Issuu on Google+


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCES

RSP Architects, Tempe, AZ – May 2012 – July 2012 Responsibilities included Client Meetings, Conceptual renders for RFQ submittals, Field reports, OAC meetings, Construction drawings, Layout design. Projects included Institutional buildings, Renovations, Laboratory and Hospitality.

KUKKE ARCHITECTS, INDIA – June 2009 – December 2009 Responsibilities included Conceptual sketches and plans, Construction drawings, Site reports, Client Meetings, City approval drawings, Estimation and Bill Checking. Projects included single family and multifamily residences and Performance centers.

CONSOLIDATED CONSORTIUM, INDIA – May 2008 – June 2008 Worked with lead architect on a retrofit project, involving the conversion of an abandoned residence into a heritage hotel. Responsibilities included process renders, plans and walkthrough.

R E S U M E NANDITHA THIAGARAJAN

EDUCATION

SKILL SETS

AWARDS AND ACHIEVEMENTS

1111, ES UNIVERSITY DRIVE, 121 611, Wells St, #1203 TEMPE, AZIL85281 Chicago. 60607

Arizona State University M.Arch – Fall 2011 to present

Design Excellence (Collaborative Project), Fall 2012, ASU

773-610-7626 nthiaga1@asu.edu

National Institute of Technology, Trichy B.Arch, 2006 – 2011

Adobe design suite CS 5.5 (Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign, Aftereffects) Rhino v5 + Grasshopper Autocad 2010 and above Revit Architecture 2011 (Certification course with Autodesk ) Sketchup 7 and above + Vray 3DS Max10 + Vray Office 2010

Rosary Matriculation Higher Secondary School, India 1992 – 2006

Pidlite Young Designer’s Award for Maximum Space Utilization, April 2011 Awarded the national Citation for the design of an Installation/ Public Space at the Annual NASA (National Association of Students of Architecture) Design Competition, India, 2009 / 2010


“CREATIVITY - The Big Bang itself, Energies collide, take form and evolve into matter. It’s a process which suffocates the brain with thoughts, ideas explode, the ‘I got it smiles’ appear and what remains is pure euphoria” * The process of design has always struck me as a sudden and unintended outburst of ideas. I believe that we as human beings are inherently knowledgeable about our surroundings; we probably just don’t understand them. For me, a simple sketch is what makes me understand. It’s astonishing what a simple stroke of the pencil can conjure up in the mind’s eye. One stroke leads to another and I start seeing a series of random patterns. These are the little bridges - connecting each idea to the other – and at the same time evaluating/comparing, discarding /manipulating; finally weaving them into a complex yet elementally simple pattern- to form a coherent whole. Following these “outbursts”, is constraining them. Be it graphic standards or codes - cross referencing them with various examples and creating a framework. I have in course of time learnt to look at these as a guide rather than a constraint – a Scaffold if I may call it that. Having grown up in Chennai, a metro in Southern India, an exposure to ancient buildings has been a source of constant inspiration to try to understand what makes an experience. And I have come to realize that any person's perception of design comes from the depth of experiences that have gone before. I see buildings as veritable time capsules, bridging the divide between cultures, people and the environment for they cannot be viewed as disparate entities, but as forces that have the ability to influence the built environment. To me the modulation of light and its effect on the built form has always fascinated me. You realize that it’s not so much the light that stands out but rather the shade around it which steps back - and that’s where patterns are formed - a pattern - a contrast and a rhythm - and once you get these right - I think architecture is capable of being "ephemeral" in quality – in the sense that each passing minute is an experience in itself! This as a philosophy has fascinated me and the starting "tool" for any design - begins with light. “Light” and its expression would be my tool of choice. “Architecture”, it is said, “is an experiential art” and having said that, it cannot be viewed in isolation anymore. We are at a point where architecture needs to transcend mere utility and a stated aesthetic; it needs to be given a certain

symbolism which has the potential to touch the very core of any living being. In the long run, I look forward to a meaningful career in designing spaces which are liveable, lively, thought provoking and community engaging. And working in an environment which facilitates just these very issues I consider important will be a major step in my professional development. Besides my interests in Design, I am an avid painter and dancer. I find myself drawing from these experiences often and a key step to integrating multiple disciplines into the design process is the process of “diagramming”. I try to tell the process and story of each of my designs as a simple diagram and that to me is key to understanding my own design better. I hope to continue this practice through my career and develop it furthur. Nanditha Thiagarajan

INSPIRATIONS / DESIGN PHILOSOPHY


01. ARIZONA CENTER FOR LAW AND SOCIETY A new ASU Downtown Campus Law Center

GRADUATE

02. FORTWORTH COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER Renovation and Expansion of a Performing Arts Center

03. HOME + OFFICE

UNDER-GRADUATE

04. COMMERCIAL / RETAIL 05. DISTRICT LIBRARY

06. ELLIPSES ON A9 Annual NASA Design Competition 07. KUKKE ARCHITECTS Internship

COMPETITION

INTERNSHIP


01

ARIZONA CENTER FOR LAW AND SOCIETY A NEW ASU DOWNTOWN PHOENIX CAMPUS LAW CENTER The design brief called for a new design for the Sandra Day O Conner Law school which is slated to move from the ASU Tempe Campus to the Phoenix Downtown Campus. In additon this would become the Arizona Center for Law and society which would hold other program such as Institutes, a conference center , retail establishments and the possibility of furthur growth.


DETAILED MASSING Taking 3 distinct programs to function as one - the program was divided into Public (consisting of the retail, administrative programs involved with the school, offices for the court officials and the institutes / clinics), Collaborative zone (consisting of the cafes and meeting spaces) , the law school and a stack of leasable law office spaces that have a monetary possibilty.

ZONE 4 Floors 17 - 20

ZONE 3 Floors 13 - 16

A NEW MODEL FOR COLLABORATION The law school is divided UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE - 40,000 SF into 4 zones - each zone comprising of classrooms, individual and group study GRADUATE COLLEGE - 60,000 SF spaces, faculty offices and support spaces. The 4 zones are then connected by a INSTITUTES - 40,000 SF library that winds its way around the central core

ZONE 2 Floors 9-12

LIBRARY

ZONE 1 Floors 5-8 COLLABORATIVE SPACE

LIBRARY

UNDERGRADUATE

FACULTY

LAW SCHOOL


ZONE 1 OF THE LAW SCHOOL TOWER

STACKS / READING ROOM CLASSROOMS

THE LIBRARY AND READING AREAS

FACULTY OFFICES CONFERENCE / STUDY

CLASSROOMS FACULTY OFFICES

CORE

LEASABLE OFFICE SPACE (FLOORS 6+)

OFFICES

TO ZONE 2 LIBRARY

MOOT COURTROOM 2ND DATUM (PUBLIC) FLOOR 5

MEZANINE READING LEVEL

CAFE / CONFERENCE ROOMS / LOUNGES (PUBLIC) FLOOR 4

ADMINISTRATION / INSTITUTES / CLINICS FLOORS 2 TO 3

RETAIL / COMMERCIAL ENTRY LEVEL

FUTURE BUILDING POTENTIAL

COLLABORATE


SHADE RELAX GATHER ENJOY


FWCAC , FORT WORTH The design brief called for the renovation and expansion of a popular Performing Atrs Center in Fort Worth, Dallas. The center is located in close proximity to Louis Kahn’s Kimbell museum and Tadao Ando’s MOMA. The intention of the design was not not to draw attention away from existing masterpieces but to rather add value to an existing aesthetic quality. This was a collaborative project involving three students. My role included conceptual design, detailed design of the theater, diagramming, plans and conceptual renders.

02


The existing theater is retained as a beacon and reminder to Fort Worth’s immense development in the Arts.

‘Bays’ of program inspired by Kimbell and Ando’s MOMA lead to a highly “utilitarian” division of zones that seperate the served and servant spaces. This also leads to a strong character for the facility that is at once both deliberate and leaves a lasting impression

All program easily accessible on a single level save for the administration and classroom making it more of a public realm as compared to a highly programmed “building”. Theaters seperated from main road by a BOH, open lobby spaces and galleries that lead to public spaces

Each service “bay” that seperates the program spaces holds the support spaces such as circulation, mechanical, electrical, HVAC and plumbing equipment.

The spaces are programmed in such a way that each program is abutted by a “bay” of service. Each program is also adjacent to an open gathering space that accentuates the solidity around it. This takes the form of open courts and a water body

In line with the concept of a “mature” building, there was a conscious endeavour to accentuate just the walls and make the program appear “light” and “weightless”

Two parallel axes divide the performance spaces from the display spaces. The main circulation space acts as the transition between two intense program spaces. While the passage through the gallery takes you through the “bays” in a perpendicular axis, the passage through the lobby takes you on an axis parallel to the “bays”. The walls are the structural system that holds the building together. They are load bearing cast in place concrete walls that are 13” thick with solid insulation. Trusses span between these walls holding up the floors


court

multipurpose

lobby

performance

BOH

performance

BOH

SECTION B

gallery

court

lobby SECTION A


BACK OF HOUSE CONCEPTUAL SECTIONS

The walls being a major part of the design, the spaces between them become anti - space. Hence it was important to study the openings and the very basic characteristics of each wall - be it the material or the openings, and the way light plays a role in defining these walls which in the end enclose active program spaces.


03


04


05


06


THANK YOU FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION


Nanditha Thiagarajan