Page 1

Weekend Woes Soccer team loses two in New Mexico Sports | Page 6

Pushing Limits ACL goes beyond music Arts and Life | Page 3

Tuesday, September 20, 2011

News 1, 2 Arts & Life 3, 4 Sports 5, 6 Views 7 Classifieds 8 Games 8

Volume 98 | Issue 15

Sunny 90° / 66°

ntdaily.com

The Student Newspaper of the University of North Texas

Apogee parking situation still a work in progress MELISSA R ATLEY Staff Writer

As Mean Green players gear up to face the Hoosiers this weekend in UNT’s second home football game of the season, fans prepare to face another menacing opponent – parking.

But just two weeks removed from an Apogee Stadium debut that drew more than 28,000 attendees – third most in UNT history – athletic officials, residents and students are voicing concerns and singing praises about a city- and universityimplemented parking plan that,

many said, functioned well. “It went as close to flawless as it possibly could,” said Eric Capper, UNT’s senior associate athletic director. The major reported hiccups were mainly with traffic flow and fans parking in improper places or on streets that were

not allowed, he said. Kelly Ebler, a radio, television and film junior, said she parked in the permit lot across the street from the stadium and had no major problems on game day, but did notice that there were flaws in the planning. “I think it was really unor-

ganized,” Ebler said. “There weren’t a lot of places to park if you didn’t have a permit on Bonnie Brae, and people were just parking where they could.” The responsibility to control traffic flow is a joint collaboration between the city of

Denton and the UNT Police Department. A new city ordinance has been put into effect for those who live in the Denia and Laurel Hills neighborhoods, located next to Apogee.

See STADIUM on Page 2

UNT recognizes anti-hazing week, university policy R EBECCA RYAN Staff Writer

PHOTO BY CORRISA JACKSON/STAFF WRITER

Texas Slim leads his band of the same name for a crowd of blues lovers on Saturday during Denton’s Blues Festival at Quakertown Park. The main stage the band played on was home to other festival performers such as Shemekia Copeland.

Denton’s got the blues A LEX COPELAND Staff Writer Aficionados and novices from as far as San Antonio and Oklahoma attended the 13th annual Denton Blues Festival this weekend, which featured local and internationally known blues musicians. The free two-day festival in Quakertown

Park included internationally recognized vocalist Shemekia Copeland, Mississippi blues veteran Zac Harmon, local-turnednationally touring Chris Watson and the UpAllNightBlues band, local legend Texas Slim and many more.

See BLUES on Page 4

Group stirs change in UNT drug policy JAVIER LOPEZ Intern

L ed by a mock cop ca r emblazoned with a marijuana leaf and topped with f lashing green lights, students from UNT’s chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws marched Monday afternoon to promote awareness of marijuana laws and reform. “Police officers sometimes stop us, but I think they are more curious than anything,”

PHOTO BY ANDREW WILLIAMS/INTERN

See NORML on Page 2 Jonathan Jones drove around campus on Monday to raise awareness for the reform of marijuana laws.

In recognition of Hazing P re vent ion We ek , U N T’s Center for Student Rights and Responsibilities invited students to the Lyceum Monday night to watch the documentary “Haze.” UNT has a zero-tolerance hazing policy, meaning if an organization is caught hazing, it can be removed from campus altogether. “This does happen more than people realize,” said peer advocate and criminal justice junior Sterling Brawley. “What people think isn’t hazing sometimes is. They need to be educated.” “Haze” is a documentary about Gordan “Gordie” Bailey, a student at the University of Colorado, who died of alcohol poisoning during a hazing incident in 2004. Bailey’s pledge brothers found him lying on his stomach by a couch in his fraternity’s house. Paramedics said he could have been saved if someone had called for help. “He was hazed to death,” psychologist Susan Lipkins said in the film. “Hazing is used to maintain order. It’s a head game. The psychology of hazing drives perpetrators to do it and victims to accept it.” According to the website stophazing.org, cases of hazing can include socially isolating new members, requiring members to refer to other members with titles like “Mr.,” “Miss,” etc., or being subject to physical abuse or sexual violation. The intention of hazing is to forge brotherhood, Theta Chi member Will Powell said, which is something his fraternity emphasizes. “In the military, it was called cognitive dissonance,” said Powell, a business senior. “It’s inappropriate here. We are not in life-or-death situations, but ironically we can be if hazing goes too far.” UNT’s punishments for hazing vary in different cases. According to UNT’s code of conduct, hazing that does not result in serious bodily injury can carry a fine of up to $1,000

“Greek life in reality isn’t how it is in movies. It’s much more of a family.” —Stephanie Hurtado Delta Gamma member and/or up to 180 days in jail. More serious cases involving bodily injur y or death can result in a fine up to $10,000 and/or one to two years in jail. “You can have a trial in front of the Panhellenic Council,” said Josie Hyde, an A lpha Phi member and journalism freshman. “If your chapter has a reputation of hazing, your entire chapter can be kicked out. Because our greek system is so much smaller, hazing is much more exposed. It would be hard to hide.” Though hazing has proven to be prevalent throughout college organizations, greek members on campus insist there is no hazing at UNT. “There is absolutely no hazing in our chapter,” said Stephanie Hurtado, a Delta Gamma member and merchandising freshman. “Greek life in reality isn’t how it is in movies. It’s much more of a family. I haven’t been made to feel uncomfortable at all.” T houg h t he i nduc t ion process is a secret among greek chapters, members say it is much more formal now. “We’re different from other sororities because we have an orientation process instead of ‘rush,’” Lambda Theta Alpha member and visual arts senior Christina Pratt said. To s u p p o r t H a z i n g Prevention Week, students are encouraged to visit the first floor of the University Union from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to pledge to not participate in hazing. To report hazing, call (940) 369-STOP.

What’s Inside NEWS:

Netflix admits to “arrogance” Page 2 after changing prices

ARTS :

Gay pride parade marches on Dallas

Page 4

SPORTS:

Mean Green overwhelmed by Crimson Tide

Page 5

VIEWS:

UNT changes alcohol, marijuana policy

Page 7


Page 2 Amber Arnold and Isaac Wright, News Editors

Stadium Continued from Page 1

Norml Continued from Page 1

Residents must purchase a $5 permit for cars to park on the street during special event s at t he stad iu m, according to the Denton Police website. A ny vehicle t hat does not have a permit can be ticketed or towed. T he ord i na nc e went into ef fect at 1 p.m. on Saturday, and homeowners on Bonnie Brae Street said t hey d id not see ma ny problems other than slow traffic on nearby roads. J o r d a n A b b y, a n 86-year-old Denton resident who lives on Bonnie Brae Street, said he noticed the congestion and thought another mode of transportation would clear up some of the most crowded streets around the stadium. “UNT could run buses from restaurants in Denton so people could park, eat a nd r ide to t he ga me,” Abby said. Abby also suggested the buses stop by area hotels to gather out-of-town fans and that UNT consider the elderly who travel to the games. “R ig ht now, t here i s really no good way for the elderly to go to the games without parking far from it, and t hat needs to be fixed,” he said. Joe Richmond, director of parking and transportation, said while chartering buses seems ideal, it would not be practical. “The buses would get c au g ht i n t he t r a f f ic, adding more delays to the congestion,” he said. For this weekend’s game against Indiana, Capper sa id improvements w i l l definitely be made to help parking and traffic f low more easily. “It’s really a matter of where we put our access points for entry and exits of ca rs, a s wel l a s ou r personnel a nd securit y. We have one game to pull upon,” Capper said. “And we can only improve from here.” There are three permit lots on the stadium side of I nter st ate H ig hw ay 35 for Mean Green Club members. Fouts Field park ing is $10. Parking at any other surface lot on campus is free.

said David Sloan, public information officer for the DFW NORML chapter. A crowd flaunted signs and chanted slogans encouraging attendees and passersby to embrace the organization’s viewpoints on marijuana laws and culture. During the spring semester, the organization worked with UNT’s Student Government Association to author a bill calling for consequences for residence hall drug violations to be equal to those for alcohol violations. The bill – which would have presented the issue for an unofficial student opinion poll – was passed and then accidentally deleted before it could be brought to students. However, the message wasn’t lost on administrators, who quietly amended the dorms’ alcohol and drug policy during the summer. “The new policy allows students to have a fresh start and learn from their mistakes,” said Maureen McGuiness, UNT’s dean of students. In the past, UNT had a zero-

News tolerance policy for students living in a dorm who were caught with any marijuana or marijuana paraphernalia. Offenders were immediately evicted and made to pay a $1,000 breach-of-cont ract fee. Although the policy for drug possession remains the same, the university now distinguishes between drug possession and possession of paraphernalia, devices used to consume illegal substances. If a student is found with paraphernalia or seeds, he or she now avoids paying the fee and being evicted from the dorms a ltogether, and is instead transferred to a new hall and made to take a drug education class. McGuinness said regardless of university rules or guidelines, marijuana is illegal in Texas, and UNT policy will continue to reflect that. She said the paraphernalia distinction was added after conversations with members of UNT NORML. According to UNT’s Crime Se c u r it y Aw a rene s s a nd Prevention report, there were 54 disciplinary referrals for drug-related v iolations in 2009. Statistics for 2010 will be released in October.

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 ntdnewseditors@gmail.com

PHOTO BY ANDREW WILLIAMS/INTERN

Psychology junior Brady Vaughan participates in a march for NORML on Monday afternoon. Vaughan purchased a plank at Home Depot and made his sign the day before the event.

POLICE BLOTTER Alcohol and drug-related offenses Saturday, Sept. 17 3:39 a.m. – A UNT student was issued a citation for being in possession of paraphernalia and was released from the scene. Thursday, Sept. 15 10:34 p.m. – A UNT

police K9 officer arrested two 18-year-old men at UNT’s parking lot near the 1800 block of W. Highland Street. One suspect was in possession of drug paraphernalia and was given a citation and released from the scene. The other suspect was in possession of marijuana and was taken to Denton County Jail.

Graffiti offenses Monday, Sept. 12 10:44 a.m. – UNT police responded to a complaint about graffiti found on UNT’s Business Leadership Building. Sunday, Sept. 18 3:15 p.m. – A UNT police officer found graffiti on property

located near the 400 block of Avenue C. Trespassing / Harassment offences Saturday, Sept. 17 7:50 p.m. – A UNT police officer observed suspicious activity in a parking lot in the 300 block of S. Welch Street. A 26-year-old

non-student was given a warning for criminal trespassing and was released. Tuesday, Sept. 13 9:58 p.m. – UNT Police were contacted with a complaint of electronic harassment at UNT’s Eagle Student Services Center. A police report was filed.

Netflix changes service after customer outrage LOS ANGELES — A fter watching customers leave and t he company’s stock price plummet, Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings on Sunday admitted that he had fallen victim to “arrogance” and announced changes to the DVD offering. The company’s DVD-by-mail service will get a new name, Qwikster, and add the option

Editorial Staff Editor-in-chief ...............................................Josh Pherigo Managing Editor .............................................Amber Arnold Assigning Editor ............................................Isaac Wright Arts and Life Editor ........................................Jesse Sidlauskas Sports Editor ...................................................Sean Gorman Views Editor .................................................Valerie Gonzalez Visuals Editor ....................................................Drew Gaines Photo Assigning Editor .................................Cristy Angulo Multimedia Manager ....................................Berenice Quirino Copy Chief ....................................................Carolyn Brown Design Editors .............................................Sydnie Summers Stacy Powers

to order video games along with movies. “We chose the name Qwikster because it refers to quick delivery,” Hastings wrote in a blog post and an email sent to subscribers. “We will keep the name ‘Netflix’ for streaming.” Netflix in August announced that it would separate the pricing for online video streaming and DVDs, resulting in a price increase of as much as 60 percent for people who utilize both options.

A number of customers were outraged, and last week Netflix disclosed that it is on track to lose 600,000 subscribers in the current quarter, after previously telling investors to expect that it would add 400,000. As a result, Netflix stock fell 26 percent in two days, equating to a loss of $2.6 billion in market value. I n t he post, Ha st i ngs defended the policy, which he said will generate more revenue and lower shipping costs so the company can spend more

acquiring digital rights to movies and television series. He said the problem was in communication. “In hindsight, I slid into arrogance based upon past success,” he wrote. “Inside Netflix I say, ‘Actions speak louder than words,’ and we should just keep improving our service. But now I see that given the huge changes we have been recently making, I should have personally given a full justification to our members of why we are separating DVD and streaming, and charging for both. It wouldn’t have changed the price increase, but it would have been the right thing to do.”

A new Qwikster website will launch within a few weeks, Hastings said, separating the company’s DVD library and ordering process from the video streaming one. People who use both will have separate charges on their credit cards. The addition of video games to Qwikster is a change of policy for Netflix after the company for years denied that it was interested in adding titles for the Wii, PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 to its DVD collection. It also puts Qwikster into competition with GameFly, the long-standing leader in subscription video games by mail.

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Arts & Life

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Jesse Sidlauskas, Arts & Life Editor

Page 3 NTDailyArtsLife@gmail.com

ACL brings more than good music to Austin Review JESSE SIDLAUSKAS

Arts and Life Editor A three-day stay in the heart of Texas’ largest music festival amongst the music snobs of Austin, their gratuitous bicycle use and people wearing oversized novelty cowboy hats, is usually enough to annoy the hell out of me. Between the music, food and weirdoes at Austin City Limits, which filled Zilker Park with around 70,000 people each day last weekend, I forgot I was in Austin. Almost. The 10th ACL festival at Zilker Park showcased 130 bands on eight stages, but while you could hop online and download the music from those artists, you couldn’t recreate the strange people or the setup of Austin Eats, the collection of about 30 food vendors selling concessions. The vendors included many Austin favorites, such as Love Burger, Mighty Cone and Torchy’s Tacos. What they didn’t include was good beer.

Music: Not for the fickle The variety of music ranged from the hip-hop sounds of Bright Lights to the folk-rock music of Bright Eyes to the country sounds of Jack Ingram, who told his audience a story about how he got famous after he stopped playing regularly in Dallas. True to the festival, concertgoers had tough choices to make. Among the biggest were the headline acts from each day. Friday, fans chose between Kanye West and Coldplay. Saturday, headliners My Morning Jacket and Stevie Wonder played the main stages at the same time. Though they had to make some choices, there was little doubt throughout the weekend about scheduling. Unruly rock bands and hip-hop artists performed on schedule at each stage, accomplishing something other Texas music festivals too often mismanage.

Food of the festival The Mighty Cone’s chicken avocado cone was the best food I sampled at the festival. The cone is a fried chicken breast fillet and a battered and fried slice of avocado that is wrapped in a flour tortilla along with some coleslaw. This deep-fried mix of Southern favorites is easily transported in a paper Dixie cup cone. I’m not one who believes that a hamburger should or could be a healthy meal, so I was pleased with the greasy beef patty that anchored Love Shack’s love burger. The juicy beef was still hot enough to melt the American cheese to the bun that topped it as if it had been plucked directly from the grill. The wild beef and mushroom kabob from Fort Worth’s Lonesome Dove Western Bistro was an exception to the quality food of the festival. Though well seasoned and probably juicy a half-hour before I bought it, the shish kabob failed to live up to the reputation of its creator and

Clockwise from top: Régine Chassagne of Arcade Fire plays the accordion Sunday night at the Bud Light stage. The band closed out the festival with its performance. Many of the attendees of Austin City Limits wore Native American costumes for the three-day festival this past weekend. Thousands of people exit Zilker Park Sunday night after attending Austin City Limits, the annual three-day music festival. Kanye West closed out Austin City Limits Friday night at the Bud Light stage. PHOTOS BY BERENICE QUIRINO AND JAMES COREAS/MULTIMEDIA MANAGER AND SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Love Shack chef, Tim Love, who was born in Denton and began Lonesome Dove Western Bistro in Fort Worth. The $9 item was little more than crusty, dried beef tips paired with shriveled mushrooms on a stick.

Keep Austin Weird. Don’t smoke. In light of the recent wildfires, the city of Austin had enacted a ban on smoking in all city parks, which included the grounds of Zilker Park. In a park full of thousands of music lovers, it appeared a futile attempt to ban smoking during this year’s festival where a cigarette smoker lurked around every corner and the smell of marijuana smoke in the crowds around every stage. To that point, there was nothing unusual about the circle of six

fans who began passing a pipe right next to me in the middle of the day. What was unusual was the arrival of an Austin police officer on his bicycle, who interrupted the group by riding his bike right up to the edge of their circle, much to the group’s surprise. Everyone noticed the cop except the guy who had his head down, trying to light a pipe with a malfunctioning lighter in the wind. He eventually looked up to notice the cop standing six feet in front of him and his pipe and pot were traded for a pink citation slip. In their attempt to keep Austin weird, crowd members covered themselves in body paint, wore Native American headdresses and carried tall flagpoles topped with flags, blow-up dolls or stuffed animals hanging from the top.

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Page 4 Jesse Sidlauskas, Arts & Life Editor

Arts & Life

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 NTDailyArtsLife@gmail.com

Community shows support at pride parade M ARLENE GONZALEZ Staff Writer

Thousands of people crowded in the streets to march alongside parade floats on Oak Lawn Avenue and Cedar Springs Road in Dallas Sunday for the 28th annual Gay Pride Parade, the theme of which was “It only gets better.” A 20-foot-long red bird, complete with flapping red, yellow and blue wings, won the float contest. Inspired by the movie “Rio,” the float took five people to operate and held 10 others. Among the 85 businesses and groups represented at the parade, UNT’s Glad organization took part in the parade, marching with student groups from TWU, UTA and UTD. Elise Freese, an English junior and events coordinator for Glad,

was one of the 150 students who showed up to support the cause. “I think with something like pride, I think a lot of times we forget how many members there are of the LGBT community; it shows pride,” Freese said. “Even with all those ridiculous colors, the biggest thing is togetherness and that we all are people and have needs and desires and wants.” Although Glad didn’t have its own float because there weren’t enough funds, Freese said she thinks the group will have one for next year. “In the past we always marched with TWU, but it was cool to have that alliance with the other schools in the area,” Freese said. “It’s cool to know that the schools have each other’s back.” Although there were a few

protestors, Freese said they did not disrupt the parade. Kaliente Discotec, one of the businesses in the parade, was proud not only that the business promoted gay pride, but also because it had made one of the few Latin floats, said Grecia Garcia, an entertainer at the club. “One can show that Latinos can be creative, not shunning down others, but we can be creative,” she said. The club has now won the parade’s float contest each of the past three years. Garcia said employees worked on the float for two weeks, thatching up the final pieces during the last two days. Her enthusiasm came from representing the Latin culture, since it isn’t represented much, she said.

Byby Jones, one of the 10 people on top of the Kaliente Discotec float, said she spent an hour getting ready for the parade. “It’s important because we’re suppose to be united,” Jones said. Sparkling sequined outfits and long feather hats induced onlookers even more. Beads, Jell-O shots and other items were thrown to the crowd. Mario Vela, a Dallas resident, was impressed by the parade in its entirety, but the crowd size surprised him even more, surpassing his expectations. “Anybody willing to be open minded, and willing to think outside the box and know that there is life out there by putting yourself in their shoes and living that lifestyle,” Vela said.

PHOTOS BY ANDREW WILLIAMS/INTERN

Above: Crossroads Community Church passed out stickers to spectators at the gay pride parade on Sunday. The parade started at 2 p.m. and proceeded down Cedar Springs Road. Top: The Center for Spiritual Living marched in the gay pride parade on Sunday. The parade started at 2 p.m. and proceeded down Cedar Springs Road. Right: A couple watches as PFLAG marches in the gay pride parade on Sunday. The theme for this year’s parade was “It Only Gets Better.”

Blues Continued from Page 1 “[Denton] doesn’t have the reputation that Dallas or Fort Worth has, but you know, bestkept secret,” said John “JMac” MacDonald, a DJ at KNON and a Denton resident. “When it’s shows like this, you tend to see the more hardcore fans come out,” JMac said. “This tends to be either a, ‘Hey there’s something going on in town, let’s check it out,’ or it’s the more hardcore blues fans. I’m all for either one, y’know. Anything it takes to get people out to blues shows like this.” Live blues events are also good for recruiting music listeners to blues, Texas Slim said. “When it’s in front of their face and their ears, then they start to get it. It’s not something has to be sold on them. Once they hear it once, they’re like, they get it. Whether it becomes their favorite or not, they get it,” Slim said. Slim, who played songs from his upcoming album, “Lucky Mojo,” said the festival hosted a diverse array of musicians from across the blues spectrum. “I like the variety you can find in blues; so having a bunch of different types of blues put together in one place is a great thing,” he said. “People who are just learning about blues don’t realize how diverse it is. When you’re the roots of everything, everything else comes back to influence you.” The event also featured a secondary stage for rap, jazz and other bands, including local rhythm group It Is What It Is. Tony Alcorn of It Is What It Is said the event was a good place to expose its music to potential fans. “Our music is very unique and we don’t expect throngs to come, but people will come when they know about it,” Alcorn said. “It’s a specialized category.”

PHOTO BY CORIRSA JACKSON/STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Shemekia Copeland was the final main act for the Denton Blues Festival at Quakertown Park on Saturday night. Copeland, born in Harlem, is the daughter of Texas blues guitar artist Johnny Clyde Copeland, and was nominated for a Grammy in 2000. Paul Shelton, a musician who performed at the event, said he simply likes to play the blues. “I just love music, man. I’m just a music lover. It’s in the soul. It’s embedded in there. It’s in the gut,” Shelton said. “I don’t know if you like good hamburger, but you got to come back. You’re like, ‘Oh I got to go back to the burger place.’ It’s in the gut.” Troy Richardson, another musician who performed at the festival, said the economy has made times tough for musicians working full time and Dallas venues are more likely to hire a DJ than a live band. But, he said, North Texans still want live music. “People are always looking to free music, always want a good time,” he said.

The event has been hit by the economic climate, but has made it through thanks to dedicated sponsors, said John Baines, treasurer of the Denton Black Chamber of Commerce, which organizes the event. This is the second year the event has been city-sponsored. Baines mounted the stage several times between performances, stressing the importance of the event and rallying to the crowd to chant, “We like it free.” “The blues, while originating with the African-American community, can be enjoyed by all,” Baines said. “In order to appreciate something, you have to be around it. So you have to put it where it can be enjoyed by all segments of society.”


Sports

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Sean Gorman, Sports Editor

Page 5 seangorman@my.unt.edu

Mean Green tripped up by No. 2 Crimson Tide PAUL BOTTONI

Senior Staff Writer Two years ago, the UNT football team was routed by nationally ranked Alabama on the road in the third game of the 2009 season. History repeated itself Saturday night. UNT fell to 0-3 after being shut out 41-0 in a one-sided affair to the No. 2 Crimson Tide Saturday night in Tuscaloosa, Ala. “If you make the mistakes that we made at times tonight where you have 10 guys instead of 11 doing jobs, which I think we did on some plays, a No. 2 team in the country like [Alabama] will just smother you,” UNT head coach Dan McCarney said. UNT entered t he ga me 1-41 all time against ranked opponents and 3-32 against teams from the Southeastern Conference. The UNT offense was shut out for a second time in three games. The Mean Green had its chances, but the Alabama defense held steady – including a late fourth-quarter goal line stand. The Alabama defense held UNT to 169 total offensive yards. “You have to give North Texas credit. They did a nice job out there and played hard,”

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CRIMSON WHITE / DREW HOOVER

Sophomore wide receiver Brelan Chancellor is brought down by the Alabama defense during UNT’s defeat on Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala. A labama head coach Nick Saban said in a postgame press release. “We played pretty good on defense and got a chance to play a lot of players today. It was great to get a shutout.”

W it h t he f i f t h ra n ked Alabama defense functioning like a well-oiled machine, the Crimson Tide offense possessed the ball frequently and the running game was given most

of the work. Alabama’s running back tandem–junior Trent Richardson and sophomore Eddie Lacy – combined for 328 yards rushing and five touchdowns. Most of

the yards came off big plays, as the running game produced scores of 58, 67 and 71 yards. “If you get hooked, or you get reached, or you can’t place an arm or a leg on future NFL

[running] backs like they have here at Alabama, you saw the end result – they get an easy, untouched touchdown,” McCarney said. Mean Green senior running back Lance Dunbar finished the night with just 16 yards rushing on 17 carries, averaging less than a yard per rush. However, the senior led the team in receiving with four catches for 45 yards. UNT wide receiver and kick returner Brelan Chancellor was the nation’s leader in allpurpose yards – averaging 297 yards per game – heading into the game. However, Alabama lessened the threat of Chancellor by kicking away from the sophomore and reducing his touches. Chancellor finished the night with 86 all-purpose yards. “I know what a national championship team looks like. I coached on one at Florida [in 2008]; I coached against one in Alabama when they won it in 2009; and I think [this Alabama team] has all the pieces for that,” McCarney said. Players were unavailable for comments. The Mean Green will next play aga inst t he India na Hoosiers at Apogee Stadium at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Volleyball team wins two of four home games BRETT MEDEIROS AND A LEX YOUNG Staff Writers

Coming off its first tournament win of the season, UNT returned home this weekend in hopes of duplicating that resu lt at t he Mea n Green Volleyball Classic. The Mean Green finished the weekend 2-1 with sophomore Courtney Windham and senior Shelley Morton, making the all-tournament team before falling to Texas Tech Monday. Morton played for the first time this season after recovering from an injured pinky finger.

Texas State The Mean Green (9-5) fell in the tournament opener to Texas State (7-5) in straight sets (25-19, 26-24, 25-16). The Mean Green could not stop the Bobcats’ attack, allowing a hitting percentage of .278. Showing rust from the fiveday layoff, the Mean Green committed 27 attack errors and hit .099, its third-lowest total of the season. “We had a great week of pract ice, a nd I rea l ly felt like we were well prepared,” head coach Ken Murczek said.

“It was a little unfortunate because we didn’t bring our best game today.” In the second set, UNT had the Bobcats on the ropes with a 20-13 lead, but the team’s mental errors and inconsistent play allowed Texas State to climb back in the match with a 13-4 run on its way to the sweep.

tant parts. I could not do it without everyone else.”

Texas Tech

Jackson State W it h t he help of eig ht ser v ice aces a nd a careerhigh 40 assists from freshman setter Liz Powell, UNT rolled past Jackson State (4-7) in stra ight sets (25-18, 27-25, 25-20). Powell, in only her second start as setter, helped the Mean Green achieve a .255 attack percentage, including .343 in the first set. “We always just try and play

“...if we execute a game play, we can play at a high level.”

—Ken Murczek Volleyball head coach

September 24 vs.

Indiana Hoosiers @ 6 pm

AMBER PLUMLEY/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Libero Addason Lamb, setter Liz Powell, outside hitters Eboni Godfrey and Shelley Morton, and middle blocker Hallie McDonald celebrate the last two winning points against Jackson State on Saturday at the Mean Green Classic. The Mean Green played Friday night against Texas State and fell 0-3, then Saturday night 3-0 against Kennesaw State. our game and worry about our side of our net,” Powell said. “I didn’t even know I had a career high today.” UNT got help from hitters W i nd h a m a nd f re s h m a n Ebon i G od f rey a s t hey contributed with 14 and 13 kills respectively. Freshman Addason Lamb filled in as libero in the final frame as

senior libero Sarah Willey was out with ice on her thigh.

Kennesaw State W it h t he help of fou r players owning a percentage greater than .350 throughout the match, the Mean Green (9-5) took the tournament’s final match against the Owls (5-9) in three straight sets

(25-14, 29-27, 25-13). Windham led the charge on offense with a career-high 19 kills. “I hope that I can beat that [kills] though, always want to get better,” Windham said. “It was fabulous setting today. It seems like such a small part of the game, but in all aspects it’s one of the most impor-

In front of a packed house Monday night, UNT fell to the Texas Tech Red Raiders (13-1) in four sets (25-19, 15-25, 14-25, 21-25). The Red Raiders e x t e nde d t he i r w i n n i n g streak to a program-best 13 straight, but their streak of seven straight sweeps ended when the Mean Green won the first set in an emotionally charged arena. “We showed today t hat if we execute a game play, we can play at a high level,” Murczek said. “That’s why we scheduled this match, so we can play somebody that’s obviously pretty darn good. We just ended the preseason, but maybe not on the note I wanted to.” Du r i ng t he rest of t he match, Texas Tech h it a n average of .404 with nine total blocks and took advantage of the Mean Green’s 43 errors throughout the match. U N T w i l l st a r t con fere n c e p l a y F r i d a y n i g ht against Florida International Un i v e r s i t y a n d F l o r i d a Atlantic University Sunday at home.


Sports

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Sean Gorman, Sports Editor

Page 5 seangorman@my.unt.edu

Mean Green tripped up by No. 2 Crimson Tide PAUL BOTTONI

Senior Staff Writer Two years ago, the UNT football team was routed by nationally ranked Alabama on the road in the third game of the 2009 season. History repeated itself Saturday night. UNT fell to 0-3 after being shut out 41-0 in a one-sided affair to the No. 2 Crimson Tide Saturday night in Tuscaloosa, Ala. “If you make the mistakes that we made at times tonight where you have 10 guys instead of 11 doing jobs, which I think we did on some plays, a No. 2 team in the country like [Alabama] will just smother you,” UNT head coach Dan McCarney said. UNT entered t he ga me 1-41 all time against ranked opponents and 3-32 against teams from the Southeastern Conference. The UNT offense was shut out for a second time in three games. The Mean Green had its chances, but the Alabama defense held steady – including a late fourth-quarter goal line stand. The Alabama defense held UNT to 169 total offensive yards. “You have to give North Texas credit. They did a nice job out there and played hard,”

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CRIMSON WHITE / DREW HOOVER

Sophomore wide receiver Brelan Chancellor is brought down by the Alabama defense during UNT’s defeat on Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala. A labama head coach Nick Saban said in a postgame press release. “We played pretty good on defense and got a chance to play a lot of players today. It was great to get a shutout.”

W it h t he f i f t h ra n ked Alabama defense functioning like a well-oiled machine, the Crimson Tide offense possessed the ball frequently and the running game was given most

of the work. Alabama’s running back tandem–junior Trent Richardson and sophomore Eddie Lacy – combined for 328 yards rushing and five touchdowns. Most of

the yards came off big plays, as the running game produced scores of 58, 67 and 71 yards. “If you get hooked, or you get reached, or you can’t place an arm or a leg on future NFL

[running] backs like they have here at Alabama, you saw the end result – they get an easy, untouched touchdown,” McCarney said. Mean Green senior running back Lance Dunbar finished the night with just 16 yards rushing on 17 carries, averaging less than a yard per rush. However, the senior led the team in receiving with four catches for 45 yards. UNT wide receiver and kick returner Brelan Chancellor was the nation’s leader in allpurpose yards – averaging 297 yards per game – heading into the game. However, Alabama lessened the threat of Chancellor by kicking away from the sophomore and reducing his touches. Chancellor finished the night with 86 all-purpose yards. “I know what a national championship team looks like. I coached on one at Florida [in 2008]; I coached against one in Alabama when they won it in 2009; and I think [this Alabama team] has all the pieces for that,” McCarney said. Players were unavailable for comments. The Mean Green will next play aga inst t he India na Hoosiers at Apogee Stadium at 6 p.m. Saturday.

Volleyball team wins two of four home games BRETT MEDEIROS AND A LEX YOUNG Staff Writers

Coming off its first tournament win of the season, UNT returned home this weekend in hopes of duplicating that resu lt at t he Mea n Green Volleyball Classic. The Mean Green finished the weekend 2-1 with sophomore Courtney Windham and senior Shelley Morton, making the all-tournament team before falling to Texas Tech Monday. Morton played for the first time this season after recovering from an injured pinky finger.

Texas State The Mean Green (9-5) fell in the tournament opener to Texas State (7-5) in straight sets (25-19, 26-24, 25-16). The Mean Green could not stop the Bobcats’ attack, allowing a hitting percentage of .278. Showing rust from the fiveday layoff, the Mean Green committed 27 attack errors and hit .099, its third-lowest total of the season. “We had a great week of pract ice, a nd I rea l ly felt like we were well prepared,” head coach Ken Murczek said.

“It was a little unfortunate because we didn’t bring our best game today.” In the second set, UNT had the Bobcats on the ropes with a 20-13 lead, but the team’s mental errors and inconsistent play allowed Texas State to climb back in the match with a 13-4 run on its way to the sweep.

tant parts. I could not do it without everyone else.”

Texas Tech

Jackson State W it h t he help of eig ht ser v ice aces a nd a careerhigh 40 assists from freshman setter Liz Powell, UNT rolled past Jackson State (4-7) in stra ight sets (25-18, 27-25, 25-20). Powell, in only her second start as setter, helped the Mean Green achieve a .255 attack percentage, including .343 in the first set. “We always just try and play

“...if we execute a game play, we can play at a high level.”

—Ken Murczek Volleyball head coach

September 24 vs.

Indiana Hoosiers @ 6 pm

AMBER PLUMLEY/ STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Libero Addason Lamb, setter Liz Powell, outside hitters Eboni Godfrey and Shelley Morton, and middle blocker Hallie McDonald celebrate the last two winning points against Jackson State on Saturday at the Mean Green Classic. The Mean Green played Friday night against Texas State and fell 0-3, then Saturday night 3-0 against Kennesaw State. our game and worry about our side of our net,” Powell said. “I didn’t even know I had a career high today.” UNT got help from hitters W i nd h a m a nd f re s h m a n Ebon i G od f rey a s t hey contributed with 14 and 13 kills respectively. Freshman Addason Lamb filled in as libero in the final frame as

senior libero Sarah Willey was out with ice on her thigh.

Kennesaw State W it h t he help of fou r players owning a percentage greater than .350 throughout the match, the Mean Green (9-5) took the tournament’s final match against the Owls (5-9) in three straight sets

(25-14, 29-27, 25-13). Windham led the charge on offense with a career-high 19 kills. “I hope that I can beat that [kills] though, always want to get better,” Windham said. “It was fabulous setting today. It seems like such a small part of the game, but in all aspects it’s one of the most impor-

In front of a packed house Monday night, UNT fell to the Texas Tech Red Raiders (13-1) in four sets (25-19, 15-25, 14-25, 21-25). The Red Raiders e x t e nde d t he i r w i n n i n g streak to a program-best 13 straight, but their streak of seven straight sweeps ended when the Mean Green won the first set in an emotionally charged arena. “We showed today t hat if we execute a game play, we can play at a high level,” Murczek said. “That’s why we scheduled this match, so we can play somebody that’s obviously pretty darn good. We just ended the preseason, but maybe not on the note I wanted to.” Du r i ng t he rest of t he match, Texas Tech h it a n average of .404 with nine total blocks and took advantage of the Mean Green’s 43 errors throughout the match. U N T w i l l st a r t con fere n c e p l a y F r i d a y n i g ht against Florida International Un i v e r s i t y a n d F l o r i d a Atlantic University Sunday at home.


Page 6 Sean Gorman, Sports Editor

Sports

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 seangorman@my.unt.edu

Freshmen pave the way to victory in Norman I AN JACOBY Intern

Facing a field including ranked opponents No. 21 Tulsa and No. 24 Oklahoma at this weekend’s Sooner Invitational in Norman, Okla., the UNT tennis team held its own by claiming two flight championships. The Mean Green freshmen led the way in their first college matches, as first-year players Franziska Sprinkmeyer and Kseniya Bardabush each shared a tournament title. “It was a tremendous weekend all around,” head coach Sujay Lama said. “For our freshmen to go to their first tournament and show that kind of poise … That’s a coach’s dream.” Sprinkmeyer and junior Barbora Vykydalova won the Flight C doubles championship against conference rival Arkansas-Little Rock while Bardabush shared the Flight C singles titles with senior Paula Dinuta after both made the final round. Bardabush and Dinuta both finished the tournament undefeated. Junior Valentina Starkova and

senior Nadia Lee also made an impact, winning the consolation doubles championship in flight A. “We won a lot, and the ones we lost, we barely lost,” Lama said. “We’re very pleased with everything we’ve accomplished. This weekend showed just what kind of potential this team has.” The team played without senior Irina Paraschiv, who is rehabbing a shoulder injury until January. Lama said the team’s performance ref lected its strong mindset. “This team is intrinsically motivated. They don’t need outside motivation,” Lama said. “To see a group this motivated and willing to do what it takes to succeed is incredible as a coach. Their drive and desire to excel makes them so good.” The team returns to action Oct. 8 in Flushing, New York, for the 16-team USTA Invitational. “We know what we need to work on,” Lama said. “The team just wants to get back on the court.” Players were unavailable for comment.

PHOTO BY JAMES COREAS/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Junior Valentina Starkova returns a serve from her teammate at last Wednesday practice. The Mean Green won two flight championships at the Sooner Invitatioal last weekend.

Mean Green soccer suffers first UNT runners place in top five winless weekend of season Mean Green loses twice in Nike Classic BOBBY LEWIS

Senior Staff Writer The UNT women’s soccer team got through its first six games without taking a loss, but it will now enter conference play as losers of three straight. UNT (5-3-1) lost both of its games in the Nike Classic in Albuquerque, N.M., this past weekend to the University of California Riverside (4-5-1) and Cal State Fullerton (4-4-1) before it st a r t s Su n Belt Conference play Friday.

Overtime heartbreak The Mean Green started t he w e ek end of f w it h a 97-minute 2-1 overtime loss to UC Riverside on Friday. “I really felt we should’ve won that game,” head coach John Hedlund said of Friday’s game. “I just thought we were the better team, but I got a lot of players out on the field, and I’m trying to make decisions with my bench heading into conference.” Freshman forward Kelsey Petty scored her first career goal in the 36th minute of t he ga me to g ive U N T a 1-0 lead that lasted just 42 seconds before UC Riverside

AUSTIN SCHUBERT

sophomore forward Andrea Morales tied it up in the 37th minute. T he of fenses were held scoreless for the rest of regulat ion, but UCR f reshma n for w a rd C el i n a Va lenc i a scored seven minutes into overtime to seal a UNT loss. “We were getting shots at t he goa l, we just cou ld n’t put t hem i n,” sophomore defender Kelsey Hodges said. “We just couldn’t get them to go in.”

Staff Writer

On a hu m id Sat u rday morning in Waco, 14 UNT men and women cross-country runners competed in their second meet of the season at the Baylor Invitational. Running aga inst strong competition that included two Big 12 teams, the UNT men’s team took fourth overall and the women’s team took second.

“The women’s performance was very impressive. Anytime you beat UTA and Baylor, it’s a good meet.”

Substitution problems UN T ret u r ned to t he Un iversit y of New Mex ico Soccer Complex Sunday to face Cal State Fullerton, but found itself down by three goa ls by t he 32nd minute, a l l s c or e d b y F u l le r t on junior for wa rd A nn Ma rie Tangora. Tangora started her scoring i n t he 29t h m i nute, t hen scored t w ice i n t he nex t fou r m i nutes to complete her hat trick en route to a 4-1 Fullerton win. “T he tea m was act ua l ly playing really well, and then I started getting a little crazy with the substitutions in the last 18 minutes of the half,” Hedlund said. “I messed up the f low of the game, and we brought some young players in and then it was like goal, goal, goal.” UNT went into ha lf time

“We need to be a more fit team if we want to improve,” head coach Sam Burroughs said. “I want to push the men’s training mileage up so they can compete more on the college level.” T he w omen’s 4 k r ac e featured the same teams as the men’s race except Arlington Baptist. Once again, A&M stormed to first place as a team, led by Katherine Devlin, who won

—Sam Burroughs Cross-country head coach

PHOTO BY JAMES COREAS/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore Defender Kelsey Hodges kicks the ball during UNT’s last home game. UNT returns to action against Western Kentucky Friday at 7 PM. dow n 3-0, but received a goa l f rom Hodges in t he second half. “I told [t he players] at ha lf, ‘There’s not hing we can do right now. Let’s go back to the starters and let’s try to win the second half,’” Hedlund said. The Mean Green begins Sun Belt play against Middle Ten ne s se e a nd We ster n Kentucky this weekend. “I just think our play was of f t his weekend,” senior for wa rd Kelsey Perl ma n s a id . “I t h i n k we were able to take a lot of posi-

tives out of [the Fullerton] game, though, and it’s just presea son, so we’re not taking the loss like it’s the worst thing in the world.”

Injury notes: Fresh ma n m id f ielder Haley Dockray, as expected, didn’t play t his weekend a f ter spra ining her k nee against Sam Houston Sept. 9. Senior forward Nikki Crocco a lso didn’t play this past weekend because of a knee injur y, although Hedlund sa id he t h i n k s she’l l be ready this weekend.

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The men’s 6k race featured UNT, Texas A&M, Baylor, UT-Arlington and Arlington Baptist. The strength of the Big 12 was evident as A&M and Baylor finished first and second in the team standings followed by UTA, UNT and Arlington Baptist. “There was a lot of adrenaline and hype to this race,” freshman Austin Yaeger said. “Ru n n i ng aga i nst Big 12 schools was a humbling experience. We still have a lot of work to do if we want to reach their level, but we have the potential.” Individually, James Hodges of A&M won the race in a time of 18:48, as the Aggies brought the first 11 finishers across the line in the 54-man field. Running without top runner sophomore Matt Russ, senior Michael Sandoval led the way for the six UNT runners in 20:12, good enough for 26th place. Beh i nd Sa ndova l, UN T r unners ca me across t he finish in bunches as Yaeger and freshmen Aurelio Silva, Justin Paul and Brad Fullman finished 33rd, 39th, 42nd and 43rd respectively.

the 54-woman race in a time of 13:58. UNT grabbed second place while UTA and Baylor finished close behind in third and fourth. Senior Ingrid Mollenkopf, one of fou r UNT women making their season debut, led the way for the eight Mean Green women, taking sixth place in a time of 14:30. “We showed our depth in this race,” Mollenkopf said. “Unlike the first meet, we ran together and finished near each other, which is what we’ve practiced.” Freshmen Hanna Rice and Lauren Sullivan both saw time improvements from the first meet and finished 14th and 19th overall. Rounding out the top five for UNT were freshman Ellie Arends and sophomore Carly Griffith in 21st and 26th. “T he w omen’s p er formance was very impressive,” Burroughs said. “Anytime you beat UTA and Baylor, it’s a good meet.” The Mean Green crossc ou nt r y tea m s c ont i nue their seasons at the Cowboy Jamboree in Stillwater, Okla., on Oct. 1.

Youth Movement Of the four schools that ran both men’s and women’s teams at the Baylor Invitational (UNT, Baylor, Texas A&M, and UTA), UNT had the highest percentage (79 percent) of freshman runners who competed Saturday. The next closest was Baylor (41 percent).


Views

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 Valerie Gonzalez, Views Editor

Page 7 ntviewseditor@gmail.com

A time and a place for clothing

Changes in UNT policy brings second chances Editorial Last semester, the National Organization for the Reform for Marijuana Laws (NORML) consistently tabled, collected signatures and met with UNT administrators. It wasn’t to dispel the notion that stoners don’t do anything. Rather, it was an attempt to bring change to UNT’s alcohol and drug policy. Although NORML didn’t get to witness an immediate change in policy, its efforts still paid off. This summer, UNT administration decided to adopt a change in its policy for both alcohol and marijuana. The change in alcohol policy was not only needed, but it was also well deserved. In 2009, there were 165 disciplinary referrals for liquor law violations alone. Now, students in violation of the alcohol policy will have to take three more education hours for an alcohol education class with the Substance Abuse Resource Center. Those students will also be put on Level I Conduct Probation for at least a year. UNT used to handle marijuana violations by removing students who lived on campus and were in possession of marijuana or marijuana paraphernalia. Those students were then charged a $1,000 fee for breaking their contract with housing. As if that wasn’t a big enough buzz kill, they would also lose their eligibility for financial aid. Not just for UNT – for any state institution. UNT’s policy no longer creates criminal profiles for all students who violate the Student Code of Conduct, as well as state, federal and local laws. Students caught in possession of marijuana paraphernalia or marijuana seeds will now be moved to a new dorm and placed on Level II Conduct Probation for at least a year. To avoid being kicked out of the dorm, those students will also take a drug education class in the Substance Abuse Resource Center. Per the Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989, any institution that receives federal funding must adopt and implement a program to deter unlawful possession, distribution or use of illegal drugs. While the university’s policy appeared to be harsh enough to keep students from illegally possessing drugs before the change, it didn’t stop students from engaging in unlawful drug-related activity. In 2009, there were 36 on-campus arrests for drug related violations. There were another 54 disciplinary referrals made for on-campus drug related violations the same year, according to the university’s Crime Security Awareness and Prevention statistics. Students who are caught possessing marijuana seeds and marijuana paraphernalia should learn from their mistakes the first time around and turn over a new leaf. The students who committed on-campus drug violations in 2009 weren’t lucky enough to have that chance.

Campus Chat

It’s time to get geared up again for the fall semester at the University of North Texas! Did you know U.S. News & World Report nationally ranked UNT ninth as Texas’ best public administration master’s program? In lieu of that impressive fact, I think it’s time for us to recognize the importance of being well dressed while strutting around campus. Wouldn’t you agree? Look at all of the amazing social opportunities and degree programs that surround us while we attend school. So, let’s get down to business and address some faux pas in attire. We’ve all seen it: Pajamas on campus. While I understand our pajamas are comfortable and even cutesy, they really throw out the wrong message when worn outside the home. It takes just a minute or two to throw on a pair of jeans and a T-shirt or a nice cool summer dress. It’s impossible to take someone seriously on any level when they are standing in front of you wearing “SpongeBob” bottoms

and matching yellow “Sponge” slippers. Secondly, let’s be sure you are dressing appropriately. In an academic setting, extremely low-cut tops and extremely highcut bottoms are a NO. This basic clothing rule goes for midriffs as well. What about those saggy jeans with exposed boxers? No one wants to see your

seem like common sense, but sometimes we get so caught up with the latest trend, we have to step back and soak in a bit of reality. The reality is your clothes are too tight and are trying to warn you! Trust your clothes. They have no reason to lie. Finally, let’s delve into hygiene. You may think that fashion and

“I think it is important to dress and present yourself respectably and you will see a difference in how your colleagues and professors perceive you.”

—Amira Ansari Pre-journalism senior

boxers. It’s a fact. Another basic rule with clothing is if any of your seams make a ripping sound when you move, it’s time to start buying one size up immediately. It may

hygiene have nothing to do with each other, but they actually go hand-in-hand. What is the point of getting dressed up to feel and look your best if you haven’t taken a shower?

Again, seems like common sense, but my nose has witnessed too many a student simply not bathing in time for class. With the type of hot weather we have been having, it is imperative that you take the time to shower and deodorize. A lso, please remember colognes and perfumes do not freshen you up. In fact, they lie on top of your skin and clothing, quickly increasing and dispersing body odors, making them more pungent. You don’t want to announce your arrival with an unpleasant scent. I think it is important to dress and present yourself respectably and you will see a difference in how your colleagues and professors perceive you. You never know when a life-changing career opportunity will pop up. Remember, fashion is an unspoken but powerful message about YOU. Make it a positive and meaningful message! Amira Ansari is a pre-journalism senior. She can be reached at amiraansari@my.unt.edu.

Government static disrupts connection Before filing suit to block the $39 billion merger of cell phone giants AT&T and T-Mobile, the U.S. Department of Justice should have asked a simple question: Now what? In its zeal to protect consumers from price increases that may or may not have occurred in the deal’s aftermath, government lawyers managed to sandbag not one but two major companies. It’s an unnecessary mess. The federal court action puts at least a temporary halt to AT&T’s plan for massively expanding its service capabilities. Without the deal, AT&T’s growth will be much slower. That leaves one less potential job engine for a struggling domestic economy. Meanwhile, it’s hard to imagine why government lawyers think T-Mobile will be an effective competitor in years to come. True, T-Mobile

has competed aggressively in the past, offering budget-minded consumers some low-cost alternatives. However, it has bled market share for months and months now, and not just because of doubts raised by its merger agreement. Nothing Justice does will change that business calculation. As a result, no way will T-Mobile roll out a next-generation network on a timely basis to keep up with AT&T or industry leader Verizon. It’s destined to fall further behind. Its strategic options look limited, too. As a merger partner, its U.S. arm is worth a lot more to AT&T than to any other rival. The distraction and uncertainty of the deal has accelerated T-Mobile’s decline. It will be impossible for the No. 3 cell phone player to bounce ahead any time soon, even if it collects

the huge fee that AT&T agreed to pay if the merger fell through. No wonder AT&T has vowed to fight Justice. Meanwhile, the Federal Communications Commission hasn’t yet ruled on the merger, and it’s possible the agency will confound Justice’s lawyers by blessing the deal. AT&T has discussed making massive concessions to reduce the combined company’s dominance in certain local markets. Market dominance is the government’s main objection. So, if AT&T were to divest onefourth of T-Mobile, as it reportedly offered to do, would that defuse the alleged anti-competitive problem? The FCC might think so, especially when it considers how the deal stands to further the agency’s most cherished public-policy goals.

Access to advanced wireless Internet is the key. A merger of AT&T and T-Mobile would bring an under-served swath of America into the 21st century of high-speed mobile data communication. Much like the rural electrification movement of the 1930s, this deal offers a chance for many Americans to leap ahead technologically. If Justice gets its way, progress will slow to a crawl. The FCC should approve the merger after obtaining appropriate concessions and Justice should settle its case sooner, not later. Dragging out this proceeding stands to hurt a nation that can ill afford more damage from a government too often hostile to business interests. The editorial above appeared in the Chicago Tribune on Monday, Sept. 12.

SAT scores in Texas and across the nation are dropping. What do you think is the cause of this trend? “It could be that [students] are under too much pressure and that they lose focus and don’t do well, or some don’t care and don’t study.”

{

Alissa Thompson

International studies senior

“New students are coming from socioeconomic groupings that are traditionally less able to provide the necessary preparation aides. To sum it up, a less-prepared applicant pool will yield lower aggregate test scores.”

{

Eric Izuora

Public administration graduate student

NT Daily Editorial Board

The Editorial Board includes: Josh Pherigo, Amber Arnold, Isaac Wright, Sean Gorman, Jesse Sidlauskas, Sydnie Summers, Stacy Powers, Carolyn Brown,Valerie Gonzalez, Drew Gaines, Cristy Angulo and Berenice Quirino.

Want to be heard? The NT Daily is proud to present a variety of ideas and opinions from readers in its Views section. As such, we would like to hear from as many NT readers as possible. We invite readers of all creeds and backgrounds to write about whichever issue excites them, whether concerning politics, local issues,

ethical questions, philosophy, sports and, of course, anything exciting or controversial. Take this opportunity to make your voice heard in a widely read publication. To inquire about column ideas, submit columns or letters to the editor, send an e-mail to ntdailyviews@gmail.com

Note to Our Readers

The NT Daily does not necessarily endorse, promote or agree with the viewpoints of the columnists on this page. The content of the columns is strictly the opinion of the writers and in no way reflects the belief of the NT Daily.


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