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SEP TEMBER 7 - SEP TEMBER 14, 2017 • VOL. 32, NO.7 • W W W.NE W TIMESSLO.COM • SA N LUIS OBISPO COUNT Y’S NE WS A ND ENTERTA INMENT WEEK LY

Winning Images 22ND ANNUAL PHOTOGRAPHY

CONTEST & EXHIBITION ENTRY FORM [5]

Future loss Two decades of planning is put on hold as

Atascadero residents worry about the impacts more than 500 proposed homes would bring [10] BY ERICA HUDSON


Contents

September 7 - September 14, 2017 VOLUME 32, NUMBER 7

Editor’s note

R

ural is the word that comes to mind when you think of North County, with untouched rolling golden hills as far as the eye can see. At the same time, others look at that land and see room for growth. For the past 20 years, developers have tried to create Eagle Ranch, a wouldbe mega-housing community in Atascadero. The project proposal was put on hold again in June while developers hash out fiscal and environmental impacts. New Times Editorial Intern Erica Hudson takes us down the winding road that has yet to produce a single house [10] . This week, you can also read about what’s on the unreleased tapes of former SLO County Jail inmate Andrew Holland’s death [8] ; George Saunders reading from his new novel at the PAC [29] ; art in the age of extinction at Studios [31] ; and what everyone is eating for breakfast in SLO [48] .

This week cover The battle over Eagle Ranch .......... 10

news What’s in the jail death footage .......8

opinion Put a homeless shelter in Grover Beach ............................. 12 Keep speaking up to save Carrizo ................................... 12

arts LITERATURE: George Saunders at the PAC ......................................29 GALLERY: Art and environmentalism at Studios........................................ 31

flavor FOOD: What’s for breakfast? ........46

cover photo by Jayson Mellom cover design by Alex Zuniga

HOMES BEYOND THE HILLS Red Heesch stands near his front yard, where boulders and oaks would be wiped out to build a roadway to Eagle Ranch if the proposal is taken off hold. Eagle Ranch would add up to 494 singlefamily residential lots, 93-multifamily units, a resort hotel, village center, and commercial highway to Atascadero.

Every week news

art

News ............................. 4 Viewer Discretion........... 6 Strokes & Plugs ............. 9

Artifacts ....................... 29 Starkey......................... 33 Club Listings ................ 36 Split Screen.................. 39 Reviews ....................... 39 Get Out! ....................... 44

opinion Hodin ............................ 12 This Modern World ....... 12 Letters .......................... 14 Street Talk..................... 15 Rhetoric & Reason ....... 16 Shredder ....................... 17

the rest Classifieds.................... 49 Real Estate .................. 49 Brezsny’s Astrology..... 55

Events calendar Hot Dates ..................... 19 Special Events .............. 19 Arts .............................. 20 Music ........................... 25 Culture & Lifestyle ....... 25 Food & Drink ............... 28

Rhythm is our business [25]

Ryah Cooley arts editor

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News

September 7 - 14, 2017

➤ Tale of the tape [8] ➤ Strokes & Plugs [9]

What the county’s talking about this week

SLO residents show support for DACA ‘Dreamers’ 1010 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 805/546-8208 Fax 805/546-8641 SHREDDER

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T

he group of adults and children that gathered on the sidewalk near the intersection of Marsh and Pepper Street Sept. 5 wasted little time before breaking into chanting. “Dreamers must stay! Trump and Pence, go away,” they shouted while waving colorful signs at passing cars. The crowd was one of many that came together across the U.S. to show support for individuals who were brought into the country as undocumented immigrants when they were children. Under the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, nearly 800,000 of those young people, often referred to as “Dreamers,” were able to live, work, and get an education in the United States without the threat of being deported. That protection is now in jeopardy, after President Donald Trump announced that he would begin phasing out the program, placing the future of those Dreamers in question and prompting immigration advocates to take to the streets in support of the DACA program and those it helps. “There’s a tremendous amount of uncertainty,” said Cal Poly Professor Jane Lehr, a founding member of the Central Coast Coalition for Undocumented Student Success. “This could have tremendous negative impacts on undocumented people across the United States.” The Coalition organized the rally, which took place outside the SLO office of Central Coast U.S. Rep. Salud Carbajal (D-Santa Barbara). Attendees included parents, educators, and even local students like Cal Poly undergrad Katie Tindel, who wanted to show up and support Dreamers attending local schools, colleges, and universities. “I feel like I had an opportunity to help my fellow students,” she said. The fate of the DACA program has been up in air since the 2016 election, which Trump won in part by taking a hardline stance against illegal immigration. The president’s past positions on

DACA have been mercurial at best. In September 2016 Trump, then a candidate, promised his supporters that he’d terminate then-President Barack Obama’s executive order on immigration, which included the DACA program. In January, the newly elected Trump told Dreamers “they shouldn’t be worried,” stating that he had “a big heart.” That uncertainty created uneasiness in the undocumented immigrant community, according to Lehr, particularly for Dreamers who could face deportation from a country were they’ve spent the majority of their lives. RALLYING FOR DREAMERS SLO residents gathered Sept. 5 to “It’s not knowing if you show their support for undocumented immigrants brought to America will be able to go to school as children and the federal DACA program, which may come to an end tomorrow. Not knowing if in six months. you will be able to go to work tomorrow… the levels of Carbajal said in a statement released shortly anxiety and depression have skyrocketed,” she said. after Trump’s announcement. “Terminating On Sept. 5, Trump announced that he DACA and stripping Dreamers of that hope and planned to begin winding down the program opportunity is unconscionable and incompatible over the next six months, placing the onus to with our American values.” pass immigration reform legislation, including Carbajal called on Congress to immediately DACA, in the hands of federal lawmakers. pass legislation to permanently codify DACA. “I am not going to just cut DACA off, but According to data from the United States rather provide a window of opportunity for Citizenship and Immigration Services, more Congress to finally act,” the president said in a than 200,000, or nearly 25 percent, of the Sept. 5 statement. country’s DACA recipients live in California. The announcement triggered a wave of Like Carbajal, Lehr encouraged citizens to pressure responses from lawmakers, including Carbajal, their congressional representatives to pass legislation who noted that more than 9,000 Central Coast to protect DACA and the immigrants it affects. residents were eligible for the DACA program. “We need to push members of Congress to “I was once a young immigrant to this nation, enact immigration support bills, not bills that which has since given me the opportunity penalize them,” she said. ∆ to work hard, raise my family, and serve my country both in the military and in Congress,” —Chris McGuinness

WeekendWeather

district fire Stack or take down the letter, but San Luis Coastal adopts ‘religious expression’ policy the SLCUSD defended SLO Expressions’ right to publish it. in wake of anti-gay letter After a summer of reflection, school officials

Jim Parsons

DISTRIBUTION

Misty Lambert, Tom Falconer, Barbara Alvis, Mike Pluneda, Russell Moreton, Michael Ferrell New Times is published every Thursday for your enjoyment and distributed to more than 100,000 readers in San Luis Obispo County. New Times is available free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. The contents of New Times are copyrighted by New Times, and may not be reproduced without specific written permission from the publishers. We welcome contributions and suggestions. Accompany any submissions with a self-addressed stamped envelope. We cannot assume responsibility for unsolicited submissions. All letters received become the property of the publishers. Opinions expressed in byline material are not necessarily those of New Times. New Times is available on microfilm at the SLO City-County Library, and through Proquest Company, 789 E Eisenhower Pkwy., Ann Arbor, MI 48106, as part of the Alternative Press Project. Subscriptions to New Times are $104 per year. Because a product or service is advertised in New Times does not necessarily mean we endorse its use. We hope readers will use their own good judgment in choosing products most beneficial to their well-being. Our purpose: to present news and issues of importance to our readers; to reflect honestly the unique spirit of the region; and to be a complete, current, and accurate guide to arts and entertainment on the Central Coast, leading the community in a positive direction consistent with its past. ©2017 New Times

Central Coast Weather Report

Dave Hovde

KSBY Chief Meteorologist

Thursday

Friday

COASTAL ➤ High 77 Low 59 INLAND ➤ High 91 Low 58

COASTAL ➤ High 76 Low 56 INLAND ➤ High 90 Low 58

Saturday

Sunday



MeMber,califorNia Newspaper publishers associatioN

A•A•N

MeMber, NatioNal Newspaper associatioN

COASTAL ➤ High 77 Low 55 COASTAL ➤ High 76 Low 55 INLAND ➤ High 91 Low 57 INLAND ➤ High 90 Low 57 Much different than last weekend’s forecast, this one is partly cloudy and near average temperatures with no storms or mugginess.

4 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

Responding to the community turmoil stirred up in May when a then-SLO High School teacher religiously condemned homosexuality in a letter to the student newspaper SLO Expressions, the San Luis Coastal Unified School District (SLCUSD) board of trustees adopted a “religious expression” policy on Sept. 5 to clarify where, when, and in what manner religious expression is appropriate on school campuses. The policy contains 11 pages’ worth of rules and guidelines for religious expression in a variety of contexts, and school officials say it prohibits staff and teachers from penning religious-based letters to student publications for print, which former special education teacher Michael Stack did earlier this year. His letter cited a Bible verse stating that people who commit homosexual acts “deserved to die.” When public outrage followed his letter, spilling into the state and national media, Stack resigned as a SLCUSD teacher. In the heat of it, many community members demanded the school

say they continue to stand by that approach. “After that whole incident, we looked at how we handled it,” SLCUSD Assistant Superintendent Ryan Pinkerton said. “It’s good to go back—what was our district policy? Was it right? Was it wrong? It looks like we did handle it correctly.” Pinkerton said the new district policy, written by district staff and attorneys over the summer, is intended to make its expectations about appropriate religious expression “more prescriptive” and “understandable” to the school community. First, the new policy broadly states that, “religious expression and activities in public schools involves a careful balancing of free speech rights and the right to free exercise of religion without promoting or establishing religion.” The policy then tackles 23 areas or venues for religious expression, ranging from student prayers, to the use of school facilities for religious purposes, to teaching about religion, the distribution of religious literature, and prayers at athletic contests. NEWS continued page 6


Do you have a

Be sure to enter our 22nd annual photo contest!

winning image?

THE RULES: Entry divisions are either ADULT or 18 & UNDER. ADULT • Categories are: People, Architecture, Land/Seascape, Animals, Flora, Travel, and Open. • Prints may be between 5x7 and 11x14 and MUST be mounted on a thick 11x14 black or white board without a mat. Images may be color or b/w. No slides are allowed. • Photos submitted in previous years are ineligible. • Each submission must be accompanied by a $5 check, cash, or money order made out to New Times. Multiple entries may be paid for with one check or money order. • New Times is not responsible for damage or loss of entry. • Submissions are due in the New Times office, 1010 Marsh St., SLO, 93401 or the Sun office, 2540 Skyway Drive, Santa Maria, 93455 by 5 p.m. on Monday, September 25. A completed entry form must be attached to the back of each mounted entry.

Winners will be published in our annual Winning Images issues on October 19, and will be featured in a photo exhibit at SLOMA

ENTRIES ARE DUE BY 5 P.M. ON MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 25

©Ron Painter

©Carolyn Eicher

©Jonathan Shapiro

©Aidan Briggs

• All photos must be the original, creative work of the submitting photographer. • All photographs must be taken within the boundaries of San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties – except submissions to categories: Travel and the Open for which photos may be taken anywhere else. • Photos can’t be returned, but may be picked up at the New Times or Sun offices between December 1 and 30, 2017. • Entry in the contest constitutes permission to use the photo in the paper, online, and for display. • All entrants are asked to submit a highquality digital file of their image (jpeg format, at least 300 dpi) to photocontest@ newtimesslo.com or on any portable storage device (e.g.: flash drive or CD). Multiple entries may be put onto the same portable storage device. Winners will be required to provide their photo electronically. Please include photographer’s name and entry name with each digital submission • Judges have the right to reassign categories for mislabeled or misfiled photos at their discretion.

18 & UNDER • This is an Open category. Photographs can be of any subject of the entrant’s choosing, but must have been taken within the boundaries of San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties. • Entrants must be 18 or younger as of October 3 and enrolled in any school (including a home school) that’s not a college. A winner’s legal guardian will be required to sign a release form.

• All other rules from the adult categories apply. All entry money goes toward prizes. The winning entries will be published in the Thursday, October 19 issue of New Times and the Sun, in an online gallery, and included in a photo exhibition that opens the evening of Wednesday, October 18 at SLOMA (San Luis Obispo Museum of Art) at 1010 Broad St. in San Luis Obispo.

ENTRY FORM (Forms are also available online at newtimesslo.com) Photographer’s Name: ______________________________________________ Entry name: ___________________________________________________________ Address: ______________________________________________________________ Telephone: Day: _________________________ Evening: ________________________ Email address: __________________________ Instagram: ______________________ Photo Division: ❏ Adult ❏ 18 & Under (Open Category) Adult Photo Category: ❏ People ❏ Architecture ❏ Land/Seascape ❏ Animals ❏ Flora ❏Travel ❏ Open All entrants are asked to submit a high-quality digital file of their image (jpeg format, at least 300 dpi) to photocontest@newtimesslo.com or on a CD attached to the back of their entry. Winners will be required to do so. Include photographer’s name and entry name with each digital submission.

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 5


News NEWS from page 4

School staff, when acting in their official capacity, “are prohibited from endorsing, soliciting, encouraging, or participating in religious expression or activities with students on campus or at school-sponsored events,” one of the policies reads. At athletic contests, sports team coaches “may not participate in or encourage prayer or other religious activities,” another states. Student religious groups have “the same right of access to school facilities” and “may distribute religious literature to other students on the same terms as they are permitted to distribute other non-religious literature,” according to the district policy. District employees distributing religious literature on campus or at school-sponsored activities, however, “shall be prohibited.” With respect to curriculum, information “must be presented in an objective manner that does not have the effect of advancing or inhibiting religion.” Pinkerton said the policies will be discussed and implemented at each school site with staff and teachers during the current school year, possibly in collaboration with a community task force. —Peter Johnson

Morro Bay local helps Texas relief effort When Dana Stein arrived in the outskirts of Houston, Texas, on Aug. 31, he found the darkness of dawn and the brown water that flooded the area ahead. “I remember getting out of the truck and it just smelled bad, like old water,” he said. Stein is a harbor patrol officer in Morro Bay and he was given the opportunity to join a small group of volunteers formed by K38 International Rescue—a watercraft rescue and boating education organization—to offer relief assistance in Texas during a three-day mission. The state is working toward regaining its footing after Hurricane Harvey devastated Houston and other nearby areas. Armed with a four-wheel drive truck, four Kawasaki jet skis, and manpower, the team traveled to Orange County, Texas, about 100 miles west of Houston. “I was expecting to see stagnant water like the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. I was surprised to see moving water,” he said. The group drove through about 2 to 4 feet of water, with a current traveling at about 10 miles per hour. Stein was able to rescue several people; among them were two men in a small boat that the current had sucked underneath a railroad bridge. “When we finally got them out of the water they just looked as white as ghosts and big-eyed. They couldn’t stop talking about how they almost died,” he said. Stein has seen plenty of emergency situations, but this was the first time he’s seen an emergency of this magnitude. After each rescue, the group took a quick rest before moving on to the next mission. Stein said he and the K38 group were taking a break on the side of the road trying to cool down when a woman approached them. He helped the woman evacuate her daughter and grandchildren from

VIEWER DISCRETION

by Jayson Mellom

their home in a nearby neighborhood. “She was so happy; one of her sons put us up for the night, fed us, and showed us great hospitality,” he said. The appreciative and hospitable people that he encountered on the way and during his time in Texas is something that Stein said would stay with him. “The whole way to Texas from California, we would stop for gas and people would give us a donation or just honk and wave,” Stein said. —Karen Garcia

Gearhart gets a shot at a reduced prison sentence The former Atascadero “citizen of the year” convicted of defrauding investors out of millions of dollars in a real estate Ponzi scheme will get a chance to reduce his lengthy prison sentence. A federal court granted an appeal by 56-year-old Kelly Gearhart and ordered a new sentencing hearing for the disgraced real estate developer, who was sentenced to 14 years in prison after he pleaded guilty to two counts of wire fraud and one count of money laundering in May 2014. According to an Aug. 25 ruling by California’s Ninth District Court of Appeals, federal Judge Otis Wright erred in determining the amount of jail time Gearhart should serve. Otis sentenced Gearhart to 14 years for each of the three counts to run concurrently. However, the maximum sentence for one of those charges, money laundering, is just 10 years. “The district judge committed procedural error at sentencing when he selected the sentence by gut instinct and then adjusted the offense level to match it,” an appellate brief fi led by Gearhart’s attorney stated. In addition to the procedural error, Gearhart’s attorney argued that Wright’s sentence was “unreasonable in light of Gearhart’s many positive attributes, his history of success and fair dealing.” The appeals court also ruled that Gearhart be granted another hearing to determine the amount of restitution he needs to pay to his victims, stating that the judge failed to take the necessary time to properly resolve disputes over the still-undisclosed restitution amount and the number of victims. Gearhart’s attorney also asked the appeals court to reassign the resentencing to another judge, claiming that Wright expressed a personal bias against Gearhart past proceedings. The appeals court rejected the request for reassignment. As of Sept. 6, no resentencing hearing had been scheduled in Gearhart’s case, though a status conference is scheduled for Nov. 20. Gearhart remains in

6 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

custody at the Fort Dix minimumsecurity federal prison in New Jersey. —Chris McGuinness

North County considers paving own path on animal shelter Earlier this year, San Luis Obispo County’s seven cities signed an agreement with the County Health Department to collectively pay for the construction of a $14 million animal shelter off Highway 1. Now, the two cities facing the biggest chunk of that bill, with the greatest demand for animal sheltering services, are getting cold feet about the arrangement. Paso Robles and Atascadero are in the midst of exploring the viability of building their own animal shelter in North County, and in turn pulling out of the financing agreement with SLO County. While the two cities “above the grade” have historically contracted with the county for animal sheltering services (which state law requires be provided), Paso and Atascadero’s estimated $4.4 million share of the new shelter has city officials searching for a less expensive alternative. “We’re not satisfied at all with the costs,” Charles Bourbeau, an Atascadero City Council member, told New Times on Sept. 5. “The increased cost that we’re looking at annually is more than the cost of hiring an additional police officer or fire fighter—considerably more. We’ve got to look at how those costs can be cut.” The topic is on the Paso Robles City Council’s Sept. 7 agenda, and the council may decide to direct its staff to begin a search for an interested nonprofit or for-profit operator of a North County shelter. The City Council could also decide not to pursue the alternative and stay with the county. According to a Paso city staff report, an animal shelter for North County could pan out as less costly to the cities, if the communities are willing to accept a “lower level of service” at the shelter. That could include “restricting the type of animals that could be accepted,” among other service reductions.

“A majority of residents in some areas believe that unclaimed dogs should be sheltered locally as long as it takes to be adopted; others are willing to follow other practices, many of which can reduce costs to the community,” the staff report reads. City officials in Paso Robles could not be reached by New Times for further comment. Atascadero officials said its City Council would not discuss the issue in a public meeting again until a proposal for an alternative shelter progressed further. Between 2013 and 2016, Paso and Atascadero sent the most stray animals to the county animal shelter out of the county’s cities, accounting for 33 percent of the shelter’s total intake in that time period. Stray and feral cats, in particular, have been an issue for North County, according to animal services organizations. If Paso and Atascadero pulled out of the county’s agreement, they’d be responsible for the already incurred costs of the future county shelter, which is still in design and planning phases. The county would then have to redesign its shelter to account for the fewer animals coming from North County cities. “The facility would shrink in size,” said county Assistant Administrative Officer Guy Savage. Its costs would shift onto the county and remaining participating cities. Savage added that he believed Paso and Atascadero would be better off financially by contracting with the county—if they wanted to provide a high level animal sheltering service. “If you compare similar levels of service, I believe you’d quickly find that staying with the county makes a lot more financial sense,” he said. Bourbeau, the Atascadero councilman, said the cities would be wise to explore a lower-service shelter in North County if it translated to a significantly lower cost. “It’s sure as heck worth investigating,” Bourbeau said. “We owe that to our citizens who are frankly forgoing other services if we stick to the county’s arrangement.” Δ —Peter Johnson


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www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 7


News BY CHRIS MCGUINNESS

In video veritas Footage of Andrew Holland’s death remains under wraps

D

espite a 13-year career in law enforcement, Brian Hedley said it was difficult to watch the video footage of Andrew Holland dying in a glass-walled cell at the SLO County jail. One of two private investigators hired by the Holland family’s attorney to dig into the 36-year-old schizophrenic man’s death, Hedley said he watched the footage multiple times. In total, he estimated he’s seen more than 100 hours of video related to the case. “I’ve seen him die at least 20 times,” Hedley told New Times. Hedley is one of a handful of people who have seen some or all of the footage documenting Holland’s Jan. 22 death, which occurred after he was strapped in a restraint chair for 46 hours. While the footage was viewed by Hedley, SLO County Sheriff’s Office investigators, multiple members of the Holland family, and at least one member of the SLO County Board of Supervisors, county officials have refused to release the footage to the media or the public, despite calls from Holland’s family to do so. That footage, the family claims, contains evidence showing that jail and medical staff failed to adhere to proper policy and procedure while he was in their care. “Once you have seen the video I challenge any of you to make the argument that Andrew’s death was not both needless and torturous,” Ron Holland, a member of Holland’s extended family, told members of the Board of Supervisors at an Aug. 22 meeting. According to Hedley, the footage of Holland’s death comes from multiple cameras inside the jail. The video is in color, but there is no sound. The footage Hedley reviewed began with Holland inside a solitary confinement cell at the SLO County Jail. That portion appears to show the selfharming behavior that sheriff’s officials said prompted them to remove Holland

and place him in the chair. “You can see him bringing his hands to his face,” Hedley said. “You can see some blood trickle down his face.” When correctional deputies removed Holland from his cell, Hedley said the footage shows he was compliant and noncombative, even voluntarily placing his hands through a food slot in the door so they could be handcuffed. The instance is one of several moments Hedley and members of Holland’s family point to as evidence of their claims that, throughout the ordeal, the mentally ill Holland did not attempt to fight the jail’s correctional staff, leading them to question why he was held in the chair for 46 hours. Hedley said that Holland remained compliant even as he was strapped into the restraint chair. “He sat in the chair just as if he was going to school,” Hedley said. In an email to New Times, SLO County 3rd District Supervisor Adam Hill said he also viewed portions of the footage and that it appeared Holland wasn’t combative toward the staff. “In the video footage I saw, he was removed from his cell because he was striking himself, hitting his face, and drawing blood,” Hill wrote. “After that footage he never seemed combative, but I did not see every minute, nor is there sound.” Hedley said he watched all 46 hours of footage of Holland strapped in the chair in a glass-walled holding cell in the jail’s intake area. Hedley characterized Holland’s state after the first five hours as “catatonic.” It is during this period that he and members of Holland’s family believe that jail staff failed to follow proper procedure to prevent blood clots from forming in Holland’s legs as a result of being seated for such a long period of time. According to the jail policy at the time, any inmate placed in restraints for more than two hours should receive rangeof-motion exercises, in which staff are supposed to move the inmate’s arms and legs for a minimum of 10 minutes every two hours. In response to questions from New Times made shortly after the circumstances of Holland’s death were made public, the Sheriff’s Office said that the custody

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8 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

restraint policy was followed properly. Hedley said the footage shows that the correctional deputies spent far less time moving Holland’s arms and legs. “Most of the time it’s 30 seconds a limb at the most,” he said. When asked by New Times about Hedley’s characterization of the time spent giving Holland the range-of-motion exercises, Hill said the description appeared to be accurate for the footage he viewed.

Final moments For Hedley, Hill, and the members of the Holland family, the last 20 minutes or so of Holland’s life is the most difficult part of the footage to watch. It begins with correctional deputies wheeling Holland into a second glasswalled cell and, according to Hedley, “unceremoniously dumping” him on its floor. Hedley says the footage clearly shows marks on Holland’s arms and legs where blood has pooled. He said that it is immediately clear that Holland is in medical distress. “From the second he hits the ground you can see he’s in agony,” Hedley said. “He curls up almost immediately.” While Holland is lying on the floor struggling to breath, Hedley said he was clearly visible to jail staff, claiming that the footage showed three to four correctional deputies watching him. At 5:08 p.m., Holland dies. “You see his arms go limp and he takes his final breath,” Hedley said. The deputies then enter the cell, drag Holland to the center of it by his limp arms, and begin CPR, according to Hedley. Later, as paramedics attempt to resuscitate Holland, Hedley alleged that the footage showed some correctional deputies in the cell laughing and joking. “It made my skin crawl,” Hedley said. Hedley’s description of the footage is similar to statements made by Sherry Roy, a 52-year-old inmate who filed a claim against the county in August, stating that she suffered emotional distress after witnessing Holland’s death in the jail. In her claim, Roy states that she observed correctional officers and jail staff talking and laughing “despite the dead man who lay in the cell.” Hill confirmed that the footage he watched showed two instances where jail staff may have been laughing or joking,

but indicated that what the footage showed was less clear-cut. “I am appalled that Andrew was left in the chair for so long, and I am appalled that he then died what appeared to be a very painful death after he was let out of the chair,” Hill said. “But this contention about joking and laughing is very hard to confirm without sound.” Since Holland’s death, neither the county nor the Sheriff’s Office announced any disciplinary action taken against any correctional staff involved in Holland’s death. The county’s legal counsel declined to comment on the content of the footage, stating that it was confidential and part of an ongoing FBI investigation. The county eventually agreed to a $5 million settlement with the Holland family. In the wake of the settlement, the county announced a number of changes to policy and procedure at the jail, including providing additional training for correctional officers and medical staff. The use of the restraint chair was permanently suspended. Thus far, the county has denied public records requests for the footage, citing that it’s exempt from disclosure because it could be classified as law enforcement security footage and because it’s part of an ongoing FBI investigation. Hedley and many members of the Holland family said they take issue with the county’s reasons, and they’ve called on the county to release the footage to the public. “San Luis Obispo County doesn’t want this public because it negates everything they said about what happened,” Hedley said. “The public needs to see this video.” Whatever the fate of the footage, members of Holland’s family have made it clear that they don’t plan to stop advocating for its public release any time soon. Many said as much to the Board of Supervisors at the Aug. 22 meeting. “You can either choose tackle this head-on by offering the public full disclosure and the changes it demands, bearing unnecessary discomfort along the way,” said Josh Holland, a cousin of Andrew Holland, “or continue to take half measures, refuse to acknowledge and speak the truth of this situation, and justifiably be held complicit by the people that entrusted you to your office.” ∆ Staff Writer Chris McGuinness can be reached at cmcguinness@newtimesslo.com.


News

Strokes&Plugs PHOTO BY KAREN GARCIA

Legal Notice

Do You Own or Work for a Fishing Business Affected by the 2015 Santa Barbara Oil Spill? You Could Be Part of a Class Action Lawsuit There is a class action lawsuit against Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. (“Plains Pipeline”). The Court ordered this notice and decided that this case should be a class action on behalf of a “Class,” or group of people. The Court has not decided that Plains Pipeline did anything wrong, and the parties have not reached a settlement. Rather, the case may go to trial. There is no money available now and no guarantee that there will be.

MOMENTUM The Platescrape is the first of many ideas that Nate Stein has grappled with to improve the food industry; he hopes to bring more of his ideas to life.

BY KAREN GARCIA

New concepts N ate Stein has his roots firmly planted in the food industry, working alongside his family to cater events. About seven years ago, his parents started Stein’s BBQ & Catering Co. At the end of the night, Stein was usually stuck cleaning hundreds of dishes. “One night, at a wedding at Still Waters Vineyards a couple of years back, I had a bus tub, a rag, and I was washing plates the exact same way I’d been doing it for the past four years,” he said. For Stein, the time spent on washing dishes took away from the time he could have been helping the rest of the crew clean up. He thought there had to be a more efficient way to wash the load. Nearing midnight, Stein went to Food 4 Less, stocked up on dollar toilet brush scrubbies, and went home to make a gadget that would make the process more efficient. About three years later and multiple prototypes thrown around, Platescrape was born. It’s a gray plastic tub that holds about 4 1/2 gallons of water with two black brushes that touch in the middle. When a plate in stuck between them, the thick and sturdy bristles capture excess grease left on a plate. The standard process for washing dishes at the end of the night, whether at a restaurant or catering event, boils down to the same thing: scrape off the food into the trash, spray the dish with pre-rinse water from a hose, send it to the dishwasher, and dry. Platescrape eliminates the need to use the pre-rinse hose. A dish is put right in between the brushes and into the water, getting rinsed of leftover residue. “I’ve washed about 600 plates with the same 4 gallons of water. It’s gross, but I felt extremely good about it because if I washed the same amount of plates the traditional way, I would have used about 70 to 80 gallons of water,” he said. Stein sent his product to the Food Service Technology Center (FSTC) —

an agency that tests the commercial kitchen energy efficiency and appliance performance—to see its efficiency. FSTC ran a test on the Platescrape and found that the tub saved 93 percent of water and 48 percent labor time. “All of that water that everybody is sitting there spraying off day in and day out is just going straight down the drain because those plates still have to go through the sanitation cycle,” he said. Aug. 28 marked the first day that Stein handed a couple of Platescrapes over in exchange for a check. The owner of Glenn’s Repair & Rental bought a few tubs and donated them to the Kiwanis club, believing that it will help them with cleanup during their events. Stein said he is hopeful that people will realize how efficient the Platescrape can be for their restaurants, catering events, and beyond. “My goal is to spread the word of our new product and help build a community in the food industry that’s doing our part to be mindful of water use,” he said. For now, Stein spends his evenings placing stickers on the tubs and packaging each and every Platescrape. To learn more about the Platescrape or to get a demo from Stein email him at nate.platescrape@gmail.com.

Fast fact • The San Luis Obispo Repertory Theatre received two grants from The Community Foundation San Luis Obispo County totaling $7,500. The funds will go toward scholarships for students participating in the theater’s Academy of Creative Theatre educational programs. It will also support the Repertory’s sound system upgrade. ∆ Staff Writer Karen Garcia wrote this week’s Strokes and Plugs. Send tips to strokesandplugs@newtimesslo.com.

What is this case about? This lawsuit claims that certain persons and businesses (and their employees) that fished for seafood in certain areas off the Central California Coast (“Commercial Fishers”) or that purchased and re-sold such seafood (“Fish Sellers”) suffered financial losses due to the May 19, 2015 Santa Barbara oil spill. Plains Pipeline denies these claims and denies it did anything wrong. The lawyers for the Class will have to prove their Claims in Court. If you have filed a claim directly with Plains under the Oil Pollution Act (“OPA”), or would like more information about doing so as a member of the class, please see the long form notice at the website address below for more details on your rights and options. Who’s included? You are included in the Class if you: • Are a person or business who owned or worked on a vessel (between May 19, 2010 and May 19, 2015 and in operation as of May 19, 2015) that landed: ° Seafood within the California Department of Fish & Wildlife fishing blocks 651 to 657, 664 to 671, and 681 to 683; or ° Groundfish (including sablefish, halibut, and rockfish) in fishing blocks 631 to 633, 637 to 639, 643 to 645, 658 to 659, and 684 to 690; or • Are a person or businesses (in operation as of May 19, 2015) that purchased and re-sold this commercial seafood at the retail or wholesale level. ° Only persons and businesses who purchased fish or seafood directly from the commercial fishers described above are included in the Class. Who represents the Class? The Court has appointed a group of attorneys to represent the Class as “Class Counsel.” You don’t have to pay Class Counsel or anyone else to participate. Class Counsel will seek fees and costs from the Court. Typically, lawyers are paid a percentage of the recovery obtained on behalf of the class or that amount is separately negotiated by the parties. You may hire your own lawyer to appear in Court for you, but if you do, you have to pay that lawyer. What are your options? To stay in the Class, you do not have to do anything. If Plaintiffs are successful, you will be notified about how to make an individual claim for money or benefits. If you want to keep your rights to sue Plains Pipeline on your own over claims or issues in this case, you need to exclude yourself. If you exclude yourself, you cannot get money or benefits from this lawsuit if any are awarded. The deadline to exclude yourself is October 27, 2017. You can find out how to exclude yourself at the website or by calling the toll-free number.

For more information: 1-888-684-6801 www.PlainsOilSpill.com www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 9


Homes on the range The Eagle Ranch proposal that spans 21 years waits on a fiscal analysis and allaying neighbors’ concerns BY ERICA HUDSON PHOTOS BY JAYSON MELLOM

ROLLING WITH THE PUNCHES For the last 21 years, Red Heesch has lived on top of the hill where San Diego and San Dimas roads meet. Since 2006, he’s followed Eagle Ranch, and is opposed to the annexation of the property into city limits.

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unlight glimmered off the large glass windows of the Lindal cedar home Red Heesch built in 1986. His greyish-blue eyes panned the horizon from his balcony, counting at least 36 different white, red, blue, black, and coastal live oaks that sink their roots deep into the golden ground of his front yard, where San Diego and San Dimas Road meet on a southwestern edge of Atascadero. Streams gush through creek swales on each end of his yard during the winter, washing leaves and grass down to Atascadero Lake through two pipes. Heesch said that it takes a couple of months for the streams to get started, but then, they run dry in the summer. On that hot day in August, crumbled rocks and boulders are all that remain of a wet winter. With one hand in the pocket of his jeans, he walks the perimeter of an agility course made for his two corgis, Lizzie and Tutti, to the dark metal fence that borders his property. Deer, wild turkeys, bobcats, coyotes, mountain lions, black bears, and cows occasionally wander along that barrier created to protect his companions from becoming a snack. Beyond that, thin wooden stakes are sprinkled like a breadcrumb trail, mapping out a potential road to the proposed commercial-residential development called Eagle Ranch. If it moves forward, those 36 oaks will be clear-cut from his yard to make way for a road near an easement on his property. The life he’s known for the last two decades would change. Heesch moved from Houston, Texas, to the Central Coast to teach graphic communications at Cal Poly. He moved to the top of his hill for solitude 21 years ago and stayed to spend his days with family. Eagle Ranch’s plans would crack into that peaceful existence, with more than 500

residential units, a hotel, a village center, and hiking trails proposed for the 3,000-plus acres behind the homes in his neighborhood. “What it does is hit every single neighborhood in the vicinity with some kind of intrusion, and what it does for the neighbors, their families, and everything else … it makes a freeway out of San Rafael [Road],” Heesch said. The space beyond his driveway is identified as a future road, running from the west side of the ranch to Highway 101. San Diego Road, which currently hits a dead end in front of his house, is planned to be extended through to the other side of the development. San Rafael Road, a few neighborhoods east, could become a shortcut for Eagle Ranch residents to access highways 101 and 41. Heesch and his neighbors with homes bordering the ranch expressed concerns about the traffic congestion from potentially thousands of new residents driving down windy, sharp roads like San Diego. “How can any road be constructed there because of the terrain, and what is this going to do to my front yard?” said Heesh, who’s had those questions since 2006, when he first found out about the project. But until further notice, neighbors have nothing to worry about. This June, developers put the project on hold, giving city staff a rain check on the nearly 20year conversation around annexing the county property to the city. The Eagle Ranch team asked Atascadero City Council to place the annexation proposal on pause while they figure out the fiscal impacts of the project. The city says in order for the development to move forward, the residential portion can’t cost Atascadero any money—as in, the fees and taxes collected from the properties have to pay for the city services that would be provided to them. But a financial plan

10 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

hasn’t been completed yet. In the meantime, city staff and hired environmental consultants FirstCarbon Solutions are composing responses to the controversial draft environmental impact report released this February. The city received more than 200 comments on the report, according to Callie Taylor, senior planner for the Community Development Department of Atascadero. Some of those comments are sentences long, while others are lengthy reviews of the document, like the 200 pages submitted on behalf of the Atascadero Neighborhood Alliance. Heesch is the president of the alliance, a local nonprofit that formed in opposition to Eagle Ranch. “The city of Atascadero provides a unique rural character and quality of life for its citizens and guests. We are committed to preserving and enhancing the city of Atascadero. To that end we endorse responsible growth that maintains revenue responsibility, respects the environment, pays to build and maintain needed infrastructure, and adheres to the city general plan,” the alliance states on its website. “The alliance, in order to preserve and enhance the city of Atascadero, is opposed to the annexation of the proposed Eagle Ranch project as it does not conform to the city of Atascadero general plan.”

Out with the old

What was once only blueprints of a utopian colony, fusing urban and rural lifestyles, is today’s Atascadero: a city made from a 23,000-acre cattle ranch purchased by E.G. Lewis. He was a magazine publisher who created his dream city to house his pre-suffrage organization, the American Women’s Republic. In 1913, Lewis drafted the original colony map, laying out roughly 452 colony lots and unbuilt roadways on Eagle Ranch, according to Atascadero Community

Development Director Phil Dunsmore. Those lots could be developed today, but only if they are developed as the original lots laid out by Lewis. “It was [1913] when this project was approved,” Dunsmore said, adding that the Atascadero Municpal Water company also gave water rights to those 452 lots. “They could build those lots today. They would have a burden on the city in terms of the fact that we wouldn’t have mitigation to do a lot of the road and infrastructure improvements that we want, and they would be destroying a lot of potential open space resources and trees.” As it stands, the current proposal for Eagle Ranch includes incorporating its roughly 3,457 acres into the city, with up to 494 single-family residential lots, 93 multifamily units, a resort, a shopping center, and 15.2 acres of commercial highway space. That property is owned by the Smiths, who in 1999 filed for a notice of nonrenewal on the property’s Williamson Act contract, a renewable 10-year agreement to maintain the property as agricultural in exchange for tax breaks. The contract expired in 2009, making the land eligible for residential and commercial development. The city’s general plan identified Eagle Ranch as a future annexation area in 2002, and the SLO Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) marked Eagle Ranch as within the city’s sphere of influence in 2003, meaning that the physical boundaries of the ranch are within the Atascadero city government’s influence. In 2008, after years of conceptual designs, the City Council authorized city staff to process an application for the specific plan—addressing developmental standards, infrastructure requirements, implementation efforts and land uses, and a draft environmental impact


report (EIR)—identifying the potential environmental effects of pursuing a proposed development. Those documents were finally released for public comment earlier this year. It is the fifth version on the table, according to Vic Montgomery of RRM Design Group, the main applicant on the project. “It’s taken a long time. But we’ve actually prepared about five draft specific plans, and this is the final version of it,” said Montgomery, who was authorized to speak on behalf of the developers. The almost 10 years between authorization and the most recent draft of the development’s plan consisted of meetings, City Council and Planning Commission hearings, and negotiating with neighbors who have homes bordering the ranch. Throughout the process, those living next to the ranch have provided feedback on what they’d like to see beyond their backyards. “We’ve been doing this long enough to know that neighborhood controversy is part of the gig these days. You might as well go talk to your neighbors early on, see what they’re thinking, talk about what you want to do, and get their feedback, because you’re going to get it sooner or later when you go to public hearings. It’s better to have talked to them and worked it out,” Montgomery said. However, the Atascadero Neighborhood Alliance doesn’t quite feel like all of the questions it raised were answered. In the review the alliance submitted on the draft EIR, the group comments that the project description is “vague and inadequate,” doesn’t demonstrate fiscal neutrality, and lacks “biological resource impact analyses.” The alliance points to these as some of the main reasons not to annex Eagle Ranch to Atascadero. “The alliance requests that the city suspend any further consideration of the project until a draft EIR that fully discloses, analyzes, and attempts to mitigate the impacts of the project has been prepared and recirculated for public review and comment. The alliance objects to any further action by the city on the project until the necessary and proper environmental review has been completed,” the alliance’s comments state.

Urban sprawl, rural feel With one hand on a large blueprint of Eagle Ranch, Montgomery traced his finger over the lime green areas colorcoded as open space. “As proposed, almost 74 percent of the ranch is preserved open space. To my knowledge, one of the highest percentages of open space for a project in the county,” Montgomery said. The ranch would consist of more than 2,000 acres of open space, 16.9 miles of hiking trails, and access to property that’s been off-limits to the public since 1913. Additionally, an agricultural easement agreement with The Land Conservancy of SLO County permanently preserves 3,255 acres neighboring Eagle Ranch as ag land and open space—marking the largest conservation easement donated to the conservancy. This easement includes 36 parcels, Eagle Peak, Eagle Lake, and numerous Salinas River tributaries, such as Paloma Creek. Regardless of those plans to maintain the area’s rural character, community members have criticized the development’s specific plan for not being detailed enough about how it will mitigate the potential environmental impacts. One of the criticisms is that the plan defers mentioning specific mitigation efforts to a later date. Additionally, some residents are concerned that the draft EIR uses old data in its environmental analysis of

“The city’s requirement is they want it to impacts such as air quality be revenue neutral without the commercial or biological resources, development. That is a high bar, because when more recent data is available. the city’s police and fire services are so Traffic is another expensive. So we were looking at what major concern. Two major impact that has on the homeowner’s entrances are proposed association, or the homeowners who are for the ranch as well as a ultimately going to be paying for it,” network of interior roads Montgomery said. providing access from the In an April 16 opinion piece published ranch to highways 101 and in the San Luis Obispo Tribune, Eagle 41. Two emergency access Ranch owners Greg and Jeff Smith stated roads are also proposed that the development will be revenue within the area. To keep up neutral for the city. But a fiscal plan wasn’t with Cal Fire standards, started for the project until just before those roads would have to developmers placed the project on hold, be paved, at least 50-feet according to Community Development wide, and able to hold a 10Director Dunsmore. ton fire truck. “[The Fiscal Impact Analysis] hasn’t One of the emergency been going on for very long. It’s a separate roads is slated to be built document. The specific plan itself puts out near Heesch’s Lindal cedar a great design plan,” Dunsmore said. “But house, but the existing a fiscal analysis, just on a bigger definition, right-of-way is quite steep. what it comes down to is a best guess of what In the West San Diego road kind of revenue the project will bring in, and neighborhood where Heesch what kind of costs the project will entail on lives, there’s currently only public services and taxation and all the like.” one way in and out of the Upon annexation, the city would take on ranch. the responsibility for funding services to “The fire department Eagle Ranch. doesn’t like that. So the A joint City Council-Planning Commission city said, ‘As part of your meeting in 2012 referred to a fiscal plan project, you need to solve being drafted to determine the project’s that problem for us, because financial impact on the city. The meeting’s we can’t find a way to minutes state that the study’s preliminary require right of way to results found that residential “property create a second way in and taxes alone are insufficient to cover the out,’” Montgomery said. added ongoing cost of city services to serve MAJOR ROAD AHEAD Beyond the fence bordering Although it will be Eagle the additional population at Eagle Ranch.” Ranch residents who would Heesch’s property, developers identified a future road to be City staff discussed renegotiating the constructed for Eagle Ranch, connecting West San Diego have to pay for the costs of property tax split between the city and the Road on the other side of the development. road maintenance through county (1/3 to the city, 2/3 to the county) a homeowners’ association, in 2012, but it’s unclear whether that will Ranch developers are having trouble neighbors like Heesch are be pursued. Developers are currently deciding what should be built first. A still wary about thousands of new cars looking at community finance districts, project that is solely residential can strain using their streets as shortcuts to the homeowners’ associations, or a combination city services if it isn’t being neutralized ranch and the state highways. He said the of the two to deal with the city’s costs. by property taxes. Developers say that windy roads near his home are prone to “That’s all tangled up with ... how accidents, and roads in Atascadero already the hotel and resort will be a lucrative you make it work when you have all need repairs. source of profit for the city, but the city is of this infrastructure that you need,” Heesch’s home is also in a high hazard requiring that the residential phases of the Montgomery said. “It’s sort of back to the landslide area. If developers build a road project be revenue neutral for Atascadero. economics drawing board.” ∆ near his home, the steep ground beyond Without the funds anticipated from his yard would have to be filled in to commercial components of the project, Reach New Times editorial intern Erica create a level roadway. He believes that developers are left “in a sticky spot,” Hudson through the editor at clanham@ the topography and geology near his home Montgomery said. newtimesslo.com. would make it “damn near impossible” to build a road that’s safe to use in URBAN OAK FOREST Adjacent to Los Padres National Forest, Atascadero emergencies. is home to sprawling hills of oak savanna, California sycamores, and chaparral. “If this is such a valuable access to the ranch, why did the city and fire department allow this house to go … for sale to a private ownership?” Heesch said about his home. “That puts you into the fire, that doesn’t take you out.”

Economics of growth

When the development is taken off hold, environmental consultants and city staff are required to address every comment in writing for the final EIR. The fiscal impact analysis will then be sent out for public review, and if developers can reach an agreement on moving forward, LAFCO will annex the property into city limits. The project is scheduled to be built in 10 phases over 20 years. But, according to RRM’s Montgomery, the Eagle www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 11


Opinion BY PATRICK FORD

➤ Letters [14] ➤ Street talk [15] ➤ Rhetoric & Reason [16] ➤ Shredder [17]

Commentary

BY BEKI BEAUCHAMP

A home in South County Fighting for public land A proposal to provide adequate, inexpensive shelter for SLO County’s homeless

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ince retiring two years ago, I’ve volunteered at the Food Bank of San Luis Obispo County in Oceano, the South County People’s Kitchen in Grover Beach, and the 5 Cities Homeless Coalition Warming Center in Arroyo Grande. Through this experience, I have come to know some of our local homeless people and I think gained a greater understanding of their needs. This experience has also been the impetus for writing this letter in support of a homeless shelter that would fit those needs and be acceptable to the residents of this county. Whether or not you have any personal experience with the plight of the homeless, we are reminded on an ongoing basis of some of the unfortunate aspects of homelessness such as panhandling, loitering, and acting out. To some extent, homelessness affects us all and it is in all of our interests that the issue of inadequate shelter for the homeless in this county be addressed. Over the past year, most of the homeless encampments in the South County have been closed, which has left our homeless population reeling in an attempt to find safe shelter. To compound the problem, the 5 Cities Homeless Coalition’s winter warming center in Arroyo Grande, which accommodated up to 50 people on cold and/or rainy nights, will not be available this winter. While the coalition has worked tirelessly to procure winter shelter, including partnering with our local churches, this strategy appears to be compromised

HODIN

for three reasons. First, the majority of the homeless population in South County resides within a half a mile of the coast. According to a 2015 point-intime demographic analysis conducted by SLO County in conjunction with HUD, 258 homeless people resided in the South County and 86 percent of these individuals traveled by bicycle or on foot. Churches interested in helping are located up to 5 miles from the coast. Second, while many homeless people own dogs for companionship and protection, the warming center has been incapable of accommodating pets. Third, many people do not use the warming center because they fear their belongings will be stolen while they are at the shelter. Consequently, up to 80 percent of our South County homeless endure the rain and cold. Providing adequate shelter for the homeless is not only humanitarian, it must be done before the societal aspects and root causes of homelessness can be addressed. Moreover, providing adequate shelter is cost effective. The housing first project in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada, has no conditions of sobriety or selfimprovement and yet has demonstrated that a reduction in days of incarceration alone pays for their program. Other Canadian studies indicate that it is much less costly to taxpayers to house someone and pay retention support than to pay the relatively staggering SHELTER continued page 14

Russell Hodin

12 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

We must continue to speak up for Carrizo Plain

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hen I was a child, I lived for my summers spent on the Central Coast. I’d spend the school year dreaming of beaches and beautiful weather as dreary rains carried on outside, and I’d count the days until I’d get to hike and bike with my family on California’s extraordinary public lands. My father made the decision to make this dream our reality 15 years ago when he bought the Kaleidoscope Inn. We now run the bed and breakfast together, making it our family business to provide experiences like I had as a child. Hundreds of visitors come through the inn every year looking to our protected public lands as a destination for rest and respite. Scenic and recreational attractions like Carrizo Plain National Monument are not just the foundation for my wonderful quality of life—they’re the backbone of my business and the local economy. That’s why I’m alarmed by the Trump administration’s recent review of our beloved Carrizo Plain and other national monuments. It’s frightening enough that the administration is trying to strip protections from these important natural, cultural, historic, and scientific sites. But the review process has also been marked by a complete lack of transparency, and that is simply unacceptable. On Aug. 24, the Department of the Interior issued a summary of the national monument review that contained no information about how and which national monuments would be impacted. An incredible 2.8 million Americans took time out of their busy lives to raise their voices and participate in the process,

and they are being left in the dark about this sham review. The public deserves to see the full recommendations prepared by Department of the Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and his team. Businesses like mine count on the permanency of these protections to fuel tourism and outdoor recreation—decisions that could threaten our livelihoods need to remain visible and well within our purview. By threatening protections for our public lands and withholding information from the American people, the administration shows it’s willing to play games with local economies and the communities that depend on them. It’s safe to say that a large portion of the businesses in San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara counties rely on tourism dollars to survive and that Carrizo Plain has a huge impact on the economy around here. And while I’ve seen it firsthand in my own community, I’ve learned that this is the case across the board for regions adjacent to a national monument. A 2017 study by nonpartisan Headwaters Economics found that the regional economies adjacent to 17 national monuments, including Carrizo Plain, all experienced growth following the national monument’s designation. Travelers come through our inn for so many different reasons, most aimed at experiencing the natural beauty of the Central Coast. People come to hike, bike, or catch glimpses of astonishing birds that soar over Carrizo Plain. Even guests who don’t come here specifically to visit CARRIZO PLAIN continued page 14


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Opinion SHELTER from page 12

cost of homelessness. In the U.S., this strategy has found most striking success in reducing homelessness among military veterans in New Orleans, Las Vegas, Phoenix, and Salt Lake City. Studies in the U.S. indicate that based on generally poorer health than the general population, the average hospital stay for a homeless person is four days longer than the norm. Other costs of homelessness include ER visits secondary to wintertime respiratory infections and other exposure-related disorders. The state of California has appropriated $2 billion and the state Legislature has earmarked $400 million, all for affordable housing. How can a portion of this money be most efficaciously allocated to provide basic shelter for the greatest number of our homeless population? The state has vast land holdings and should strongly consider making land available to shelter the homeless. A prime example in the South County is an area comprising hundreds of acres of land located immediately south of Grand Avenue in Grover Beach, between the Pacific Coast Highway and the ocean. In this area, there is a secluded 5- to 6-acre parcel located on level ground that is not visible from the highway or the ocean and would conceivably be an ideal location for a year round en masse homeless shelter. Basic, inexpensive A-frame structures could be erected that would serve to protect numbers of homeless people from the elements, allow them to pitch their tents, have a modicum of privacy, and

Letters

This Week’s Online Poll Vote at www.newtimesslo.com

How should the city of Atascadero handle marijuana?

regarding this endeavor and take swift action. Winter is soon approaching. ∆

57% Fully embrace it. I want dispensaries and delivery services just like Grover Beach.

Patrick Ford is retired in Pismo Beach and volunteers in the Five Cities. Respond in a letter to the editor by sending it to letters@newtimesslo.com.

17% Atascadero has bigger problems than marijuana. Why are we wasting our time on this issue? 16% Let’s take a measured approach and just allow delivery services. No dispensaries! 10% Keep that “wacky tobaccy” out of my city! I support a total ban. 99 Votes

keep their pets and personal belongings with them. While this area along the coast is ecologically sensitive, it is my impression that given the opportunity, people inhabiting this area would have a vested interest in preserving the integrity of this land. If this area is untenable for an en masse homeless encampment, perhaps the state could select an area in this general locale that would be acceptable. I can assure you that any attempt to coerce or entice the homeless to move inland will result in failure. The provision of land and a yearround shelter for the homeless should be a top priority for the state. I urge all citizens to contact the Select Committee on Homelessness in Sacramento. I implore all the state, county, and local government officials to become proactive

CARRIZO PLAIN from page 12

the monument end up being drawn to it, especially during the springtime when the hillsides burst with vibrant blooms. We regularly help guests drawn to the region for R&R, wine tasting, or even a destination wedding to create a mini road trip adventure through the plains, breathtaking roads, and beyond. People can come here knowing nothing about our extraordinary national monument and end up completely enchanted by it. As the region has become more and more popular, the booming tourist economy has provided a slew of jobs and opportunities for residents. A study from Headwaters Economics shows that in 2015, tourism and travel provided 53,354 jobs in the communities surrounding Carrizo Plain. Carrizo and other public lands are also tremendous drivers of our state’s outdoor recreation economy, generating approximately 691,000 jobs and $92 billion in consumer spending each year. The current administration needs to look at these national monuments for their economic value and see that this review just doesn’t make sense. Secretary Zinke recognizes that the comments received were “overwhelmingly

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in favor of maintaining existing monuments,” and I hope that his recommendations reflect this support. I urge Central Coast residents to send a tweet to President Trump (@POTUS) and Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke (@SecretaryZinke) and tell them you support public lands and oppose any changes to Carrizo Plain and other national monuments. As a young girl, I never dreamed I’d have to fight for a place with so many gifts. But I am, and we must—my business, our economy, and the future of our protected public lands depend on it. ∆ Beki Beauchamp is innkeeper, manager, and events coordinator of the Kaleidoscope Inn in Nipomo. Send comments through the editor at clanham@newtimesslo.com or write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@newtimesslo.com.

Fuel of the future

The Sierra Club (“Ready for 100 percent renewable energy,” Aug. 31) is after me (“Mathematical conundrum,” Aug. 17), but I am not too worried about that. After all, you are talking about an organization that not too long ago got caught taking some $28 million directly from the natural gas industry, ostensibly to assist in their anti-coal campaign, which, of course, would have been of direct benefit to the natural gas industry. Obviously, Sierra Club’s continuation of its irrational anti-nuclear policy could only LETTERS continued page 15

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Opinion LETTERS from page 14

help to cement this unlikely partnership, since it would also be a direct benefit to the natural gas industry. The Sierra Club was also expected to promote natural gas as a flawed but necessary “bridge fuel” since there were no other alternatives … except maybe nuclear. The organization has since disavowed future partnerships with oil and gas interests, at least any that could be detected, but continues to maintain its anti-nuclear policy. After all, it is based on irrational fear, and fear is a big seller. I cannot help but note that critics of my piece simply announce that my findings are wrong, but they never offer anything in the way of facts to prove it. They simply refer to a vague panoply of wondrous, pure, and non-carbon emitting technologies (biofuels?) that is somehow going to save the day. You can take their word for it if you like, but thanks to organizations like the Sierra Club, I am fairly certain that natural gas will be the fuel of the future in California whether you like it or not. Mark Henry San Luis Obispo

A warning from Houston A Natural Resources Defense Council simulation of a severe accident at Diablo Canyon shows a southbound radioactive plume extending from Avila to Santa Barbara, illustrating that evacuation via Highway 101 south isn’t realistic. In 2013, a U.S. Government Accountability Office Congressional report raised concerns that unauthorized

“shadow” evacuations would impede those under evacuation orders. Many told to “shelter-in-place” would resist complying, unaware that the rate of air exchange in a closed, moving car greatly exceeds that in a closed house, increasing the risk of inhaling radioactive particles. An official at our county’s Office of Emergency Services conceded that evacuations planned for our highways aren’t workable. Nonetheless, “shelteringin-place” training isn’t being offered to help residents lower risks during acute emergencies, such as a release of toxic chemicals from derailed tankers or a radioactive cloud from Diablo Canyon. My public statements in 2016 to the SLO City Council and County Board of Supervisors and the Diablo Canyon Independent Safety Committee have been met with chilly silence. Resistance to more realistic emergency planning subjects county residents to even greater hazards now that Diablo Canyon is preparing to shut down—a risky stage, as other U.S. nuclear plants being decommissioned have saved funds by deferring replacement of failing components. Milt Carrigan San Luis Obispo

Street talk What’s your favorite way to beat the heat?

John and Donna Muller retired “We love it. We don’t even live here; it’s a little cooler in Los Osos.”

Jackie W. business owner “It doesn’t really bother me.”

Kathy Martin rental owner “Luckily we have air conditioning.”

Isaac Dixon finance “Getting ice cream.”

letters

Please include your name and town. Keep letters to 250 words. Send them to New Times Letters, 1010 Marsh St., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, or email to letters@newtimesslo. com. All letters become the property of New Times. We reserve the right to edit for length and clarity. Published letters appear and are archived on the New Times website as well as in print.

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Opinion

Rhetoric&Reason

BY KRISTINE HAGEN

The right answer Labor unions shouldn’t be considered a thing of the past

O

ver Labor Day weekend, I spoke with Firefighter Erik Baskin about his experience leading the SLO City Firefighter’s union, the IAFF Local 3523. He said that unions have been losing ground politically since he joined two decades ago, even though a recent Gallup poll found that 60 percent of Americans approve of them. Erik explained why unions wield less power now than in the past. “Citizens United and the right-wing agenda are killing us,” he said. “Corporations like Walmart and the Koch Enterprises now spend millions on a single political race. They back candidates who are anti-union, and, as powerful as we once were, we can’t keep up with that kind of money. Our political donations come out of our own pockets.” Erik also lamented the fact that rookies increasingly question whether to join the union. “Often, it is a crisis that pulls us together,” he said. I thought about Erik’s comment the next day while attending the Democratic Party’s Labor Day picnic in Arroyo Grande. Images of Rosie the Riveter, the event’s theme, were emblazoned on

posters hanging in nearby trees. Rosie seemed a fitting guest. She served as the symbol of women joining the workforce to build tanks and aid in the fight against the Nazis. Nearby, kids colored pictures of Rosie while their parents hummed along to a live rendition of Woody Guthrie’s “This Land is Our Land.” As I served tri-tip and beans to 400 happy picnickers, U.S Rep. Salud Carbajal (D-Santa Barbara) and other volunteers at my side, I wondered if any of us could ever fathom the sacrifices early labor activists made on our behalf. Workers have been fighting—and dying—for humane working conditions since the Industrial Revolution. In the United States, the first labor organizers were killed by our own federal troops. More were killed in Chicago’s Haymarket Square while demonstrating for an eight-hour workday. Thirty Pullman employees died protesting unfair pay and living conditions: Those workers were required to pay rent to live in companyowned houses, even when Pullman cut their pay. They couldn’t make ends meet. The company had engineered a cycle of poverty that was impossible to escape. As recently as this last century, poor children worked 70 hours per week in mines and textile mills. More than a hundred teenagers and young girls died in a sweatshop fire in New York.

Matchstick factory workers’ jaws grew deformed and eventually rotted from exposure to toxic chemicals. Today, children of immigrants living in the U.S. on work visas are unprotected by our child labor laws. Postal workers and teachers skip meals and water so they can time bathroom breaks according to arcane workplace restrictions. Former company towns, like Flint, Michigan, poison citizens with lead-tainted water. What explains industry’s profound disregard for workers? Greed. The fallacy of the so-called “free market” is etched into every labor activist’s gravestone. The only real trickle-down is the tears they shed. But when profits disconnect from people, people can absorb only so much cruelty. Eventually, there is a backlash. As soldiers were marching to break up the Pullman boycott, a Methodist minister said it best. He called government leaders “pliant tools of the codfish-monied aristocracy who seek to dominate this country,” having abandoned “the rights of the people against aggression and oppressive corporations.” Let’s not delude ourselves that labor unions are a thing of the past. Indeed, the type of union that we need now is something larger, something country-wide. Even with two incomes, families can’t earn enough to make ends meet. Investment groups are buying wide swaths of real estate and forming new versions of the company town. The current minimum wage ensnares people in poverty. Most of us— conservatives, liberals, and independents—

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Kristine Hagen is a member of the SLO County Democratic Party and the SLO County Progressives Democratic Club. Send comments through the editor at clanham@newtimesslo.com or write a letter to the editor and email it to letters@newtimesslo.com.

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are subjugated by the aristocracy. Unions should serve as the new model for how we face the punishing inequities that we all feel. We need to walk alongside our labor leaders and union members. They’ve been in the trenches for hundreds of years and know how to organize. During our talk, Erik also mentioned a hot-button topic for many Californians: service year-based pension benefits. “The problem is, pension incentive calculations are complicated and don’t fit in a sound bite,” he said. “Unfortunately, most firefighters struggle when they retire, because our health care benefits stop at retirement. The pending California health care-for-all bill, SB 562, would be fantastic for middle-class workers like me.” I know I’m not alone in wanting a battalion of experienced firefighters to help me in an emergency. Plus, pension incentives prevent costly turnover. I asked what our community can do to help. “Next year’s midterm elections are key,” Erik warned. “We need to stick to basics. Labor and the middle class are hurting. Let’s get candidates who help people, even if we need to go up against the Koch Brothers. Human dignity is the right answer, always.” ∆

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What’s Your Take? This week’s online poll 9/7 – 9/14

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What do you think should happen to undocumented immigrants currently protected by DACA? m They should be able to stay; these individuals are an asset to the local culture and economy. m We should keep the “Dreamers” we have and not allow any more people in the program. m They should be sent back where they came from; they’re stealing our jobs.

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16 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

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Opinion

The Shredder

Inclusive inaction

A

re you ready for a little game? It’s one you used to watch on TV as a kid. It’ll be fun. I promise. You can even sing it! One of these things is not like the others: Cuesta College, UC Santa Barbara, CSU Monterey Bay, and Cal Poly. Can you guess which one? Cuesta College denounced President Donald Undoing-Everything-MyPredecessor-Did-Because-I-Have-NoOther-Agenda Trump’s Sept. 5 decision to end the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program, which enabled undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children— known as “Dreamers”—to live, work, and get an education without the threat of being deported. The executive order signed by, you guessed it, awesome-sauce former President Barack Obama, protected 800,000 immigrant youth. “They are in school, and working hard. They are our friends, our classmates, our co-workers and neighbors. They are Cuesta College students,” Cuesta Assistant Superintendent/Vice President of Student Services Mark Sanchez said in a statement. Well said, Sanchez. Dreamers also got a shout out of support from UC Santa Barbara Chancellor Henry T. Yang, who said, “We are proud of the dedication, perseverance, and remarkable achievements of our DACA students.” Yang also said the university

planned to advocate for students when conferring with elected representatives in Washington, D.C., who are now tasked with the insurmountable: Come up with bipartisan legislation that does what Trump just said he’s undoing. CSU Monterey Bay plastered its opinion on the university’s home page, “CSUMB welcomes their DACA students with a safe campus environment,” alongside a link to Undocumented Student Support Services. That department’s page has a banner that reads “UNAFRAID & UNAPOLOGETIC.” Can you figure out the odd educational institution in the bunch yet? Fine! I’ll tell you: It’s definitely Cal Poly. On Sept. 5, Cal Poly President Jeffrey Armstrong tweeted that he was “Proud to be a smoke free campus!” Hey undocumented students who may not be able to get an education in six months, Armstrong cares more about smoking than he does about what’s going to happen to you! Don’t worry though, he cared enough to re-tweet other people’s support. You know what he didn’t do? Create an original 140-word statement that expressed either his or the university’s opinion on the policy reversal. Cal Poly—infamous for its lack of diversity and inclusivity—was mum on the policy decision that could affect some of its students. Not surprised? Yeah, me neither. The university hired a new vice president

and chief officer for diversity and inclusion, Josephine “Jozi” De Leon, and they still won’t let New Times interview her. She started on July 10, and a Cal Poly spokesperson told our Staff Writer Peter Johnson in August that De Leon still needs time to get up to speed and “develop her vision.” But she spent nine years as the vice president of equity and inclusion at the University of New Mexico! In my not-at-all humble opinion, she can totally speak as an expert on what Cal Poly needs to do with its “diversity and inclusion” policies. She can start by talking about the 174-point “diversity and inclusion action plan” Cal Poly released last year. How’s that bit of buzzword-filled nonsense going, guys? How long does it take to get up to speed? Six months? That’s how long Congress has to pass legislation before the new DeporterIn-Chief will begin enforcement actions against Dreamers. If I were them, I wouldn’t hold my breath, because the crew of misfits we’ve elected are only good at talking shit about each other. Team America—the Senate, House of Representatives, and president—doesn’t know how to make our government function. It’s about as efficient as Paso Robles’ and Atascadero’s city councils, which can’t seem to make any decisions in a timely manner. The latest and greatest waffling comes after the cities already signed onto a contract with every other municipality in the county and the county itself to pay for

and build a badly needed animal shelter. So why are Paso and Atascadero choosing now to consider pulling out of the project? “We’re not satisfied at all with the costs,” Atascadero City Councilmember Charles Bourbeau told New Times. But, when the council voted to participate in the contract in February, it was cool? The steep $14.8 million price tag is old news at this point. It wasn’t a hidden cost. Now, Atascadero and Paso Robles are both feeling skittish and considering creating a facility all on their own. A North County shelter could provide a “lower level of service” than the county shelter, and restrict the type of animals that could be accepted! So take dogs and not cats, maybe? Even though feral cats are a major issue in North County? Where do the other animals go? The county shelter? If the cities decide to go rogue, it sends the county and its five other cities back to the drawing board, sinking even more planning costs into a project that’s already been stretched out over the years due to waffling over whether to retrofit the old facility or build a new one. Team America needs a new one, too. I say we tear the whole thing down and start over again. Maybe we can borrow Cal Poly’s 174-point plan. We’ll need some buzz words to get things right on this next go-round. ∆ The Shredder prides himself on diversity and inclusion, and never grants immunity. Send comments to shredder@newtimesslo.com.

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GLAZE OF GLORY

SEPT. 7 – SEPT. 14 2017

L.A. rockers Cherry Glazerr, who released their sophomore album Apocalipstick earlier this year, will play SLO Brew on Sept. 18 at 10 p.m., with Winter opening the show. Tickets are $12 and are available via slowbrew.com. For ages 18 and up. —Trever Dias

PHOTO COURTESY OF JOHNNY KENNY

SPECIAL EVENTS N O R T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

AVOCADO AND MARGARITA STREET FESTIVAL Festival includes food, drink, live music, arts and crafts, and specialty vendors. Sept. 9, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. $5-$7. 805-772-4467. avomargfest. com/. Embarcadero Morro Bay, 714 Embarcadero, Morro Bay.

CALIFORNIA WINE MONTH AT VINA ROBLES WINERY Three summer wines served alongside three expertly paired seasonal offerings created by Executive Chef Randal Torres. Fridays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Sept. 30 $20 retail | $15 club members. 805-227-4812. vinarobles.com/events/ California-Wine-Month1. Vina Robles Winery, 3700 Mill Rd., Paso Robles. NORTH SLO COUNT Y

BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS All are welcome.

SAVING THE STEELHEAD Attendees are then invited to join printmaker Helen K Davie in creating an artistic spawning run by embellishing prints of Steelhead Trout using watercolor, markers, and collage. Sept. 16, 1-9 p.m. free. 805-238-9800. Studios on the Park, 1130 Pine St., Paso Robles, studiosonthepark.org.

TASTE OF THE GROVE All-inclusive farm-to-table pairing with area farmers and local chefs to present tantalizing avocado-themed dishes. Sept. 8, 5-8 p.m. $75. 805.772.4467. avomargfest.com/taste-of-thegrove/. Packing Shed, 1360 Atascadero Rd., Morro Bay. S A N L U I S O B IS P O

THE BIG BLOCK PARTY Celebrating 150 years in SLO. Feature service with Bishop Mary Gray-Reeves, food, live music, kid’s activities, and a raffle. Tour the church and learn it’s history. Sept. 10, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. 805-543-7212. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 1344 Nipomo St., San Luis Obispo.

Pets should be on leash or in a carrier. Each will receive an individual blessing. Sept. 10, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. 805-466-9108. atascaderoucc.org. Community Church of Atascadero, 5850 Rosario Ave., Atascadero.

INSPIRED HOME & GARDEN EXPO View pop-up rooms, for ideas and inspiration to make a change and discover new products and services. Sept. 16, 10 a.m.5 p.m. and Sept. 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. 805-7724600. inspiredexpos.com. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

CRYSTALS AND STONES FOR SERVICE #4, MEDITATION Wendy McKenna will provide

SAN LUIS OBISPO HEART & STROKE WALK

participants with tools and an understanding of how to use crystals and stones. Please bring one stone and one crystal that you would like to learn more about. Sept. 16, 4-8 p.m. $40. 805-3057595. lightshare.us. Lightshare Center, 22701 El Camino Real, Santa Margarita.

FALL FAMILY FUN FEST Free classes all day and discounts for those who register for classes during the event. Plus Paso fire fighters and police with vehicles, inflatable fire truck slide, free balloon creations, orange pumpkin slushies, hot dogs, popcorn bar, inflatable basketball, Paso Rocks art activity, and more. Sept. 9, 11 a.m.3 p.m. Free. 805-237-3988. prcity.com/ government/departments/recreation/ index.asp. Centennial Park, 600 Nickerson Dr., Paso Robles. MORE THAN HONEY SCREENING AND MEAD TASTING An evening of education about the global phenomenon of disappearing bees in California and beyond. Features a talk, slide show, mead tasting, and film screening. Sept. 9, 3:30-9 p.m. Free; $8 per glass.. 805-238-9800. Studios on the Park, 1130 Pine St., Paso Robles, studiosonthepark.org.

Join us in the fight to end heart disease. Bring your employees, family, and friends to enjoy a non competitive walk/run, survivor miracle mile, kids zone, health and wellness expo, VIP tent and much more. Sept. 16, 9 a.m. 805-979-5283. SLOheartwalk.com. Avila Beach Promenade & Bob Jones Trail, 410 Front Street, San Luis Obispo. S O U T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

at the Wittenberg Kiosk. Rain cancels event. Sept. 17, 9 a.m.-noon Park day use fee $10 per vehicle.. 805-788-2381. Lopez Lake, 6800 Lopez Dr., Arroyo Grande.

KIDS FREE FISHING CLINIC All equipment needed is provided and everyone gets a chance to fish. The clinic is held at the Nature Center near the Marina. Rain cancels event. For ages 16 and under. Sept. 16, 9-midnight Park day use $10 per vehicle. Lopez Lake, 6800 Lopez Dr., Arroyo Grande.

MASTERS OF THE NIGHT: OWL CALL HIKE Join the Ranger for guided night hike. Moderate to easy, dress warm, wear sturdy shoes, and bring water. Meet at Wittenberg Kiosk. Rain cancels event. Sept. 9, 7:308:30 p.m. Park day use fee $10 per vehicle.. 805-7882381. Lopez Lake, 6800 Lopez Dr., Arroyo Grande.

NATURE BOAT CRUISE Learn about the history and mystery hidden below the water including the flora and fauna that live in the park. Meet at the Marina launch ramp docks. Rain cancels event. Sept. 16, 10:15-12:15 a.m. Park day use fee $10 per vehicle.. 805.788.2385. Lopez Lake, 6800 Lopez Dr., Arroyo Grande. S A N TA M A R I A VA L L E Y/ L O S A L A M O S

PAINT WITH ME WORKSHOP Teen artists learn to create unique pieces of art by starting a painting and then passing it to their neighbor. Everyone goes home with their original canvas. Sept. 15, 4-5:30 p.m. Free. 805-925-0994. cityofsantamaria.org/. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

FUNDRAISERS N O R T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

DUNA VISTA EXPLORATION HIKE Exciting and strenuous hike. Wear sturdy shoes and bring water. Meet

SUMMER BOOK SALE Help support the Cayucos Library. Hundreds of used books ranging from

New Times and the Sun now share their community listings for a complete Central Coast calendar running from SLO County through northern Santa Barbara County. Submit events online by logging in with your Google or Facebook account at newtimesslo.com. Deadline is one week before the issue date on Thursdays. Submissions are subject to editing and approval. Contact Calendar Editor Trever Dias at calendar@newtimesslo.com.

INDEX

children’s books, to cookbooks, fiction and non-fiction at bargain prices. Sept. 16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. 805995-3312. Cayucos Library, 310 B. St., Cayucos. NORTH SLO COUNT Y

11TH ANNUAL DOG SPLASH DAYS IN TEMPLETON Event proceeds benefit Vineyard Dog Park in Templeton. Both tot pool and adult pools are open for dog swimming. Dogs only are allowed in the pool. Sept. 9-10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $20 per dog per swim session. 805-239-4437. parks4pups. org. Templeton Community Pool, 420 Crocker St., Templeton.

3RD ANNUAL WHEELS AND WINE An evening of vintage autos, good food, wine and beer tasting, kombucha, live music, silent auction, a boho marketplace, and more. Helps raise funds for vocational and enrichment programs. Sept. 9, 4-7 p.m. $50 per person, includes 2 tastings. 805-4343895. Courtney’s House, 311 6th St., Templeton, courtneys-house.org. SLO WINDS ENSEMBLE CONCERT AND AUCTION FUNDRAISER AUMC’s fundraiser will include live music by the wind ensemble, live and silent auctions, and heavy appetizers. It will benefit some of AUMC’s ministries. Sept. 15, 5-7 p.m. $10 for adults; free for children. 805-4662566. atascaderoumc.org/events/aumc-auctionfundraiser. Atascadero United Methodist Church, 11605 El Camino Real, Atascadero. S A N L U I S O B IS P O

17TH ANNUAL HOME OF DISTINCTION TOUR View five beautiful homes, presented by the Rotary Club of San Luis Obispo. Each home has a unique ambiance where architecture, décor, landscaping tell the stories of their lives. All proceeds fund scholarships for local students. Sept. 17, 11 a.m.4:30 p.m. $25. 805-546-8806. slorotary.org/. Rotary Homes of Distinction Tour, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo.

APPLES AND HONEY FESTIVAL A family-friendly

Special Events ..........[19]

day in the park featuring local artisans, apple crafting, traditional foods, zoo animals, storytelling, and more. Sept. 17, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 805-426-5465. Mitchell Park, 1445 Santa Rosa St., San Luis Obispo.

Arts ............................[20]

HUNGER WALK + 5K Award for best Superhero

Music .........................[25] Culture & Lifestyle.......[25] Food & Drink..............[28]

costume. After party with beer garden, live music, food trucks, and more. Sept. 16, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 0-17 Free. 18+ $25 until 8/31. $35 9/1 - 9/16. 805-238-4664. slofoodbank.org/events/hungerwalk5k. Laguna Lake Park, 504 Madonna Rd., San Luis Obispo. SPECIAL EVENTS continued page 20

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 19


SPECIAL EVENTS from page 19

INSPIRE: FILM SCREENING AND BENEFIT SHOW Join this inspiring gathering to celebrate women and uplift the community while raising funds for women’s organizations. Features live performing artists, refreshments, and a screening of The Goddess Project documentary. Teens and adults of all genders are welcome. Sept. 10, 7-11 p.m. $15 in advance, $20 at the door. 805-5429500. facebook.com/events/466680987063797. East Wellbeing and Tea, 1238 Monterey St. Ste. 110, San Luis Obispo.

ITW UNITED WAY WEEK WALK-A-THON Participate by pledging per lap, or a one-time donation, orpledge someone you know. ITW will match all funds raised times two. Sept. 14, 10:3011:30 a.m. 805-541-1234. unitedwayslo.org. Islay Hill Park, 1151 Tank Farm Rd., San Luis Obispo.

TAP IT & TACOS IF Features live music, magic, and aerialists. Sept. 9, 4-10 p.m. $40. 805-7813660. Tap It Brewing Company, 675 Clarion Ct., San Luis Obispo, tapitbrewing.com/.

WINE WOMEN & SHOES A strolling wine and food tasting, boutique shopping experience with a silent and live auction, and fashion show, all benefiting RISE San Luis Obispo County. Sept. 10, 2-6 p.m. $125. 805-226-5400. winewomenandshoes.com/rise/. Avila Beach Resort, 6464 Ana Bay Dr., Avila Beach. S O U T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

CATCH OF THE CENTRAL COAST This exciting fundraiser will feature an authentic Caribbean style multi-course dinner with wine pairings. Enjoy live music and silent and live auctions. Proceeds benefit marine science education programs. Sept. 9, 5-8:30 p.m. $125 per person. 805-595-7280. centralcoastaquarium.org. Central Coast Aquarium, 50 San Juan St., Avila Beach.

A GOOD OLD-FASHIONED BENEFIT BASH Join Spokes for a glorious evening filled with gourmet fare and games galore to celebrate nonprofits. Enjoy dining, dancing, and merriment reminiscent of days gone by. Proceeds benefit Spokes programming and services for nonprofit organizations. Sept. 16, 4-8 p.m. $85. 805-5472244. spokesfornonprofits.org/upcoming-events/ good-old-fashioned-benefit-bash/. The Victorian, 789 Valley Rd., Arroyo Grande.

KIWANIS BENEFIT CONCERT FEATURING

CUESTA RIDGE The profits benefit an all-access

PHOTO COURTESY OF NICHOLAS ANTHONY

for cll-children playground at Elm Street Park. Sept. 10, 1-3 p.m. Free. 805-423-5918. Heritage Square Park, 201 Nelson St., Arroyo Grande.

THREE SOPRANOS & A PIANO AND LYRA LIVE Benefit concert for the Cambria Community Chorale and the Cambria Lions Club Music Scholarship Fund. Sept. 16, 6:30-8 p.m. and Sept. 17, 6:30-8 p.m. $20. cambriachorale.org. Painted Sky, 715 Main St., Cambria, 805-927-8330. S A N TA M A R I A VA L L E Y/ L O S A L A M O S

SHOES FOR STUDENTS Golf fundraiser to help buy shoes for children in need. Sept. 10, 10 a.m. shoesforstudents.com/. Santa Maria Country Club, 505 W. Waller Lane, Santa Maria.

Arts ClAsses & Workshops N O R T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

CREATIVITY GROUP Bring your art work, in any medium, and join others. Come and go as it works for you. Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Through Sept. 13 Free. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay. org. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

FUSED GLASS WORKSHOP Teens and adults are invited to create amazing works of art using glass. Registration required. Sept. 14, 3:30-5:30 p.m. Free. 805-927-4336. slolibrary.org. Cambria Library, 1043 Main St., Cambria. HYPERTUFA FAIRY COTTAGE GARDEN WORKSHOP Paint a small cottage and plant a mini bowl garden. Materials provided include hypertufa house, paints, soil, succulents, and assorted rocks. Preregistration required at www. CreativeMeTime.com. Sept. 9, 1-3 p.m. $75. 805772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

IMPROV COMEDY CLASS Improv Comedy Classes for beginner-intermediate students taught by comedian, Sabrina Pratt. This 6-week session covers the basics of scene building and working on an improv ensemble. All students ages 21 and up welcome. Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Through Sept. 10 $150 for the session. 805-242-3109. centralcoastcomedytheater.com. Ignite Movement

hAve A heArt

Heart of the Arts Gala and Sidecar After Party, a biennial fundraiser for The Foundation for the Performing Arts Center, will be held at 6 p.m. on Sept. 16 at the Performing Arts Center in San Luis Obispo. Attendees will enjoy dinner and cocktails, live music, and dancing, and are encouraged to dress in all black or white. Tickets are $200 for dinner and the after party, $50 for just the after-party, and tables of eight are available for $2,500 to $7,500. Studio, 698 Morro Bay Blvd., Morro Bay.

IMPROV COMEDY CLASSES Learn basic techniques of improvisation including how to start and build a scene, creating a character, and playing with an ensemble. Sept. 17, 2-4 p.m. $150. 805242-3109. centralcoastcomedytheater.com. Ignite Movement Studio, 698 Morro Bay Blvd., Morro Bay.

MOSAIC WINE BOTTLE WORKSHOP Instructor Joan Fee guides students in crafting mosaic wall art using china plate pieces and other baubles. Everything provided including use of tools, glue, and grout. Preregistration required at www. CreativeMeTime.com. Sept. 10, 10 a.m.-noon $50. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

hummingbird and rose. Participants take home a finished painting and new techniques. Sept. 7-8, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $79. 805-395-7077. thenestgallerycambria.com. The Nest Gallery, 2164 Center St, Cambria.

QI GONG CLASS Qi Gong is an ancient and powerful system for physical health and spiritual development. Join certified instructor Devin Wallace for this class in a beautiful outdoor setting. Please call to register. Fridays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Suggested donation $10. 805-709-2227. Tidelands Park, South end of Embarcadero, Morro Bay.

STILL LIFE OIL PAINTING WITH JASON MAYR For beginner to advanced students. Register by contacting Jason at 805-234-6941 or email

PAINTING WITH SUSAN JENKINS Jenkins

ARTS continued page 22

will lead a step-by-step painting demo of a

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EMPLOYMENT

ADVERTISING SALES Join our team! Do you love Santa Maria? Do you want to help local businesses succeed? So do we! The Sun is a family-owned business that has been part of the community since 2000. Our mission is to publish a great newspaper which is successful and enduring, create a quality work environment that encourages employees to grow, and to have a positive impact on our communities and make it a better place to live. If you want to make a difference and do something that matters then keep reading. The Sun is looking for an individual who cares about building relationships and partnering with local businesses. If you have the heart, we have the tools to train you to be a successful Ad Consultant. You must be self-motivated, ambitious, and an independent person who also wants to be part of a great team. Successful reps will have a sincere desire to help our clients assess their needs and work together to create marketing campaigns that increase their business.

HEROES NIGHT vs [ SUN., SEP. 10 - 4 PM ] ALEX G. SPANOS STADIUM

Talents: • A curiosity about how different types of businesses work. • An interest in learning consultative sales skills. • Excellent time management skills and the ability to work within deadlines. • The ability to learn how to develop solutions to marketing problems.

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• A strong work ethic. • Superior customer service skills. Experience: • College degree preferred. • Vehicle, license, and insurance required. TO APPLY: If this sounds like you, please let us know by e-mailing your résumé and cover letter to Kim Rosa at krosa@santamariasun.com. When you submit your résumé please answer the following questions in the body of your e-mail: 1) Why are you interested in working for the Sun? 2) Why should we hire you? 3) Tell us something about yourself that we can’t learn from your résumé. Compensation includes a base salary, commission and bonus; excellent benefits package including medical, dental, paid time off and 401(k). The Sun is proud to be an equal opportunity employer.

All military, law enforcement, and fire personnel can get up to 4 FREE GENERAL ADMISSION TICKETS to the game by showing their official ID card at the box office on game day. VISIT GOPOLY.COM OR CALL 805-756-4TIX TO BUY TICKETS TODAY!

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1010 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo NewTimesSLO.com 2540 Skyway Drive, Santa Maria SantaMariaSun.com www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 21


PAPER MOSAIC WORKSHOP Instructor Judy Ann

ARTS from page 20 jkmayr@aol.com. Mondays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Through Nov. 6 $30 MBAA members, $35 for non-members. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org/. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

SUCCULENT CRAFTING WORKSHOP Design with succulents while crafting wreaths, birdhouses, and other projects. Preregistration is required at www.CreativeMeTime.com. Sept. 9, 10 a.m.-noon $70-$90. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

SUSAN MALMGREN: JOURNEY TO SCULPTED PAINTINGS DEMO Learn how to take your two-dimensional art to an entire new level. Susan Malmgren will demo her unique style of turning a painting into a colorful three- dimensional sculpture using acrylic paint on watercolor paper. Sept. 11, 3-5 p.m. Free. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay. org/. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

WATERCOLOR PAINTING WORKSHOP Instructor Grace Elaine teaches students to paint beautiful, vibrant poppies using a loose watercolor technique. All materials provided. For teens and adults. Sept. 16, 2-4 p.m. Free. 805-927-4336. slolibrary.org. Cambria Library, 1043 Main St., Cambria. ZEN DOODLE ADULT COLORING BOOK GROUP Drop in adult coloring book club open to the public. Fridays, 10-11:30 a.m. Through Sept. 15 Free. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay. NORTH SLO COUNT Y

HYPERTUFA BASKETS WITH SUCCULENTS Students will mix a batch of hypertufa and apply it to a basket to take home and cure. Instructor supplies a cured basket for each student to plant with succulents. Learn to drill holes, add wire, and wood handles. Sept. 14, 6-8 p.m. $75. 805-2865993. apm.activecommunities.com. Centennial Park, 600 Nickerson Dr., Paso Robles.

IMPROV COMEDY CLASSES IN NORTH COUNTY \Learn improv techniques like how to develop a scene, create a character, and work with an ensemble in a positive, fun environment with an experienced instructor. Sept. 14, 6-8 p.m. $150 for the session. 805-242-3109. centralcoastcomedytheater.com. Earthtones, 1319 Park St., Paso Robles.

PHOTO COURTESY OF MARY CIESINSKI

teaches students how to create extraordinary paper mosaic tiles using simple tools and recycled paper. All materials provided. Preregistration required. Sept. 14, 1-4 p.m. $95. 805-395-7077. The Nest Gallery, 2164 Center St., Cambria. S A N L U IS O B I S P O

BEGINNING CERAMICS This class teaches the basics of ceramics. Each class has a different focus, including hand-building, wheel throwing, and surface decoration/glaze application. Second Monday of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. 40. 805242-1285. slomakerspace.com/store/beginningceramics/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo.

BLACKSMITHING: BASIC SAFETY Instructed by blacksmithing guru Boone Bauer. Online class registration required. Tuesdays, 11 a.m.noon Free. 805-242-1285. slomakerspace.com/ blacksmithing/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo. BLACKSMITHING: BEGINNING LEVEL For people with no previous blacksmithing experience. Instructor Boone Bauer takes students through key elements of blacksmithing and how to use forge and anvil unattended. Tuesdays, 1-2 p.m. $50. 805242-1285. slomakerspace.com/blacksmithing/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo.

CARDMAKING WORKSHOP Learn how to create a handcrafted card using simple stamping and die-cutting techniques. Sept. 16, 2-3 p.m. $30. 805-772-4600. inspiredexpos.com. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

CHARMAINE MARTINEZ: BRUSH LETTERING WORKSHOP This 3-hour workshop will introduce basic brush lettering techniques, transforming handwriting into works of art. No previous experience necessary. Sept. 9, 1-4 p.m. $25. 805-747-4200. Art Central, 1329 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo.

Keep it clean

Do your part to help keep the coastline clean at one of more than 30 designated sites for the 33rd Coastal Clean Up, held Sept. 16 from 9 a.m. to noon. Some supplies will be available, but volunteers are encouraged to bring gloves, grocery bags, and a bucket, and will use data cards to record the type of debris found. To register and find a list of locations, go to ecoslo.org/coastalcleanup-day. long lasting centerpiece. Sept. 16, 4-5 p.m. $30. 805-772-4600. inspiredexpos.com. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

slolibrary.evanced.info/signup. Sept. 9, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. 805-781-5989. San Luis Obispo Library, 995 Palm St., San Luis Obispo.

A GUIDED WORKSHOP ON HOW TO DESIGN A HOME YOU LOVE Create your own home book

learning how to make a kokedama hanging string flower pod. Sept. 17, 10-11 a.m. $30. 805-7724600. inspiredexpos.com. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

FILM AND TV ACTING CLASS For all ages and skill levels. Optional showcases with major Hollywood talent agents and casting directors. Sundays, 12-8:45 p.m. through Dec. 31 310-9101228. actorsedge.com. Mission Cinemas, 1025 Monterey St., SLO.

FALL CENTERPIECE WORKSHOP Linda

FUSED GLASS WORKSHOP Instructor Sheri Klein

DIY KOKEDAMA HANGING STRING GARDEN CLASS Combine gardening and crafting skills while

Georgeadis, former flower shop owner and holiday decor specialist, teaches students how to create a

with worksheets and guided exercises to learn how to pinpoint your personal interior design style and professional tips on how you can make your home into the sanctuary you always wanted it to be. Sept. 17, 12-1 p.m. $30. 805-772-4600. inspiredexpos.

guides students in creating their own glass art. Materials provided. Registration required at http://

ARTS continued page 23

A North County

ATASCADERO

STATE HOSPITAL

CAREER

Beer Festival in the German Tradition

FAIR

Saturday September 30, 2017 1–5pm Templeton Park Enjoy live music by Trio Internationale, German cuisine, beer tasting, traditional German drinking games and song, plus a Lederhose & Dirndl costume contest.

Come learn about the exciting career opportunities that DSH-Atascadero has to offer!

Saturday Time:

9am-3pm

2017

Atascadero, CA 93422 Main Lobby

Sept. 9

Location: 10333 El Camino Real

Contact us for more information! Richard Myerscough, DSH-Atascadero Recruitment Coordinator 805.468.3389 Richard.Myerscough@dsh.ca.gov

Joseph Moreno, DSH-Atascadero Asst. Recruitment Coordinator 805.468.3660 Joseph.Moreno@dsh.ca.gov

DSH Statewide Recruitment Unit 916.654.2609 DSH.Recruitment@dsh.ca.gov dsh.ca.gov/jobs

www.dsh.ca.gov/Atascadero 22 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

$30 Pre-Sale $40 at the door - includes tasting mug Additional $10 for optional commemorative beer stein, with first beer

www.templetonoktobeest.com (805) 434-1789

Produced by


ARTS from page 22 com/. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

HAND LETTERING CLASS: CUSTOM GARDEN ROCK MARKERS Local calligrapher Raina ToySmith teaches the basics of hand-lettering and how to create custom garden marker rocks. Sept. 16, 10-11 a.m. $30. 805-772-4600. inspiredexpos.com. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

IMAGE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES WORKSHOP Students will learn how to skillfully blend images on to a painterly surface, creating expressive and evocative compositions. Please register by Friday, September 8. Acrylic paint and materials list online. Sept. 15-17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $275 members; $299 non-members. 805-543-8562. sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo.

WOODTURNING Basic Safety, Spindle, Bowl Turning I, Bowl Turning II and Advanced class. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-noon 50. 805-242-1285. slomakerspace.com/woodturning/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo.

Special art eventS GOLDEN QUILL LITEARY CONTEST The theme is Liberation. There are three categories: Poetry up 40 lines; Short Fiction up to 1500 words; Creative Non-fiction (personal essay, memoir) up to 1500 words. Prizes awarded in each category: $500, $250, and $100. Sponsored by SLO NightWriters. Sept. 15 $15 per entry. slonwgoldenquillwritingcontest.com. NORTH SLO COUNT Y

ALMOND COUNTRY QUILT GUILD SEPTEMBER MEETING Quilter Joe

Cunningham will be presenting. Sept. INTRO TO 3D PRINTING Learn how 8, 6:30-9 p.m. Free. 805-237-9313. to use the 3D Printers and software. ACQGuild.com. Trinity Lutheran Once certified, and if Basic Safety Church, 940 Creston Road, Paso has been passed, users can utilize Robles. the 3D printers with their own CENTRAL COAST WOODCARVERS filament or pay for the filament 40TH ANNUAL SHOW 28 local onsite through membership, or free Sept. 7 – Sept. 14 and statewide carvers will display and weekly SLO County Library Hours. 2017 sell their carving art. Competition at Wednesdays, 7-8 p.m. $50. 242-1285. 1:00 p.m. both days, raffle for individual slomakerspace.com/3d-printing/#class. carvings plus a silent auction for a featured SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and carving (Christmas tree loaded with hand carved 180, San Luis Obispo. ornaments). Sept. 16, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sept. INTRO TO CERAMICS STUDIO Take and pass 17, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $2. 805-550-4389. Cambria our Intro to Ceramics Studio and have 24/7 Veterans Memorial Hall, 1000 Main Street, unsupervised access to our Ceramics Studio. Cambria. Previous ceramics experience required, or our Intro to Ceramics class. 25lb of clay comes with SECOND SUNDAY AT SEVEN Bonnie Young and this class. Second Wednesday of every month, 11 Ivan Brownotter will be the featured poets. Sept. a.m.-1 p.m. $50. 242-1285. SLO MakerSpace, 81 10, 7-9 p.m. Free. 805-772-2880. Coalesce Garden Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo, Chapel, 845 Main St., Morro Bay. slomakerspace.com. S A N L U IS O B I S P O INTRO TO LASER CUTTER & ENGRAVER Learn ART AT HIGH NOON LUNCHTIME LECTURE how to use a 100 watt laser cutter and engraver. SERIES Bring your lunch and enjoy a feast for the Users who are certified, and have passed Basic eyes with Art at High Noon, an art appreciation Safety, can use it on their own through membership, program for working adults. SLOMA will host an or through free SLO County Library Hours for and art history lecture, artist’s talk, or activity that fits $0.50/min. cutting time. Mondays, 7-10 p.m. $50. perfectly within your lunch hour. First Thursday 242-1285. slomakerspace.com/laser-cutting-andof every month. Through Dec. 7 Free admission engraving/#class. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., & open to the public.. 805-543-8562. sloma.org/ Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo. events/art-at-high-noon.php. San Luis Obispo INTRO TO MIG WELDING Learn how to use the Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo. welder and welding station. Certified students who ART WALK IN OLDE TOWNE NIPOMO Members have passed Basic Safety can use the welding area of Gala de Arte display artwork while doing through membership or during Free SLO County live painting. Local artists are encouraged to Library cardholder hours. Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. participate by contacting the Nipomo Chamber $50. 242-1285. slomakerspace.com/store/intro-toabout space availability. Sept. 14, 6-8 p.m. Free. mig-welding-class/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera 805-748-1377. nipomochamber.org. Gala De Arte, St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo. 136 N. Thompson Ave #B, Nipomo. INTRODUCTION TO CANNING CLASS Presented CAR FREE CULTURE WITH EDWARD SOLIS by Master Food Preservers Of San Luis Obispo And Photographer Edward E. Solis presents information Santa Barbara Counties. Come and learn the basics on a car free culture through discussion and visual of home canning safely. Sept. 9, 10 a.m.-noon $10. 805-781-1429. cesanluisobispo.ucanr.edu. UCCE presentation. Through Sept. 30, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Audtiorium, 2156 Sierra Way, San Luis Obispo. Free. 805-781-5989. San Luis Obispo Library, 995 Palm St., San Luis Obispo. LEATHERCRAFTING: BASIC SAFETY For people with no previous leathercraft experience. Includes JULIA MORGAN BUILDING TOUR Member overview and training of common leatherworking docents will guide you through our historic building tools, safe tool use, and a discussion of materials and grounds. Tours may also be arranged by needed for leathercraft. First Thursday of every appointment. Mondays, 2-5 p.m. Free. 805-541month, 7-9 p.m. Free. 805-242-1285. slomakerspace. 0594. themondayclubslo.org. The Monday Club, com/leathercrafting/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera 1815 Monterey St, San Luis Obispo. St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo.

MIXED MEDIA PAINT AND COLLAGE CLASS Use paint and a playful attitude to handcraft an original piece of art. Sept. 17, 2-3 p.m. $30-$35. 805-772-4600. inspiredexpos.com. Alex Madonna Expo Center, 100 Madonna Rd, San Luis Obispo.

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE An opportunity to try out some great new art supplies for free, including fashion sprays and liners to customize your clothing; abstract acrylic paints; porcelain and glass paint markers; screen printing ink, and easy marbling paint. Sept. 16, 12-3 p.m. Free. 805-7474200. artcentralslo.wordpress.com. Art Central, 1329 Monterey St., San Luis Obispo. SLOMA LIFE DRAWING WORKSHOP Wednesday morning life drawing. All levels of drawing skill are welcome. Sessions incorporate multiple poses for three hours, from one minute gestures to 20 minutes, giving the artist a variety of poses to work from. A model is provided along with tables and easels. No instruction. Wednesdays, 9 a.m.-noon through Nov. 15 $12 members, $15 non-members. 805-543-8562. sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo.

SLOMA WORKSHOP: LIFE DRAWING For all levels of drawing skill. A model is provided along with tables and easels. No instruction. Wednesdays, 6:30-9 p.m. Through Nov. 15 $12 for members, $15 for non-members. 805-543-8562. sloma.org/education/ life-drawing.php?event=20. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo.

Downtown Paso Robles Main Street Association presents . . .

20 th Annual

Taste of Downtown 2017

Anglim Winery Artisan Restaurant Basil Thai Restaurant Berry Hill Bistro Bless Your Heart Bakery Blue Moon Southwestern Grill Brown Butter Cookie Co. CaliPaso Tasting Room Cold Stone Creamery Catch Seafood Bar & Grill Derby Wine Estates Fish Gaucho F. McLintock’s Saloon Frolicking Frog Cellars Good Times Café Kreuzberg Coffee Company Lusso Della Terra Cellars Marv’s Original Pizza Co.

Odyssey World Café Orale Taqueria Pappy McGregor’s Pub & Grill Pasolivo Paso Robles Inn Steakhouse Pine Street Saloon Red Scooter Deli Rocky Mtn. Chocolate Factory SLO Sweets Spice of Life Seven Oxen Estate Wines Taste in the Alley Thomas Hill Organics Touch of Paso Tudor Wine Tasting Room Vivant Fine Cheese We Olive Paso Robles Wine Boss Beer & Wine Lounge

Saturday, Sept. 16th

11 am - 4 pm • Passes $25 (Visa/MC/Discover Accepted) Call Paso Robles Main Street

805-238-4103

Your

Pass entitles you to:

· Samples from 35 restaurants and wine-tasting rooms: 11 am to 4 pm · Arte de Tiza: Chalk Art 8 am · DJ: 11 am - 4 pm Thank you to these business for supporting this event. . . . KPRL 1230 AM Paso Printers • Paso Telecom

Arte de Tiza Sidewalk Chalk Art Sponsored by PR Art Assoc.

STARTS 8 am

Arte de Tiza SPONSORS: PPaso Robles Art Association, Paso Robles Optimist, Thaddeus Sherman Masonic Lodge #196, Rita’s Rainbow and HomeZones Realty

A Paso Robles Main Street Association event~

SLOMA TOUR OF CHAGALL: FANTASIES FOR THE STAGE Join SLOMA for a day trip to the Los

Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) to tour the special exhibition Chagall: Fantasies for the Stage. Sept. 11 $130 members; $145 general. 805-5438562. sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo. S A N TA M A R I A VA L L E Y/ L O S A L A M O S

DREPUNG GOMANG MONASTERY SACRED ARTS TOUR 2017 A group of Tibetan monks will be creating large and elaborate Sand Mandala Paintings and more. Call for specific times. Through Sept. 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 342-5245, Ext. 3465. hancockcollege.edu/gallery. Ann Foxworthy Gallery, 800 S. College Dr., Santa Maria.

HARVEST OF QUILTS A show of members’ quilts, with featured artist Cathi Unland. The event also includes a boutique sale, quilts and fabric sales. Sept. 16, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $5, children under 12 free. St. Joseph’s Catholic Church, 298 S. Thompson Ave., Nipomo. S A N TA Y N E z VA L L E Y

TREES OF THE TRI-COUNTIES Trees of the Tri-Counties is an annual photography competition featuring local photographers. Through Oct. 23, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 686-8315. Wildling Museum of Art and Nature, 1511-B Mission Drive, Solvang. ARTS continued page 24

The hilarious new musical set in Pismo Beach

$3

Great Snacks Cold Beer

The melodramatic classic by George M. Cohan

PLAYING ON ALTERNATE NIGHTS OFF

9/13/17

Hwy 1 Oceano

www.americanmelodrama.com

489-2499

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 23


s o u t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

ARTS from page 23

art soIrEE Wonderful artwork will be on display

Exhibits N o r t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

CarLo ChrIstIaN Photo EXhIBIt A variety of framed and canvas works featuring the Central Coast and beyond. through sept. 28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. 805-772-1068. Gallery at Marina Square, 601 Embarcadero Ste. 10, Morro Bay. Mary DE WILDE Photo EXhIBIt Featuring ocean scenes, sea life, and spaces where the ocean meets the land. through sept. 28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. 805-772-1068. Gallery at Marina Square, 601 Embarcadero Ste. 10, Morro Bay.

PrEFIX 927 art shoW This nontraditional show emphasizes out-of-thebox thinking, humor, and funky themes. Includes wine bar, live music, and refreshments. Thursdays-Sundays, 1-4 p.m. through sept. 24 Free. 805927-8190. cambriacenterforthearts. org/. Cambria Center for the Arts, 1350 Main St., Cambria.

thINK PINK: hoW CaNCEr CoLorED My WorLD Mary Summers’ paintings chronicle her journey through breast cancer. Tuesdays-Saturdays. through sept. 29 Free. 805-927-4336. slolibrary. org. Cambria Library, 1043 Main St., Cambria. North sLo CouNt y

GoING, GoING, GoNE: art IN thE aGE oF EXtINCtIoN Works created by artists who are deeply concerned for the fate of this fragile planet and all its inhabitants. through sept. 24, 12-9 p.m. Studios on the Park, 1130 Pine St., Paso Robles, 238-9800, studiosonthepark.org.

MaNaQuIN MaDNEss Paper mosaic mannequins created with recycled paper. FridaysSundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. through Nov. 30 805-2868380. changalawinery.com. Changala Winery, 3770 Willow Creek Rd., Paso Robles. s a N L u Is o B I s P o

CaLIForNIa sCuLPturE sLaM 2017 A unique opportunity to see current works by both established and emerging sculptors. Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. through oct. 29 Free. 805-543-8562. sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo.

CaLIForNIa sCuLtPurE sLaM 2017 through oct. 29 sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo, 543-8562.

DoNaLD FrIth: tEaPots through oct. 29 805-543-8562. sloma.org. Enjoy the combination of the technical expertise Frithy nuses in porcelain, precious woods, and acrylics to create a small teapot. Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. through Oct. 29 Free. 805-543-8562. sloma. org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo. EthErEaL sKIEs Laurel Sherrie’s new paintings

Independent Retirement Living San Luis Obispo, CA

focused on skyscapes that reveal emotional connections to the drama we often see in the sky. through sept. 12, 8 a.m.-9 p.m. 805-545-5401. bigskycafe.com. Big Sky Cafe, 1121 Broad Street, San Luis Obispo.

KID’s EyE VIEW 2017 Showcases selected artwork created during SLOMA’s 2017 youth summer art camps. through oct. 1, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 805-543-8562. sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo. thursDay PaINtErs: a LEGaCy Featuring

Independent. Social. Fun. That’s the Holiday way. ©2017 HARVEST MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL HOLDINGS LP, HOLIDAY AL NIC MANAGEMENT LLC.

24 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

p.m. Free. Monarch Resort Art Studio, 1645 Trilogy Parkway, Nipomo. s a N ta M a r I a Va L L E y/ L o s a L a M o s

MyaNMar: MoMENts IN LIFE Photographer Theresa Gingras presents photos from her journey through Southeast Asia in the Ann Foxworthy Gallery. through sept. 29 Free. Allan Hancock College, 800 S. College Drive, Santa Maria.

saNta yNEZ VaLLEy arts assoCIatIoN The

Calls for artists

sEPt. 7 – sEPt. 14 2017

Harris, is the judge for this celebrated exhibit. through sept. 11, 12-4 p.m. Free. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay.

Las Brisas

thE trILoGy art GrouP soIrEE sept. 9, 1-4

Santa Ynez Valley Arts Association presents the 2nd Saturday Artisans series. second saturday of every month, 12-5 p.m. 688-7338. santaynezvalleyarts.org. Santa Ynez Valley Grange Hall, 2374 Alamo Pintado, Los Olivos.

PushING BouNDarIEs: EXPLorING aBstraCtIoN Award winning artist, Krista

Call us at 805-214-1713 to schedule your visit.

and part of sales proceeds will benefit scholarships for local art students. sept. 9, 1-4 p.m. Free. Trilogy Art Group, 1645 Trilogy Parkway, Nipomo, 651-605-5955.

paintings by the Thurdsay Painters artist group which has been meeting in SLO for over 70 years. through oct. 1 805-543-8562. sloma.org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo.

Who has thIs Paintings and assemblage works by Vincent Bernardy. through sept. 30 Free. 805547-0278. Steynberg Gallery, 1531 Monterey, San Luis Obispo, steynberggallery.com/.

N o r t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

soCIaL JustICE: CaLL For artIsts In this remarkable exhibit, artists express their own concepts of human rights, inequality and betrayal. Take-in date: September 19, 2017, 10am – 2pm. “Social Justice” is on display from September 21 through October 30, 2017. For additional information, visit our website. through sept. 19, 12-4 p.m. 805-772-2504. artcentermorrobay.org/. Art Center Morro Bay, 835 Main St., Morro Bay. s a N L u Is o B I s P o

DIMENsIoNs: JurIED FINE CraFt EXhIBItIoN Open to artists residing in California. All artwork must be original and executed by the hand of the artists in any of the following: clay, fiber, paper, glass, metal, jewelry, wood, and mixed media. through oct. 6 543-8562. rsaliklis@sloma. org. San Luis Obispo Museum of Art, 1010 Broad St., San Luis Obispo.

stagE N o r t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

THE GOLDEN AGE This play follows Isabel Hastings Hoyt, an aging but still charming recluse, once a glittering figure in the literary salons of the 1920s. Directed by Gene Strohl. Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30-9:30 p.m. through oct. 1 $20. 805-927-3877. pewterploughplayhouse.net. Pewter Plough Playhouse, 828 Main St., Cambria. s a N L u Is o B I s P o

THE ALL NIGHT STRUT! A delightful, musical revue paying homage to the music of the 1930’s and 1940’s, and featuring a live band. WednesdaysSundays, 7 p.m. through sept. 17 $20-$38. 805786-2440. slorep.org. San Luis Obispo Repertory Theatre, 888 Morro Street, San Luis Obispo.

IMProV CoMEDy shoW Fast-paced and fun improv comedy shows by the talented ensemble of Central Coast Comedy Theater. All shows are based on audience suggestions- every show is unique, hilarious and sure to make for a great evening! saturdays, 8-10 p.m. $5. centralcoastcomedytheater.com. Kreuzberg Coffee Company, 685 Higuera Street, San Luis Obispo, 803-430-0260. s o u t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

THE KARAOKE KID aND THE TAVERN The Great American Melodrama presents The Karaoke Kid and The Tavern playing alternate nights with performances Wednesday through Sat. at 7 p.m., Saturdays at 3 p.m., and Sundays at 6 p.m. through sept. 16 $19 to $25. 489-2499. americanmelodrama.com. Great American Melodrama, 1863 Front St., Oceano. s a N ta M a r I a Va L L E y/ L o s a L a M o s

LIVE FroM thE CorE: PoEtry New York City poet Toni Wynn and Sedona, Az. poet/curandera, Carla Riedel perform. sept. 9, 7:30 p.m. CORE Winery, 105 W Clark Ave., Orcutt. s a N ta y N E Z Va L L E y

TWELFTH NIGHT The Pacific Conservatory Theater (PCPA) performs Twelfth Night. WednesdaysSundays, 8 p.m. through sept. 10 $40.50-51.50. 922-8313. pcpa.org/TwelfthNight.html. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. CALENDAR continued page 25


PHOTO COURTESY OF SLO REPERTORY THEATRE

CALENDAR from page 24

s a N ta M a r I a Va L L E y/ L o s a L a M o s

PoEtry NIGht Monthly poetry group with two featured poets and open readings. Check CORE Winery Facebook page for details or schedule changes. Second Saturday of every month, 7:30 p.m. through Jan. 31 Free. facebook.com/MisterMoreved/. CORE Winery, 105 W Clark Ave., Orcutt.

Music Live Music

cuLture & LifestyLe

N o r t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

CaBarEt 805 Live vocals in the Cabaret styling

singing with live pianists. tuesdays, 6-8 p.m. No cover. Stax Wine Bar & Bistro, 1099 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, 772-5055, staxwine.com.

Lectures & Learning

CENtraL Coast JaZZ INstItutE BaND Each evening features one of Charlie Shoemake’s jazz musicians, accompanied by Matthew Evans on Bass and Tom Brown on Drums. Charlie is on vibraphone and his wife Sandi sings. Every other thursday, 7-9:30 p.m. Free admission/suggested donation $15. 805-927-0179. pewterploughplayhouse.org/ Entertainment/music-ccji.html. Pewter Plough Playhouse, 828 Main St., Cambria.

mbmassageandbodywork.commb. Morro Bay Massage and Bodywork, 736 Main St., Morro Bay.

PIaNo CoNCErt: aLL strauss, aLL thE tIME Presenting pianist Louise King and

BEGINNING WEB DEsIGN CLass This class

N o r t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

ChaNGE your MIND, ChaNGE your hEaLth - thE PoWEr oF aPPLIED MEDItatIoN aND hyPNosIs sept. 10, 4-5 p.m. Free. 805-709-2227.

s a N L u Is o B I s P o

soloist Karen Dunn. Features works by Richard, Johann, and Oscar Strauss. sept. 9, 2:30-4 p.m. Free; $10 suggested donation.. 805-528-0654. stbenslososos.org. St. Benedict’s Church, 2220 Snowy Egret Ln., Los Osos.

will cover the basics of HTML and CSS. Every participant will need a fully charged laptop (MAC, Windows).Register online: http://slolibrary.evanced. info/signup, or call 805-781-5989. sept. 9, 10 a.m.noon and sept. 16, 10 a.m.-noon Free. 805-7815989. San Luis Obispo Library, 995 Palm St., San Luis Obispo.

saturDay LIVE: MELoDy KLEMIN IN CoNCErt Enjoy live music while savoring awardwinning Vina Robles wines. No outside alcohol permitted. sept. 9, 1-4 p.m. Free. Wine and lunch offerings available.. 805-227-4812. vinarobles.com. Vina Robles Winery, 3700 Mill Rd., Paso Robles.

ChrIs BELaND LIVE sept. 11, 6:30-9 p.m. Free!. 805-772-8388. Morro Bay Wine Seller, 601 Embarcadero, Morro Bay. trIaDa BuLGarIaN trIo CLassICaL GuItar

sept. 16, 2-4 p.m. Suggested donation of $20. 805-771-8138. St. Benedict’s Church, 2220 Snowy Egret Ln., Los Osos.

saturDay LIVE: NoaCh taNGEras IN CoNCErt Enjoy live music while savoring awardwinning Vina Robles wines. No outside alcohol permitted. sept. 16, 1-4 p.m. Free. Wine and lunch offerings available.. 805-227-4812. vinarobles.com. Vina Robles Winery, 3700 Mill Rd., Paso Robles.

soNGWrItErs at PLay trIButE to NEIL youNG Neil Young songs performed by Archie Logsdon, Nick Brittan, Elizabeth Etta, Sebastian Luna, Noach Tangeras, Donna Phillips, Ben Davis, David Foster Evans, Miss Leo, Jack Poulis, Steve Key, and Sofia Lundgren. For ages 21 and over. sept. 12, 6:30-9 p.m. $5. 805-772-8388. songwritersatplay.com/calendar/. Morro Bay Wine Seller, 601 Embarcadero, Morro Bay. North sLo CouNt y

CataLINa EDDy & thE BLuE KEys LIVE Catalina Eddy & The Blue Keys perform their unique mix of blues, roots-rock, and soul, featuring both classics and tasty originals by award-winning songwriter Ted Waterhouse. sept. 9, 8-10:30 p.m. $10 general; $5 club members. 805-227-6800. catalinaeddy.com. D’anbino Vineyards and Cellars, 710 Pine St, Paso Robles.

DaMoN CastILLo LIVE Damon Castillo headlines this Wine-Down Wednesday concert with opening act Katie Chappell. Damon’s original music style has been described as “jam band plus pop, layered with funky jazz, and full of old-school soul.” sept. 13, 6-8 p.m. $15. 805-226-8881. songwritersatplay.com/. Sculpterra Winery, 5015 Linne Rd., Paso Robles.

thE GIPsy KINGs FEaturING NICoLas rEyEs aND toNINo BaLIarDo The Gipsy Kings perform their classic flamenco sound and exuberant vocals alongside sons Nicolas Reyes and Tonino Baliardo. sept. 9, 7:30-10:30 p.m. $45-$90. 805-286-3680. vinaroblesamphitheatre.com. Vina Robles Amphitheatre, 3800 Mill Rd., Paso Robles.

LIa MENaKEr LIVE Lia Menaker infuses poetry and theatrical flair into a blend of pop, rock, and soul music. sept. 10, 6-9 p.m. Free. 805-461-1393. Last Stage West BBQ, 15050 Morro Road, Highway 41 at Torro Creek Road, Atascadero.

LINN’s suMMEr CoNCErt sErIEs Featuring live local music, beer, wine, and food. Saturdays, 2-5 p.m. through oct. 28 Free admission. 9243040. linnsfruitbin.com. Linn’s Easy As Pie Cafe, 4251 Bridge St., Cambria.

NICK NaCE LIVE Special guests include Craig

Louis Dingman. sept. 17, 1-4 p.m. Free. 805-2268881. Sculpterra Winery, 5015 Linne Rd., Paso Robles, sculpterra.com/.

PEPE aGuILar IN CoNCErt Pepe Aguilar performs mariachi and Latin pop fusion hits. sept. 8, 8-10:30 p.m. $56-$96. 805-286-3680. vinaroblesamphitheatre.com. Vina Robles Amphitheatre, 3800 Mill Rd., Paso Robles.

BooK DIsCussIoN - THE SYMPATHIZER The Sympathizer by Nguyen Viet Thanh, recipient of the 2016 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. sept. 14, 10:30 a.m.noon Free. 805-539-9374. slolibrary.com. San Luis Obispo Library, 995 Palm St., San Luis Obispo. CorNErs oF thE Mouth PoEtry sErIEs

strut your stuff

Swing by the San Luis Obispo Repertory Theatre for the musical revue The All Night Strut, onstage through Sept. 17. The show features a live band playing tunes from the 1930s and ’40s, and runs Wednesday through Sunday at 7 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are $20 to $38 and are available via slorep.org or at 786-2440. thE rEaL BLuEs JaM North All Blues musicians, regardless of experience, are welcome to join this jam session. Hosted by Ted Waterhouse with Bruce Willard and Dean Giles. thursdays, 6:30-9:30 p.m. $5 donation/musicians exempt. 805-704-5116. danbino.com. D’anbino Vineyards and Cellars, 710 Pine St, Paso Robles.

toM CorBEtt LIVE sept. 10, 1-4 p.m. Free. 805-226-8881. Sculpterra Winery, 5015 Linne Rd., Paso Robles, sculpterra.com/.

traIN WrECK FrIDay: thE INCrEMENtaLs ring a picnic, food to grill, or purchase dinner from Stein’s Catering. Free Wine Tasting 5-7pm. No outside alcohol or pets please. Lawn chairs recommended. sept. 15, 5:30-8:30 p.m. $15 pp/ free to wine club and children 6 and under. 805238-9940. pomarjunction.com/events/. Pomar Junction Vineyards & Winery, 5036 S. El Pomar Dr., Templeton. s a N L u Is o B I s P o

CoMMuNIty JaM Reignite your love for music and play with others in unique, supportive community. All levels and all instruments welcome. Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m. through oct. 6 $49. 805-546-3132. cuesta.edu/communityprograms. Cuesta College Community Programs, Highway 1, San Luis Obispo.

For thE FoLKs BENEFIt CoNCErt The Sam Chase and the Untraditional share the stage with The Turkey Buzzards to benefit the SLO Surfrider Foundation. sept. 8, 7-11 p.m. $10 donation. 805-888-7940. facebook.com/forthefolksmusic. Whalebird Kombucha, 3576 Empleo St Unit #1, San Luis Obispo. s o u t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

CENtraL Coast FIDDLErs JaM sEssIoN Musicians, dancers, and listeners are invited to enjoy this casual jam session. With feature classic country, bluegrass, and oldies music along with refreshments. All string instruments welcome. sept. 10, 1:15-3:30 p.m. Free. 805-937-2238. centralcoastfiddlers.org. Arroyo Grande Community Center, 211 Vernon St., Arroyo Grande.

CuEsta rIDGE Cuesta Ridge will perform in the Village of Arroyo Grande. Kiwanis Centennial Playground at Elm Start Park will be the featured non-profit. sept. 10, 1 p.m. Free. 805-473-2250. agvillageconcerts.com. Heritage Square Park, 201 Nelson St., Arroyo Grande.

PIsMo BEaCh PaCIFIC BrEEZE CoNCErts Features local bands and activities. second sunday of every month, 1-4 p.m. Free. 805-773-7063. Dinosaur Caves Park, 2701 Price St, Pismo Beach.

a toast to thE rat PaCK LIVE A musical journey featuring the greatest hits from the

legendary Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, and Sammy Davis Jr. sept. 16, 7:30-9:30 p.m. $29-$46. 805489-9444. clarkcenter.org. Clark Center for the Performing Arts, 487 Fair Oaks Ave., Arroyo Grande. s a N ta M a r I a Va L L E y/ L o s a L a M o s

thE MoLLy rINGWaLD ProJECt IN CoNCErt The Molly Ringwald Project comes to the Central Coast as part of Presqu’ile’s Summer Concert Series. sept. 9, 5:30-9 p.m. $20. 805-9378110. presquilewine.com. Presqu’ile Winery, 5391 Presqu’ile Drive, Santa Maria. s a N ta y N E Z Va L L E y

BaMBoo Born as Francisco Belardo Gaudencio Lope Manalac, Bamboo is best known as the frontman for bands like Rivermaya and his very own Bamboo. sept. 8, 8 p.m. $55/$75. chumashcasino. com. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Highway 246, Santa Ynez.

“CraFtED” LIVE MusIC sErIEs Features artists from all genres of music. thursdays, 6 p.m., Fridays, 8 p.m. and Saturdays, 8 p.m. 686-4742. bottlest.com. Bottlest Winery, Bar & Bistro, 35 Industrial Way, Buellton. JIM MEssINa LIVE Limited VIP tickets available. sept. 7-8, 7-10 p.m. $65-$90. 805-691-9413. standingsunwines.com. Standing Sun Wines, 92 2nd St., Buellton. thE ruBEN LEE DaLtoN BaND LIVE Picnicfriendly performance of Southwest rock. sept. 15, 4-7 p.m. Free. 877-327-2656. solvangdanishdays. org. Solvang Park, Mission Drive and First Street, Solvang.

DJ/Dance North sLo CouNt y

PICK uP aND DaNCE Party Music by DJ KSSSD. Complimentary Tasting from 6:00-8:30pm. Taco Bar, and wine available for purchase. No outside alcohol, no pets please. sept. 9, 6-10 p.m. $20, free for members. 805-238-9940. pomarjunction.com/events/. Pomar Junction Vineyards & Winery, 5036 S. El Pomar Dr., Templeton.

KaraoKe/open Mic North sLo CouNt y

oPEN MIC NIGht Hosted by Rusty Hobbs. Featuring wine by the glass and burgers. Fridays, 5:30-9 p.m. through Dec. 15 $15.00, includes a glass of wine and a burger.. 805 237 2389. darkstarcellars.com/events/. Dark Star Cellars, 2985 Anderson Rd., Paso Robles.

Poetry reading with Paul Willis and Michael McLaughlin. Open reading to follow. sept. 17, 7-9 p.m. free. 805-903-3595. languageofthesoul.org. Linnaea’s Cafe, 1110 Garden St., San Luis Obispo.

thE END oF CassINI: EXPLorEr oF thE outEr soLar systEM The Cassini spacecraft will end its 13-year mission to the Saturn system as it enters the atmosphere on September 15. Planetary scientist Jani Radebaugh studies images captures by the spacecraft to learn about the origin and geologic history of Saturn’s moon Titan. sept. 16, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. 805-756-2448. physics.calpoly.edu. Spanos Theatre, Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo.

LEarN to CooK WIth thE suN Solar Cooking is a fun, easy, nutritious, efficient, and cost-effective way to prepare home-cooked meals even while you’re away all day. Third Saturday of every month, 12:30-2 p.m. through oct. 21 Free. 805-458-1241. Davies Farm, 5009 Jesperson Rd., San Luis Obispo. s o u t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

art aND hIstory oF DIsNEyLaND Chris Strodder, local author of The Disneyland Encyclopedia, shares artifacts and stories from the interesting past of Disneyland. sept. 9, 2-3 p.m. Free. 805-473-7161. slolibrary.org. Arroyo Grande Library, 800 W. Branch, Arroyo Grande. s a N ta M a r I a Va L L E y/ L o s a L a M o s

BI-LINGo Informal conversation to practice Spanish language skills for anyone with basic Spanish-speaking skills. second thursday of every month, 6-7 p.m. Free. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria. GuaDaLuPE WaLK aND taLK Join Shirley Boydstun on her monthly Walk and Talk around Guadalupe. Shirley will discuss Guadalupe’s points of interest and its history. Rain will cancel. Third Saturday of every month, 10-11 a.m. through Dec. 16 suggested donation. 805-343-2455. dunescenter.org/events/. Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, 1065 Guadalupe St, Guadalupe. VaLLEy sPEaKs Attorney Joni Gray, a native of the Santa Maria Valley and former member of the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors will be the guest speaker. sept. 9, 11 a.m. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

cLubs & Meetings N o r t h C oa s t s L o C o u N t y

GarDEN CLuB MEEtING Linda Hicks will speak on daffodils at this first meeting of the season. New members welcome. sept. 14, 1-3 p.m. Los Osos Valley Garden Club, 1675 Los Osos Valley Rd., Los Osos, 805-534-1951. saN LuIs oBIsPo

BooK DIsCussIoN The book for this discussion is The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid. second thursday of every month, 10:30 a.m.-noon Free. 805-539-9374. slolibrary.org/index.php/ CULTURE & LIFESTYLE continued page 26

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 25


CULTURE & LIFESTYLE from page 25 adults/book-groups. San Luis Obispo Library, 995 Palm St., San Luis Obispo.

Wednesday, Thursday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Through Jan. 31 wineanddesign.com. CORE Winery, 105 W Clark Ave., Orcutt.

THE WORKFLOW OF WRITING A high-value

Mind & Body

meeting to all who attend, guaranteed to provide some unique insights into the writing process. Sept. 12, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. 805-225-1251. events.pubwriter.com/. United Church of Christ (Congregational) of San Luis Obispo, 11245 Los Osos Valley Rd., San Luis Obipo.

FREE MEDITaTION CLaSS Megan McGreen,

S O u T H C Oa S T S L O C O u N T y

NIPOMO SENIOR CENTER The center is open

N O R T H C Oa S T S L O C O u N T y LCSW, and Ruth Cherry, PhD, long time meditators and psychotherapists, teach meditation to reduce stress and increase well-being. Fridays, 10:30 a.m.noon Free. 805-748-3372. meditationintro.com. Morro Bay Library, 625 Harbor St., Morro Bay.

five days a week; closed on weekends and holidays. Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Through aug. 31 929-1615. Nipomo Senior Center, 200 E. Dana St., Nipomo.

MEDITaTION FOR WELL bEING Sept. 8, 10:30 a.m.-noon free. 805-748-3372. meditationintro.com. Morro Bay Library, 625 Harbor St., Morro Bay.

Support GroupS

based practices of mindfulness and movement to activate well-being. No drop-ions. Thursdays, 5:30-7 p.m. Through Nov. 2 805-270-5523. mindfulkindfulyouniversity.com/gps-class/. Ignite Movement Studio, 698 Morro Bay Blvd., Morro Bay.

NORTH SLO COuNT y

NaR-aNON FaMILy GROuP MEETING A meeting for those who know or have known a feeling of desperation concerning the addiction of a loved one. Fridays, 12-1 p.m. Free. 805-221-5523. The Redeemer Lutheran Church, 4500 El Camino Real, Atascadero. SaN LuIS ObISPO

RESOLVE GENERaL INFERTILITy SuPPORT GROuP If you or anyone you know is suffering through the trauma of infertility, support is finally here. A peer led support group through RESOLVE, the national infertility association. Second Wednesday of every month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. through Aug. 8 Free. 619-807-7006. Downtown Slo, Higuera St, San Luis Obispo.

NaR-aNON - LET IT bEGIN WITH ME Nar Anon is a support group for those who are affected by someone else’s addiction. Tuesdays 458-7655, http://www.naranoncentralca.org/meetings/ meeting-list/.

Create and Learn SaN LuIS ObISPO

SLO COuNTy LIbRaRy CaRDHOLDER FREE HOuRS SLO County Library Cardholders can have free access to SLO MakerSpace (after taking Basic Safety) five days a week. Cardholders can use our woodshop, sewing, or general free areas, or complete any specialty classes and use that machine/area during Library Hours. TuesdaysFridays, 4-7 p.m. and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 0. 805-242-1285. slomakerspace.com/libraryprogram/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo.

SLO MaKERSPaCE baSIC SaFETy SLO MakerSpace offers Basic Safety twice a week, a requirement for anyone who wants to use SLO MakerSpace tools and space. Basic Safety is a 90-minute shop walk-through reviewing all areas of the shop that can be dangerous to you and others. Tuesdays, 6-8 p.m. and Tuesdays, Saturdays, 2-4 p.m. Free for Members and SLO County Library Cardholders. 242-1285. slomakerspace.com/store/ makerspace-basic-safety-class/. SLO MakerSpace, 81 Higuera St., Ste. 160 and 180, San Luis Obispo. S a N Ta M a R I a Va L L E y/ L O S a L a M O S

DESIGN ON WHEELS aT CORE Wine and Design On-Wheels has paired up with CORE Winery Tasting Room. Create a painting and sample CORE wines. Register on the Wine and Design website. Second

PHOTO COURTESY OF TE FOOD BANK COALTION OF SLO COUNTY

MINDFuL HabITS: GPS TOWaRDS WELLbEING A workshop style class using evidence

yIN yOGa aND MaSSaGE WITH DOTERRa ESSENTIaL OILS Join Bridget Salisbury & Massage

Therapist Jessica Pua Holder. Sept. 10, 2-4 p.m. $30. 805-215-4565. facebook.com/Omniyogastudio/. Omnio Yoga Studio, 2190 9th St., Los Osos.

yOGa STRETCH Explore yoga postures and increase strength and flexibility. Set to inspiring music and appropriate for beginners. Tuesdays, 6:30-7:30 p.m. email support@getstudiofit.com. 805-776-3676. Cassandra Bodlak, 349 Quintana Rd., Morro Bay, studiofitnessmorrobay.com. NORTH SLO COuNT y

50+ yOGa CLaSSES Baby boomer and over 50? Its not too late to get fit with a regular exercise program with certified instructor, Doris Lance. Tuesdays, 1-2 p.m. Through Sept. 26 $45. 805-2373988. prcity.com/recreation. Centennial Park, 600 Nickerson Dr., Paso Robles.

FREE PINEaL TONING CLaSS Every second Tuesday of the month, Lightshare hosts a Pineal Toning Group and Instructional Class, facilitated by Lightshare team volunteers. No registration or prior experience is necessary. Second Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Through Dec. 12 Free. 805305-7595. lightshare.us. Lightshare Center, 22701 El Camino Real, Santa Margarita. S a N L u IS O b IS P O

CaT yOGa CLaSSES Sundays, 10:15-11:30 a.m. $20. 543-9316 Ext. 10. woodshumanesociety.org/ news-and-events/event.php?id=347. Woods Humane Society, 875 Oklahoma Ave., San Luis Obispo.

CONSCIOuS aGING: aN 8-SESSION CLaSS Topics include self-compassion, life review, transformative practices, creating a new vision of aging, and more. Sept. 7, 4-5:30 p.m. There is a one-time workbook fee of $10 collected in advance.. 805-544-2266. hospiceslo.org/workshops/ conscious-aging. Hospice SLO County, 1304 Pacific St., San Luis Obispo.

GENTLE yOGa WITH CaSSaNDRa bODLaK Cassandra’s classes are more than workouts, they’re experiences. Mats, blocks and straps are available. Open to all levels. Tuesdays, 10:15-11:15 a.m. and Tuesdays, Thursdays, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Through Dec. 14 $56. 805-549-1222. register. asapconnected.com. San Luis Coastal Adult School, 1500 Lizzie St., San Luis Obispo.

RESTORaTIVE GaNJa yOGa aND LIVE ELECTRONIC SOuND baTH September’s event features special guest Zodiac Gallery who will

Be a hero

Team up with the Food Bank Coalition of SLO County to fight hunger at the annual Hunger Walk and 5K, Sept. 16 at 9:30 a.m. at Laguna Lake Park in SLO. Check-in begins at 9 a.m. Participants are encouraged to dress up as their favorite superhero. Awards will be given for best original, classic, kid, pet, and group costumes. Registration is $30 for adults and free for children 17 and under. Visit slofoodbank.org or call 238-4664 to find out more. be providing a ive electronic sound bath during the event. Sept. 9, 7-10 p.m. 30. vanaspati.yoga/ current-classes/. TBA, Call for location, San Luis Obispo, 8053956778.

SELF DEFENSE INTRO This Women’s class teaches simple but powerful defenses for the most common standing attacks. Techniques are from the nationally acclaimed Model Mugging program and can be used by women of all shapes and sizes. The instructor is Mary Tesoro. Pre-register (no dropins). Sept. 15, 5:30-9 p.m. $37. 805-549-1222. ae.lcusd.org. San Luis Coastal Adult School, 1500 Lizzie St., San Luis Obispo. S O u T H C Oa S T S L O C O u N T y

LaDIES bOOT CaMP 5 week program, consists of drills, timed tests, cardio sessions, and resistance training. Includes progress tracking, and more. For all levels. Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 6-7 a.m. through Sept. 27 805-474-9928. tantrumfitness. com. This is a 6 Week program. Sessions consist of drills, timed tests, cardio sessions, and resistance training. Sept. 11, 6:30-7:30 p.m. 805-474-9928. tantrumfitness.com/bombshell-bootcamp. Tantrum Fitness, 1590 W Grand Ave, Grover Beach.

MEDITaTION FOR INTuITIVE DEVELOPMENT 6-week series. Clarivoyance, Clairaudience, Clairsentience, etc. are all increased by meditation, the quiet observation of the inner

r a ts

world. AnnKathleen will lead guided meditations to increase connection to each of the 5 senses that relate to different psychic abilities. Thursdays, 6:30-8 p.m. Through Oct. 12 $82.50. 805-5981509. divining.weebly.com. Halcyon Store Post Office, 936 South Halcyon Rd., Arroyo Grande. S a N Ta M a R I a Va L L E y/ L O S a L a M O S

THE Way THROuGH: INSPIRaTIONaL aND VISIONaRy bOOK CLub Based on the Body, Mind and Soul Mentoring work that AnnKathleen created. Wednesdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Through Sept. 20 $115. 805-598-1509. divining.weebly.com. Divine Inspiration, 947 E Orange St, Santa Maria.

outdoorS N O R T H C Oa S T S L O C O u N T y

SIERRa CLub HIKE - MORRO STRaND STaTE bEaCH Less strenuous, 3.5 mile roundtrip beach hike, Morro Strand State Beach. This scenic hike will lead you through wetlands, sand dunes, onto the beach, and ultimately to the base of the iconic Morro Rock. Sept. 16, 10:30 a.m. no cost. 805-602-0403. sierraclub.org/santa-lucia. Morro Strand State Beach, End of San Jacinto St., Morro Bay. CULTURE & LIFESTYLE continued page 27

GET A LITTLE MORE COLORFUL EVERY WEEK

NewTimesSLO.com/art/ 26 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com


CULTURE & LIFESTYLE from page 26 San LuiS ObiSpO

auDubOn biRD WaLK aT San LuiS ObiSpO bOTaniCaL GaRDEn This engaging walk through the SLO Botanical Garden and the surrounding environs will get you acquainted with the wide variety of feathered friends found in SLO County. Sept. 9, 9-11 a.m. $5 for garden members, $10 for public. 805-541-1400 x 303. slobg.org/bird/. San Luis Obispo Botanical Garden, 3450 Dairy Creek Rd., San Luis Obispo. S O u T h C Oa S T S L O C O u n T y

Obispo, 805-756-7297.

CaL pOLy WOMEn’S SOCCER VS. paCiFiC Youth Day, all kids age 13 and under get into the game for free! The first 100 fans will also get a Cal Poly soccer scarf. Sept. 17, noon Alex G. Spanos Stadium, 1 Grand Ave., San Luis Obispo, 805-756-7297.

CaL pOLy WOMEn’S SOCCER VS. SaCRaMEnTO STaTE Sept. 15, 7 p.m. Alex G. Spanos Stadium, 1 Grand Ave., San Luis Obispo, 805-756-7297.

KidS & Family

Access the Pismo Preserve via free shuttle from one of 4 shuttle stops. Access is via shuttle only. Sept. 17, 8 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. 805-544-9096. lcslo. org. Pismo Preserve, Mattie Rd., Pismo Beach.

SiERRa CLub hiKE - ShELL bEaCh PoleCats is a group dedicated to demonstrating the effective use of trekking poles. Go right and park near the illegal gate. Sept. 9, 10 a.m. no cost. 805-458-5575. sierraclub.org/santa-lucia. Shell Beach Trailhead, Corner of Bluff Dr. and El Portal, Shell Beach.

S O u T h C Oa S T S L O C O u n T y

bOOK bRaCELET WORKShOp Design an original bracelet with actual pages from beloved books. Class for ages 10-17. Registration required at slolibrary.org. Sept. 16, 2-3 p.m. Free. 805-4737161. slolibrary.org. Arroyo Grande Library, 800 W. Branch, Arroyo Grande. S a n Ta M a R i a Va L L E y/ L O S a L a M O S

n O R T h C Oa S T S L O C O u n T y

DiSCOVERy Day aT ThE piSMO pRESERVE

and Thursdays at 4pm. Pre-registration required. Tuesdays, Thursdays. Through Sept. 28 $50-75 /mo. 805-544-8866. aikidosanluisobispo.com. Budo Ryu, 3536 South Higuera St., San Luis Obispo.

DRaGOnFLy aCaDEMy pERSOnaL EnRiChMEnT pROGRaM - LOS OSOS Integrating mindfulness, yoga, and social-emotional learning to develop the essential life skills of emotional intelligence.Ages 4-18, flexible scheduling, approved Vendor for Inspire Charter. Mondays-Saturdays mindfulkindfulyouniversity.com. Mindful Kindful YOUniversity, 1520 4th St., Los Osos, 805-270-5523.

aFTERnOOn STORy TiME Special program featuring stories, movies, and a craft. Open to children aged 6 and above. Tuesdays, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Through Oct. 10 Free. 805-925-0994. cityofsantamaria.org. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

biLinGuaL STORy TiME Features

nORTh SLO COunT y

SportS nORTh SLO COunT y

bEST buDDiES ChaLLEnGE: hEaRST CaSTLE pRESEnTED by pEpSi-COLa A 100, 60, or 30-mile cycling ride on loop courses starting and finishing at the beautiful Hearst Ranch. Sept. 9 bestbuddieschallenge.org/hc/. Hearst Castle, 750 Hearst Castle Rd., San Simeon, 305-374-2233.

MiD-STaTE MOTO Mania All-day event featuring professional and amateur motorcycle racing, a vintage motorcycle show, live bands and more. Sept. 9, 12-9 p.m. $10-$25. 805-440-4839. midstatemotomania.com. Paso Robles Event Center, 2198 Riverside Ave., Paso Robles. San LuiS ObiSpO

CaL pOLy MEn’S SOCCER VS. ST. MaRy’S Heroes Night, so all military and first responders receive up to 4 ffree general admission tickets to this game, and the first 1,000 fans in attendance will get a patriotic Cal Poly koozie. Sept. 10, 4 p.m. Alex G. Spanos Stadium, 1 Grand Ave., San Luis

FaLL FaMiLy yOGa SERiES WiTh paSO RObLES RECREaTiOn SERViCES Taught by certified kid

SEpt. 7 – SEpt. 14 2017

amd adult yoga instructor, Vanessa Orr. Thursdays, 10-10:30 a.m. Through Oct. 26 $60. 805-237-3988. yayayogaca.com. Centennial Park, 600 Nickerson Dr., Paso Robles. S a n L u iS O b i S p O

pyJaMa DRaMa - DRaMa anD iMaGinaTiVE pLay CLaSSES Drama and imaginative play develops skills that can last a lifetime like the confidence to be brave, desire to share ideas with others, and the joy of solving problems with friends by your side. 9:30 a.m.: ages 6mo - 2.5, 10:15 a.m.: ages 2-4 years,11 a.m.: ages 5-8 years. Saturdays, 11-11:45 a.m. and Mondays, 9:30-11 a.m. $12. 805709-0761. pyjamadrama.com. SLO Movement Arts Center, 2074 Parker St., San Luis Obispo.

yOuTh aiKiDO CLaSSES Kids have fun, stay fit, make friends, gain important life skills for today’s world, and learn to deal with bullies without becoming one. Aiki-Mites (age 4-6) class is at 3pm on Tuesdays. Aiki-Kids (age 7-12) classes are Tuesdays

fun stories, songs, and rhymes in both Spanish and English. Saturdays, 11-11:30 a.m. Through Oct. 14 Free. 805-925-0994. cityofsantamaria. org/city-government/departments/ library. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

GLEEFuL GnOMES STORy TiME

This story time features stories, songs, finger plays, digital storytelling, and a book-on-DVD. This story time is open to preschoolers aged 3 to 5 and their families. Wednesdays, 10:30-11 a.m. Through Oct. 11 Free. 805-925-0994. cityofsantamaria.org/citygovernment/departments/library. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

hOMEWORK hELp Free after school homework help for grades K-6. Mondays-Thursdays, 4-7 p.m. Through May 31 Free. 805-9250994. cityofsantamaria.org/city-government/ departments/library. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria. REaDaLOuD The Buellton Library presents

Museum features a locomotive, boxcar, caboose, railroad artifacts and diorama. Second Saturday of every month, 12-4 p.m. 714-4927. Santa Maria Transit Center, Miller and Boone Streets, Santa Maria.

STORy TiME FOR TODDLERS Toddlers welcome to learn and grow through stories, movement, and music. Registration is required. Story time on Sep.7 is 11:30 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. All other times 10 to 10:45 a.m. Thursdays, 10-10:45 a.m. Through Oct. 12 Free. 805-925-0994. cityofsantamaria.org/ city-government/departments/library. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

SupERhERO TRaininG WiTh SpiDER-Man Learn what it takes to be a hero, including cool action moves, how to be stealthy and quick, how to treat others kindly, and be brave and courageous! Costumes encouraged but not required. Sept. 13, 4-5 p.m. Free. 805-925-0994. cityofsantamaria.org/ city-government/departments/library. Santa Maria Public Library, 421 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

TEEn CaRDbOaRD bOaT REGaTTa For grades 7 through 12, test boat building skills and creativity. Sept. 10, 12-4 p.m. Free. 925-0951, Ext. 2519. Abel Maldonado Community Youth Center, 600 S. McClelland St., Santa Maria.

Spiritual n O R T h C Oa S T S L O C O u n T y

MaRRiaGE R & R All day marriage retreat for engaged, newly weds, and oldie weds. Includes discussion, sharing, and a catered lunch. Presented by marriage counselor Frank Walker LMFT. Sept. 16, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $ 30 per couple. 805 395 1155. cambriavineyard.org/. Cambria Vineyard Church, 1617 Main St., Cambrai.

MEDiTaTiOn FOR WiSDOM anD WELL-bEinG Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-noon Through Sept. 29 Free. 805-748-3372. meditationintro.com. Morro Bay Library, 625 Harbor St., Morro Bay.

S a n L u iS O b i S p O

inTuiTiVE anD ORaCLE CaRD REaDinGS

ReadAloud, a play-reading group for adults, teens and children 9 and up. Fridays, 4-5 p.m. Free. 688-3115. Buellton Library, 140 W. Highway 246, Buellton.

Readings by an Intuitive who works with quantum physics, auras, and energy as tools to provide answers, healing, and guidance. Sept. 9, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $60 for 30 minutes, ($55 for mentioning

SanTa MaRia VaLLEy RaiLWay hiSTORiCaL MuSEM The Santa Maria Valley Railway Historical

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE continued page 28

DOWNTOWN PASO ROBLES MAIN STREET ASSOCIATION PRESENTS. . .

“Rebel Without a Cause” 1955 Original ty r a P r fte A r a Sidec

Sun., Sept. 10th - 7 pm - Park Cinemas Sponsored by Park Cinemas

Pajama Movie Night (PJs Optional) $10.00 Includes Popcorn & Soda

James Dean Natalie Wood Sal Mineo

Sponsored by

saturday, September 16, 2017 8:00-11:00pm

loading dock, performing arts center, slo Sidecar Cocktails | DJ JoJo Lopez

tickets on sale now | $50

register at fpacslo.org/heart-arts-gala

PARK CINEMAS Tickets, call Main Street Office: 238-4103 Or at the office at 835 12th St. #D (in the alley) Visa, MC, Discover

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 27


PHOTO COURTESY OF SKYLAR CRUMBLEY

HALF MARATHON • SEA SIDE 5K • KIDS’ FUN RUN

Sunday

October 8th, 2017

dinner For dough

Enjoy a barbecue chicken dinner while helping to raise funds for St. Patrick’s Catholic School in Arroyo Grande at their 55th annual fundraiser, Sept. 17 from noon to 5 p.m. The event features an auction, farmers’ market, kids’ carnival, and more. Admission is free; barbecue is $9 for adults and $5 for kids. Visit stpatschoolag.com for further info. S O U T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

CULTURE & LIFESTYLE from page 27

Register Today! www.CitytotheSea.org

this ad). Prices vary by time. 805-723-4208. aodesign77.wixsite.com/aolsen/about. Tamed Wild Apothecary, 144 West Branch St., Arroyo Grande.

TIBETAN BUDDHISM BOOK STUDY Meditation practice and a discussion of Foundations of Tibetan Buddhism, by H.E. Kalu Rinpoche. Wednesdays, 7-9 p.m. Free. 805-438-3949. BodhiPath SLO, 3484 Gregory Ct., San Luis Obispo, bodhipath.org. S O U T H C OA S T S L O C O U N T Y

exhibitions

WISDOM READINGS Inspiration from Spirit through the Tarot and Oracle cards. Tuesdays, 1-5 p.m. $30-$60. 805-598-1509. divining.weebly.com. Halcyon Store Post Office, 936 South Halcyon Rd., Arroyo Grande.

SLAM: california sculpture donald frith: master in porcelain thursday painters: a legacy kids’ eye view education

large variety of locally grown produce. Open year round Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. nipomofarmersmarket.com/. Nipomo Farmers Market, Via Concha Road, Nipomo.

pISMO BEACH FARMERS MARKET Where the Produce Meets the Sea. In the parking lot on the corner of Highway 1 and Main Street. Wednesdays, 3-6 p.m. Free. 805-773-4382. pismochamber.com. Pismo Beach Pier, West end of Pomeroy, Pismo Beach. S A N TA M A R I A VA L L E Y/ L O S A L A M O S

DOWNTOWN FRIDAYS Features fresh produce,

Coast holds youth services for junior high school students. Mondays, 6:30 p.m. Free. 929-8990. thecitycc.org. Faith Life Community Church, 726 W Tefft St, Nipomo.

live music, food booths, arts and crafts, and more. Fridays. Through Sept. 30 Free. 331-4744. Town Center West, Broadway and Main, Santa Maria.

ORCUTT FARMERS MARKET Presents local farmers and small businesses. Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Orcutt Farmers Market, Bradley Road, Orcutt.

NORTH SLO COUNT Y

day trip to chagall exhibit at lacma 9/11 SLOMA.ORG

NIpOMO FARMERS MARKET Includes a

FestiVals

CASA INFO SESSION Learn about

events

for details

produce, artists and musicians. Saturdays, 12-2:25 p.m. Arroyo Grande Farmers Market, Olohan Alley, Arroyo Grande.

YOUTH SERVICES The City Church Central

Volunteers

adult workshops kids after school art

ARROYO GRANDE FARMERS MARKET Includes

emma luna white stack, ceramic

Free Admission • Open 11–5 • Closed Tuesdays 1010 Broad Street west end of the Mission Plaza

THE WEATHERMAN HEATING & AIR

volunteer opportunities at CASA of NORTH SLO COUNT Y SLO County. Become an advocate for sePt. 7 – sePt. 14 EVENING IN SANTA MARGARITA an abused or neglected infant, toddler, 2017 AND pEDDLER’S MARKET Support child or teen, or a mentor for a young Friends of the Santa Margarita Library adult leaving foster care. Sept. 13, 6:30and enjoy local restaurants, good cheer, and 7:30 p.m. slocasa.org. Starbucks, 2301 Theatre music downtown. Sept. 15, 12-9 p.m. 508-380Dr., Paso Robles, 805-237-8278. 8858. Downtown Santa Margarita, 6420 W. Pozo SAN LUIS OBISpO

HOSpICE SLO COUNTY VOLUNTEER TRAINING In-Home Volunteers provide comfort, practical assistance, and support to those with life-limiting illnesses. Preregistration is required at www.hospiceslo.org. Sept. 8, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. 805-544-2266. hospiceslo.org/workshops/homevolunteer-training. French Hospital Copeland Health Education Pavilion, 3rd Floor, 1911 Johnson Ave, San Luis Obispo.

MEALS ON WHEELS Meals on Wheels, San Luis Obispo, needs noon time drivers. Must have own car to deliver prepared meals. Mondays-Fridays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 805-235-8870. San Luis Obispo, Citywide, SLO.

· Service & Repair · New Install for Heating & AC

Food & drink

· Service Maintenance Agreements

Farmers markets

HELPING YOU SET THE TEMP

S A N L U IS O B I S p O

Robert Iverson Owner

CALL: 805-459-8191 E-mail: robertalleniverson@gmail.com LICENSED & BONDED LICENSE #1020473

28 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

FARMERS MARKET Farmers Market in SLO is the largest Farmers Market in California. Thursdays, 6:10-9 p.m. Downtown Slo, Higuera St, San Luis Obispo.

SLO FARMERS MARKET Hosts over 60 vendors. Saturdays, 8-10:45 a.m. World Market Parking Lot, 2650 Main St., San Luis Obispo.

Rd., Santa Margarita.

eVents NORTH SLO COUNT Y

WINEMAKER DINNER Enjoy dining among the vines and under the stars. Chef John McDevitt of Farmstead Catering will prepare a four course meal using a BBQ and wood fired oven. Each course will be paired with award-winning Pomar Junction wine. Call for reservations. Sept. 8, 6-10 p.m. $90 for club members/$105 for non-members. 805238-9940. pomarjunction.com/events/. Pomar Junction Vineyards & Winery, 5036 S. El Pomar Dr., Templeton.

WINEMAKER’S SUNSET HAYRIDE & FULL MOON pARTY A sunset hayride chaperoned by Jimmy the winemaker. Sept. 8, 6-9 p.m. Free. 805-227-4766. docerobleswinery.com. Doce Robles Winery, 2023 Twelve Oaks, Paso Robles. S A N L U IS O B I S p O

WOODSTOCK’S SLO pINT NIGHT With the first pint as low as $5, Woodstock’s gives half-off refills in the same glass. Wednesdays, 8-11 p.m. Free. 805-541-4420. woodstocksslo.com. Woodstock’s Pizza, 1000 Higuera St, San Luis Obispo. WOODSTOCK’S SLO TRIVIA NIGHT For trivia aficionados and fun-lovers alike! Tuesdays, 9-11 p.m. Free. 805-541-4420. woodstocksslo.com/ events/. Woodstock’s Pizza, 1000 Higuera St, San Luis Obispo. ∆


Arts Artifacts Art on the inside

See the world from a different perspective at the Between the Bars art exhibit at Cuesta College’s Harold J. Miossi Gallery. The show, on display through Oct. 31, features the work of incarcerated artists from the California Men’s Colony in SLO. The work was displayed at Cal Poly’s Robert E. Kennedy Library earlier this summer. The exhibit serves to provide a medium for dismantling negative perceptions about prisoners, demonstrating their unique abilities to create, and empowering CMC artists to hone their interpersonal and professional skills through collaboration to develop and display their artwork. For gallery information, visit cuesta.edu.

Barn dancin’

Class up your next barn session by hitting up Ballet at the Barn on Sept. 9 at Avila Valley Barn. The event will be held from 6:30 to 9 p.m. and features a show by Ballet Theatre San Luis Obispo’s performing company. Attendees can also enjoy dinner, dessert, live and silent auctions, box raffles for the kids, fund-a-need for the BT-SLO Scholarship Fund, and more. Tickets are $35 for adults and $15 for children under age 12. Visit the Ballet at the Barn event page on Facebook for more information.

➤ Film [39] ➤ Get Out! [44]

Literature

BY ANDREA ROOKS

Many voices, one author George Saunders to read from his novel, which weaves monologues from beyond the grave, at the PAC

I

n his first novel, George Saunders takes readers into the 19th century, through death, and to the bardo, an in-between place where various souls are still hanging onto something dear from their lives. Dozens of characters populate Lincoln in the Bardo, and whether they’ve passed into the grave or are yet living, these souls are pressed up against their humanity in the face of loss and sorrow. Come Sept. 30, the acclaimed author will bring his voice to SLO County by reading excerpts from his novel at the PAC on the Cal Poly campus. Over the past two decades, Saunders has cultivated compassion and wit in his writings, and his style and voice have captured the attention of the literary world, students, and readers across the country and beyond. He has four short story collections to his name plus a novella, a book of essays, and a children’s book. He has often been published in GQ, Harpers Magazine, and The New Yorker, and TIME named him one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World in 2013. Accolades aside, Saunders’ characters are relatable. His works cut to the heart of the human condition with equal parts grit and whimsy, sans sentimentality. He keeps readers on the hook, almost daring them to finish his stories without some level of understanding PHOTO COURTESY OF CHLOE AFTEL

Seasonal DIY

With summer quickly slipping away, it’s time to embrace all things fall, starting with the dining room table. Get in the autumnal spirit by attending the Fall Centerpieces for Your Table workshop, taught by Linda Georgeadis of Beverly’s Fabrics. The class will be held Sept. 16 from 4 to 5 p.m. at the Alex Madonna Expo Center as part of the DIY Workshops at the Inspired Home Expo of SLO. As a former owner of a flower shop and off and on member of the Beverly’s team for the last 20 years, Georgeadis specializes in holiday decorating and floral arrangements. Come learn how to create a long-lasting beautiful centerpiece for your holiday table setting. Tickets and passes for the expo range from $30 to $99. Visit eventbrite.com for more information. ∆ —Ryah Cooley

➤ Gallery [31] ➤ Starkey [33] ➤ Clubs [36]

and empathy for his characters. In Lincoln in the Bardo, Saunders weaves together historical and fictional accounts of President Abraham Lincoln grieving the loss of his young son. As in real life, some of these accounts differ, and the space between perspectives heightens the novel’s drama and poignant emotions. Saunders recently conversed with New Times over email regarding his upcoming reading, this first novel, and literature in general. New Times: What do you enjoy most about reading to an audience? George Saunders: Well, I’m a natural ham, so I like the sense of real-time connection—the feeling of everyone sort of leaning into the story together. Reading can underscore this idea that I feel is very important to my writing process—namely, that writing is a form of communication between reader and writer. Not a lecture or a performance, but an intimate connection, that either moves/persuades the reader, or doesn’t. NT: So much of Lincoln in the Bardo is concerned with characters telling their stories, to remember them and then share them. Why might it be important for us to hear—beyond reading—stories? GS: Well, in their case, they are telling their stories to underscore their identities— sort of like The Ancient Mariner, in the Coleridge poem. Beyond that—I was raised on the south side of Chicago, which, it turns out, is a real storyteller’s paradise. But so much of what is good IMAGE COURTESY OF BLUE FLOWER ARTS

30TH OF SEPTEMBER Author George Saunders brings his grit and whimsy to SLO County for a reading at the PAC at the end of the month. He’ll share excerpts from his recently published first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo.

ALL WERE SUFFERING As in his many short stories, George Saunders’ first novel captures a deep level of grief and sorrow balanced with levity and originality.

Lincoln in Obispo

Acclaimed author George Saunders will read from his recently published first novel, Lincoln in the Bardo, at the PAC on the Cal Poly campus on Sept. 30 at 8 p.m. For ticket info, visit calpolyarts.org. The cost ranges from $27.20 to $104 per person. For the full New Times interview with Saunders, visit newtimesslo.com.

about a Chicago story is in the spoken voice— the small emphases and pauses and even, you know, the eye-rolls, or assumed accents. So I’ve noticed that people will sometimes say that they understand my stories better once they hear them read aloud. NT: How do you choose what to read to an audience, especially from Lincoln in the Bardo? What types of scenes do you gravitate toward when reading aloud? GS: Generally, I like to read something selfcontained and entertaining. Funny is good. Again—I want to make it fun for the audience and for them to feel like we’ve been through an experience together, preferably a pleasurable one. NT: How are you planning to present the reading? Will you perform different voices for the many characters? GS: That book is tough. It’s made up of hundreds of monologues, and it’s a tough sell if I’m the only one doing it—I can’t do that many voices. We’ve been doing a staged reading from one section, that uses six actors. So, planning is ongoing for the Cal Poly reading. NT: After writing primarily short stories, you turned your energies to what is now Lincoln in the Bardo. In a 2013 conversation with David Sedaris, you’d said the novel in its early stages was shaping up to be a “worthy adversary.” How did your relationship to the novel’s writing process continue—did it remain a worthy adversary? And do you find that kind of challenge motivating to you as a writer? GS: Yes, it was a worthy adversary right to the end. I love the notion of writing as a form of self-expansion—to take on a project with the hope that it will challenge you technically, because a technical challenge always leads to personal growth, or a corresponding expansion in your understanding of the world. Form and ethos are connected that way, I think. And I am also a big believer in “not knowing”—that is, not knowing in advance what you want to say, or what your theme is, or … well, anything. Let the story tell you what it wants to be. I find that really exciting. NT: One of the most striking aspects of Lincoln in the Bardo is its form. What inspired you to write it in such a visually airy way? Had you ever seen a novel presented in a form like that? GS: That was suggested to me by the material. One good writing-related mantra is, “Try not to suck.” When I tried to write this particular (Lincoln-involving, 19th-century) story in more conventional ways (or, more truthfully, when I thought about writing it in those more conventional ways), the potential for SAUNDERS continued page 30

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 29


Arts SAUNDERS from page 29

PA C I F I C C O N S E R VAT O R Y T H E AT R E

LAST WEEKEND!

AUG 24 - SEP 10

Solvang Festival Theater

William Shakespeare

“PCPA’S CAST ABSOLUTELY NAILS THIS!”Santa Maria Sun SEP 15 - OCT 1 Marian Theatre Santa Maria

PULITZER & TONY

suckiness was great. So, one way of thinking about form is simply: to find form, lurch away from suckiness. This monologue-based form was a way of avoiding those obligatory third-person sentences like, “On a stormy night, Abraham Lincoln, having just lost his beloved son, Willie, walked into the deserted graveyard.” Ugh. I think I was influenced, also, by that George Plimpton book, Edie—an unconventional biography of Edie Sedgwick, made up of hundreds of (sometimes contradictory) personal stories about her, told by friends and acquaintances—no authoritative narrator, no final arbiter—just a bunch of voices, and the final story is just that accumulation of notions. NT: What are some non-writing-related practices or disciplines of yours that help your writing the most, that shape or inform you as a writer? Where do you turn to be nourished and grounded? GS: I love music. I listen to it and play it (badly). During the last stages of this book, I’d take breaks from writing and crank up some Wilco or Sleater-Kinney, just to remind myself of what intensity felt like on the receiving end, and then I’d listen to Copland or a beautiful song called “Appalachia Waltz” by Mark O’Connor, to take myself back into this sort of pastoral 19th-century mindset. Music sort of resets my aspirationto-beauty—makes me want to make something as moving and intense.

NT: What were some of your favorite stories or types of stories as a child? GS: There were a lot of good storytellers in my family, and I think what I retained from that was how mixed-mode the stories were—funny and smutty, sometimes, but also moving and human and sad. In retrospect, I can also see that in many of the stories, the joke was “on” the storyteller; he or she was put through some funny/degrading thing. I once heard Junot Diaz say that he thought writers tended to come out of backgrounds where they learned that language was power; in our family, if you could get somebody to laugh, that was a very powerful thing. For a few minutes, a kid got upgraded to a full adult, if he could get a laugh. NT: What excites you—and what do you think readers should find exciting—about the current state of American fiction? GS: This might be a weird thing to say but I think American lit is starting to get more spiritual. There’s more attention being paid to the notion that we live in this world by grace and have to make it worthwhile, and take responsibility for our presence here. I don’t mean stories that are preachy—but stories that are sane and thoughtful and humane. I see fewer stories that seem to be filled with posturing, or exist as vehicles to show how cool and edgy and naughty the writer is. That is: stories where the things that actually matter, actually matter. ∆ Proofreader Andrea Rooks is as excited about the 30th of September as the Tenth of December. Comment at arooks@newtimesslo.com.

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Chapter 415 September Meeting Wednesday, Sept. 13th | 2:30–4pm

French Hospital Copeland Pavilion 3rd Floor Auditorium | 1911 Johnson Ave, SLO

This Month’s Topic: Diabetes

We are pleased to announce our guest speaker, Patricia Herrera. A community health educator and community benefit outreach coordinator at French Hospital Medical Center with 20 years experience in developing and implementing health education programs.

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PLEASE RSVP:

Sat., Sept. 16 Call 805-544-1505 for info th

Michael Mariscal, Chapter President: 805-459-9373 | slomendedheartsslo@gmail.com Jennifer Bailey, Secretary/Membership Coordinator: 510-331-2595 | Mendedhearts72017@gmail.com

30 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

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Arts

Gallery

BY RYAH COOLEY

IMAGE COURTESY OF SARA WOODBURN

Last call Going, Going, Gone exhibit zeros in on mass extinction of plants and animals

W

ithin the next 300 years, 75 percent of the species of plants and animals we now know of will be gone. Let that sink in. It won’t be the first time. Earth has already begun to experience the effects of the sixth mass extinction of flora and fauna. The last one happened about 65 million years ago, triggered by a meteorite crashing into the planet. With this sobering information in mind, Studios on the Park in Paso Robles chose to shed some light on the issue in the exhibit Going, Going, Gone: Art in the Age of Extinction. The show is on display through Sept. 24 and aims to raise awareness about the fate of this fragile planet and all of its inhabitants. Santa Barbara artist Sara Woodburn, whose work is featured in the show, said she’s always found comfort and inspiration in nature. “When I’m out in nature it’s just a sense of solace and energy at the same time,” Woodburn said. “Being in that space is quite inspiring.” One of her pieces, a woodcut collaboration with Karen R. Schroeder, Climate Change: We Are Part of It, shows

Before it’s gone

Going, Going, Gone: Art in the Age of Extinction will be on display at Studios on the Park in Paso Robles through Sept. 24. The gallery will also host a mead tasting starting at 3:30 p.m. on Sept. 9 with a screening of More Than Honey at 5 p.m. at Park Cinemas. A cedar blessing ceremony will close out the exhibit on Sept. 24 at 10:45 a.m. Visit studiosonthepark.org for more information and events.

one tree with the word “change” carved into it prospering, while another tree with “denial” on it withers away. It’s a direct nod to the ongoing “debate” and general sense of helplessness surrounding the climate change issue. “Thinking about climate change, I think this is an important time to recognize that all levels of individuals are responding to this. I want people to come away thinking, ‘I’m part of it, there are solutions.’” If Schroeder and Woodburn’s piece is a nod to the future and what might be, then Templeton artist Helen K. Davie’s work is a somber homage to the past and just how much we’ve already lost. Davie works in a water media known as gouache—it has an opaque look to it that comes from EXTINCTION continued page 32

CHANGED Santa Barbara artist Sara Woodburn’s woodcut collaboration with Karen R. Schroeder, Climate Change: We Are Part of It, shows one tree with the word “change” carved into it prospering, while another tree with “denial” on it withers away.

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www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 31


Arts

Gallery IMAGE COURTESY OF HELEN K. DAVIE

GONE FOR GOOD Helen K. Davie’s work features 12 different animals that have become extinct in the past 100 years, like this Xerces Blue Butterfly. EXTINCTION from page 31

layers of glaze. She created a series of 12 paintings that feature animals that have become extinct within the last 100 years, like the California Grizzly Bear, Xerces Blue Butterfly, Golden Toad, and more. “There’s just an increasing rate of extinction and I think my pieces will show that,” said Davie, who grew up camping and exploring nature as a Girl Scout. “I’ve always just felt more akin to animals than people. Animals don’t have a voice. We make decisions for them.” To round out the show, Studios will also host events like a mead tasting and movie

screening of More Than Honey, a talk on the endangered steelhead trout, and a cedar blessing ceremony to close out the exhibit. Aside from driving home just how dire the situation on our home planet has become, Davie wants viewers of the show to leave with a sense of hope, that the tide still might be changed. “I want there to be more awareness,” Davie said. “We’re going to need to work harder, and I want people to feel like they can help.” ∆ Arts Editor Ryah Cooley does not consider climate change to be a debate at rcooley@ newtimesslo.com. IMAGE COURTESY OF SARA WOODBURN

NATURAL BEAUTY Pieces like woodcut Channel Islands evoke artist Sara Woodburn’s abstract and folksy take on the landscape.

32 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com


Arts

Strictly Not Starkey

BY CAMILLIA LANHAM

Un Amor

PHOTO COURTESY OF GIPSY KINGS

Gipsy Kings bring flamenco and Spanish soul to Vina

a sort of one-time deal, the 10-piece Los Angeles-based band released its second album, Jambú, earlier this year. Kicking off with the samba-infused funk of “La Kossa,” the EP can push a booty-shaker through their cumbia-Caribbean-salsabreak-beat funky paces. Tooth & Nail will also play host to the acoustic flamenco flare of Ottmar Liebert & Luna Negra on Sunday, Sept. 10 (6 p.m.; all ages; $35 general admission; $99 with four-course meal at ticketfly.com). La Semana, their first album with all new songs in five years, started conceptually as something like a diary for Liebert—“a leather-bound package, and each song would be titled after a different day of the week.” However, according to press materials, Liebert decided he didn’t want too many words to interfere with the album’s musicality. “For me, the beautiful thing about instrumental music is it allows each person to have their own interpretation of what the music is about. The eyes rule over the ears; that’s the way the human body works,” he said. “And if you’re being told something, the music takes a second seat. In the end this idea seemed too confining; I want music to be free of that specific a context.”

Revel in the blues

FLAMENCO ROYALTY The Gipsy Kings lay down some serious Spanish guitar strumming and singing at Vina Robles on Saturday, Sept. 9.

W

ith tears streaming down my face, I rolled down all the windows in the car and took a deep breath of the ocean air careening around me, whipping my hair into my mouth and across my shoulders. Opening the sunroof, I reached down to turn up the sound of Spanish guitar and stepped on the gas. Hurtling down Highway 1 outside of Santa Cruz, I let my angst and sadness float out of my brain as the sounds of the Gipsy Kings surrounded me. “Ese amor llega asi esta manera/ No tiene la culpa/ Amor de compra y venta/ Amor de en el pasada … ” Translation: “This love comes this way/ It doesn’t have fault/ Love to buy and sell/ Love in the past … Stumble-singing/mouthing the words, I readied myself for the part I could actually understand: “Bem, bem bem bem, bem bem bem … Bamboleo bambolea. “Porque mi vida yo la prefiero vivir así.” Translation: “Because my love, I prefer to live like this.” I was a freshman in college at UC Santa Cruz, and there were stupid boy things that I needed to rid myself of. The sounds of the Gipsy Kings got me through to the other side, like a companion that would fill my soul with relief and joy. Odd, maybe, for someone who graduated high school in 2000 to blast hits from the late ’80s and early ’90s, but the strumming guitar and vibrant vocals from this group was all I needed to feel better—that, and racing down the Pacific Coast Highway at midnight in my white BMW, heading for my favorite beach to stare at the stars and feel the surf on my legs. That Grammy Award-winning pair— Nicolas Reyes and Tonino Baliardo—and their band that used to serenade me is coming to Paso Robles. The Gipsy Kings play Vina Robles on Saturday, Sept.

9 (7:30 p.m.; all ages; $45.50 to $90.50 at vinaroblesamphitheatre.com), with special guest Simi Stone. “Bamboleo” is only one of their songs that I used to have on repeat when I was 18. The soft, sweet sounds of “Un Amor,” the bouncing grit of “Escucha Me,” the quick strut of “Volare,” I wasn’t picky at all. Perhaps, that’s just evidence of the Gipsy Kings’ timelessness. After 20 million albums sold, 25 years past the band’s first album release, the band returns with their ninth studio album, Savor Flamenco, and a tour with the band’s next generation of sons. “Even though it’s been 25 years, we want to keep on making new music because it’s our life, it’s who we are,” Reyes said on the Gipsy Kings’ website. “But I think there will be a time when we pass down the Gipsy Kings to our sons.” Friday, Sept. 8, Pepe Aguilar will grace the Vina stage (8 p.m.; all ages; $56 to $96 at vinaroblesamphitheatre.com). The leader in mariachi and Latin pop fusion music has more than 26 studio albums, nine Grammy Awards, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Born on tour to Mexican icons and rachera singers Antonio Aguilar and Flor Silvestre, Pepe first hit the stage when he was 3 years old. He started his solo career with the album Pepe Aguilar Con Tambora, released in 1991, eventually becoming a three-volume package. His released his most recent album, No Lo Había Dicho, in 2016, which comes with the single “Nada de Nada.”

The event that celebrates and gathers lovers and collectors of vinyl is in its fifth year of organizing large functions like what happens at the Guild/Grange Hall every year as well as smaller popup events. “We have been proud to see our passion for records reflected back in the community support we’ve received, and hope these events bring our musicloving community closer together,” press materials stated. If you’re interested in becoming a vendor, email slorecordswap@gmail.com. Learn more by visiting slorecordswap.org. Similar to the sounds coming out of Ozomatli, Jungle Fire brings a little bit of funk, a dash of cumbia, and a smattering of Afro-Caribbean to the mix, drawing inspiration from James Brown, Fela Kuti, Ray Barretto, and Irakere to pound out infectious rhythms you can’t help but move to. Originally coming together in 2011 as

The SLO Blues Society is pretty excited to present the return of Mark Hummel to the Central Coast. The two-time Blues Award winner harp master Mark Hummel has teamed up with Texas guitar legend Anson Funderburgh (Anson & The Rockets), Austin guitar slinger Mike Keller (Fabulous Thunderbirds/ Marcia Ball/The Keller Brothers), Austin drummer Wes Starr and Bay Area bassist RW Grigsby to form the Golden StateLone Star Revue. They released their self-titled debut album in 2016, which was recorded by Kid Andersen at Greaseland Studio in San Jose and produced by Funderburgh and Hummel. The blues powerhouse will touch down at The Siren in Morro Bay on Thursday, Sept. 7 (6:30 p.m.; 21-andolder; $20 to $25; ticketfly.com) There’s more fun at The Siren spinning out over the weekend, with the Erick Tyler Band blending acoustic fingerpicking and groovy electric guitar solos on Friday, Sept. 8, at 9 p.m., and local surf-rock and reggae jam band NOT STARKEY continued page 34 PHOTO COURTESY OF DURAN CASTRO

Swap this rhythm

The San Luis Obispo Record Swap is hosting a pop-up vinyl swap at Tooth & Nail Winery in Paso Robles at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 9, (free) which will be followed by the explosive rhythm of Jungle Fire (7 p.m.; all ages; $15 presale at ticketfly.com or $20 at the door).

SWAP TUNES Jungle Fire plays Tooth & Nail Winery after a SLO Record Swap pop-up event on Saturday, Sept. 9.

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 33


Arts NOT STARKEY from page 33

Sovereign Vine taking the stage early on Saturday, Sept. 9 (3 to 6 p.m.), with alternative rockers The Bogeys and Up! Way Up! taking the late shift (9 p.m. to midnight). The Cinders Blue Band with guitarist Dorian Michael and mandolinist/guitarist Kenny Blackwell will play you “real blues that you can dance to” at D’Anbino’s Cellar in Paso on Friday, Sept. 8 (8 p.m.; 21-and-over; $10). The night before, D’Anbino’s hosts the first Blues Jam Band North on Thursday, Sept. 7 (6:30 to 9:30 p.m.; $5 minimum suggested donation). All musicians welcome, but playing the blues is required.

Other music ...

On Friday, Sept. 8, the Los Angelesbased alternative/indie sounds of Divided Heaven (aka, Jeff Berman) will pound out of the Pour House in Paso (and the Frog and Peach on Saturday, Sept. 23). Enjoy your beer and the normal, balmy—not boiling—fresh edge-of-SLO weather at the SLO Brew Rock for a couple of midday shows over the weekend. Catch the local guitar-violin duo The Cimo Brothers (who also perform in the Moonshiner Collective) on Saturday, Sept. 9, at 1 to 5 p.m. “Both are clasiccaly trained under the Suzuki method, but have also explored the realms of jazz, tango, rock, and folk,” according to the Facebook event page. El Dub jams his reggae tunes for your open-air pleasure on Sunday, Sept. 10 starting at 1 p.m. he

Strictly Not Starkey plays Mr. Ricks in Avila Beach on Friday, Sept. 8, at 8 p.m. Lia Menaker combines haunting pop/rock vocals with accessible, soulful storytelling at Last Stage West in Atascadero on Sunday, Sept. 10, at 6 p.m. (free). The show will feature music from her debut album Animal Behavior. “Just over a year ago, I took a 9-to-5 office job that sounded like a dream on paper. It was a real stepping-stone for what could’ve turned into a great public health career. But after a year, I just felt completely depleted and disconnected,” Menaker said in press materials. “That’s when I woke up and realized I was living someone else’s life. I knew it was time to redefine what ‘normal’ means to me—it was time to re-enter the music scene, but this time with a fierceness and reclaimed vigor I had spent years running away from.” The tour, she said, is a celebration of being “a square peg in a round hole,” a “fearless step out into the light where I can turn the volume up on my voice without apologizing.” Portland-based jazzy R&B band Astro Tan shines its brand of sunlight into SLO Brew on Higuera Street on Tuesday, Sept. 12 (10 p.m.; 21-andover; free). The trio’s debut full-length album Canary, borrows from the British Invasion’s psychedelic rhythm and guitar and crooning vocals, with a little bit of indie-type jazz thrown in there for good measure. Songs like “To Joyce, From Japan” and “The Jetsons” are a great example of what to expect from these harmonizing hipsters. After all, “Life is like the Jetsons … in a

PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHELE D’AMOUR AND THE LOVE DEALERS

HUMP DAY FUN Michele D’Amour and the Love Dealers bring soulful blues to the Frog and Peach on Wednesday, Sept. 13.

future utopia where it tastes like Picasso … my digs are like the Flinstones … just working class. … I don’t ask any questions/ Bam Bam beat the gramophone … Where on Earth is Astro Jetson?” I’m not sure about Astro, but I could get into these lyrics, for sure. The San Diego-based B-Side Players takes over SLO Brew on Wednesday, Sept. 13 (10 p.m.; $12; 21-and-over). A nine-piece band that “honors the international crosspollination that has always made music the universal language,” the Players will lay down some latin global funk for your hump-day pleasure. Swooping into the Frog and Peach on

hump day, Sept. 13 (and Paso Brewing on Friday, Sept. 15), is Michele D’Amour and the Love Dealers. Touring for their third album, Lost Nights at the Leopard Lounge, the band, the Seattle-based blues and R&B band has a soulful sound reminiscent of Chicago and Mississippi Delta blues.

More music …

The next For the Folks benefit show is coming up on Friday, Sept. 8 at 7 p.m. ($10 donation at the door; all ages) outside of Whalebird Kombucha in San Luis Obispo. Sam Chase & the NOT STARKEY continued page 35

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Arts

Strictly Not Starkey PHOTO COURTESY OF SAM CHASE AND THE UNTRADITIONAL

I See You

Fall North America Tour

with special guest

Perfume Genius TUNES FOR A CAUSE Bay Area band Sam Chase & The Untraditional headline the next For the Folks benefit show on Friday, Sept. 8, in front of Whalebird Kombucha. NOT STARKEY from page 34

Untraditional, twice voted Best Band in the Bay Area (SF Weekly), will be paired up with the Turkey Buzzards for a concert that will support the SLO Surfrider Foundation. “These bands are cut from different ends of the same cloth and they embody what we had in mind with melding local/traveling acts when we started this series in March of 2016,” press materials said. The Cuesta Jazz Faculty Concert on Friday, Sept. 8, at the Cultural and Performing Arts Center, will benefit scholarships for Cuesta music students (7:30 p.m.; $10 students/seniors; $15 general; cpactickets.cuesta.edu). This year’s show will feature local favorite performers such as David Becker, Bob Bennett, Dylan Johnson, Ron McCarley, George Stone, and Darrell Voss. There will even be a special guest, Alexander Kato-Willis, performing improvised solo piano in the classical style. The Arroyo Grande Village Summer Concert Series concludes with bluegrass and Americana rock of Cuesta Ridge on Sunday, Sept. 10, at the Rotary

Bandstand in the Village (1 p.m.; all ages; free). The band was born in the sweet confines of the Santa Lucia Mountains, on the Central Coast. This six-piece, bluegrass-injected, Americanarock conglomerate has been together since 2004. Baywood Bayfest 2017 helms the Back Bay Inn and Café on Sunday, Sept. 10, from 1:30 to 7 p.m. (all ages, free). The family-friendly event will feature Burning Bad & Cool and New Times Music Awards winners Proxima Parada and the Zongo All-Stars. This is a free event, but there will be food and drink available for purchase at the Back Bay Café. Bring a low back chair, a blanket, and some friends. Don’t bring any outside food or drink (please!). ∆ Editor Camillia Lanham is happy to pass this column back to Glen Starkey next week! You can make it, and so can she! Keep up with Glen Starkey via Twitter at twitter.com/glenstarkey, friend him at facebook.com/glenstarkey, or contact him at gstarkey@newtimesslo.com.

September 27 7PM thexx.info/tour

THE FLAMING LIPS

MAC DEMARCO

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6 AT 6:30PM

PHOTO COURTESY OF LIA MENAKER

HAUNTING VOCALS Last Stage West in Atascadero hosts the pop/rock sounds of Lia Menaker on Sunday, Sept. 10.

TICKETS AVAILABLE: SB BOWL OR AT AXS.COM / SBBOWL.COM / GOLDENVOICE.COM www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 35


Arts Goin’ South

THE CLIFFS RESORT: 2757 Shell Beach Rd., Shell Beach, 773-5000, cliffsresort.com. FIGUEROA MOUNTAIN BREWING CO.: Singer/Songwriter Night every Wed. from 8-10pm. 1462 E. Grand Ave., Arroyo Grande, 474-8525, figmtnbrew.com. HARRY’S NIGHT CLUB AND BEACH BAR: Cypress and Pomeroy, downtown Pismo Beach, 773-1010. Thurs.: Front Row Karaoke. 9/7: DJ Camote at 5pm and JAWZ Karaoke at 9pm; 9/8: CK Solution at 9pm; 9/9: Soundhouse at 3pm and CK Solution at 9pm; 9/10: Three 4 All at 9pm; 9/11: Three 4 All at 7:30pm; 9/12: Tommy Lee and the Portigees at 7:30pm; 9/13: Tommy Lee and the Portigees at 7:30pm; 9/14: DJ Camote at 5pm and JAWZ Karaoke at 9pm; 9/15: Cougrzz Rock at 9pm; 9/16: DJ Camote at 3pm and Cougrzz Rock at 9pm; 9/17: Triple Threat at 9pm. LIDO RESTAURANT AT DOLPHIN BAY: 2727 Shell Beach Rd., Pismo Beach, 7734300 or thedolphinbay.com. Live music Tues., Thurs., and Fri. from 5-8pm. MONGO’S SALOON: 359 W. Grand Ave., Grover Beach, 489-3639. Open blues jam every Wed.: DJ Drumz every Fri.; Karaoke with DJ Sam every Sun. 9/9: Akussa and Soulo from 3-6pm and Three 4 All at 9pm; 9/16: Keith Cox at 3pm. MR. RICK’S: 404 Front St., Avila Beach, 5957425. 9/8: El Dub at 4pm; 9/9: 6250; 9/10: LBS; 9/15: Tommy Lee and the Portigees; 9/16: Steve Tracy Project at 9pm; 9/17: Tommy Lee. PUFFERS OF PISMO: 781 Price St., Pismo Beach, 773-6563, puffersofpismo.com. Live music every Tues. from 6:30-9:30pm, and most Fri. and Sat. from 7-10pm. 9/7: Open Mic with John Alan Connerly at 7pm; 9/9: Robert Herrera at 7pm; 9/9: Robert Herrera at 7pm; 9/10: The Taproots at 5pm; 9/13: Side Effects at 6:30pm; 9/15: Side Effects at 6:30pm; 9/16: The Blue Flamingos and Brian Black and 7pm. SEAVENTURE: 100 Ocean View, Pismo Beach, 773-4994. Live music every Wed. from 6-9pm, Fri. from 6-9pm; and Sun. from 2-6pm.

San Luis Obispo BANG

THE

DRUM

BREWERY:

950

Clubs

New Times’ Clubs lists lounges, restaurants, and coffee houses where you can dance or listen to live music.

Orcutt Rd., 242-8372, bangthedrumbrewery.com. BARRELHOUSE BREWING CO. SPEAKEASY: 1033 Chorro St. 296-1128, barrelhousebrewing. com. BON TEMPS CREOLE CAFE: 1000 Olive St., 544-2100. Zydeco music, live blues, and jazz on Monday, Wednesday, and Thursday evenings. FROG & PEACH PUB: 728 Higuera St., 5953764. 9/7: Highway Poets. THE GRADUATE: 990 Industrial Way, 541096, slograd.com. 9/7: Country Night from 8pm-2am; 9/8: Noche Caliente from 10pm-2am; 9/14: Country Night from 8pm-2am; 9/15: Noche Caliente from 10pm-2am. KREUZBERG COFFEE COMPANY: 685 Higuera St., 439-2060, kreuzbergcalifornia. com. Open mic night every Wed. THE LIBRARY BAR AND LOUNGE: 723 Higuera St., 542-0199. LINNAEA’S CAFE: 1110 Garden St., 541-5888. LUNA RED: 1023 Chorro St., 540-5243. MOTHER’S TAVERN: 725 Higuera St, 5418733, motherstavern.com. Live music every Fri. from 7:30-10:30pm. NOVO RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE: 726 Higuera St., 543-3986, novorestaurant.com. 9/8-9/10: Late Night Lounge (DJ) from 10pm-1am. SLO BREW: 736 Higuera St., 543-1843, slowbrew.com. 9/9: The Cimo Brothers at 10pm; 9/10: El Dub at 10pm; 9/12: Astro Tan and Dan Tedesco at 10pm; 9/13: B-Side Players at 10pm; 9/16: Emily Haworth at 10pm; 9/17: Nicole Nadine Band at 10pm. STEYNBERG GALLERY: 1531 Monterey St. 547-0278. TAP IT BREWING COMPANY: Clarion Ct., 545-7702, tapitbrewing.com.

North County

ASUNCION RIDGE: 725 12th St. Paso Robles, 237-1425. Live music Fridays and Saturdays from 5-8pm. 9/8: J Street Slim and the Leisurnaut; 9/9: Martin Paris; 9/15: Wine Country Troubadours; 9/16: Ted Waterhouse. BARRELHOUSE BREWERY AND BEER GARDENS: 3055 Limestone Way, Paso Robles, 296-1128, barrelhousebrewing.com.

9/8: Five Parts Devil at 5:30pm; 9/9: Joshua Aigner Band at 5:30pm; 9/10: Gypsy Flame at noon; 9/11: Song at 2pm; 9/15: The Jill Knight Band at 5:30pm; 9/16: The JD Project at 5:30pm; 9/17: Gypsy Flame at noon. BROKEN EARTH WINERY: 5625 Highway 46E, Paso Robles, 239-2562. Live music every Sat. from 1-4pm. 9/9: Wood; 9/16: The Blimp Pilots. CHATEAU LETTAU: 840 13th St. Paso Robles, 238-6800. 9/8: Wine Country Troubadours at 7pm; 9/15: Dulcie Taylor at 7pm; 9/16: Ted Waterhouse at 7pm. D’ANBINO VINEYARDS AND CELLARS: 710 Pine St., Paso Robles, 227-6800 or danbino. com. 9/8: The Cinders from 8pm-10:30pm; 9/9: Catalina Eddy and the Blue Keys from 8-10:30pm; 9/14: Real Blues Jam from 6:30-9:30pm; 9/15: The Mojo Combo from 8-10:30pm; 9/17: Julie Kelly from 4-6:30pm. ENOTECA RESTAURANT AND BAR: 206 Alexa Ct., Paso Robles, 238-2834, labellasera. com. Jazz every Thurs. night featuring Adam Levine and Judy Philbin from 7-9pm. LAST STAGE WEST: Halfway Station on Highway 41 (15050 Morro Road at Toro Creek), 461-1393 or laststagewest.net. 9/7: The BanjerDan Show with Tanner Scott at 3pm; 9/10: Lia Menaker at 6pm; 9/13: Bluegrass Jam Session and Buffet at 5pm; 9/14: The BanjerDan Show with Rocky Tallent and Spanky Baldwin at 6pm. PASO ROBLES INN CATTLEMAN’S LOUNGE: 103 Spring St., 238-2660. Live music 6-8pm and Friday and Saturday from 9:30-11:30pm. 9/8: Five Parts Devil at 5:30pm; PINE STREET SALOON: 1234 Pine St., Paso Robles, 238-1114. PONY CLUB WINE BAR AT HOTEL CHEVAL: 1021 Pine St., Paso Robles, 226-9995. 9/8: Kenny Taylor from 6-9pm; 9/9: Rewined from 6-9pm; 9/10: Lance Robison from 5-8pm; 9/15: Nataly Lola from 6-9pm; 9/16: Louie Ortega from 6-9pm; 9/17: Lance Robison from 5-8pm. SCULPTERRA WINERY: 5015 Linne Rd., Paso Robles, 226-8881. Steve Key presents “Songwriters at Play” Saturdays and Sundays from 1-4pm.

TOOTH & NAIL WINERY: 3090 Anderson Rd., Paso Robles, 369-6100. 9/10: Ottmar Liebert and Luna Negra at 5:30pm. VINA ROBLES VINEYARDS AND WINERY: 3700 Mill Rd. Highway 46 E. Paso Robles, 227-4812, vinarobles.com. Live music every Sat. from 1-4pm. 9/9: Melody Klemin; 9/16: Noach Tangeras.

North Coast

CAMBRIA PINES LODGE: 2905 Burton Drive, Cambria, 927-4200, cambriapineslodge.com. 9/7: Marcus DiMaggio at 8:30pm; 9/8: Marcus DiMaggio at 3pm and Mighty Croon Dogs at 9pm; 9/9: Bobby Malone at 3pm and John Wessel Band at 9pm; 9/10: Billy Foppiono at 8:30pm; 9/11: Billy and Charlie Duo at 8:30pm; 9/12: Louie Ortega at 8pm; 9/13: Andy Scott at 8pm; 9/14: Cool Notes at 8pm; 9/15: Marcus DiMaggio at 3pm and Mighty Croon Dogs at 9pm; 9/16: Bobby Malone at 3pm and Rough House at 9pm; 9/17: Sebastian Luna at 8pm. LAS CAMBRITAS: 2336 Main St., Cambria, 927-0175. Jon Stephens every Thurs. from 5-8pm. OLD CAYUCOS TAVERN & CARDROOM: 130 N. Ocean Ave., Cayucos, 995-3209, oldcayucostavern.com. Live music every Fri and Sat. OTTER ROCK CAFE: 885 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, 772-1420. Wed: Karaoke, 8pm. Thurs.: Live jam, 8pm. Fri.-Sun.: live music. 9/7: Keith Kenny from 7-10pm; 9/8: Crooked Eye Tommy from 8:30pm-midnight; 9/9: FourcEM from 8:30-11:30pm; 9/11: Jill Knight from 7-10pm; 9/12: Jim Gustin and Truth Jones from 8:30am-midnight; 9/13: Mark Adams from 7-10pm; 9/14: Jimmy Harrell and Amaya Rose from 7-10pm; 9/16: Bob Santa Cruz from 8-11pm; 9/17: David Jones and 58WEST from 7-10pm. THE SIREN: Main St., Morro Bay, 772-8478, thesirenmorrobay.com. STAX WINE BAR: 1099 Embarcadero, Morro Bay, 772-5055, staxwine.com. Live music Thurs. and Sun. from 6-8pm. WINDOWS ON THE WATER: 699 Embarcadero, Suite 7, Morro Bay, 7720677. 9/8: Ted Wise; 9/11: Ted Wise; 9/15: Jeff Peters. ∆

Great Food Good Times Live Music

359 Grand Ave. Grover Beach

805-489-3639

Tasting & Retail Sales 10am-5pm 805-788-6310 www.wildhorsewinery.com Sat, Sept. 9 Live Music with Chris Beland

Chris Beland’s music nods stylistically to folk gods Paul Simon and Bob Dylan as well as contemporary artists Vance Joy and Josh Ritter. Beland’s soulful silk vocals flesh out his subtly profound lyrics of love, humanity, and humility. As a solo act, he accompanies his words with the seasonal strum of an acoustic guitar, the haunted twang of a harmonica, and the steady heartbeat of his kick drum.

Barrels & Brushes Painting Event

Sat, Sept. 23 • 12-4 Join us for our 1 st Annual Barrels & Brushes Event! $ 100 per barrel - includes the entire wine barrel for you to paint (the barrel is yours to take home, but it is empty and does not contain wine), painting supplies, and a glass of wine. All you have to bring is your creativity and a craving for our amazing wines, we will supply the rest!

1437 Wild Horse Winery Ct. Templeton Exit Vineyard Rd, Go East, Right On Templeton Rd.

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Thu 9/7 FRI 9/8

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Arts

Split Screen

PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

and a feeling that she has never felt before, but love at first sight bears no mercy for these two. A regular Romeo and Juliet forbidden-love story forces them to hide their affair. On one of these occasions, Sophia wears Maria’s cloak on her way to see Jan, and William mistakenly believes Maria is having an affair. The betrayal he feels sends him into a spiral at the local pub where he’s robbed of his earnings from the tulip market, gets into a brawl, and is then sent to serve in the navy as punishment. Maria is left alone and with child. After confiding in Sophia of her misfortune and worrying that she’ll be thrown out for having a child out of wedlock, Maria threatens to tell Sophia’s secret. The lies only continue to take more twists and turns from there. Ryah: With Tulip Fever, you’re really getting a Shakespearean comedy and tragedy all in one. The ridiculous manipulations and ruses that escalate would be purely comical if the consequences weren’t so dire. We won’t give many more plot details, as going further would really give away the twist of the film (which is a doozy!), but it’s safe to say that while everyone doesn’t necessarily get a happy ending here, each of the characters evolve in their own way. We see a softening of Cornelius, and, through this, he finds the life and relationships he’s always sought. Jan’s work, in standard tortured artist fashion, is made truly great by

PASSION Sophia (Alicia Vikander) becomes entangled in a passionate love affair with the painter Jan Van Loos (Dane DeHaan) after her husband commissions her portrait.

Drunk in love Editor’s note: This week’s Split Screen was written by Arts Editor Ryah Cooley and Staff Writer Karen Garcia while Glen and Anna Starkey were off on vacation.

F

rom director Justin Chadwick (The Other Boleyn Girl) and writer Tom Stoppard (Shakespeare in Love) comes Tulip Fever, set in 17th century Amsterdam. An orphaned girl (Alicia Vikander) is married off to a rich and powerful merchant (Christoph Waltz). After her husband commissions a portrait, she begins a love affair with the painter (Dane DeHaan), a struggling young artist. The lovers risk everything and enter the tulip bulb market, with the hope that the right bulb will make them a fortune and buy their freedom. (107 min.)

Ryah: While Tulip Fever is being hailed by many as a “sexy thriller,” to me it reads more like a dark comedy. In terms of visual aesthetics (which are stunning) and humor, it reminded me a lot of a Wes Anderson film. Sophia (Vikander) is presented as the story’s protagonist when as a teen orphan, living at a nunnery with few options, she’s essentially sold to be the wife of the wealthy and much older merchant Cornelius (Waltz). The film is narrated by Maria (Holliday Grainger), Sophia’s servant, for reasons that become clear later in the film. While Cornelius isn’t purely a bad man or husband, he essentially rescued Sophia from poverty and married her so she would give him a child. Three years later, with no baby still, he nonchalantly speaks to a friend

At the

TULIP FEVER

What’s it rated? R What’s it worth, Ryah? Full Price What’s it worth, Karen? Full Price Where’s it showing? The Palm, Stadium 10 about possibly “letting her go” in another six months. We go a good chunk of time into the film before even hearing Sophia really say much of anything, which is disheartening since most of the action seems to revolve around things happening to her. Her mirror opposite is Maria, who, while unmarried and poor, is relentlessly cheerful and hopelessly in love with William (Jack O’Connell), the fishmonger. In order to save enough money to get married and live well, William decides to take his savings and gamble in Amsterdam’s chaotic and insane tulip market. Think Wall Street, but with no computers and deeds to tulips (that have yet to even sprout out of the ground) being awarded to the highest bidder, with lots of drunken brawls thrown in for good measure. Karen: Sophia is supposed to be the protagonist of the film, but her silence makes it difficult to root for her. At the start of her marriage, you feel somewhat sorry for her when Cornelius and his “little soldier” pester her every night for a child—of course infertility is always the female’s fault, but let’s remember that Cornelius is an older man. But sympathy is lost when her husband contracts an ambitious young painter Jan Van Loos (DeHaan) to memorialize the couple via portrait. The painter gives Sophia a look

What’s it rated? PG Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre All Saints is based on the inspiring true story of salesman-turned-pastor Michael Spurlock (John Corbett), the tiny church he was ordered to shut down, and a group of refugees from Southeast Asia. Together, they risked everything to plant seeds for a future that might just save them all. (108 min.) —Sony Pictures

ANNABELLE: CREATION What’s it rated? R What’s it worth? Streaming Where’s it showing? Park, Sunset Drive-In David F. Sandberg (Lights Out) directs Annabelle (2014) screenwriter Gary Dauberman’s prequel script about a

possessed doll. After doll maker Samuel Mullins (Anthony LaPaglia) and his wife, Esther (Miranda Otto), lose their daughter in an accident, they believe she’s returned by embodying one of Samuel’s dolls. When they realize the doll is actually possessed by evil, they lock it away, but 12 years later the couple invite nun Sister Charlotte (Stephanie Sigman) and a group of six girls from a shuttered orphanage into their home, and the evil doll begins to call out to one girl in particular, Janice (Talitha Bateman), reigniting the evil. (109 min.) —Glen Starkey

THE BIG SICK What’s it rated? R What’s it worth? Full Price Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre

Pick

Director Michael Showalter (Hello, My Name is Doris) directs this semi-autographical screenplay by Emily V. Gordon and Kumail Nanjiani about a Pakistani stand-up comic named Kumail (Nanjiani) who falls for a white woman named Emily (Zoe Kazan) who heckles him during a performance. Their budding relationship is strained when Emily discovers Kumail has a stash of photos of Pakistani women his parents have been trying to set him up with in an arranged marriage, so she breaks things off. Later, she’s taken to the hospital and put into an induced coma due to an infection, and Kumail realizes he made a mistake letting her go, but now it may be too late. (120 min.) —Glen Starkey

This week’s Split Screen was written by Arts Editor Ryah Cooley and Staff Writer Karen Garcia. Comment at rcooley@ newtimesslo.com.

FORCED A young and poor orphan girl, Sophia (Alicia Vikander), marries a rich and powerful merchant (Christoph Waltz) out of necessity.

Movies

ALL SAINTS

his greatest personal tragedy. Sophia, for once, gets to choose her own path. Maria is perhaps the only character who ends just as she started: truly happy. The main cast members all deliver solid performances, and we also get some delightful little appearances from actors like Zach Galifianakis as Jan’s hilarious drunkard of a friend, Cara Delevingne as the cunning harlot who steals William’s money, Tom Hollander as the pervy doctor who helps the scheming ladies, and dame Judy Dench as the shrewd abbess who has a hand in the tulip market. Karen: The characters in this film all have one thing in common: a rise and fall with the ambition to get ahead. We see William rise with the purchase of a tulip parcel, Jan with his later investment in the tulip frenzy, Maria and her innocent love, Sophia and her affair, and Cornelius with his chance at a child. But everyone’s pursuit of happiness is cut short even if their intentions are pure. All these actors really deliver stellar performances, staying true to their role in the story. It’s interesting to see how the actions of these individuals affect each other; the lives of these four are really intertwined. Often we watch films to root for characters that are flawless, but these characters have relatable imperfections that make the story better. Driven by love, success, and the pursuit of happiness, Tulip Fever is a must see if you aren’t into cookie cutter happily-ever-after endings. Δ

REVIEW SCORING FULL PRICE .... It’s worth the price of an evening show MATINEE ........ Save a few bucks, catch an afternoon show RENTAL .......... Rent it STREAMING.... Wait ’til Netflix has it NOTHING ........ Don’t waste your time

CARS 3 What’s it rated? G Where’s it showing? Galaxy Blindsided by a new generation of blazing-fast racers, the legendary Lightning McQueen (voice of Owen Wilson) is pushed out of the sport he loves. To get back in the game, he will need the help of an eager young race technician, Cruz Ramirez (voice of Cristela Alonzo), plus inspiration from the late Fabulous Hudson Hornet (voice of Paul Newman), and a few unexpected turns. (109 min.) —Walt Disney Pictures

DESCPICABLE ME 3 What’s it rated? PG Where’s it showing? Stadium 10 The mischievous Minions hope that Gru (Steve Carell) will return to a life of crime

after the new boss of the Anti-Villain League fires him. Instead, Gru decides to remain retired and travel to Freedonia to meet his long-lost twin brother (also voiced by Carell) for the first time. The reunited siblings soon find themselves in an uneasy alliance to take down the elusive Balthazar Bratt (Trey Parker), a former 1980s child star who seeks revenge against the world. (90 min.) —Universal Pictures

DUNKIRK What’s it rated? PG-13 What’s it worth? Full Price Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre Writer-director Christopher Nolan (Memento, Batman Begins, The Prestige, The Dark Knight, The Dark Knight Rises, Interstellar) helms this historical

Pick

drama about the World War II evacuation of Dunkirk, when allied forces from Belgium, the British Empire, Canada, and France were surrounded by the German army between May 26 to June 4, 1940. Civilians in fishing, merchant marine, and pleasure boats valiantly came to their rescue. (106 min.) —Glen Starkey

THE EMOJI MOVIE

What’s it rated? PG Where’s it showing? Park This animated comedy takes place in Textopolis, a world inside a smartphone that’s inhabited by various emojis. There, an emoji named Gene (voiced by T.J. Miller) is ashamed that he has multiple facial expressions while his colleagues only have MOVIES continued page 40

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 39


Arts

At the Movies PHOTO COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES

MOVIES from page 39 one each, and he embarks on a quest to be like everyone else. (86 min.) —Sony Pictures Animation

THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD

EVIL The villainous clown Pennywise (Bill Skarsgård) returns in the remake of the classic thriller IT.

What’s it rated? R Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy The world’s top protection agent (Ryan Reynolds) is called upon to guard the life of his mortal enemy, one of the world’s most notorious hit men (Samuel L. Jackson). (111 min.) —Summit Entertainment

HOME AGAIN What’s it rated? PG-13 Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Fair Oaks, Bay, Galaxy Home Again stars Reese Witherspoon as Alice Kinney in a modern romantic comedy. Recently separated from her husband, (Michael Sheen), Alice decides to start over by moving back to her hometown of Los Angeles with her two young daughters. During a night out on her 40th birthday, Alice meets three aspiring filmmakers who happen to be in need of a place to live. Alice agrees to let the guys stay in her guesthouse temporarily, but the arrangement ends up unfolding in unexpected ways. Alice’s unlikely new family and new romance comes to a crashing halt when her ex-husband shows up, suitcase in hand. Home Again is a story of love, friendship, and the families we create. (97 min.) —Open Road Films

New

INGRID GOES WEST What’s it rated? R What’s it worth? Matinee Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre Matt Spicer directs and co-writes with David Branson Smith for this black comedy about Ingrid Thorburn

Pick

MOVIES continued page 41

LGBTQ Healthcare Community Forum

Equitable & Inclusive Care

San Luis Obispo County Come meet local healthcare providers who are committed to improving the health and well-being of the LGBTQ community with sensitive and culturally competent care. We also invite you to engage in our roundtable discussion about the state of LGBTQ healthcare in our community and the issues that matter most to our LGBTQ patients and their families.

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September 13, 2017

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Arts

At the Movies PHOTO COURTESY OF OPEN ROAD FILMS

REDO A mom starting over suddenly finds herself with three younger male housemates in Home Again.

MOVIES from page 40 (Aubrey Plaza), a disturbed social media stalker who moves to L.A. to befriend Taylor Sloane (Elizabeth Olsen), an Instagram sensation. The dark side of social media is on full display in this wickedly satirical skewering of people desperate for attention. Ingrid lives her life online, where she jealously follows what she believes are other people’s perfect lives. Gorgeous images, happy emojis, and trendy hashtags are all slaps across her face by people she wants to be friends with, and she misguidedly believes deep in her soul that if she could be friends with these “perfect” people, her life would be perfect too. The film opens after her mother has died and she’s inherited some $60,000. She crashes a wedding of a woman who once commented on one of her posts, hence signaling to Ingrid that they should be best friends and that the woman should have invited Ingrid to that perfect wedding. Ingrid has a meltdown and commits assault. Later, Ingrid decides to move to California. Why? Because Instagram star Taylor Sloane responded to a comment Ingrid made on one of Taylor’s posts. Yes, Ingrid is clearly unhinged. She settles in Venice Beach and starts stalking Taylor, and after several near misses, she finally sees her, follows her home, and kidnaps her dog. Responding to the missing dog ad, Ingrid suddenly finds herself in the good graces of Taylor and her artist husband Ezra O’Keefe (Wyatt Russell). At first, Ingrid’s life does improve. She’s happy being in the inner circle with Taylor and Ezra, but to stay in their good graces, she starts to disrupt the lives of those around her, such as her landlord Dan Pinto (O’Shea Jackson Jr.), whose truck she borrows as a favor to Taylor. Things do not go as planned. Ingrid’s life really go off the rails when Taylor’s brother Nicky (Billy Magnussen) breezes into town with an invite for Taylor and Ezra to meet an even bigger social media sensation, Harley Chung (Pom Klementieff). Suddenly Ingrid finds herself

Chef Giovanni’s STARTS FRIDAY

RUMBLE: THE INDIANS THAT ROCKED THE WORLD (NR) Weekdays: 4;15, 7:00 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00

Monday Sept. 11: THE NIGHT OF THE IGUANA (Richard Burton, Ava Gardner, Deborah Kerr, Sue Lyon) 1964

Weekdays: 4:15, 7:00 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00

TULIP FEVER (R)

Monday Sept. 18: HOUSEBOAT (Sophia Loren, Cary Grant) 1958

Weekdays: 4:15, 7:00 Sat-Sun: 1:30, 4:15, 7:00 ENDS TODAY! ENDS TODAY!

THE BIG SICK (R)

Monday Sept 25: THE CONVERSATION (director Francis Ford Coppola, starring Gene Hackman) 1974

Today: 7:00

THE ONLY LIVING BOY IN NEW YORK (R)

Monday Oct 2: NETWORK (Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Robert Duvall) 1976

Today: 4:15

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What’s it rated? R Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre, Sunset Drive In, Stadium 10, Park, Galaxy New Line Cinema’s horror thriller IT, directed by Andy Muschietti (Mama), is based on the hugely popular Stephen King novel of the same name, which has been terrifying readers for decades. When children begin to disappear in the town of Derry, Maine, a group of young kids are faced with their biggest fears when they square off against an evil clown named Pennywise, whose history of murder and violence dates back for centuries. (135 min.) —Warner Bros. Pictures

New

LEAP!

What’s it rated? PG Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre, Galaxy In this animated film, 11-year-old orphan, Félicie (Elle Fanning) has one dream—to go to Paris and become a dancer. Her best friend Victor (Nat Wolff), an imaginative but exhausting boy with a passion for creating, has a dream of his own—to become a famous inventor. In a MOVIES continued page 42

SAN LUIS OBISPO

Monday Movie Night

FOOD & FILM PAIRING

THE TRIP TO SPAIN (NR)

cast to the side, leading to a series of dark events fomented by Nicky, who steals Ingrid’s phone, discovers her stalking, and threatens to reveal her secrets to Taylor. It’s all pretty uncomfortable to watch, and the film works because Plaza delivers an engaging, raw, and committed performance, leading the audience to vacillate between sympathy for and horror at Ingrid and her actions. Olsen, too, delivers a properly vapid performance as Taylor, whose “job” it is to look like her life is amazing and fluff up the various products she’s paid to endorse. Social media is fake. It’s the careful curation of people’s best moments made to look like everyday occurrences. This is the story of someone who doesn’t get that. (97 min.) —Glen Starkey

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www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 41


Arts

At the Movies PHOTO COURTESY OF REZOLUTION PICTURES

LEGENDS In the documentary Rumble: Indians Who Rocked The World, filmmakers explore music greats with Native American ancestry.

MOVIES from page 41 leap of faith, Victor and Félicie leave their orphanage in pursuit of their passions. (86 min.) —The Weinstein Company

LOGAN LUCKY

What’s it rated? PG-13 What’s it worth? Full Price Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre, Stadium 10, Galaxy Steven Soderbergh (Sex, Lies, and Videotape; Out of Sight; Erin Brockovich; Traffic; Ocean’s Eleven (2001); Magic Mike) directs this crime comedy about two brothers—Jimmy (Channing Tatum) and Clyde Logan (Adam Driver)— and their attempt to rob a North Carolina NASCAR track. Once it gets cooking, this Southern fried heist flick is a hoot! The set-up is simple. Jimmy Logan gets unjustly fired from his heavy machine-operating job at Charlotte Motor Speedway, where he’s been helping to repair sinkholes, and which gives him inside knowledge of the heist target. He’s a doting albeit estranged dad to Sadie Logan (Farrah Mackenzie), who lives with her surly remarried mother Bobbie Jo Chapman (Katie Holmes). Broke and feeling cheated out of his job; he enlists his bartender brother Clyde and hairdresser sister Mellie (Riley Keough) to rob the racetrack. Things get complicated after that. They need a demolition expert to get to the cash, which is shuffled from concession areas via pneumatic tubes. The only guy they know is Joe Bang (Daniel Craig), who’s got five more months on his sentence, but Jimmy and Clyde claim they have a plan to break him out and back into jail if he agrees to help, which he does provided his brothers Fish (Jack Quaid) and Sam Bang (Brian Gleeson) can get in on the job. What makes it all so comical is the Logan family curse of bad luck and the general perception that the Logans are a bunch of redneck idiots. What follows is a Rube Goldberg-level complicated plan with layers upon layers of intrigue, and a lot of funny moments. The whole premise plays on the idea of misperception of Jimmy Logan as well as knowing the various players’ weaknesses. For instance, for the jailbreak to work, Jimmy has to know that Warden Burns’ (Dwight Yoakam) pride will delay him reporting a jail riot. Likewise, the Logans have to understand that their plan will leave the speedway unable to track the amount of money stolen and realize that they’ll be interested in closing the investigation as soon as their insurance is willing to pay out. Of course, all of this is further complicated by Special Agent Sarah Grayson (Hilary Swank), who unlike the racetrack owners and her superiors, doesn’t want to drop the investigation. Between the difficulties we don’t see coming, the close familial relationships that add emotional resonance to the proceedings, and the hugely entertaining and wildly colorful cast of characters— including Seth MacFarlane as pompous Brit

Pick

BLACK RAIN

detective who doesn’t play by the rules and isn’t averse to defying his superiors if it means bringing the bad guys to justice When? 1989 (see every other cop in any 1980s action What’s it rated? R movie). The film begins with Conklin Where’s it available? DVD, arresting a Japanese Yakuza gangster for murder. Soon, Conklin and his partner, Streaming on Netflix Charlie Vincent (Garcia) are tasked with o one is perfect. That adage is true escorting their suspect back to Japan of everyone, even groundbreaking as part of an extradition agreement. Hollywood directors. Sometimes, no As soon as they arrive, the Yakuza matter how much money and talent you gangster escapes. Conklin is forced to bring to a film, things just don’t work out, work with a straightlaced Japanese and these creative titans of cinema are detective named Masahiro Matsumoto left with a costly white elephant they’d (Ken Takakura). In the end both men rather forget about. overcome their differences and bring the Nowhere is this more apparent than Yakuza gangster to justice while also the big-budget 1989 cop drama Black bringing down an international currency Rain. The movie was directed by Ridley counterfeiting operation. Scott, and thus was blessed with a big For all the story’s potential, the film budget, an ambitious production, and just doesn’t come together the way a (at the time) star-studded cast that it should. Douglas’ performance in included Michael Douglas and Andy particular seems wooden and anemic. He Garcia. While they sound like all the right was 45 when he filmed the movie, and ingredients for yet another Scott hit, it is apparent while watching that his what we ended up getting was a film that age is beginning to catch up with him. never quite lived up to its potential. He looks gassed in the fight scenes and Black Rain tells the story of Nick action sequences, and downright silly in Conklin (Douglas), a bad-boy New York what is supposed to an edge-of-your-seat

N

PHOTO COURTESY OF SCOTT FREE PRODUCTIONS

RIDLEY’S FLOP 1989’s Black Rain isn’t one of legendary director Ridley Scott’s best films, but it’s still worth a viewing for its stunning visuals.

THE LAST FACE

RERELEASED Released on Tuesday, Sept. 5

ALL EYEZ ON ME What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Don’t bother

AUSTIN FOUND What’s it rated? Not rated Should I rent it? Maybe

BAND AID What’s it rated? Not rated Should I rent it? Definitely

CHRONICALLY METROPOLITAN What’s it rated? Not rated Should I rent it? Don’t bother

FIRST KILL What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Don’t bother

PLEASURES motorcycle chase. He seems to take the whole “bad cop” persona to an almost outlandish extreme. The plot itself, while interesting, is nearly forgettable. Still, even a total stinker of a movie is still worth one watch when the stinker was directed by someone like Scott. While the story is boring, the movie is visually stunning. The bulk of it takes place in the dark, neon-drenched streets of Japan, much of it giving off the same techno-noir vibe as Scott’s futuristic masterpiece Blade Runner. Scott allegedly had such a hard time shooting in Japan that he swore he’d never film there again, and had to shoot the movie’s final scenes in Napa Valley. Still, the effort paid off, as the movie’s visuals are its single redeeming quality. Even though it is not very good, Black Rain is still worth a watch. Directors like Scott will always be remembered for their best work (Blade Runner, Alien, etc.), but their flops and misses can also tell us more about who they are as artists. Usually, when a great director flops, it’s because they are trying to do something ambitious, interesting, or new, and just can’t quite make it work. Movies like Black Rain are little windows inside the minds of these great directors, who like the rest of us, are still human and make mistakes. (125 min.) Δ — Chris McGuinness

BATTLE SCARS

LOWRIDERS

What’s it rated? Not rated Should I rent it? Don’t bother

MEGAN LEAVEY

What’s it rated? PG-13 Should I rent it? Definitely

PARIS CAN WAIT What’s it rated? PG Should I rent it? Maybe

What’s it rated? R What’s it worth? Full Price Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre If I had to choose one word to describe Patti Cake$, I would probably go with “surprising.” And I mean that in a good way. The story follows Patricia Dombrowski (Danielle Macdonald), an aspiring rapper who lives in a poor New Jersey town with her mother (Bridget Everett) and grandmother (Cathy Moriarty). In between trying to help keep her family’s finances afloat and dealing with her alcoholic mother being embarrassing and unsupportive, Patricia and her best friend Jheri (Siddharth Dhananjay) try to find someone or something to kick start their rap careers. Patricia, Jheri, and Patricia’s grandmother eventually team up with a screamo musician who calls himself “Bastard the Anti-Christ” (Mamoudou Athie), and the four of them form an unlikely but talented band. At first glance, it seems like a story thousands of movies have already told: The main character has a lofty dream, other characters try to prevent that dream from becoming a reality, and then the odds have to be beaten. Because of this, and because of the fact that I have little to no interest in rap music, I honestly wasn’t expecting to like or care about this film, but I’m happy that it proved me wrong. Because Patricia’s life is shown from so many different angles—at home, at work, and in the world of rap—and each of those angles comes with their own set of problems, it’s easy to sympathize with her and see her as more than just some small town girl with a big dream. The movie doesn’t shy away from addressing the more sensitive aspects of her problems either, which shoots down any shallowness the plot might otherwise have had. Patricia, an overweight white girl, is frequently mocked or dismissed by other rappers because of her size, race, and gender, and despite her tough attitude, the audience knows it bothers her. My favorite thing about this film is its ongoing theme with defying expectations. From Patricia’s grandmother joining her rap group, to “Bastard” hesitating about

Pick

What’s it rated? NR Where’s it showing? The Palm When recalling Link Wray’s shivering guitar classic, “Rumble,” Martin Scorsese marvels, “It is the sound of that guitar . . . the aggression.” Wray was the first to deploy thumping power chords and hone distortion, carving out a new guitar sound that influenced rock ’n’ roll forever. But as a Native American, Wray’s music was a threat—and it was treated as such. Blues pioneer Charlie Patton, cherished jazz singer Mildred Bailey, and metaphysical wizard Jimi Hendrix are among the many music greats who have Native American heritage and have created their distinctive music amid the attempted cleansing of indigenous culture from the country. Their music was not even meant to exist. Using playful re-creations and little-known stories, alongside concert footage, audio archives, and interviews with living legends, this deeply insightful film cements how some of our most treasured artists and songs found their inspiration in ancient, native melodies and harmonies that were infused with a desire to resist. (103 min.) —Rezolution Pictures

New

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

What’s it rated? PG-13 What’s it worth? Full Price Where’s it showing? Stadium 10 This new Spider-Man film picks up a few months after the events of Captain America: Civil War, which chronicled the rift between Captain America (Chris Evans) and Iron Man (Robert Downey Jr.). This time around, Tony Stark (AKA Iron Man) and the federal government create the Department of Damage Control (D.O.D.C.), which inadvertently drives Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton) out of business, leading him to become the villain Vulture. Meanwhile Peter Parker (Tom Holland) returns to his studies after Stark tells him he’s not ready to be an Avenger, but that doesn’t stop Peter from pursuing his crime fighting endeavors. (133 min.) —Glen Starkey

Pick

THE TRIP TO SPAIN

What’s it rated? NR Where’s it showing? The Palm, Galaxy MOVIES continued page 43

PHOTO COURTESY OF FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS What’s it rated? PG Should I rent it? Probably

FUN MOM DINNER What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Maybe

ROUGH NIGHT

IT COMES AT NIGHT

What’s it rated? Not rated Should I rent it? Definitely

PATTI CAKE$

RUMBLE: THE INDIANS WHO ROCKED THE WORLD

What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Probably

What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Definitely

SCORE: A FILM DOCUMENTARY

What’s it rated? PG Where’s it showing? Galaxy Surly Squirrel (Will Arnett) and the gang are back again in Oakton, where the evil mayor has decided to bulldoze Liberty Park and build a dangerous amusement park in its place. Surly and his ragtag group of animal friends band together to save their home, defeat the mayor, and take back the park. (86 min.) —Open Road Films

BEATRIZ AT DINNER

RAW

What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Don’t bother

THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE

their first gig since it was in a strip club and therefore might be supporting the objectification of women, pretty much no character turns out to be as they appear on the surface. These pleasant, consistent surprises make the movie fresh and enjoyable even for people like me who aren’t into the rap scene. Overall, I would definitely recommend Patti Cake$, as long as you don’t mind profanity or drug references. It’s the perfect example of giving old ideas unique twists. (108 min.) —Katrina Borges

Due for release on Tuesday, Sept. 12

What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Don’t bother

What’s it rated? PG-13 Should I rent it? Maybe

Max Chilblain, a rich energy drink maven and race car sponsor—Logan Lucky is a blast! Funny, engaging, and surprising, it’s a slick, clever, rollicking crackerjack of a heist film. Think of it as breezy Deep South Oceans 7-Eleven. (119 min.) —Glen Starkey

What’s it rated? R Should I rent it? Maybe

THE MUMMY What’s it rated? PG-13 Should I rent it? Don’t bother

42 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

UNIQUE An unlikely rapper finds her way in the film Patti Cake$.


Arts

At the Movies PHOTO COURTESY OF SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

MOVIES from page 42 After jaunts through northern England and Italy, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon embark on another deliciously deadpan culinary road trip. This time around, the guys head to Spain to sample the best of the country’s gastronomic offerings in between rounds of their hilariously offthe-cuff banter. Over plates of pintxos and paella, the pair exchanges barbs and their patented celebrity impressions, as well as more serious reflections on what it means to settle into middle age. (111 min.) —IFC Films

TULIP FEVER What’s it rated? R Where’s it showing? The Palm, Stadium 10 See Split Screen.

VALLEY OF BONES What’s it rated? R Where’s it showing? Galaxy A disgraced paleontologist (Autumn Reeser) struggling to raise her son is tipped off to a groundbreaking dig site in the Badlands by a recovering meth addict, but his tie to the cartel threatens to bury them both under the weight of their criminal pasts. (90 min.) —Bad Medicine Films

WIND RIVER What’s it rated? R Where’s it showing? Downtown Centre, Galaxy, Stadium 10 Wind River is a chilling thriller that follows a rookie FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) who teams up with a local game tracker with deep community ties and a haunted past (Jeremy Renner) to investigate the murder of a local girl on a remote Native American reservation in the hopes of solving her mysterious death. (111 min.) ∆ —The Weinstein Company

REAL LIFE? In Ingrid Goes West, a young woman’s social media obsession leads her out to LA where she stalks and befriends a boho-chic Instagram influencer.

New Times movie reviews were compiled by Arts Editor Ryah Cooley and others. You can contact her at rcooley@ newtimesslo.com.

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Arts

Get Out!

BY RYAH COOLEY PHOTO COURTESY OF CENTRAL COAST COMEDY THEATER

In the moment Central Coast Comedy Theater celebrates one year of hilarious improv shows and classes

T

he conversation and beer are flowing and the house lights are on in the back room of Kreuzberg Coffee Co. in downtown San Luis Obispo as the packed room roars with laughter on Saturday, Sept. 2. This isn’t your typical stuffy show, cellphones aren’t tucked away and silenced but are busy capturing one witty on-the-spot joke after another as the ensemble members of Central Coast Comedy Theater think on their feet through various improv games at their weekly show. I’m sipping a cold North Coast Saison as Sabrina Pratt, the founder of the comedy theater, introduces the improv teams for the evening. Tonight, it’s Your Mom against the Edwardian Buttholes with hot rollers and snacks and tutus and blond wigs, respectively. In celebration of their one-year anniversary, the group is turning their regular show into a series of improv battles for a few weeks, with the applause, cheers, and screams from the audience determining how many points each team scores. Pratt, a Second City alumnus and drama teacher at Atascadero High

School, moved to SLO County a few years ago to be closer to family. She started off last year teaching improv classes at Ignite Movement Studio and hosting shows at Libertine in Morro Bay. “I just felt like something was missing and it was this thing I’d been doing for 15 years,” said Pratt, who sat down to chat with me a few weeks before. She also explained that improv isn’t necessarily about being naturally funny, that’s why you take classes. Instead her focus is on saying, “Yes and—” getting out of your own way, and being present. “I like comedy because I like people coming in and taking a break from who they are,” Pratt said. “Come in, take a little vacation, relax.” That’s exactly what’s happening tonight as audience members yell out suggestions for everything from names to non-geographical locations as the ensemble members gleefully try to best each other by jumping from rhyming to crafting personalities and scenes on the spot. Unlike a stand-up comedy show, COMEDY continued page 45

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44 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

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FUNNY GIRL Sabrina Pratt, founder of Central Coast Comedy Theater, hosts the group’s weekly improv show every Saturday at Kreuzberg Coffee Co in SLO.


Arts

PHOTOS COURTESY OF CENTRAL COAST COMEDY THEATER

Get Out!

A real knee slapper

Catch a Central Coast Comedy Theater improv show every Saturday at 8 p.m. at Kreuzberg Coffee Co. in SLO. The troupe’s last improv battlestyle show will be Sept. 9 at 8 p.m. The cost is $5 per person. Wanna get funny? Improv classes are now available in Morro Bay and Paso Robles. Visit centralcoastcomedytheater.com for more information.

GOOFING AROUND Central Coast Comedy Theater is here to make you laugh. The members of the ensemble, from left to right: Evan Fox, Garth Wilwand, Brian Joo, Shawna Hood-Volpa, Molly Jo Pendley, Sabrina Pratt, Wade Tillotson, Ryan Lloyd, and Jonathan Shadrach.

GET OUT from page 44

there’s little risk of audience members getting heckled or roasted here. But those looking to do more than just watch now have plenty of opportunities. While Pratt started out with classes just in Morro Bay, she now also offers improv

classes at the Earthtones Gift Store in Paso Robles and is looking to expand to offer a youth and teen class as well as improv classes in SLO and South County. There’s even talk of Central Coast Comedy Theater hosting a sketch comedy festival in SLO in January. Long-term, Pratt envisions having a dedicated space

in town for a comedy club. “We don’t have anything like that,” Pratt said. “I know SLO would welcome it and use it. [Improv] is the place to get real.” ∆ Ryah Cooley is laughing out loud at rcooley@newtimesslo.com.

YOUR MAMA… Shawna Hood-Volpa, Cori Ramsay, and Michelle Madgett of the team Your Mom narrowly lost in a sudden death round to the Edwardian Buttholes at the improv battle show on Sept. 2.

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www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 45


Flavor BY HAYLEY THOMAS CAIN

Food PHOTOS BY HAYLEY THOMAS CAIN

Champions of breakfast So, how do you like your eggs?

W

hat really turns me on in the morning? The irresistible tease of bacon snapping in a cast iron pan, turning the whole house porky. The frenzied sizzle of eggs (laid just moments before by an early rising hen) rippling across a slick of hot, whole fat butter. The holy promise of freshly perked Peet’s Sumatra coffee with a dash of 2 percent, followed later by the tang of OJ, fresh squeezed from backyard oranges and extra pulpy. Throw in a few luscious cherry tomatoes and maybe some buttered San Luis Sourdough toast (browned, but still chewy in the center), and I am a happy camper, indeed. What you do in your bedroom is your own business, but what about what you do around your breakfast table? My hypothesis: You can learn a lot about a person by learning about (or making) their preferred breakfast of choice. Instagram food posts aside, I still feel that breakfast—a real, satisfying hitsthe-spot breakfast—is an intimate experience. Think about it. You might know what a casual friend drinks at the bar (shot of Jame-o with a pickle back) and you might very well know what stinky brand of tuna fish your co-worker packs for lunch each week. However, their true breakfast preference? You probably only know that if a) you’re a blood relative, b) a very close friend, or c) you’re sleeping with them. This past winter, I worked as a chef at a bed and breakfast in downtown SLO— rising at 6 a.m. to prepare eggs, toast, potatoes, and sausages to mostly world travelers. What I learned I will take to the grave. Although my superior, nicknamed “Butter Paul,” had plenty of good advice: “Brown equals flavor/you want your eggs to talk to you then shut up/don’t chop fruit with the onion knife/the first piece of fried ham is never as sweet as the last,” other truths shocked me to my core. For instance, some people do not prefer eggs at breakfast! On the other hand, others want only a single, shell-on soft boiled egg cooked for 1 minute 30 seconds, no more, no less. Still others pushed ripe fruit aside and scraped delicious, flaky quiche crusts into the trash, yet asked for seconds of “blackened” bacon and cinnamon raisin bread. So, you’re probably wondering why now—of all times—I’ve decided to dedicate an entire article to these individualistic and telling breakfast desires? Luckily—insert rim shot here—there’s a holiday for that! “September Better Breakfast Month” may not be on your calendar, but for a

Honor thy breakfast

Don’t forget to observe national pancake day Sept. 26, World Egg Day Oct. 2, and (gasp) Cinnamon Roll Day Oct. 4.

number of school districts around the country, this unofficial holiday period is serious business. As school officially begins in earnest and pencil cases are swung open with gusto, we are all reminded of this oldie but goodie: “Don’t skip breakfast! It’s the most important meal of the day!” Whether you’re 12 or 72, this is still a true statement, in my book. But what is a better breakfast? As I asked my friends, colleagues, and fellow SLO residents, I came to find that this really is a personal question.

Findings

New Times Staff Writer Chris McGuinness is a hard-hitting news guy— and although I always prefer to imagine him swilling whiskey from a drawer while typewriters ding in the background, he is actually fueled by Diet Coke. He eats breakfast only sporadically, when time permits, seeking out a “calorie bomb” of a breakfast burrito when available. His eggs? Over easy and smothered in hot salsa. Let’s compare this to his more laidback colleague yet equally hard-hitting Staff Writer Peter Johnson—who wakes up with a big cup of coffee, always eats breakfast without fail, prefers French toast, and takes his eggs scrambled. I mean, one has to wonder: Are they really even in the same profession? And don’t even get me started on our arts editor, Ryah Cooley, who drinks hot water with lemon upon waking and goes for chocolate chip pancakes on the weekends. When I aimed to fi nd out what real people ate in the a.m., I didn’t expect much interest. Instead, I was bombarded by enthusiastic online responses to my simple query, “So, how do you like your eggs?” Ashley Riddle, bartender at Luis Wine Bar in SLO, is into what I can only call “breakfast self-care,” preferring to make her own perfectly soft poached eggs. I asked her how in God’s name she does this. “I bring the water up to a boil and then lower it down to barely a few rolling bubbles, crack the egg into a measuring cup, and lower it gently into the water, let it hang out for no more than four minutes and scoop with a slotted spoon,” she said. We could all learn a thing or two from her dedication. Riddle’s boss, Luis Wine Bar owner Vanessa North, is more primal. Her favorite breakfast is eaten around “brunchtime”: a chicken tamale with two over-easy eggs, salsa verde, Pepper Plant, and a dollop of plain Greek yogurt. BREAKFAST continued page 48

46 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

SUNNY SIDE WHAT? Whether scrambled, poached, fried with a runny yolk or simmered solid, an egg is really never just an egg. Just ask the masses: No one person takes theirs exactly the same. That would just be creepy.

WAITING GAME Flavor writer Hayley Thomas Cain waits for her hen Beyonce to lay her morning breakfast (today she has made a rogue nest in Cain’s windowsill). A warm, justlaid egg is always preferred.


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If you post something you think we should see, please tag us @NewTimesSLO or use hashtag #NewTimesSLO! www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 47


Flavor breakfast than there are Alaskan words for snow. A quick primer: There’s unruly, boozy “Maybe some fresh tomato and avocado slices if we have them around,” she added. brunch with your friends; pleasant brunch buffet with your mother-inMaybe it’s my California heritage, but law; there’s hung-over bleary-eyed I, too, believe that avocado and tomato breakfast feast; Sunday morning pancake make every breakfast better. breakfast that makes you feel like a kid My good friend Theresa Michelle—who again; quick-out-the-door-eat-in-thelikes her eggs over medium but not too car breakfast; never-went-to-bed at all wet—gave me a little breakfast TMI, boldly stating to the world: “I like to mush breakfast; and the kind of breakfast that marks your life, literally, forever. my food around and swirl it up in a big That’s the breakfast you eat when pile, so every bite is a perfect bite.” something really great happens. Whoa, girl! SLO’s own Stacy Willis shared a She continued, “I know the eggs are memory of noshing with her husband, right when they are crispy looking on the Wayne, just after their nuptials. outside, but you can kinda see that the “We ate leftover cupcakes and inside is still swishy.” strawberries in bed and opened and read Swishy, sure! When we talk about all the cards from friends and family,” she breakfast (and especially eggs), words said wistfully. become elastic, molding to fit our desires. Doesn’t that sound fantastic? Maybe that’s why there are more kinds of My friend Sarah Daly, arts editor for the PHOTO BY HAYLEY THOMAS CAIN SLO Tribune, took my question as a chance to get a few confessions off her chest. Yes, my child? She actually “confessed” to not one breakfast secret, but three: Confession No. 1: “My mother is the queen of the day-after hash/ scramble. Any leftovers from the previous night’s dinner—veggies, meat, potatoes—inevitably end up being pan-fried or scrambled with eggs. (Weird but true.) She’s also been known to mix leftover fruit crisp with her morning oatmeal.” Confession No. 2: “The one rule regarding breakfast that we had to follow as kids was that you needed to eat (at the very least) milk, starch, and some kind of fruit. Guess what? Pie with ice cream ticks all those boxes!” Touché. Confession No. 3: “The classic Mexican WAKEY WAKEY At Cain’s house, a mini cast iron skillet— dish chilaquiles is one the perfect size for frying two eggs—sizzles with butter and of my favorite breakfast fresh cracked black pepper. foods. I regularly order

BREAKFAST from page 46

eat & drink up!

nachos at restaurants so I have enough leftover chips, beans, etc., to make chilaquiles the next morning.” Thanks Mrs. Daly, for spilling the beans! To be fair, I don’t think any Hail Marys are required. My husband, too, loves chilaquiles with pickled cactus and runny eggs, and I’ve totally used leftover chips (that’s what free chip re-fills are for). Other responses (SLO’s Lisa Messner Funk: “over easy with chorizo or corned beef/some kind of crazy carnitas hash on French bread”) made my mouth literally water. You might be thinking, “What’s the deal with breakfast? I just have a big lunch.” No shade here, but I do implore that you, please, for the love of breakfast, live a little. Maybe it’s not an egg that’s alluring to you this morning. Maybe it’s taboo: that weirdly satisfying cold pizza or leftover fried chicken, straight from the doggie bag. This is a safe space. As my friend and Santa Margarita native Spencer Bone so aptly concluded, “If you wake up around lunchtime, anything is really an acceptable breakfast.” ∆ Hayley Thomas Cain has been known to crave cold pizza in the morning. She can be reached at hthomas@newtimesslo.com.

coladas and mai tais. Flagship is open now for breakfast, lunch, and dinner (find out more at pismoflagship.com).

Cork poppin’ Cheers to Golden State wine: September is California Wine Month! Enjoy Paso wine events, like a sunset hayride at Doce Robles Winery and Vineyard on Sept. 8, a musical barbecue at Still Waters Vineyards on Sept. 10, or head south for a swath of cool tasting room events in Edna Valley and Santa Maria (find events at discovercaliforniawines.com) … While some local wineries are just hopping on the harvest train, Monterey County is already going full-steam ahead! If you’re into cool climate varieties and sparkling wine grapes (being harvested right now), a road trip may be in order (go to montereywines.org). ∆ Hayley Thomas Cain is ready for cooler weather and awesome autumnal eats! Send bites to hthomas@newtimesslo.com.

H ayley’s P icks Guac around the clock!

H ayley’s Bites Greenery a Go Go Sweet harvest: The Heirloom Tomato Fest is right around the corner this Sept. 23 featuring a lush dinner by Chef Julie Simon. Dine on more than 40 heirloom tomato varieties at gorgeous Windrose Farm in Paso Robles (also enjoy farm tours, tomato growing tips, and fun for the whole family; go to farmsteaded.com for tickets).

nosh on this Standout vineyard star: Halter Ranch Vineyard in Paso Robles just announced that vineyard manager Lucas Pope has been named to Wine Enthusiast’s coveted 40 Under 40 list in the upcoming October 2017 issue. Pope is first vineyard manager to ever make the list! Way to grow! … Crashing waves, sunny sand, and bikinis galore: Pismo Beach is home to a new restaurant with spectacular ocean views—not to mention tropical piña

Who doesn’t like avocados and margaritas? This refreshing and satisfying combination of creamy and cold is pretty much the unofficial meal of “the California dream,” where waves shimmer and shoes are never required. If you live on the Central Coast, ripe avocados are your birthright, OK? Claim your scoop of the dip and gather at the annual AvoMarg Festival kicking off at the Morro Bay Embarcadero this Saturday, Sept. 9. Wear your sunscreen and prepare for a delicious day filled with live music (The Mighty Croon Dogs, Ricky Montijo, Lulu and the Cowtippers, and more), kids’ activities (face painting, mini avocado toss, drum line session, cornhole), and a whole area dedicated to elevating the humble avocado to new foodie heights! Most importantly, lets salute our local avocado growers who (as we can all agree) do an extremely important job. Saturday, Sept. 9, from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Morro Bay Embarcadero; avomargfest.com. ∆ Hayley Thomas Cain thinks guacamole is a meal. She can be reached at hthomas@ newtimesslo.com.

For everything food & drink, check out our weekly food column:

Flavor

EVERY THURSDAY by Hayley Thomas Cain Get Hayley’s Bites and Hayley’s Picks each week!

48 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com


Classies

Keep it Classy—for Free! If you’re a private party, run free classified ads for Sales and Auto/Boat sections online and in print! Check us out online at:

➤ classifieds.newtimesslo.com

Reaching 167,000 readers from Paso Robles to Lompoc weekly · We want your business to be featured! Call (805)546-8208 ext. 213

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rooM & rooMates

ALL AREAS - Free Roommate Service @ RentMates.com. Find the perfect roommate to compliment your personality and lifestyle at RentMates.com! : (AAN CAN)

SLO MOTEL ROOMS

HBO/Cable, TV, Free Wi-Fi, Refrigerator, Micro, Low Rates, Sunday through Thursday, Weekly Available, No Pets. 805543-7700

1558 W. Branch St. Arroyo Grande

Classifieds

(Kmart Shopping Center)

For Strong Results

Open 24 hours 7 days a week 805-489-6573

centralcoastpetemergency.com

Jobs WanteD

PAID IN ADVANCE! - Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStation.net : (AAN CAN)

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Miscellaneous

Massage tHeraPy ***NOTICE***

ALL ADS IN THIS CATEGORY ARE FOR THERAPEUTIC NONSEXUAL MASSAGE ONLY!

JT’S HAULING

Trees, Debris, Garage Clean Up, Moving and Recycling. Call Jon 805-440-4207

Moon Spa Before Noon Special

LIVELINKS - Chat Lines. Flirt, chat and date! Talk to sexy real singles in your area. Call now! 1-844- 359-5773 : (AAN CAN)

Body Massage

NEW AUTHORS WANTED! Page Publishing will help you self-publish your own book. FREE Author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 888-231-5094 (AAN CAN)

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Miscellaneous

DISH NETWORK-SATELLITE - Television Services. Now Over 190 channels for ONLY $49.99/ mo! HBO-FREE for one year. FREE Installation, FREE Streaming, FREE HD, Add Internet for $14.95 a month. 1-800-373-6508 : (AAN CAN) PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? - Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401 : (AAN CAN)

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Repairs, Strings, Buy, Sell, Trade – New & Used Instruments Donald L. Young & Hilary K. Young, Owners

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All Dogs & Cats All 1/2 Dogs & Cats Price. All & Cats Cats All Dogs Dogs & 1/2 Price. 1/2 Today through 1/2 Price. Price. Today through Saturday Saturday Today through September 6th -- 9th Today through September -- 9th 11am to6th 4pm Saturday Saturday 11am to6th 4pm September -- 9th

6th 9th Ave. SLO SLO CountySeptember Animal Services, 885--Oklahoma 11am to 4pm call11am the volunteers 805-781-4413 to 4pm SLOQuestions, County Animal Services, 885 at Oklahoma Ave. SLO Ad sponsored by Animal Shelter Adoption Partners -- SLOASAP.org Questions, call the volunteers at 805-781-4413 SLO County Animal Services, 885 Oklahoma Ave. SLO Ad sponsored by Animal Shelter Adoption Partners -- SLOASAP.org SLO County Animal Services, 885atOklahoma Ave. SLO Questions, call the volunteers 805-781-4413 Questions, the 805-781-4413 Ad sponsoredcall by Animal Sheltervolunteers Adoption Partners -- at SLOASAP.org Ad sponsored by Animal Shelter Adoption Partners -- SLOASAP.org

Open Saturdays 12:00 – 6:00 Thursday and Friday evenings by appointment.

SLO County Animal Services Shelter 885 Oklahoma Ave. SLO

garage sales cars

1968 Blue Plymouth Barracuda Rebuilt engine & transmission. Runs Great. All original interior/exterior paint. 318 engine/V8. Asking $5,000. Call 209-642-1874

Yardsale Sat. 10am-3pm, 920 Olivera St., Guadalupe. Sony Video Cam. New T-shirts, handmade clothing, locally handmade pottery, power tools, housewares. Come see what we have!

rV’s

BISSELL CLEANER HOOVER

73’ ARISTOCRAT TRAVEL TRAILER

All original, non-smoking, asking $3500 obo. 805-286-8323

FOUND!!

HOLLY’S HOPE CHEST

Free 438-3543 SUNDANCE SPA Seats 6/full lounge. Gray/teal. Steps, new cover. $2,500 OBO 928-4484

Pets

Classifieds For Strong Results

#A220309. Approximately 2 yr old Alaskan Husky male was brought in September 4th from the unincorporated area of the County.

Shelter Volunteers 805-781-4413

GET RID OF IT ALREADY! Free up your space by advertising in a FREE space. Private parties: list your For Sale items FREE in our Classifieds section. Send up to 30 words + 1 image to classifieds@ newtimesslo.com, subject line: FREE CLASSY. Your ad will appear in print and online, hassle free.

NewTimesSLO.com www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 49


LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1752 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (07/19/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: ROSEWORKS, 550 Ariba Road, Paso Robles, CA 93446. San Luis Obispo County. Mary Rose Niemi(550 Ariba Road, Paso Robles, CA 93446). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ Mary Rose Niemi. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 07-19-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, D. Chavez. 0719-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

LegaL Notices

LegaL Notices

LegaL Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1776 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (07/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: BLUE HULA STUDIOS, 842 Los Ciervos, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Craig Vanderzwaag(842 Los Ciervos, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Craig Vanderzwaag. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 07-20-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, D. Chavez. 07-20-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FILE NO. 2017-1850 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (07/31/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: THE STEAMING BEAN, 1651 Shell Beach Road, Pismo Beach, CA 93449. San Luis Obispo County. Marshall Kent Williams(121 Wawona, Pismo Beach, CA 93449). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Marshall K Williams. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 07-31-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 07-31-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FILE NO. 2017-1866 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: BADASS TUTORS, 191 Kentucky Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405. San Luis Obispo County. Dubravka Maria Gott(191 Kentucky Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Dubravka Maria Gott. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-01-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-01-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

NOTICE

TO ANYONE CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE FOLLOWING SEIZED PROPERTY WHICH IS SUBJECT TO FORFEITURE: $9,967.00 U.S. CURRENCY. On 8-17-2017 at 3860 S. Higuera, #113, San Luis Obispo, CA the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff ’s Office Narcotics Unit / San Luis Obispo Police Dept. seized the property listed above for health and Safety Code Sections (s) HS11378/11379/HS11351/11352/HS11470. We are now taking action to forfeit this property. If you claim an interest, you MUST file a claim within 30 days from the date this notice is first published. Claims MUST be filed with the Superior Court Clerk’s office located at the County Government Center, San Luis Obispo, California. You MUST ALSO provide a copy of the claim to the District Attorney’s Office at the County Government Center, Room 450, San Luis Obispo, California 93408, Attention: Chief Deputy District Attorney Jerret Gran. Use Control No. 17SO-029AF on any correspondence relating to this property. If you fail to file a claim on time, the District Attorney WILL FORFEIT the property to the State and it will be disposed of according to law (Health and Safety Code #11489). Dated: 8-23-2017

/s/ Jerret Gran Jerret Gran, Chief Deputy District Attorney

August 31, September 7, & 14, 2017

LegaL Notices

FILE NO. 2017-1868 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (07/30/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: ROBEN DELCO, 793 Pepper St, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Tane Martin(793 Pepper St, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ Tane Martin. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-01-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-01-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1881 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (10/01/2016) New Filing The following person is doing business as: GINA’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT, 138 E. Branch St, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Estrella Ventures, Inc.(138 E. Branch St, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420) California. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Estrella Ventures, Inc .Manuel Estrella, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-02-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Kramos. 08-02-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1885 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: ROSEN SAN LUIS OBISPO, 170 Granada Drive, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Sorona, Inc.(170 Granada Drive, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401) California. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Sorona, Inc. Ronald B. Alers, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-0217. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-02-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

NOTICE

We are now taking action to forfeit this property. If you claim an interest, you MUST file a claim within 30 days from the date this notice is first published. Claims MUST be filed with the Superior Court Clerk’s office located at the County Government Center, San Luis Obispo, California. You MUST ALSO provide a copy of the claim to the District Attorney’s Office at the County Government Center, Room 450, San Luis Obispo, California 93408, Attention: Chief Deputy District Attorney Jerret Gran. Use Control No. 17SO-025AF on any correspondence relating to this property. If you fail to file a claim on time, the District Attorney WILL FORFEIT the property to the State and it will be disposed of according to law (Health and Safety Code #11489). Dated: 8-29-2017

/s/ Jerret Gran Jerret Gran, Chief Deputy District Attorney

September 7, 14, & 21, 2017

City of Pismo BeaCh state of CaLifoRNia NotiCe to BiDDeRs SEALED BIDS will be received at the office of the City Clerk, 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach, California, until 2:00 p.m., on September 28, 2017 as determined by www.time.gov for performing work as follows: PISMO HEIGHTS GENERATOR ENCLOSURE PROJECT A mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held on Thursday, September 14, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. Please meet promptly at the project site at the corner of Longview Avenue and Merced Street. Bidders that do not attend this mandatory pre-bid meeting shall be disqualified from bidding on this project. Project Plans and Specifications are available at the Engineering Division office located at 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach, CA, 93449. A non-refundable fee of $50.00 per set will be charged. Electronic Plans and Specifications are available via email at no charge. Questions will be accepted in writing up to 72 hours before bid closing by emailing Chad Stoehr at cstoehr@pismobeach.org. Questions regarding bid procedure or other non-technical questions can be asked by emailing Erin Olsen at eolsen@pismobeach.org or by calling (805) 773-4656. Erica Inderlied, City Clerk August 31 & September 7, 2017

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO CONVEY COUNTY-OWNED REAL PROPERTY

LOCATED AT 900 MAIN STREET, CAMBRIA, CA 93428 On September 19, 2017, the Board of Supervisors of the County of San Luis Obispo will meet to consider the conveyance of Countyowned real property at 900 Main Street in the unincorporated area of Cambria in San Luis Obispo County. An exact legal description of said real property is on file in the Central Services Department, 1087 Santa Rosa St., San Luis Obispo, CA 93408, Attention: County Real Property Manager, (805) 781-5206. The property includes a commercial building totaling approximately 2,331 square feet, .58 water Equivalent Dwelling Units (EDUs), and approximately 9,888 square feet of land. The County-owned interest in the real property will be conveyed for $405,000. This matter will be considered by the Board of Supervisors at 9:00am, or as soon as possible thereafter, in the Board Chambers, County Government Center, 1055 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408. Dated: September 1, 2017 Tommy Gong, County Clerk-Recorder By: /s/Sandy Currens, Deputy Clerk September 7, 2017

50 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1889 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/03/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: CAMBRIA MIMOSAS STEAK & SEAFOOD, 841 Main St. Cambria, CA 93428. San Luis Obispo County. San Simeon Resort, Inc.(9520 Castillo Drive, San Simeon, CA 93452) Nevada. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/San Simeon Resort, Inc. Miguel Sandoval, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-03-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, D. Chavez. 08-03-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1892 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (04/01/1999) New Filing The following person is doing business as: POP UP CELLARS, 1427 Archer Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Evaki, Inc.(1427 Archer Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Evaki, Inc. Ken Jacques, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-03-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-03-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1911 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (06/15/2004) New Filing The following person is doing business as: THE SECRET GARDEN ORGANIC HERB SHOP, 740 Higuera St, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Kirstin Suzanne Sherritt(454 Pismo Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ Kirsten Sherritt. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-04-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-04-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

PUBLIC NOTICE

TO ANYONE CLAIMING AN INTEREST IN THE FOLLOWING SEIZED PROPERTY WHICH IS SUBJECT TO FORFEITURE: $7,935.00 U.S. CURRENCY On 7-29-2017 at 223 Oro Drive, Arroyo Grande, CA the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff ’s Office Narcotics Unit / Arroyo Grande Police Dept. seized the property listed above for health and Safety Code Sections (s) HS11378/11379/HS11351/11352/HS11470.

LegaL Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday, September 19, 2017 at 5:30 p.m., the Pismo Beach City Council will hold a regular meeting at City Hall, 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach California in the Council Chamber, during which it will consider the following: An application for a Goat Keeping Permit to keep two pygmy goats in a residential area. The property is located within the low-density Single-Family Residential Zone (RSL), and is located outside the Coastal Zone. APN: 005-383-015 Address:

126 Valley View

Applicant:

John W. Hiatt

Project No:

P17-000065

You have a right to comment on this item and its effect on our community. Interested persons are invited to appear at the meeting or otherwise express their views and opinions regarding the proposed item. An opportunity will be presented during the agenda item for verbal comments. Written comments are also welcomed at the meeting or prior to the meeting. Written comments prepared prior to the meeting may be submitted to the City Clerk’s Office by mail or hand-delivery at 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach, CA 93449, by fax at (805) 773-7006, or by email at einderlied@pismobeach.org. Staff reports, plans and other information related to these projects are available for public review at the City Clerk’s Office, 760 Mattie Road, Pismo Beach, CA. The meeting agenda and staff report will be available no later than the Thursday before the meeting and may be obtained at City Hall or by visiting www. pismobeach.org. The Council meeting will be televised live on Charter Cable Channel 20 and streamed on the City’s website. Further information on the above items may be obtained from or viewed at the City Clerk’s Office at City Hall, or by telephone at (805) 7734657, or by emailing Erica Inderlied, City Clerk, at einderlied@pismobeach.org. Erica Inderlied City Clerk September 7, 2017

LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1913 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (01/10/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: 4G’S PLUMBING, 1509 North Riverside Rd #14, Paso Robles, CA 93446. San Luis Obispo County. Gilkey Plumbing, Inc.(1509 North Riverside Rd #14, Paso Robles, CA 93446) California. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Gilkey Plumbing, Inc. Brad Gilkey, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-0717. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. McCormick. 08-07-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FILE NO. 2017-1926 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/08/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SOIL HARMONICS, 225 Ocean Ave. Cayucos, CA 93430. San Luis Obispo County. Amanda Smith(1691 Cass Ave, Cayucos, CA 93430). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Amanda Smith. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-08-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, I. Diaz. 08-08-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1927 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: LOVE’S CABINETS, SLOREMODEL, 2035 Rachel Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Diablo Valley Builders Inc.(2035 Rachel Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401) California. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Diablo Valley Builders, Inc. Nathan Love, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-08-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-08-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FILE NO. 2017-1916 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: HINKLE TWINS SALSA, 525 Mesa View Dr, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Lacey Marie Hinkle and Krystie Lane Hinkle(525 Mesa View Dr, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420) California. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture./s/Lacey Hinkle, Partner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-07-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-07-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1917 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (01/01/1996) New Filing The following person is doing business as: BMT TRANSPORT, INC., 131 Suburban Road, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. BMT Transport, Inc. (1420 Royal Industry Way, Concord, CA 94520) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/BMT Transport, Inc. Heidi Becker, Corp Secretary. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-07-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-07-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1919 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/07/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: CART BEFORE THE NORSE, 1424 Woodside Drive, Apartment B, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Brad Thomas Opstad(1424 Woodside Drive, Apartment B, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Brad Thomas Opstad. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-07-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, I. Diaz. 08-07-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1923 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (09/27/2011) New Filing The following person is doing business as: STOCKMAN’S AUTOMATION, 5 E. Gabilan St. Ste. 218, Salinas, CA 93901. Monterey County. Stockman’s Energy, Inc.(5 E. Gabilan St. Ste. 218, Salinas, CA 93901) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Stockman’s Energy, Inc. Kirk Story, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-07-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-07-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1924 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (07/21/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: C NAILS, 1240 Los Osos Valley Road, Ste 2, Los Osos, CA 93402. San Luis Obispo County. Bay Thi Duong(1245 4TH St. #A, Los Osos, CA 93402). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Bay Thi Duong. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-08-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-08-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1934 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: C & C WELL DRILLING INC., 1680 Old Oak Park Rd., Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. PC Inc.(P.O. Box 2116, Nipomo, CA 93444) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/ PC Inc. Mark Crisp-President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-0917. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-09-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1937 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (09/01/2007) New Filing The following person is doing business as: BLUEPRINT EXPRESS, 618 E. Grand Ave. Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Shirley Mae Shaw and Jerry Dean Shaw(1560 Paloma Place, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420). This business is conducted by a Married Couple./s/Shirley Shaw. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-09-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-09-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1946 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SONG, 8550C El Camino Real, Atascadero, CA 93422. San Luis Obispo County. Leo & Gregory, LLC(5710 Olmeda Ave, Atascadero, CA 93422) CA. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company./s/Leo & Gregory, LLC. Thomas Stein, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-09-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-09-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1948 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (05/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: FUNKIT APPAREL, 299 Sweet Springs Ln, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Ryan Christopher East(299 Sweet Springs Ln, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Ryan Christopher East. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-09-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-09-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

» MORE LEGAL NOTICES ON PAGE 53


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LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1951 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (05/26/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: M.J. EXCAVATION, LLC, 14555 Tierra Rd. Atascadero, CA 93422. San Luis Obispo County. M.J. Excavation, LLC(14555 Tierra Rd. Atascadero, CA 93422) California. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company./s/M.J. Excavation, LLC. Angela Elyse Juneau, Managing Member. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, TJ. Blandford. 08-10-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1966 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/11/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SLO SHENANIGANS, 1750 Prefumo Canyon Road #7, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405. San Luis Obispo County. Sadie Anna Rogers(1750 Prefumo Canyon Road #7, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Sadie Anna Rogers. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-11-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-11-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1952 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (12/31/1977) New Filing The following person is doing business as: S.M.A.F.S., 390 Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. McNamara Realty(390 Higuera, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/ McNamara Realty, President Michael McNamara. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-10-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

FILE NO. 2017-1971 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/09/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: CENTRAL COAST BREWERS GUILD, 179 Niblick Rd. Ste. 192, Paso Robles, CA 93446. San Luis Obispo County. Central Coast Brewers Consortium(P.O. Box 1445, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Central Coast Brewers Consortium, Matt Dolman, Treasurer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-11-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, TJ. Blandford. 08-11-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1954 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/10/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: REGAL FLOORING SOLUTIONS, 650 Pershing, Oceano, CA 93445. San Luis Obispo County. Beau Lee Usney(650 Pershing, Oceano, CA 93445). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Beau Lee Usney. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, I. Diaz. 08-10-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1959 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/10/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: MP LIVESTOCK, 1672 8TH Street, Los Osos, CA 93402. San Luis Obispo County. Martin Alexander Pierce(1672 8th Street, Los Osos, CA 93402). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Martin Alexander Pierce. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-10-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

ALL BAsic NEW & RENEWALs

LegaL Notices

FILE NO. 2017-1960 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: CENTRAL COAST PREMIER REALTY, 1980 Riena Ct, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405. San Luis Obispo County. Central Coast Premier Realty, LLC(1980 Riena Ct, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405) CA. This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company./s/Central Coast Premier Realty, LLC. Elizabeth Anderson, Owner/Broker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-10-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1963 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: LEO AND MICHEAL PRODUCTIONS, 473 Woodbridge Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Leonel Santos Farias(473 Woodbridge Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401) and Micheal Woldeaberha Fekadu(785 Reseda Dr. Apt. 32, Sunnyvale, CA 94087). This business is conducted by a General Partnership./s/Leonel Santos Farias. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-11-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-11-22. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

FILE NO. 2017-1986 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: AG TEES, 414 California St, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. David Lawrence Fair(414 California St, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420.). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/David Lawrence Fair. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-15-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-15-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1987 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SANDE PETRUZZI, COASTAL HABITAT INDIGENOUS PRESERVE, 0, South Price Street, Pismo Beach, CA 93449. San Luis Obispo County. James R. Jones(1004 House Ave. Cheyenne WY, 82007). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ James R. Jones. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-15-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-15-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1995 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (09/15/1977) New Filing The following person is doing business as: WILLIAM BROS REALTY, 182 Seacliff Drive, Pismo Beach, CA 93449. San Luis Obispo County. David Lowlan Williams(182 Sea Cliff Drive, Pismo Beach, CA 93449). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/David Williams, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-15-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-15-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1997 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SLO FAMILY ACUPUNCTURE, 2066 Chorro St. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Carla Nerelli(663 Church St. San Luis Obispo, CA 93401). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Carla Nerelli. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-16-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-16-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-1999 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: MERCANTILE ON MAIN, 863 Main St, Morro Bay, CA 93402. San Luis Obispo County. Kimberley Lynn Mayes (564 Woodland Drive, Los Osos, CA 93402). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Kimberley Mayes. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-16-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, TJ. Blandford. 08-16-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2002 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (01/01/2010) New Filing The following person is doing business as: OLIVE & EMERALD, 289 Cheyenne Drive, Paso Robles, CA 93446. San Luis Obispo County. Kerry Scott Grolle(289 Cheyenne Drive, Paso Robles, CA 93446). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Kerry S. Grolle, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-16-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-16-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2005 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: DENNY’S FARMING, 784 Mesa Rd. Nipomo, CA 93444. San Luis Obispo County. Raul Taborga and Wilma Taborga(1119 E. Creston St. Santa Maria, CA 93454). This business is conducted by a Married Couple./s/Raul Taborga. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-1617. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, I. Diaz. 08-16-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2008 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/16/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SUGAR & GLOW SLO, 878 Boysen Ave, San Luis Obispo, CA 93405. San Luis Obispo County. Willis Ann Jennifer(472 Broad St. San Luis Obispo, CA 93405). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Jennifer Willis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-1617. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, TJ. Blandford. 08-16-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2024 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: GOLDENAGE HANDYMAN, 824 B Brighton, Grover Beach, CA 93433. San Luis Obispo County. Michael Turk(824 B Brighton, Grover Beach, CA 93433). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ Michael Turk. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-18-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, TJ. Blandford. 08-18-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2062 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (06/30/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SHORTY AND SON AUTO SERVICE, 2190 Main Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442. San Luis Obispo County. Natalie F. Santos and Anthony F. Santos(1698 12th Street, Los Osos, CA 93402). This business is conducted by a Trust./s/Natalie F. Santos, Co-Trustee of the Santos Living Trust. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-23-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, D. Chavez. 08-23-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FILE NO. 2017-2093 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (04/20/2010) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SIX ONE TANGO LLC, 1076 Redbud Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444. San Luis Obispo County. Six One Tango, LLC(1076 Redbud Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444.) CA. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company./s/Six One Tango, LLC. John Bova, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-25-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 08-25-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2027 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/17/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: METAMORPHOSIS, INARA SOPHIA, 636 Avocet Way, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Karen Hatmaker(636 Avocet Way, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Karen Hatmaker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-18-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, I. Diaz. 08-18-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FILE NO. 2017-2070 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: THE LAPIDUS CLINIC, 6627 Bay Laurel Place A, Avila Beach, CA 93424. San Luis Obispo County. Yelena Lapidus MD, Inc.(6627 Bay Laurel Place A, Avila Beach, CA 93424) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/Yelena Lapidus MD, Inc. Yelena Lapidus, MD. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-23-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 08-23-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FILE NO. 2017-2094 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/15/1989) New Filing The following person is doing business as: J.B.’S CUSTOM WOODWORKING, 1076 Redbud Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444. San Luis Obispo County. John Bova(1076 Redbud Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444) CA. This business is conducted by an Individual./s/John Bova. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-25-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 08-25-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2028 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/18/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: PREFERRED AUTO DETAILING, 175 Woodbine Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444. San Luis Obispo County. Mary Blake/Preferred Auto Detailing(175 Woodbine Lane, Nipomo, CA 93444). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Mary Blake. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-18-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-18-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2045 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (01/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: MCMILLAN CENTER LIMITED PARTNERSHIP, 2945 McMillan Avenue, Suite 148, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Foster Family Trust(1315 Santa Ysabel Avenue, Paso Robles, CA 93446) and McMillan Partners, LP(1700 Harmony Way, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401).This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership./s/Jack Sloan Foster, Partner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-21-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-21-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2009 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/16/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: GARDEN WORKS, 1347 Pasadena Drive, Los Osos, CA 93402. San Luis Obispo County. Lisa Denker(1347 Pasadena Drive, Los Osos, CA 93402). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Lisa Denker. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-16-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, D. Chavez. 08-16-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

FILE NO. 2017-2056 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (07/01/2016) New Filing The following person is doing business as: 805 LIVESTOCK, 395 Old Creek Road, Cayucos, CA 93430. San Luis Obispo County. Jeff G. Minetti and Terri A. Minetti(395 Old Creek Road, Cayucos, CA 93430). This business is conducted by a Married Couple./s/Jeff G. Minetti. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-22-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, I. Diaz. 08-22-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2015 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (01/01/1981) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SYCAMORE CONSTRUCTION & DESIGN, 801 S. Halcyon #30, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. Daniel Guthrie and Sandra Guthrie(801 S. Halcyon #30, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420). This business is conducted by a Married Couple./s/Daniel Guthrie. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-1717. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-17-22. Aug. 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

LegaL Notices

FILE NO. 2017-2060 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: BY THE TEASPOON, 1460 Higuera St. Suite 101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. Julianne Marie Taylor and Brielle Renee Snyder(1460 Higuera St. Suite 101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401). This business is conducted by a General Partnership./s/Brielle Snyder, General Partner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-22-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-22-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FILE NO. 2017-2071 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (05/15/2007) New Filing The following person is doing business as: VALENTINA SUITES, VALENTINA VILLA, VALENTINA INN, 911 Price Street, Pismo Beach, CA 93449. San Luis Obispo County. Pismo Beach Inn, LLC(911 Price Street, Pismo Beach, CA 93449) CA. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company./s/Pismo Beach Inn, LLC. Robert C. Pringle, Member. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-23-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 08-23-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2074 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: RV HOTELS, 1440 Trimera Ave, Santa Maria, CA 93458. San Luis Obispo County. RV Hotels, LLC(1440 Trimera Ave, Santa Maria, CA 93458) CA. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company./s/RV Hotels, LLC. Baltazar G. Magana, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-24-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-24-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2081 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/24/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: CENTRAL COAST ESCROW, 350 James Way, Ste. 130, Pismo Beach, CA 93449. San Luis Obispo County. Stravinsky Holdings, Inc. (350 James Way, Ste. 130, Pismo Beach, CA 93449) CA. This business is conducted by a Corporation./s/ Stravinsky Holdings, Inc. Jay Peet, Chief Operations Officer. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-24-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 08-24-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2090 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: PREFERRED REALTY & PROPERTY MANAGEMENT SERVICES, 792 Arlington St. Cambria, CA 93428. San Luis Obispo County. Harry Keshvari(792 Arlington St. Cambria, CA 93428). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ Harry Keshvari, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-25-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, JF. Brown. 08-25-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FILE NO. 2017-2101 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (02/01/2012) New Filing The following person is doing business as: SIERRA SHORE FINANCIAL, HOLLETT INSURANCE SERVICES, 500 Cypress St, Suite S-15, Pismo Beach, CA 93449. San Luis Obispo County. Edward A. Hollett(875 Hibiscus Court, Nipomo, CA 93444). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Edward A. Hollett. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-2517. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-25-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2103 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/28/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: YARN AND BEADS, 225 West Grand Avenue, Grover Beach, CA 93433. San Luis Obispo County. Julia G. Powers(675 Barberry Way, Nipomo, CA 93444).This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Julia G. Powers. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-28-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. 08-28-22. Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2105 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (01/01/2000) New Filing The following person is doing business as: OPPORTUNITY HOUSING, 1958 Huasna Dr. San Luis Obispo, CA 93405. San Luis Obispo County. Thomas Allen McLaughlin(1958 Huasna Dr. San Luis Obispo, CA 93405). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Thomas McLaughlin. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-28-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Bolden. 08-28-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2110 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/01/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: WINDERMERE CENTRAL COAST, 1191-A N. Main Street, Salinas, CA 93906. Monterey County. Carlos Daniel Vargas(1191-A N. Main Street, Salinas, CA 93906). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/ Carlos D. Vargas, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-28-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, TJ. Blandford. 08-28-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

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» LEGAL NOTICES CONTINUED FROM PAGE 53

LegaL Notices FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2115 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/15/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: 3010 SOLAMERE, 989 Jacqueline Place, Nipomo, CA 93444. San Luis Obispo County. Paul Jeffery Laughton(989 Jacqueline Place, Nipomo, CA 93444). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Paul Laughton, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-28-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 08-28-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2118 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (N/A) New Filing The following person is doing business as: PERFORMANCE PAINTING, 460 Aloma Way, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo County. James Wade Cadam(460 Aloma Way, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420) CA. This business is conducted by an Individual./s/James Cadam. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-2917. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. McCormick. 08-2922. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FILE NO. 2017-2125 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (08/29/2017) New Filing The following person is doing business as: GOLDMAN ELECTRIC, 175 J St, Cayucos, CA 93430. San Luis Obispo County. Benjamin Paul Goldman(175 J St, Cayucos, CA 93430) Sole Ownership. This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Benjamin Goldman, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-29-17. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, S. Kramos. 08-29-22. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

LegaL Notices NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MATTHEW R. WHITAKER CASE NUMBER: 17PR - 0220

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: MATTHEW RUSSELL WHITAKER; MATT WHITAKER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by LISA R. WHITAKER in the Superior Court of California, County of San Luis Obispo. The Petition for Probate requests that LISA R. WHITAKER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: OCTOBER 10, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in Dept: 9, in Superior Court of California, County of San Luis Obispo, located at 1035 Palm Street, Room 385, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Michael R. Pick Jr. PO Box 1917 San Luis Obispo, CA 93406

FILE NO. 2017-2146 TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE (05/01/1996) New Filing The following person is doing business as: CRI CONTRACTING, 334 N. 10th Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433. San Luis Obispo County. Dennis Loren Jacobson(334 N. 10th Street, Grover Beach, CA 93433). This business is conducted by an Individual./s/Dennis Loren Jacobson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo August 31, September 7, & 14, on 09-01-17. I hereby certify that 2017 this copy is a correct copy of the NOTICE OF SALE OF statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong. County Clerk, J. Goble. ABANDONED PERSONAL 09-01-22. PROPERTY Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017 Notice is given that pursuant to sections 21701-21715 of the Business and Professions Code, Section 2328 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS of the Commercial Code, Section NAME STATEMENT 515 of the Penal Code, Main Mini Storage, located at 1380 Santa Ynez FILE NO. 2017-2147 Ave, 2000 Mountain View Ave., Los TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE Osos, CA 93402 and 2100 Main (05/19/2017) Street, Morro Bay, CA 93442, will New Filing The following person is doing busi- sell by competitive bidding ending on or after September 18th, 2017 on or ness as: IZAKAYA RAKU, 953 West after 10:00 A.M., property in storage Grand Avenue, Grover Beach, CA units. Auction is to be held online at 93433. San Luis Obispo County. AI www.storagetreasures.com. Kinjo SLO Inc.(2280 Emily Street #306, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401) Property to be sold includes, but is CA. This business is conducted by not limited to: Bookshelves, dressa Corporation./s/AI Kinjo SLO Inc. ers, washers & dryers, desks, beds, Kyung Youn Shin, President-Secre- tables and chairs, bed frames, mattary. This statement was filed with tresses, kitchen utensils, kitchenware, pots and pans, appliances, furthe County Clerk of San Luis Obispo nishings, clothing, household items, on 09-01-17. I hereby certify that luggage, stereo equipment, cabinets, this copy is a correct copy of the sporting equipment, fishing gear, statement on file in my office. (Seal) camping gear, tools, construction Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bau- equipment, computers, monitors, printers, toys, TV’S, bicycles, golf tista. 09-01-22. clubs, surf boards, office furniture, Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017 personal items, possible collectibles/ antiques and boxed items contents FICTITIOUS BUSINESS unknown, belonging to the following: LOS OSOS NAME STATEMENT Hollands, Dorri (10x10) FILE NO. 2017-2149 Bolster, Joe (3x10) TRANSACTION BUSINESS DATE Miller, Jason (10x10) (09/01/2017) Cummins, Andi (10x10) New Filing Morro Bay The following person is doing busi- Wright, Stephen (10x20) ness as: MICHELLE ANNE PHOTOGRAPHY, 424 Orchard Ave. Arroyo Purchases must be paid for at time Grande, CA 93420. San Luis Obispo of sale in CASH ONLY. All purchased County. Michelle Rogers(424 Orchard items sold as is, where is. Items must be removed at the time of sale. Ave. Arroyo Grande, CA 93420). Sale is subject to cancellation in the This business is conducted by an event of settlement between owner Individual./s/Michelle Rogers. This and obligated party. Advertiser restatement was filed with the County serves the right to bid. Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 09-0117. I hereby certify that this copy is Auction by StorageTreasures.com (855)722-8853 a correct copy of the statement on Phone Main Mini Storage (805) 528-7864 file in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong. County Clerk, A. Bautista. 09-01-22. Ad to run September 7th & 14th, Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017 2017

LegaL Notices NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE T.S. NO.: 2017-01056CA A.P.N.:077-128-001 PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1332 JASMINE PLACE, ARROYO GRANDE, CA 93420

PURSUANT TO CIVIL CODE § 2923.3(a) and (d), THE SUMMARY OF INFORMATION REFERRED TO BELOW IS NOT ATTACHED TO THE RECORDED COPY OF THIS DOCUMENT BUT ONLY TO THE COPIES PROVIDED TO THE TRUSTOR. NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED 注:本文件包含一个信息摘要 참고사항: 본 첨부 문서에 정보 요약 서가 있습니다 NOTA: SE ADJUNTA UN RESUMEN DE LA INFORMACIÓN DE ESTE DOCUMENTO TALA: MAYROONG BUOD NG IMPORMASYON SA DOKUMENTONG ITO NA NAKALAKIP LƯU Ý: KÈM THEO ĐÂY LÀ BẢN TRÌNH BÀY TÓM LƯỢC VỀ THÔNG TIN TRONG TÀI LIỆU NÀY IMPORTANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 03/01/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. Trustor: John Brandon Sinner, and Kari Lyn Sinner husband and wife Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Deed of Trust Recorded 03/07/2006 as Instrument No. 2006015488 in book ---, page--- and of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Luis Obispo County, California, Date of Sale: 10/03/2017 at 11:00 AM Place of Sale:IN THE BREEZEWAY ADJACENT TO THE COUNTY GENERAL SERVICES BLDG. LOCATED AT 1087 SANTA ROSA STREET, SAN LUIS OBISPO, CA 93408 Estimated amount of unpaid balance, reasonably estimated costs and other charges: $ 406,861.40

LegaL Notices will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/ MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx using the file number assigned to this case 2017-01056-CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: August 24, 2017Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee for beneficiary C/o 1500 Palma Drive, Suite 237 Ventura, CA 93003 Sale Information Line: (866) 9608299 http://www.altisource.com/ MortgageServices/DefaultManagement/TrusteeServices.aspx Trustee Sale Assistant WESTERN PROGRESSIVE, LLC MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

THE TRUSTEE WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR September 7, 14, & 21, 2017 CASH, CASHIER’S CHECK DRAWN NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S ON A STATE OR NATIONAL BANK, A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDSALE ERAL CREDIT UNION, OR A CHECK DRAWN BY A STATE OR FEDERAL TRUSTEE SALE NO. SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION, 850072 LOAN NO. A SAVINGS ASSOCIATION OR SAVINGS BANK SPECIFIED IN SECTION 20160201 TITLE ORDER 5102 OF THE FINANCIAL CODE AND NO. APN SEE ExHIBIT “A” AUTHORIZED TO DO BUSINESS IN TRA NO. THIS STATE: YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 02/15/2016. UNAll right, title, and interest conveyed LESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROto and now held by the trustee in the TECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE hereinafter described property under SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU and pursuant to a Deed of Trust deNEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE scribed as: NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONMore fully described in said Deed of TACT A LAWYER. On 09/21/2017 Trust. at 11:00AM, First American Title Insurance Company as the duly apStreet Address or other common pointed Trustee under and pursuant designation of real property: 1332 to Deed of Trust recorded on FebruJasmine Place, Arroyo Grande, CA ary 29, 2016 as Document Number 93420 A.P.N.: 077-128-001 2016008642 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of San The undersigned Trustee disclaims Luis Obispo County, California, exany liability for any incorrectness of ecuted by: Warwick Properties, LLC, the street address or other common a Nevada limited liability company, designation, if any, shown above. as Trustor, See Exhibit “A” attached hereto and incorporated by reference The sale will be made, but without herein, as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT covenant or warranty, expressed or PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST implied, regarding title, possession, BIDDER FOR CASH (payable at time or encumbrances, to pay the reof sale in lawful money of the United maining principal sum of the note(s) States, by cash, a cashier’s check secured by the Deed of Trust with drawn by a state or national bank, interest thereon, as provided in said a check drawn by a state or federal note(s), advances, under the terms credit union, or a check drawn by of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges a state or federal savings and loan and expenses of the Trustee and of association, savings association, the trusts created by said Deed of or savings bank specified in section Trust. The total amount of the unpaid 5102 of the Financial Code and aubalance of the obligation secured by thorized to do business in this state). the property to be sold and reasonAt: In the breezeway adjacent to the able estimated costs, expenses and County General Services Building, advances at the time of the initial 1087 Santa Rosa Street San Luis publication of the Notice of Sale is: Obispo, CA 93408, all right, title $ 406,861.40. and interest conveyed to and now held by it under said Deed of Trust in Note: Because the Beneficiary rethe property situated in said County, serves the right to bid less than the California describing the land therein: total debt owed, it is possible that at See Exhibit “A” attached hereto and the time of the sale the opening bid incorporated by reference herein Exmay be less than the total debt. hibit “A” Parcel A: Parcel 3 Of Parcel Map Co-03-0231, In The County Of If the Trustee is unable to convey title San Luis Obispo, State Of Califorfor any reason, the successful bidnia, As Per Map Recorded In Book der’s sole and exclusive remedy shall 68, Pages 90-92 Inclusive Of Parcel be the return of monies paid to the Maps, In The Office Of The County Trustee, and the successful bidder Recorder Of Said County. Parcel shall have no further recourse. B: A Non-Exclusive Easement For Access And Utility Purposes Over The beneficiary of the Deed of Trust Those Portions Of Parcels 1 And 2 has executed and delivered to the Of Parcel Map Co-03-0231 Shown As undersigned a written request to “30’ Access And Utility Easement Per commence foreclosure, and the unThis Map”. Said Easement Is To Be dersigned caused a Notice of Default Appurtenant To And For The Benefit and Election to Sell to be recorded Of Parcel 3 Of Parcel Map Co-03in the county where the real property 0231 As Per Map Recorded In Book is located. 68, Pages 90-92 Inclusive Of Parcel Maps, In The Office Of The County NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: Recorder Of San Luis Obispo County. If you are considering bidding on Apn: 091-195-003 The property herethis property lien, you should under- tofore described is being sold “as is”. stand that there are risks involved The street address and other comin bidding at a trustee auction. You mon designation, if any, of the real

54 • New Times • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • www.newtimesslo.com

LegaL Notices property described above is purported to be: 2115 Willow Road, Arroyo Grande, CA 93420-5854. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust, to-wit: $824,151.14 (Estimated) Accrued interest and additional advances, if any, will increase this figure prior to sale. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and delivered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Default and Demand for Sale, and a written Notice of Default and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Default and Election to Sell to be recorded in the county where the real property is located and more than three months have elapsed since such recordation. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may visit the website below using the file number assigned to this case. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. For information on sale dates please visit our website at: http://www.ncs. firstam.com/socal/ DATE: 8/22/17 First American Title Insurance Company 4380 La Jolla Village Drive Suite 110 San Diego, CA 92122 (858) 410-2158 David Z. Bark, Foreclosure Trustee NPP0314956 To: NEW TIMES PUB: 08/31/2017, 09/07/2017, 09/14/2017

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. TS 41938 LN HERNANDEZ TO 170030656.

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/26/2016. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. NOTICE: ALL AMERICAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE, AS TRUSTEE, WILL NOT ACCEPT THIRD PARTY ENDORSED CASHIER’S CHECKS. ALL CASHIER’S CHECKS MUST BE PAYABLE DIRECTLY TO ALL AMERICAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: Sergio Arturo Perez Hernandez, an unmarried man, Duly Appointed Trustee: All American Foreclosure Service.

LegaL Notices Recorded 6/2/2016 as Instrument No. 2016025336 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Luis Obispo County, California. Date of Sale: 9/28/2017 at 11:00 AM. Place of Sale: In the breezeway adjacent to the County General Services Bldg. located at 1087 Santa Rosa St., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $35,646.16. Street Address or other common designation of real property: LOT 57, UNIT 35, CALIFORNIA VALLEY, IN THE COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO RECORD OF SURVEY RECORDED IN BOOK 11, PAGE 113 OF RECORDS OF SURVEY, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. EXCEPTING THEREFROM 50% OF ALL OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES LYING IN, UNDER OR UPON SAID LAND LYING BELOW A DEPTH OF 500 FEET FROM THE SURFACE BUT WITHOUT THE RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY AS RESERVED BY SECURITY TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CORPORATION IN DEED RECORDED OCTOBER 26, 1970 IN BOOK 1590, PAGE 437 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. . A.P.N.: 082-291-074. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of the monies paid to the trustee and the successful bidder shall have no recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (805) 543-7088 or visit this Internet Web site http://eloandata. com/, using the file number assigned to this case 41938. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 9/02/2017. All American Foreclosure Service, 1363 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (805) 543-7088. Sheryle A. Machado , Certified Trustee Sale Officer September 7, 14, & 21, 2017

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE. TS 41939 LN ARELLANO TO 170030657.

LegaL Notices AMERICAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE, AS TRUSTEE, WILL NOT ACCEPT THIRD PARTY ENDORSED CASHIER’S CHECKS. ALL CASHIER’S CHECKS MUST BE PAYABLE DIRECTLY TO ALL AMERICAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: PABLO RODRIGUEZ ARELLANO, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE AND NOBERTO RODRIGUEZ LUGO, A SINGLE MAN, Duly Appointed Trustee: All American Foreclosure Service. Recorded 2/29/2012 as Instrument No. 2012011248 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Luis Obispo County, California. Date of Sale: 9/28/2017 at 11:00 AM. Place of Sale: In the breezeway adjacent to the County General Services Bldg. located at 1087 Santa Rosa St., San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $6,456.29. Street Address or other common designation of real property: LOT 169, UNIT 6, CALIFORNIA VALLEY, IN THE UNINCORPORATED AREA OF THE COUNTY OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS PER RECORD OF SURVEY RECORDED IN BOOK 10, PAGE 86 OF RECORDS OF SURVEY, RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM 50% OF ALL OIL, GAS AND OTHER HYDROCARBON SUBSTANCES LYING IN, UNDER OF UPON SAID PROPERTY LYING BELOW A DEPTH OF 500 FEET FROM THE SURFACE BUT WITHOUT THE RIGHT OF SURFACE ENTRY AS RESERVED BY SECURITY TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY, A CORPORATION, BY DEED RECORDED MAY 9, 1972 IN BOOK 1667, PAGE 536 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. . A.P.N.: 084-211-032. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder’s sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of the monies paid to the trustee and the successful bidder shall have no recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call (805) 543-7088 or visit this Internet Web site http://eloandata. com/, using the file number assigned to this case 41939. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 9/02/2017. All American Foreclosure Service, 1363 Marsh Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 (805) 543-7088. Sheryle A. Machado , Certified Trustee Sale Officer

YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 9/8/2011. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of September 7, 14, & 21, 2017 Trust described below. NOTICE: ALL

LegaL Notices NOTICE SUMMONS NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DWIGHT G BECKSTRAND; DOES 1-50 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): CAMERON N VERDI CASE NUMBER:30-201600893641-CU-FR-CJC

Notice! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond in 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts online Self-Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS CALENDARIOS despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales para presentar una repuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted puede usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formuleriors de la corte y mas informacion en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su repuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte la podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requistas legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar ias cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo ao una consesion de artitraje en un caso dce derecho civll. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NUMBER: 30-2016-00893641-CU-FR-CJC The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF ORANGE 700 Civic Center Drive West Santa Ana, CA 92701 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Cameron N Verdi 220 Newport Center Drive #11-122 Newport Beach, CA 92660 Date: 02-21-2017 By:. David H. Yamasaki, Clerk of the Court /s/ Monique Ramirez, Deputy Clerk AUGUST 17, 24, 31, & September 7, 2017


LegaL Notices ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 17CV-0440

To all interested persons: Petitioner: Bryan Bowers for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Bryan Buddy Bowers PROPOSED NAME: Bryan James Bowers THE COURT ORDERS: that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: 10/11/2017, Time: 9:00 am, Dept. 9 at the Superior Court of San Luis Obispo, 1035 Palm St. Rm. 385, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: New Times Date: August 15, 2017 /s/: Charles Crandall of the Superior Court Aug 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 17CV-0456

To all interested persons: Petitioner: Robert Bischoff for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Devon Nicholas Womack PROPOSED NAME: Devon Nicholas Bischoff THE COURT ORDERS: that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: 10/05/2017, Time: 9:00 am, Dept. 2 at the Superior Court of San Luis Obispo, 1035 Palm St. Rm. 385, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: New Times

LegaL Notices ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 17CVP-0185

To all interested persons: Petitioner: David Christopher Silva for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: David Christopher Silva PROPOSED NAME: David Christopher Callahan THE COURT ORDERS: that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOHN DENNIS SHAVER CASE NUMBER: 17PR - 0280

To all interested persons: Petitioner: Jimena Gonzalez Nava for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Jimena Gonzalez To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, Nava PROPOSED NAME: Jimena contingent creditors, and persons who (NMN) Gonzalez-Nava may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: JOHN DENNIS THE COURT ORDERS: that all per- SHAVER sons interested in this matter appear A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been before this court at the hearing indi- filed by STEVEN D. SCHMIDT in the cated below to show cause, if any, Superior Court of California, County of why the petition for change of name San Luis Obispo. should not be granted. Any person The Petition for Probate requests that objecting to the name changes de- STEVEN D. SCHMIDT be appointed as scribed above must file a written ob- personal representative to administer jection that includes the reasons for the estate of the decedent. the objection at least two days before THE PETITION requests the decedent’s the matter is scheduled to be heard will and codicils, if any, be admitted to and must appear at the hearing to probate. The will and any codicils are show cause why the petition should available for examination in the file not be granted. If no written objection kept by the court. is timely filed, the court may grant THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Indethe petition without a hearing. pendent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: representative to take many actions 09/13/2017, Time: 9:00 am, Dept. without obtaining court approval. P2 at the Superior Court of San Before taking certain very important Luis Obispo, 901 Park Street, Paso actions, however, the personal repreRobles, CA 93446. A copy of this sentative will be required to give notice Order to Show Cause shall be pub- to interested persons unless they have lished at least once each week for waived notice or consented to the four successive weeks prior to the proposed action.) The independent date set for hearing on the petition administration authority will be granted in the following newspaper of gen- unless an interested person files an oberal circulation, printed in this county: jection to the petition and shows good New Times cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petiDate: July 24, 2017 /s/: Barry T. Labarbera of the Supe- tion will be held in this court as follows: NOVEMBER 21, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. in rior Court Dept: 9, in Superior Court of California, County of San Luis Obispo, located at Aug 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017 1035 Palm Street, Room 385, San Luis Obispo, CA 93408. ORDER TO SHOW IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should CAUSE FOR CHANGE appear at the hearing and state your OF NAME CASE objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your NUMBER: 17CVP-0204 appearance may be in person or by ORDER TO SHOW your attorney. CAUSE FOR CHANGE IF YOU ARE A CREDIOF NAME CASE TOR or a contingent creditor of the NUMBER: 17CVP-0204 decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the To all interested persons: personal representative appointed by Petitioner: Brandon St. Claire for a the court within the later of either (1) decree changing names as follows: four months from the date of first isPRESENT NAME: Brandon Michael suance of letters to a general personal St. Claire PROPOSED NAME: Brandon representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, Michael Landis or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing THE COURT ORDERS: that all per- or personal delivery to you of notice sons interested in this matter appear under section 9052 of the California before this court at the hearing indi- Probate Code. Other California statcated below to show cause, if any, utes and legal authority may affect why the petition for change of name your rights as a creditor. You may want should not be granted. Any person to consult with an attorney knowledgeobjecting to the name changes de- able in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the scribed above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for file kept by the court. If you are a perthe objection at least two days before son interested in the estate, you may the matter is scheduled to be heard file with the court a formal Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of and must appear at the hearing to the filing of an inventory and appraisal show cause why the petition should of estate assets or of any petition or not be granted. If no written objection account as provided in Probate Code is timely filed, the court may grant section 1250. A Request for Special the petition without a hearing. Notice form is available from the court clerk. NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: Attorney for Petitioner: 10/04/2017, Time: 9:00 am, Dept. Christian E. Iversen P2 at the Superior Court of San 605 13th Street Luis Obispo, 901 Park Street, Paso Paso Robles, CA 93446 Robles, CA 93446. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be pub- August 31, September 7, & 14, 2017 lished at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the STATEMENT OF date set for hearing on the petition ABANDONMENT in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: OF USE OF New Times

Date: August 25, 2017 Date: August 09, 2017 /s/: Barry T. Labarbera of the Supe- /s/: Roger Picquet of the Superior rior Court Court Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017 Aug 24, 31 & Sept. 7, 14 2017

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 17CV-0458

LegaL Notices

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 17LC-0611

To all interested persons: Petitioner: Maria Guadalupe Contreras Garcia for a decree changing names as follows: PRESENT NAME: Guillermo Alejandro Contreras PROPOSED NAME: Alejandro Guillermo Medina Contreras THE COURT ORDERS: that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

NEW FILE NO. 2017-1950 OLD FILE NO. 2015-1962 MJ EXCAVATION, 14555 Tierra Rd. Atascadero, CA 93422. San Luis Obispo County. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in San Luis Obispo County on 07-29-2015. The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Matthew G. Jeneau and Angela E. Moles(14555 Tierra Rd. Atascadero, CA 93422). This business was conducted by a General Partnership./s/Angela Elyse Moles, Co-Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10-2017. I hereby certify that this copy is a correct copy of the statement on file in my office. (Seal) Tommy Gong, County Clerk. By TJ. Blandford, Deputy Clerk. Aug. 17, 24, 31 & Sept. 7 2017

NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: 09/28/2017, Time: 9:00 am, Dept. 2 at the Superior Court of San Luis Obispo, 1035 Palm Street, Room 385, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: New Times

SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)

CASE NUMBER (Número del Caso): 16LCP-0250 NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Jesse Patague, an individual YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁ DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self-Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. ¡AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación. Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte. ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede más cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperación de $10,000 ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. The name and address of the court is (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): Superior Court of CA, San Luis Obispo, 901 Park Street, Paso Robles, CA 93446 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is (El nombre, la dirección y el número de teléfono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Jeffrey Mukai, SB #: 273338, Collection at Law, Inc., A.P.C., 3835 East Thousand Oaks Blvd, Suite R-349, Westlake Village, CA 91362 (818)716-7630 DATE (Fecha): 6/16/2016 by Janis Dumouchelle, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL) 9/7, 9/14, 9/21, 9/28/17 CNS-3045184# NEW TIMES

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

NEW FILE NO. 2017-1957 OLD FILE NO. 2014-1226 SONIC SENSORS, 170 Granada Drive, Suites C&D, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. San Luis Obispo County. The fictitious business name referred to above was filed in San Luis Obispo County on 06-02-2014. The following person has abandoned the use of the fictitious business name: Sorona, Inc. (170 Granada Drive, Suites C&D, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401). This business was conducted by a Corporation/s/ Ronald B. Alers, CEO of Sorona, Inc. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of San Luis Obispo on 08-10Date: August 10, 2017 2017. I hereby certify that this copy is Date: August 25, 2017 /s/: Barry T. Labarbera of the Supe- a correct copy of the statement on file /s/: Charles S. Crandall of the Supe- rior Court in my office. (Seal)Tommy Gong, Counrior Court ty Clerk. By J. Goble, Deputy Clerk. Sept. 7, 14, 21 & 28 2017 Aug 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017 Aug. 31 & Sept. 7, 14, 21 2017

NOTICE OF HEARING: Date: 10/11/2017, Time: 9:00 am, Dept. 9 at the Superior Court of San Luis Obispo, 1050 Monterey St. San Luis Obispo, CA 93408. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county: New Times

for the week of Sept. 7

LegaL Notices

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology Homework: Why is this a perfect moment? To hear my reasons why, tune in to my podcast: http://bit.ly/PerfectionNow. ARIES

LIBRA

(March 21-April 19): You’re half-intoxicated by your puzzling adventures—and half-bewildered, as well. Sometimes you’re spinning out fancy moves, sweet tricks, and surprising gambits. On other occasions you’re stumbling and bumbling and mumbling. Are you really going to keep up this rhythm? I hope so, because your persistence in navigating through the challenging fun could generate big rewards. Like what, for example? Like the redemptive transformation of a mess into an asset.

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Let’s meet in the woods after midnight and tell each other stories about our origins, revealing the secrets we almost forgot we had. Let’s sing the songs that electrified our emotions all those years ago when we first fell in love with our lives. Starlight will glow on our ancient faces. The fragrance of loam will seep into our voices like rainwater feeding the trees’ roots. We’ll feel the earth turning on its axis, and sense the rumble of future memories coming to greet us. We’ll join hands, gaze into the dreams in each other’s eyes, and dive as deep as we need to go to find hidden treasures.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Free your mind and your ass will follow,” sings funk pioneer George Clinton in his song “Good Thoughts, Bad Thoughts.” And what’s the best way to free your mind? Clinton advises you to “Be careful of the thought-seeds you plant in the garden of your mind.” That’s because the ideas you obsess on will eventually grow into the experiences you attract into your life. “Good thoughts bring forth good fruit,” he croons, while “Bullshit thoughts rot your meat.” Any questions, Taurus? According to my astrological analysis, this is the best possible counsel for you to receive right now.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): James Loewen wrote a book called Lies My Teacher Told Me: Everything Your American History Textbook Got Wrong. He said, for instance, that during the Europeans’ invasion and conquest of the continent, it wasn’t true that Native Americans scalped white settlers. In fact, it was mostly the other way around: whites scalped Indians. Here’s another example: The famous blind and deaf person, Helen Keller, was not a sentimental spokesperson for sweetness and light, but rather a radical feminist and socialist who advocated revolution. I invite you to apply Loewen’s investigative approach to your personal past, Gemini. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to uncover hidden, incomplete, and distorted versions of your history, and correct them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Now that you’re getting a taste of what life would be like if you ruled the world, I’ll recommend a manual. It’s called How To Start Your Own Country, by Erwin Strauss. (Get a free peek here: tinyurl.com/YouSovereign.) You could study it for tips on how to obtain national sovereignty, how to recruit new citizens, and how to avoid paying taxes to yourself. (P.S.: You can make dramatic strides toward being the boss of yourself and your destiny even without forming your own nation.)

CAPRICORN

(June 21-July 22): Roger Hodge writes books now, but when he worked for Harper’s magazine, he had an unusual specialty. He gathered heaps of quirky facts, and assembled several at a time into long sentences that had a nutty poetic grace. Here’s an example: “British cattle have regional accents, elephants mourn their dead, nicotine sobers drunk rats, scientists have concluded that teenagers are physically incapable of being considerate, and clinical trials of an ‘orgasmatron’ are underway in North Carolina.” I’m offering Hodge as a worthy role model for you in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Be curious, miscellaneous, and free-flowing. Let your mind wander luxuriantly as you make unexpected connections. Capitalize on the potential blessings that appear through zesty twists and tangy turns.

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): There was a time when not even the most ambitious explorers climbed mountains. In the western world, the first time it happened was in 1492, when a Frenchman named Antoine de Ville ascended to the top of Mont Aiguille, using ladders, ropes, and other props. I see you as having a kinship with de Ville in the coming weeks, Capricorn. I’d love to see you embark on a big adventure that would involve you trying on the role of a pioneer. This feat wouldn’t necessarily require strenuous training and physical courage. It might be more about daring creativity and moral courage.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In Japan you can buy a brand of candy that’s called The Great Buddha’s Nose Snot. Each piece consists of a rice puff that resembles the Buddha’s nose filled with bits of brown sugar that symbolize the snot. The candy-making company assures customers that eating this treat brings them good luck. I invite you to be equally earthy and irreverent about your own spiritual values in the coming days. You’re in prime position to humanize your relationship with divine influences ... to develop a more visceral passion for your holiest ideals ... to translate your noblest aspirations into practical, enjoyable actions. (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Will a routine trip to carry out an errand take you on a detour to the suburbs of the promised land? Will you worry you’re turning into a monster, only to find the freakishness is just a phase that you had to pass through on your way to unveiling some of your dormant beauty? Will a provocative figure from the past lead you on a productive wild-goose chase into the future? These are some of the possible storylines I’ll be monitoring as I follow your progress in the coming weeks.

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(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I don’t usually recommend giving gifts with strings attached. On the contrary, I advise you to offer your blessings without having any expectations at all. Generosity often works best when the recipients are free to use it any way they see fit. In the coming weeks, however, I’m making an exception to my rule. According to my reading of the omens, now is a time to be specific and forceful about the way you’d like your gifts to be used. As an example of how not to proceed, consider the venture capitalist who donated $25,000 to the University of Colorado. All he got in return was a rest room in a campus building named after him. If you give away $25,000, Scorpio, make sure you at least get a whole building named after you.

CANCER

VIRGO

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SCORPIO

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Science fiction proposes that there are alternate worlds alongside the visible one—hidden, yes, but perhaps accessible with the right knowledge or luck. In recent years, maverick physicists have given the idea more credibility, theorizing that parallel universes exist right next to ours. Even if these hypothetical places aren’t literally real, they serve as an excellent metaphor. Most of us are so thoroughly embedded in our own chosen niche that we are oblivious to the realities that other people inhabit. I bring these thoughts to your attention, Aquarius, because it’s a favorable time to tap into those alternate, parallel, secret, unknown, or unofficial realms. Wake up to the rich sources that have been so close to you, but so far away.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m always in favor of you cultivating a robust relationship with your primal longings. But I’ll be rooting extra hard for you to do that during the next 11 months. I hope you will dig deep to identify your primal longings, and I hope you will revere them as the wellspring of your life energy, and I hope you will figure out all the tricks and strategies you will need to fulfill them. Here’s a hint about how to achieve the best results as you do this noble work: Define your primal longings with as much precision as you can, so that you will never pursue passing fancies that bear just a superficial resemblance to the real things. ∆

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny's expanded weekly horoscopes and daily text message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. © Copyright 2017

www.newtimesslo.com • September 7 - September 14, 2017 • New Times • 55


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New Times, Sept. 7, 2017  

San Luis Obispo County's News and Entertainment Weekly

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