Engineers all over the country got large bonuses for excellent services rendered, yet the depths of water distribution pipes in new housing estates were not monitored, will anyone be

held to account? Don’t think so. Towns in the most scenic areas of our country got no proper sewage systems, Cliften and Oughterard being cases in point. Again the tax payer has to pick out the tab for work not done and services not rendered. Now to add insult to injury the money to pay for water meters is to be taken from the Pension Reserve Fund. We are paying to put in meters to charge ourselves! When all the costly work is done at the expense of the tax payer you will see the whole

system privatised. The Water Distribution Network like the ESB will sold off to fund the biggest Bailout in History....I am not talking about water here. Are we not just like turkeys voting for Christmas when we agree to water charges under the circumstances where the majority of working people will find a huge drop in their take home pay as a result of the recent Budget.  Yours Sincerely, Nuala Nolan

Traditional fiddle lessons for beginners Contact Patricia 085 123 57 05 The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

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The Courtyard, Claregalway Shopping Centre, Claregalway. Tel: 091 739 405 Email: info@treatcafe.ie www.treatcafe.ie

Beginners Cookery Course

Cooking on a Budget

4 Week Course starts February 1st from 7:30pm to 9:30pm

4 Week Course starts February 9th from 7:30pm to 9:30pm

Learn the basics of cooking, techniques & tips to make you a confident cook. From easy starters to simple yet tasty main courses. How to make sauces and whats the most impressive thing to do with poultry or fish. Learn some fundamental baking skills & how to make mouth watering desserts. Handout of all the recipes will be supplied along with sampling of food and a complimentary glass of wine.

Quick-fix, healthy, nutritious meals, shopped for in 5 minutes and put on the table in less than 30 that’s our very popular one-pot dinners. Clever ideas to invigorate your everyday home cooking. Easy food planning to save money. Fill your freezer with delicious dishes that you can eat anytime. Handout of all the recipes will be supplied along with sampling of food and a complimentary glass of wine.

Lackagh, Turloughmore, Co. Galway

Leading Funeral Undertakers for Claregalway & Lackagh 12 | www.nuachtchlair.com

Telephone / Fax: 091 797 167 Mobile: Frank 085 1266 133 Joe 087 629 2350 Email: frank@kearneyfunerals.com www.kearneyfunerals.com

January/February 2011


Claregalway GAA Update

U14:  Claregalway Ladies are back in training for the 2011 Season. Indoor training continues each Saturday for the U14 Panel and upwards in the Claregalway Centre.  The U14 Panel travels to Ballyboden on Saturday 5th February.  Details of bus, times etc will be given at the next training session.  There are a number of players from the club completing Trials for the U14 County Panel and we would like to wish them the best of luck and congratulations on their excellent performances to date. U12s: Ladies begin indoor training on Sunday 23rd January from 3-4pm and will continue each Sunday.  There is a minimal charge of 2 euro for each session and new members are also welcome.  for further information on U12’s, please contact Christine Moran on 0879180544. 

The Claregalway GAA Social is a night of Celebration of our Club and takes place this on Saturday 19th February.  The Ladies Club had a particularly successful year in 2010 with fantastic achievements both on an off the pitch.  It is therefore a great opportunity to celebrate and we would hope to have a strong representation of parents from every age group from U10 up to Minor Ladies attending the Night.  The Social which is also an important annual fundraiser is being sponsored once again by the Claregalway Hotel so all proceeds will go towards development work to improve facilities for all of our players.  Tickets are available from all Club Managers/Mentors.   Our Annual Social Night in the Claregalway Hotel on Saturday February 19th will feature Special Guest Don Stiffe, well

The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

known entertainer from the AllIreland Talent Show and Music by Silkwood. Patrons who wish to sit at tables on a group basis with their companions can arrange this in advance by informing any member of the committee. There will be both door and spot prizes on offer. Tickets are available for purchase from any member of the committee or contact Tony Stephens 087 6538569. The Club is looking for a big turnout of members and friends as a show of support for its ambitous plans to facilitate sport and recreation for the rapidly expanding Claregalway community, including the development works at the newly acquired grounds in Knockdoemore - the grounds grass seeded in 2010 with its two new pitches will be ready for use next May. Furthermore, improvements to the

Lakeview pitch are due to commence shortly. Proceeds from the Social will be allocated to the Claregalway GAA Development Fund.  So come and join us for the night of the year. U-21’s have been drawn to play Annaghdown in the quarter finals of the North Board A championship to be played on Saturday February 12th. Junior A’s will play in the North Board Group B with Dunmore MacHales,  Mountbellew/Moylough and St. Gabriels. Lotto numbers for January 31st. were 9 10 11 25 - one match three winner Sean Newell, Muinteach. The sellers prize went to Ann Ryan, c/o Grealishes. The Jackpot now stands at €4540 and the next draw will be in the Claregalway Hotel.

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January/February 2011


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Bread: Soda Bread

Soup: Carrot & Coriander

500g (1lb) stoneground wholemeal plain flour 2 level teaspoons bicarbonate of soda 1 level teaspoon salt 100g (3 ½ oz) butter 1 level teaspoon caster sugar 284ml carton buttermilk 4 tablespoons milk Baking sheet, oiled   1. Set the oven to Gas Mark 7 or 220oC   2. Tip the flour into a bowl and add the butter.   Rub it in until the mixture resembles fine breadcrumbs.

1 ½ dessertspoonful crushed coriander seeds 1 ¼ litres (2 pints) vegetable stock 1 kg (2-2 lb) carrots, diced 500 g (1lb) onions, diced 3 teaspoons sunflower Seasoning

3. Stir in the bicarbonate of soda, salt and sugar.   4. Tip the buttermilk into the flour mixture, along with the milk. Mix the ingredients together to give a soft dough.   5. Turn the dough out on to a floured surface and shape it into a ball.  Place the ball on a baking sheet and flatten it slightly, Then cut a deep cross into the top using a long-bladed knife, cutting almost all the way through the dough.   6. Bake the bread in the centre of the oven for 25-30 minutes, or until it has risen and sounds hollow when tapped underneath.   Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool. The bread may be eaten hot or cold, & is best eaten on day of baking. Wrap in a freezer bag and freeze for up to 1 month. Allow the bread to defrost for a few hours, and refresh it in a hot oven for a few minutes before serving. 16 | www.nuachtchlair.com

  1. Heat the oil in a saucepan and add the finely diced onions.   2. Sweat, covered with greasproof paper for 5-8 minutes until soft.   3. Add the diced carrots and coriander and cook for a further 5 minutes.   4. Add in the stock ( a stock cube may be used if preferred).   5. Bring to the boil and cook until the vegetables are soft.   6. Season with salt and pepper and liquidize.   7. Sieve to remove coriander seeds.   Serve hot.

Serving Suggestion Try the homemade Soda Bread with the Carrot & Coriander soup for a delicious starter or wholesome lunch. For more recipes, visit www.nuachtchlair.com and search ‘Recipes’ January/February 2011


Naoínra

A few days after Christmas we all rejoiced in the luxury of the thaw, water flowed freely through pipes, we reveled in the luxury of a shower.  However, little did I realize that water was flowing a little too freely in places?  One night as I sat in the post Christmas comfort of a warm fire, good food and the children otherwise occupied (a luxury indeed!) I received an utterly depressing phone call.  Michelle Rohan broke the news as gently as possible that there were burst pipes in the GAA clubhouse and that the room we use as a ‘Naoinra was wet.  She urged me to come down telling me our furniture and equipment was being salvaged.  I reluctantly pulled on my wellies and set off.  Yes, I was reluctant to see the damage. Who will willingly greet misery? I trudged into the building passing several GAA men and others all earnestly sweeping water out the door.  Others were

moving our precious equipment to the dry safety of the changing rooms.  I couldn’t look at anyone.  I just put my head down and joined in.  I couldn’t help but steal furtive glances at the destruction as I worked.  The room looked dismal and sodden. As I looked around, memories rushed through my mind.  I heard the laughter of the children as they played, saw their impish looks as they tried out their Irish by using handpuppets to converse, their earnest pride in a painting or craft completed and displayed on the walls, their lovely animation as they practiced their action songs and their shy delight as they chatted to Daidi na Nollaig only a week earlier. Suddenly it dawned on me the most important things I needed to salvage, their scrap books which held all of their completed work which will keep alive memories of their Naoinra life as they move on to

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‘Big School’.  Sure enough, the scrap books had been damaged but only superficially so I stored them in the boot of my car.  Looking around I realized with a sinking heart that we would not be able to re-open as planned on the 10th January.  How would I tell the parents who greeted me with such kindness each day as they delivered and collected their children?  As if reading my mind Michelle put a hand on my arm and said that maybe we could move into the Community Centre whilst the room was being repaired.  Like a drowning person I clung to this life-raft of friendship.  Michelle, herself a founding mother of the Naoinra knew that the staff is responsible for the preschool education of the children and understood that I couldn’t let the children and their parents down. A week later, having been given the blessing of Alan, Michelle and Centers Committee, Patsy, Anne and I began the move.  It

took a week of washing and packing to set up home.  John from FAS did most of the heavy lifting, he did it in such a generous manner that we were humbled.  We re-opened just a week late.  Not one parent complained, their only question being”How can we help?”  The children showed the way in how quickly they adjusted to their new surroundings, they are as lively and happy as ever. Thank you is a small word, but what else can I say to Michelle, Alan, the FAS workers, the GAA men and all the others who worked so hard that night and since to help us.  Thank you to the parents, children and staff who made the adjustment so eagerly and without complaint.  The saying “It takes a village to raise a child” rings so true.  I salute you all.  

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Glass of Milk

One day a poor boy that was selling goods from door to door to pay his way through school, found he had only one thin dime left, and he was hungry. He decided he would ask for a meal at the next house. However, he lost his nerve when a lovely young woman opened the door. Instead of a meal he asked for a drink of water!. She thought he looked hungry so brought him a large glass of milk. He drank it so slowly, and then asked, how much do I owe you?. You don’t owe me anything; she replied. Mother has taught us never to accept pay for a kindness. He said….”then I thank you from my heart”. As Howard Kelly left that house, he not only felt stronger physically, but his faith in God and man was strong also. He had been ready to give up and quit. Many year’s later that same young woman became critically 18 | www.nuachtchlair.com

ill. The local doctors were baffled. They finally sent her to the big city, where they called in specialists to study her rare disease. Dr. Howard Kelly was called in for the consultation. When he heard the name of the town she came from, a strange light filled his eyes. Immediately he rose and went down the hall of the hospital to her room. Dressed in his doctor’s gown he went in to see her. He recognised her at once. He went back to the consultation room determined to do his best to save her life. From that day he gave special attention to her case. After a long struggle, the battle was won. Dr. Kelly requested the business office to pass the final bill to him for approval. He looked at it, and then wrote something on the edge, and the bill was sent to her room. She feared to open it, for she was sure it would take the rest of her life to pay

for it all. Finally she looked, and something caught her attention on the side of the bill. She read these words….”paid in full with one glass of milk” (Signed Dr. Howard Kelly).

Tears of joy flooded her eyes as her happy heart prayed; Thank you God, that your love has spread through human hearts and hands. There’s a saying which goes something like this:

Bread cast on the water comes back to you. The good deed you do today may benefit you or someone you love at the least expected time. If you never see the deed again at least you will have made the world a better place. And after all, isn’t that what life is all about? You can spread a positive message like this one, or ignore it and pretend it never touched your heart. The hardest thing to learn in life is which bridge to cross and which to burn. January/February 2011


Special News & Local Notices Fit4Life will start again for the Spring term at the following times. The Fit 4 Life is a program for runners, joggers and walkers, to help them get motivated and get fit. The cost of joining is just € 35. Beginners are welcome. Expert coaching & guidance, Organised training and advice, FUN!

Corofin: Maria Hehir 085 108 5872 Monday 9.30am and Wednesday 9.30am St Colmans National School, Corofin

Congratulations to Jarlath Walsh and his wife Nicole, Cahergowan on the birth of their first baby on Thursday January 13th 2011, a boy Felix Sean Walsh. Another grandchild for Patsy to spoil! Congratulations to Arthur & Katharzyna Kosecki, River Oaks, on the birth of their baby Kayla. Congratulations to Brendan & Aoife Lydon, Crusheen, on the birth of their baby Lori. Congratulations to Galvin and Isabelle Kavanagh, Cúirt na hAbhainn, on the birth of their twin boys Ian and Mark on Thursday 27th January.

R.I.P.

R.I.P. Eileen Murtagh, Knockdoe, Jan 2011 Michael Walsh, late Carnmore, Jan 2011 Bridie Grealish, Carnmore, Jan 2011 Darby Greally, Montiagh, Jan 2011

Back: (left to right): Catherine McKenna, Pauline Doyle, Julie McKenna, Bernie Steedman, John Glennon, Fiona Place. Front: Pat Forde, Jim Sergeant, Tom McKenna, Marie Kenny, Mary Forde. Missing from photo: Josette Farrell. Claregalway Badminton Club is very active in the Community Centre. We meet every Tuesday morning from 10 to 12 and new members are always welcome. Further information contact Josette Farrell at 086 391 3852. The Badminton Club is also run on Tuesday evenings. For further information contact Mary Forde at 091 798 114.

Line Dancing Classes in Grealish's Bar Carnmore Cross every Wednesday @ 8pm. All levels welcome.  Just drop in for a dance or call Ciara on 087 795 2660 if you need more details.

Noel Grealish opening new pitch for Carnmore National School last week The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

Send Special News/Local Notices to Nuacht Chláir, Creig Buí, Baile Chláir, Co. na Gaillimhe or email news@nuachtchlair.com. www.nuachtchlair.com | 19


Home Grown Irish Potatoes

Sprout potatoes now for an early crop this Summer. Gardeners are now interested in growing a smaller quantity of vegetables but more variety covering a longer cropping time from early summer to late winter. Potatoes can be growing even in the smallest section of soil and

are ideal for growing in Potato bags and pots to give you lots of great tasting potatoes which are easy to crop and care for. Sprout early seed potatoes now indoors in a bright frost free location for planting out next month. Look for the tried and tested varieties including Sapro Mira, Sapro Axona, Swift, Home

Lydican, Oranmore. Tel: 091-739958

Guard, Duke of York, Colleen, Sharp’s Express, Orla and those popular second early British Queens and Records. Good soil preparation is important, ideally in ground where potatoes have not been grown in for several seasons. Add some Westland organic farm yard manure or Organic Chicken

Fertiliser as potatoes are hungry feeders and appreciate plenty of nutrition throughout the season. Horky’s Tip: This season grow your potatoes in Grow Beds or Potato Planters and place them on your patio to grow on this spring and summer – potatoes do great in raised planters and pots.

Early Planters Colleen - resistant to potato tuber blight. 1. Super Irish Bred variety with excellent flavour and large crops. 2. Tubers are medium to large, short oval. Super flavour for an early variety. 3. Creamy yellow skin, light yellow flesh and shallow eyes. Good cropper. 4. Medium to high yield of regular tubers. 5. Moderately resistant to dry rot, black scurf and common scab. 6. Suitable for boiling, baking, steaming. It is a firm potato with good skin finish and does not disintegrate on boiling. It is free from after-cooking discolouration and enzymic browning. 7. Excellent Irish variety bred for our heavy and wet soils. 8. Ready to use in mid July. 20 | www.nuachtchlair.com

Home Guard - Waxy flesh, Great cropper for West of Ireland. 1. Excellent first early varieties, round large potatoes are produced in mid July. Super flavour and ideal for use throughout the summer period. Ideal for anyone looking to grow a waxy fleshed variety. 2. Tubers are short-oval with yellow-brown skin which develop faint purple on exposure to light. 3. The flesh is creamy-white and the eyes are shallow. 4. The variety produces a moderately heavy crop and is ideal for our West of Ireland conditions. 5. A larger crop is produced on moisture retentive soils. 6. Tubers are medium size and uniform in shape and usually free from secondary growth irregularities. January/February 2011


Frost Damage to Garden Plants: What to Do

The winter of 2010 and January 2011 will be remembered for the severe frosts, snow and bitter biting winds.  The other key feature is that his severe frost remained for many days and weeks and continued to penetrate plants and garden soil to a greater depth night after night causing further damage and in many cases killing plants totally. When the temperature level

drops below -5°C, some shrubs can be affected such as Fuchsia, Pittospormum, Libertia Grasses.  Below -10°C many others were damaged such as Cordyline, Griselinia & Phormium. Temperature levels dropped to minus -16°C in some places in the first two weeks of 2010 and early January 2011 and perhaps a degree or two lower in others.  This is very cold – these

temperatures are plumbed only every fifteen or twenty years and then only for an exceptional night or two. But the big freeze saw low temperatures last for a week and more, without thaw, depending on location.  When this happens, real damage is done to plant tissues.  They freeze and the ice crystals slowly grow, just as the ice thickens on a lake, and

eventually the ice bursts the cells and the cells die. Very often this damage appears as dried out leaves, or mushy leaves, but sometimes the damage is done inside the plant, in the buds or in the cambial layer, that slippery layer of cells between bark and wood.  Some damage will not be evident until growth begins in mid March/April.

What to Do 1. To establish whether there is life still in a plant – simply scrape back the bark on the main stems of the plant checking a number of areas along the main stem from top to toe on the plant.  2. Scrape back the brown stem to check for green healthy wood under the bark.  3. Where green coloured stems are present there is a good chance this plant will re-shoot.  4. If however the stems are brown or black and brittle there is every chance this plant has failed. Supergro Tree, Hedging & Shrub Fertiliser: 1. Supergro Fertiliser is a specially formulated granulated fertilizer which is perfect to encourage new growth in all trees, hedging and garden shrubs. It stimulates plants to produce new growth and stronger root structure.  3. Supergro should be applied by hand to the base of your garden plants.  4. Keep the fertilizer out from the main stem and apply evenly around the entire base of the plant. 5. Apply a dressing in early spring and early summer for best effect. The local newsletter for Claregalway & Carnmore

Happy Gardening, Josette Farrell.

www.nuachtchlair.com | 21


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“ A Taste of Home”

This photo was taken during the archaeological investigation at the bridge in Claregalway. Two temporary pontoon bridges are due to be constructed in early March to allow the permanent bridge at Claregalway Castle to be closed temporarily for flood relief work.

22 | www.nuachtchlair.com

January/February 2011


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Of a choir (6) 2 Place for helicopter to land (7) Down In a comatose state (6) 3 Liquid precipitation (4) 2One State of exalted delight (7) country, capital: Riga (6) who plays music alone (7) 4 European out (7) 5 Small object worn to ward 3Spreads Pneumatic car part (4)off evil etc. (6) Canter with a long easy stride (4) player (5) coat (6) 6 Hoist (4) 4A pipeStoat's Fencing sword (4) 7 Obscuration of sun’s light by moon (7) 5e.g. portrait Killpainting (6) (3) 8 Sacred songs or hymns (6) of common salt (6) 9 Rear (naut.) (6) 6Metal Aquatic bird of Anatidae family (4) Sea between Greece and Turkey(6) 14 Reproduced for reading audience (7) (7) 16 Public service vehicles (5) 7Sorrow Wash (7) Related, kindred (6) 18 Type of broom (5) 8Surname Passionate (6) of Baker St. detective (6) 20 Crazy (3) Sleeping platform (3) 21 Volcanic version prevented flights (3) 9SenseStubby (6) of appropriateness (4) 23 Deer horn (6) (5) Pests referred to in Bible (7) 14Ciphers Temporarily blinded24 (7) Residue of an injury (4) 26 Ghastly (7) 16In theWalk East (7) noisily (5) 27 Astute (6) Natural occurrence of 28 Headgear (6) 18visibleRage (5) spectrum (7) 29 Shortage (6) (6) 20ClimbMeasure of current 33 (3)In this location (4) 34 Movie (4) 38 Impede (6) 21 Finish (3) 23 Stabbing knife (6) 1 5 10 11 12 13 15 17 19 21 22 23 25 28 30 31 32 35 36 37


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OPEN EVERY DAY 8am - 10pm

24 | www.nuachtchlair.com Raftery’s Centra, Claregalway

Tel: (091) 798 805 Fax: (091) 799 031 January/February 2011 Email: rafterysclaregalway@centra.ie Web: www.rafterys.ie


Nuacht Chláir January/February 2011