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CHANGE A Quarterly Journal for Nonprofit Leaders

ISSUE SEVENTEEN MARCH 2015

Letter from the Editor

Editor

Joleen Ong Marketing & Publications Director, NTEN

Design

JOLEEN ONG Marketing & Publications Director, NTEN

Philip Krayna Conifer Creative www.conifercreative.com

Editorial Committee Members

Jeanne Allen Manager/Instructor, Duke University Nonprofit Management Program, and Consultant

Melanie Bower Credibility Manager, Green Electronics Council

Tobias Eigen Executive Director, Kabissa—Space for Change in Africa

Sophia Guevara Social Media Fellow, Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy (EPIP)

Wiebke Herding Managing Director, On:Subject Communications

Josh Hirsch Director of Development and Marketing, The Weiss School

Nicole Lampe Digital Strategy Director, Resource Media

Bonnie McEwan Assistant Professor and Consultant, Milano-The New School & BonnieMcEwan.com

Rebecca Reyes Communications Manager, Everyday Democracy

Cover Art: Beppe Giacobbe, Morgan Gaynin, Inc.

Advertising: Learn more about sponsoring NTEN:Change at nten.org/ advertising/reserve Permissions & Inquiries: Please give credit to all referenced or re-published content according to the Creative Common license: Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported. Example Attribution text: “First published in NTEN:Change (nten.org/NTENChange), March 2015, CC BY-SA 3.0 (creativecommons.org/licenses/ by-sa/3.0/).” More information about the journal can be found at nten.org/NTENChange/Press

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NTEN: CHANGE | MARCH 2015

I can be sure of one thing: this issue is going to surprise you. As you dive into this quarter’s NTEN: Change journal, prepare to have your assumptions challenged on who’s using technology, and the role your organization may play in addressing the digital divide. This issue covers a range of perspectives from organizations and institutions that are at the forefront of bridging the digital divide: schools, libraries, city governments, and nonprofit organizations. Features take us across institutions: from AARP, and how it continues to defy stereotypes through its digital engagement efforts of its nearly 38 million members over 50 years old, to the City of Austin’s Digital Inclusion program to keep Austin-ites connected, to Civic Hall, the latest hub in New York to foster discussions on civic tech. Plus, our CEO, Amy Sample Ward, shares how to address digital inclusion in every mission.

Herding from On:Subject shows us how to improve our website’s accessibility in 15 minutes, and Vanessa Mason from ZeroDivide explains how text messaging can be a lifeline for vulnerable communities. A key lesson gleaned from this issue: The future of technology requires an active commitment to inclusiveness. Organizations need to challenge themselves to not just look at the number of people reached, but also the numbers of those they have not.

A key lesson “ gleaned from this issue: The future of technology requires an active commitment to inclusiveness.

We also go behind the scenes with the filmmakers behind the CyberSeniors documentary, the Weiss School, Geek Club Books, and the oldest library west of the Mississippi River: Multnomah County Library in Oregon.

At NTEN, the topic of digital inclusion is at the forefront of our mission. As the largest network for nonprofit technology professionals, we are a small (but mighty) voice of change with our continuing commitment to serve and highlight a diversity of perspectives.

Sophia Guevara from EPIP shares her tips on virtual learning to support professional development, Wiebke

We hope this issue inspires you with the knowledge, tools, and inspiration to get started in your organization.

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NTEN: Change | March 2015  

Digital Inclusion and Technical Divides: What's Next?

NTEN: Change | March 2015  

Digital Inclusion and Technical Divides: What's Next?

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