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ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO: NICOLE TRACEY_391786


PERSONAL PROJECT: VIRTUAL ENVIROMENTS HEADPIECE

Using basic 3D modelling software, a form has been created that tests a materials performance and limits in the ability to adapt to multiple forms, shapes and sizes. Although this personal piece is not a form of architecture but a headpiece, similarities can be drawn from the fundamental design process of architecture along with technologies used and innovative ways of thinking in future architectural discourse. The point of discovering these new types of technologies can be not only applied singularly to architecture but to numerous amounts of disciplines. Which is why it is important for new ways to be found and explored beyond boundaries.

STATE OF THE ART PROJECT: THE WATERCUBE, BEIJING PTW Architects present the world with Beijing’s Nation Aquatics Centre, The Watercube. This structure demonstrates how technology can create such a forward thinking design and simultaneously experimenting and discovering new materials. Not only has this progressed design drawn from inspiration such as the water molecule but it has also involved Chinese culture through the use of the cube form to produce an energy efficient, sustainable and aesthetically appealing form of advancing architecture. Culture being a significant aspect in regards to create a Gateway for Wyndham City.


STATE OF THE ART PROJECT: THE SPOT, THE UNIVERSITY OF MELBOURNE

The Spot, The University of Melbourne’s faculty of economics and commerce is a clear demonstration of a state of the art project in advancing for the future. In accordance to the design of this piece of architecture, there was a goal to produce new ways to create an efficient, yet comfortable and environmentally friendly structure. This well planned building uses both active and passive systems to heat and cool the interior depending the use of particular rooms to provide the most suitable environment for the building users. This type of innovative concept can be useful in producing an iconic feature for Wyndham City. The spot has successfully reflected Melbourne’s goal for sustainability, for Wyndham City I believe they strive for connectivity and growth which can be depicted through the Gateway project.


GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM BILBAO SPAIN (1997) ARTITECT: FRANK GEHRY


Frank Gehry’s Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao uses a collaboration of limestone-covered orthogonal shapes with fluidly curved objects that are covered in a metallic titanium material. Gehry began forming ideas for this museum with the exploration of paper and wooden models. These were then refined and enhanced further using the 3D design computer program, Cotia.

‘traditional approaches to structural design are largely based on presumptions of regularity, symmetry and repletion of identical parts.’ Gehry uses these fundamental techniques and enhances his designs using computer technology that creates structures that are intricate, free-forming and of enormous scale. These advanced designs are then constructed with lower production cost and within a shorter or approximately the same time period. Like Gehry, I intend to push past the traditional boundaries by using Rhino to achieve an innovative design that captures the attention of passers’ by. In doing this I also intend to maintain cost levels and keep the construction period within the desired time frame.


EUREKA PAVILION Architects: Nex Architecture Location: London, United Kingdom
 Project Year: 2011


The Eureka Pavilion’s structure is created using a timber framed system that incorporates recycled plastic cells that highlight and capture particular views of the surrounding gardens. The design of the pavilion was constructed through the use of scripting technologies that depict a magnified view of leaf capillaries. NEX Principal Alan Dempsey says: “We extended the design concepts of the garden by looking closely at the cellular structure of plants and their processes of growth to inform the design’s development. The final structure was designed using computer

algorithms that mimic natural growth and is intended to allow visitors to experience the patterns of biological structure at an unfamiliar scale. The primary structure is timber sourced from sustainable spruce forests with a glass panelled roof.” In regards to the Wyndham Project, the Eureka Pavilion shows that through the development of scripting technologies, architects are able to maintain control and manipulate the forms and development of these designs simultaneously. Which was once impossible to do with conventional methods of sketching and drafting by hand.


SURFACE GRIDS IMAGE SAMPLER

SURFACE NORMALS CURVE ATTRACTOR ROTATION

EVALUATE CURVE IMAGE SAMPLER COMPONENTS

OVERLAYING PATTERNS IMAGE SAMPLER

BOOLEAN PATTERNING ATTRACTOR POINT ROTATION


OVERLAYING PATTERNS IMAGE SAMPLER

IMAGE SAMPLER EXTRUSION ROTATION


Through the experiementation of combining and manipulating grasshopper definitions I was able to gain an understanding of what the capabilities are of certain components and by experiementing with number sliders in particular orders through these different components I could produce extrodinarily different outcomes. Through this matrix, I gained this understanding of my limitations and possibilities. For example, I discovered that by using image sampler I was able to produce any pattern I desired to try and manipulate it to the point that it was unrecognisable through rotation methods and increasing the size of the individual circles. Although, I found the knowledge of knowing how to produce such a form, it is not suitable for the installation for Wyndham City as it does not convey any particular message. Another example from the matrix that has possibilities to be developed further is the fourth column over, third row down. Where I incorporated components such as image sampler, extrusion and a distorted surface. By interlocking the extruded circles, I have experimented with the idea of cutting with in one another. This interlocked and abstracted form of a surface would prove interesting and eye catching if it were to form a tunnel over the road that leads from Wyndham CIty to Metropolitan Melbourne. However, it may be limited in terms of fabrication time span and also may be hindered by a structural support system.


DIOR BUILDING


Dior Building Architect: Kumilco Inui location: Osaka, Japan Date: 2005


By using the Dior Building as a case-study, I began combining the provided definitions to create effects that would exhibit layering, repetition, form, depth and make use of light and shadow. In doing so I became aware that using

the image sampler association made it possible to develop and have more control over the patterns that would take place. This new development will assist in producing a iconic design for Wyndham City’s Gateway.


These are the outcomes of using Image Sampler and Pattern Overlay definitions after using the Dior Building as a precedent. These definitions will be useful for developing ideas for Wyndham City’s Gateway. While developing this ideas, I attempted to regenerate a similar pattern to the Dior Building(top two examples displayed to the right) however I felt it was too literal and didn’t apply to the project at hand so I began to produce different patterns which can be seen through the thrid image displayed to the right, that have the possibility to grow as Wyndham City has done itself.


materials and methods


Experimenting with manual methods such as glueing, cutting and moulds with a variety of materials such as card, balsar wood, plaster and tracing paper to distinguish how materials and how they are manufactured have an effect on the form, scale, light and shadow.


Experimentation of light and shadow with Balsar wood, moulded plaster and hole punched tracing paper.


Moving onto more sophisticated methods such as laser cutting to create a cuts with high precision. Then using these patterns and layering them to create multiple effects such as that with the solid form and with the shadows they create. A photo montage was also created to give some idea of how it will be viewed as a gateway for Wyndham City. A limitation of this idea that was discussed is that the viewers of the installation will be travelling at high speeds and that the perforations and shadows will probably not have much effect on passers by.


Applying laser cutting methods to create cuts in an abstract fashion and employing these to a 3D form which enhances the effect of light and shadow, not only projecting out in front or behind but also onto itself. Which creates more depth to the form and design for Wyndham City’s Gateway. Although, with this idea it doesn’t have a narrative or have a connection with Wyndham City which causes problems with progressing further with this design idea.


Another idea that was experiemented with was the perferation patterns seen in the above images. This pattern provides visual intrigue and would ensure our current theme of light and shadow however, it is believed to be over used and the theme of light and shadow does not really provide for a strong and lasting relationship with the people passing through. Although we are not abondaning light and shadow we believe it will become a secondary effect.


In response to the EOI design crit, my colleagues and I have taken on board the lack of narrative to our design development for Wyndham City’s Gateway project. We believe that through our development there are multiple avenues that we could take, for example, dynamism of our 3D forms or even enhancing the layers and patterns. Through discussion and further development and refinement of our ideas we will choose the best option that reflects Wyndham City.


To create an installation that highlights the transition between the city and Wyndham through the use of the Wyndham City iconography. The iconography is further utilized through the orientation of the design. Furthermore the motion of the curve reflects the movement of a sail boat. This will guide the driver along their path. TECHNIQUE Using the geometry of the sails on the Wyndham City a pattern is generated. The scale of this pattern will change according to the proximity to Wyndham. The further away from Wyndham, the more abstract the perforations. EXPERIENCE The encounter of the installation will connect the driver to the notion of a journey. The abstraction of the geometry will further express the idea of movement and travelling. SECONDARY EFFECT The shadows created by the design will further enhance the initial narrative and add to the overall experience.

FINAL PROJECT DEVELOPMENT


NARRATIVE

1 ICONOGRAPHY OF WYNDHAM CITY

5 ROTATION OF REPEATED FORMS

2 ABSTRACTION OF SAIL FORM

6 APPLY PATTERN TO

RECTANGULAR PANELS


3 REPETITION OF

ABSTRACTED FORM

7 ARRANGE PANELS ALONG CURVE OF ICONOGRAPHY

4 GRADIENT UPON

8 TILT PANELS IN A

CONTINUOUS MOTION


GRASSHOPPER DEFINITION


input multiple curves

loft surface through a set of selection curves

generate grid of {uv} points on surface

generate list of pseudo random numbers

generate 3D points

compute Euclidean distance between 2 points

provide image sampling routines

attractor point

remap numbers into a new numeric domain

create numeric domain from 2 numeric extremes

generate numeric domain which encompasses a list of numbers


PARAMETRIC DEVELOPMENT generate 3D geometry

rotate object in plane

generate polygon with round edges

multiply

translate object along vector

create vector from {xyz} components

represent 3D curves

retrive item

interpolated curve through set of points


From the vector images above, the steps that were taken digitally can be understood in a more visual sense. These steps show the process of how the design started as a single surface, then a parametric pattern was apply, the application of the gradient and rotation, continued development of these techniques, the application of the the 40 panels and the separation to become individual panels working together through the parametric pattern.


From the previous cut exercise, the use of gradients and layering were taken to help produce a final design. Progressing from this, we decided to use the form of a sail that is used for Wyndham City’s iconography. From this we choose to simplify the shape of a sail to a triangle and then create a rounded, abstracted form. Although we wished to establish more of a sail form, we were limited in our ability with the ways of Grasshopper.

This is a projection view taken from the Rhino model that was created to give an idea of how the installation would be positioned on the site. Originally the design was to span over 200m with larger spaces between the panels. After some errors made with scale calculations we came to the conclusion that the installation would span over 100m moving at a maximum of 12m from the road at the largest part of the curve. The first half of the curve has 23 panels whereas the second curve on the opposiste side of the road, the curve closer to Melbourne has 17 panels.


1

2

3

4

5


These images display the options that have been developed in regards to the parametric pattern that will be applied to the rectangular panels. These experiementations show some of the capabilities of parametric design. Although they appear to be subtle changes between each of the examples, at a larger scale it can make a huge impact on the overall design and meaning. Through this development of the pattern it was decided that we should use pattern number 5 as it has more detail at the smaller gradiented end. However, this could prove to cause issues with the larger shapes as they seem to overlap excessively.


steel frame that acts as structural support for aluminium sheeting

wooden studs

bolts attach aluminium sheeting to wooden studs on the side to avoid aluminium sheeting that has structural hinderprefabricated perferation of the ance in regards to parametric pattern the pattern.

1:10 SECTION MODEL


This 1:50 detail model depicts the inner workings within the ground that allows for the panels to be on tilted angles. By employing an insitu system within the ground, brackets will be placed at particular angles in regards to what degree the panels are to be tilted.


PHOTOGRAPH

1:500 SITE MODEL

Due to the model being made at a 1:500 scale we decided to concentrate on the composition of the panels on the site rather than the perforations. From these particular photographs it can be seen how the panels use the curved form to hug the road and and the same time sweep away by tilting the panels. The panels begin by lying back and then gradually stand up to great the driver at the sides of the road and then begin to slowly decend back again the closer the installation gets to Melbourne. In tilting the panels this way, they lose some of the secondary shadow effect due to the shape and positioning of the curve in relation to the sun movements.


NORTH ELEVATION

PHOTO MONTAGE

VIEW 1

VIEW 2

VIEW 3


From this final project of designing an installation for drivers to pass through on there way from Wyndham City to Metropolitan Melbourne. The installation that we designed to represent Wyndham City has successful elements and also limitations that can be improved upon. Although my group took longer to find a narrative that expresses Wyndham, the time is took allowed us to develop an idea through the iconography already used by Wyndam City and one that many can relate and respond to. With any design there are limitations that need to addressed, in this case we found that when the perforation became larger and they began to overlap excessively creating large gauges in the aluminium panels, creating a somewhat messy design. Although through the middle of the design where the panels stand upright and closer to the road the perforations are at there most vital and intriguing position. Another successful element that of the design was the sweeping motion of the panels, creating a visually stimulating journey in a sail boat for the driver. Through Grasshopper, my group and I were able to generate abstracted forms and pattern in a shorter amount of time than if we were to do it without parametric techniques. It also gave us the opportunity to address issues and quickly adapt them to ensure they work. From this studio I found that working in a group has pros and cons. I enjoy working with people and splitting the workload between three allowing us to develop and learn new techniques. I personnaly found it challenging and a resourceful skill in working with others and learning how to bring ideas together to create the best possible solution.



Journal final