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On the Right Foot UNT soccer tries to rebound after first loss Sports | Page 4

Friday, September 16, 2011

News 1, 2 Sports 4 Classifieds 3 Games 3 SCENE Insert

Volume 98 | Issue 14

Rainy 85° / 72°

ntdaily.com

The Student Newspaper of the University of North Texas

UNT alum brings fundraising talent back to Denton A LEX M ACON

Senior Staff Writer

PHOTO BY JAMES COREAS/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

Sophomore quarterback Derek Thompson looks for an open receiver during last weekend’s game. The football team plays Alabama at 6:30 p.m. Saturday.

Season’s top test awaits UNT

PAUL BOTTONI

Senior Staff Writer The challenge the UNT football team will face this weekend becomes clear when looking to college football spreads: the Mean Green’s opponent A labama is favored by 47 points. UNT will undergo its biggest test of of the season against the No.2 Crimson Tide (2-0) at 6:30 p.m. Saturday in Tuscaloosa, Ala. “What you see is a team

[Alabama] that plays with unbelievable relentless effort and plays with such confidence,” McCarney said. “We all know that there’s going to be a lot of those guys at Alabama in the starting lineup that will play in the NFL.” Win or lose, UNT has something to gain from the game, as its athletic department announced Alabama will pay UNT $750,000 for facing them

See FOOTBALL on Page 4

Saturday’s Key Matchup Lance Dunbar

Trent Richardson

• Both named to the 2011 Doak Walker Watch List • Dunbar surpassed Ja’Quay Wilburn in the Houston game for third on the all-time rushing list at UNT • Richardson played a big role in Alabama’s national championship last season, rushing for 102

Local 7-Eleven posts photos, mocks thieves SARAH BETTIS AND R EBECCA RYAN

pair is doing. Another photo is of a man trying to hide a News Interns candy bar in the back of his pants, which yielded an even With every customer who more sardonic caption. steps foot into the 7-Eleven After seeing theft become a on West Oak Street, the omnihabit for some, Lam wanted to scient eye of t he secu r it y remind people that stealing is camera follows t heir ever y not only immoral, but illegal move. Whether they know it or as well. Rather than slapping not, they’re being watched. on t he cuf fs, La m decided This particular 7-Eleven has a slap on t he w r ist wou ld found a new way of preventing suffice. theft. Starting in November of “We try to let them know last year, owner Chiy Lam and ‘Do the right thing,’” Lam said. staff began posting chronologPHOTO BY JAMES COREAS/SENIOR STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER “If you really need something, ical photos of people stealing. The staff writes witty captions Josh Navarifar calls his friend over to see the security camera footage photos I can help you out, but don’t in an attempt to embarrass outside 7-Eleven on West Oak Street Thursday night. In November of last year, steal. It becomes a hobby for t he t h ieves a nd decrea se owner Chiy Lam and staff began posting photos and writing captions of people some people and if you get caught stealing, you can screw theft. The images were taken stealing from the store. up your life. Instead of calling frame by frame from security cameras after the crimes were in case there’s a burglary or bott les of water a nd ot her t he cops a nd getting t hem committed. fire, but sometimes we see items. It includes a photo in big t rouble, we t hought “We put it out to let people something funny and decide showing the woman slipping posting pictures may prevent know ‘Hey, maybe you’re on to post it on the window.” them into her purse, believing re-offenders.” ca mera,’” L a m sa id. “T he A series of photos reveals she isn’t seen, and a sarcastic camera is here for security, a ma n a nd woma n ta k ing caption explaining what the See THEFT on Page 2

Cancer incidence rate rises for Denton NICOLE BALDERAS Senior Staff Writer

In Denton County and five surrounding counties, breast cancer incidence is on the rise, leading to studies being done to determine the reason for the spike. The rise in breast cancer rates is occ u r r i ng i n t he Ba r net t Sha le a rea where natural gas drilling is going on, affecting the “core count ies” of Denton, Joh nson, Tarrant and Wise, according to the Railroad Commission of Texas website.

“We were looking at a number of things like benzene and its effects on cancer levels.”

-Chris Van Deusen Assistant press officer for the Texas Department of State Health Services

Accord i ng to t he Tex a s Cancer Registry, the average of all six counties’ breast cancer incidence rate has risen from

58.7 cases per 100,000 people in 2005 to about 60.7 per 100,000 in 2008. The possible link between

carcinogens leaked into the air from drilling and the rise in ca ncer rates has led to several studies being done in the Dallas Fort-Worth area. “ We w e r e l o o k i n g a t a nu mber of t h i ngs l i ke benzene and its effects on cancer levels,” said Chris Van Deusen, assistant press officer for t he Texas Depa r t ment of State Hea lt h Ser v ices. “We did not find anything outside of what you would expect.”

See CANCER on Page 2

Last month the UNT System a nnounced t he creation of a new position to be filled by UNT alumnus Bill Lively. Lively began his job as vice chancellor of strategic partnerships Sept. 7. The position exists primarily to assist and coordinate UNT’s fundraising efforts, which have seen an unprecedented amount of success in recent months, raising about $52 million for the university over the summer. “My experience at UNT was profoundly impactful to me,” Lively said. “It gave me a lot of confidence. I saw a chance to return some of what UNT did for me.” Lively is well known in North Texas as the president and CEO of the North Texas Super Bowl XLV Host Committee and his integral role in raising about $338 million for the construction of the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Lively was raised in Oak Cliff and has spent most of his life living and working in North Texas.

“Well, I’m a Texan through and through,” Lively sa id. “The people are entrepreneurial, bold, somet imes BILL crazy, but allLIVELY around good people. There’s nowhere I’d rather be.” Frequently described as a workaholic, he earned scholarships and worked menial jobs to put himself through Southern Methodist University. Lively, a trumpet player and avid music-lover, earned a bachelor’s degree from SMU in music in 1965 and a master’s degree in music education from UNT in 1970. He was a band director for the Dallas Independent School District and then spent 25 years working at SMU, first as a music and band director before moving on to administrative and fundraising duties. Lively said he met with UNT President V. Lane Rawlins and Chancellor Lee Jackson and saw an opportunity to help his alma mater.

See LIVELY on Page 2

Denton P.D. names new police chief STAFF R EPORTS

After evaluating five potential candidates from across the country, the city of Denton announced Thursday afternoon that Denton County Chief Deputy Sheriff Warren Lee Howell was chosen as the Denton Police Department’s new chief of police. According to a press release issued by the city Thursday, Denton City Manager George Campbell announced that Howell will begin working for Denton P.D. Oct. 21. Howell has worked in law enforcement for more than 30 years and first worked for the Denton P.D. in 1981 and achieved the rank of captain before leaving in 2004 to work for the county. “I am proud to have been selected to lead an organization like the Denton Police Department, which has a long tradition of being one of the most professional and innovative law enforcement agencies in the countr y,” Howell sa id in t he press release. Howell is a UNT alumnus

“I am proud to have been selected to lead.” —Warren Lee Howell Denton police chief with a bachelor’s degree in applied arts and sciences and is a lso a member of t he Denton Cha mber of Commerce. Howell was also a finalist for the position in 2007 when the city hired Roy Minter as chief of police. Mi nter resig ned i n February after accepting the position of police chief for Peoria, Ariz. Paul Abbott, a retired Denton P.D. captain, has served as interim police chief since Minter announced his resignation. Tune in to NT Daily TV’s webcast for more information about Howell’s appointment to chief of police.

What’s Inside NEWS: ONLINE:

Debt committee criticized for fundraising distractions Mean Green starts season at Sooner Invitaional

Page 2

NTDaily.com

NTDaily TV breaks down the news in weekly webcast NTDaily.com


SCENE

NORTH TEXAS DAILY, September 16 VOLUME 98, ISSUE 4

Goose Chase High-tech devices lead local treasure hunters to hidden containers. Page 4


Page 2 Amber Arnold and Isaac Wright, News Editors

Theft Continued from Page 1 T houg h some of t he stories are humorous and tease the thieves, the photo tactic is just for security purposes. According to the Denton Police Department, not only the police, but also citizens share responsibility in preventing crime in the community as well. “Only 1 or 2 percent of customers steal,” Lam said. “Some customers say they like the photos because they hate to see theft. [The customers] are actua lly the ones who inform us of the incidents after they occur.” The staff has noticed that customers have responded to the photos. Some have stood at t he w i ndow, reading the captions and reacting to the pictures for several minutes. “It’s a very good idea,” customer Lance Baldwin sa id. “People rea l ly shouldn’t steal. I just moved here from Illinois and I’ve never seen anything like that before. It seems to be effective.” Employees have tried ot her met hods to stop theft, including in one case chasing a thief down the block. However, they have found the posted photos to be most effective. Cashier Ash Davis has witnessed how this exposure affects thieves. “It’s emba r rassing to have your picture up there,” Davis said. “People come back and ask if we’ll take down their picture if they pay for what they took. Ultimately, I believe it’s a good theft deterrent.”

News

Friday, September 16, 2011 ntdnewseditors@gmail.com

Supercommittee’s fundraisers upset constituents WASHINGTON, (D.C.) — Hours after convening the first working meeting of Congress’ “supercommittee” Tuesday, committee co-chair Sen. Patty Murray of Washington state had another engagement: She hosted a $1,000-per-ticket fundraiser at the fall reception of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee, raising money for her party’s 2012 Senate candidates. Two ot her Republ ica n members of the debt-reduction panel held fundraisers the same night, giving lobbyists and influence peddlers an opportunity to mingle with them: Sen. Rob Portman hosted a reception for fellow Ohioan Republican

Cancer Because of an increased rate of leukemia in Flower Mound, the department conducted an investigation of “Specific Cancer Occurrences” in the city. According to the study report updated March 30, the department could not determine with any degree of certainty why the number of breast cancer cases is higher than expected in these areas, but the increase is likely explained by the rapid growth of the Flower Mound population. With no scientific data yet confirmed, the exact reason for the increase in incidence is not yet known. “We’ve seen an increase in breast cancer patients and lung cancer patients in probably the last year,” said Jessica Emerson, chief radiation therapist at the Denton Cancer Center. The average age of those

Rep. Steve Chabot, and Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona hosted one for Republican Sen. Roger Wicker, his Mississippi counterpart. Democratic Rep. Jim Clyburn of South Carolina had the busiest week of any supercommittee member, with five fundraisers scheduled over four days. Despite growing calls for the 12 committee members to stop raising money until they conclude their task of cutting $1.2 trillion from the federal budget, most are adhering to the timehonored tradition of mixing their politics with plenty of cash. At least nine of them, five Democrats and four Republicans, have held or scheduled 21 fund-

raisers since getting named to the committee last month, according to the Sunlight Foundation, a Washington-based organization that tracks the influence of money in politics. To be sure, no one’s accusing members of any wrongdoing. Fundraising has long been considered part of the job, and the Supreme Court in recent years has loosened limits on corporate political contributions, defending them as expressions of free speech protected by the Constitution’s First Amendment. In Congress, legislative attempts to institute taxpayer financing of congressional elec-

tions have failed to gain traction, and opinion polls find that most Americans oppose the idea anyway. But critics say that by raising money while they’re doing such high-profile work, supercommittee members are doing nothing to instill confidence in Congress, which already is facing record low public approval. The spotlight has been particularly intense on the supercommittee, which by design has much more clout than most congressional panels do. It could set spending levels for hundreds of federal projects extended over 10 years. Nick Nyhart, the president and chief executive officer of Public

Campaign, a national nonprofit group that focuses on specialinterest money in politics, said the committee members could send a “clear signal” that their recommendations would be made without the undue influence of big-money interests by suspending all fundraising for the next two months. The supercommittee, known officially as the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, has until Nov. 23 to make its recommendations. Nyhart said the 94 senators and 429 members of the House of Representatives who weren’t on the committee could pick up any fundraising slack.

Continued from Page 1

diagnosed is 30 to 45 years old, Emerson said. Though this age group is much younger than what she is used to diagnosing, Emerson said it may be due to growing awareness among the younger generation. “There’s about a 25 percent increase in breast cancer [diagnosis], and about a 40 percent increase in lung cancer,” she said. Because of r ising loca l concern, Denton will host its first Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure Sept. 24. Zeta Tau Alpha, which promotes breast cancer awareness as its philanthropy, will have a booth at the event. “Zeta sponsors the survivor tent, which will give out pins for racers to put on their shirts,” said Tessa Kus, president of Zeta Tau Alpha at UNT. “On one side of the pin you can write down someone

PHOTO BY CAROLYN MARY BAUMAN/FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM

Dr. Penny Labor compares mammogram film to a TV image at Doris Kupferle Breast Center at Harris Methodist Hospital in Fort Worth, Texas. you lost to cancer and on the other someone you know who survived.” A l l 86 members of t he

Lively

sorority, including new pledges, have signed up to volunteer, though Kus said the race still needs 500 volunteers.

Continued from Page 1

Je r r y Ho l b e r t , e x e c u t ive d i rector of t he UN T Fou nd at ion, a nonpr of it cor porat ion t hat oversees donations made to the UNT System, sa id L ively ’s rea l benefit would be his breadth of experience. “He has people in Dallas on speed dial who don’t even know of UNT,” Holbert said. “He can introduce a broader group of people to the univer-

sit y a nd Nor t h Tex a s i n general.” Holbert said Lively was a potential “game changer” for the university. “He gets it when it comes to what it takes to move a school to the next level in terms of ph i la nt h ropic donat ions,” Holbert said. Lively pra ised t he work a l ready done by Rawl i ns, t he UN T Fou ndat ion a nd

To participate or volunteer for t he event, v isit Komennorthtexas.org for more information.

members of UNT’s Office of Development. UNT is at a “moment in time,” Lively said, to lay a foundation for future generations to build on. Lively said he would be on the UNT campus in Denton about three or four days a week and said he would enjoy being at a university again. “Ou r cou nt r y ’s g reatest asset is our youth, and they depend on h ig her education,” Lively said. “UNT is embraci ng it s m ission i n higher education.”

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S C E N E

FOOD: The Food Snobs crow about Rooster’s Roadhouse

Page 3

Day In the Life:

In Theaters:

Geocaching: Students use GPS in high-tech game of hide-and-seek.

Page 4

A sneak peak at today’s new releases.

Page 6

Glamour:

Fashion exhibit reviews frugal ‘40s.

Page 7

Those classrooms don’t clean themselves.

Page 8


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FoodSCENE

[ ] Food Snobs

Rooster’s Roadhouse 113 Industrial St. Mon-Thu, Sun 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.

A shley-Crystal Firstley Senior Staff Writer

Industrial Street is giving Fry Street a run for its money. While Fry Street’s scene is lively and convenient for students, Industrial has something that Fry lacks: Rooster’s Roadhouse – among the best barbecue restaurants in Denton. Located between Dan’s Silverleaf and Fuzzy’s Tacos, Rooster’s isn’t the typical sit-and-dine barbecue joint. As expected with a barbecuejoint, worn-out menus and rolls of paper towels sit on wooden picnic tables (without plastic table cloths) in the dining room. The other half of Rooster’s is the bar stocked with more than 30 domestic and import beers. Every day, there’s a bar special. The empty peanut shells that litter the floor are commonplace. What are not normal are the Christmas tree, lawnmower and motorcycle that hang from the ceiling alongside a chandelier made of beer-tap handles. My eyes wandered from one side of the restaurant to the other from walls decorated with sports memorabilia to photos and neon beer signs to the marker graffiti that management does not discourage. Patrons have the option of either sitting at a cushioned booth or table. Within two minutes, a server greeted me but wasn’t as energetic as I expected in the creative atmosphere, but got the job done and knew the food well enough to answer questions and suggest menu items. There are more than 30 menu choices consisting of appetizers, salads, flattop baskets (burgers and

Friday 09.16.2011

3

sandwiches), pit barbecue baskets and dinner-plates – all offered at reasonable prices. The crispy fried pickles ($4.49) were a great choice to begin my meal. Served on a silver plate, the appetizer came out hot. The salt seasoning the appetizer blended well with the sour pickles. For dinner, patrons can start with something as easy as a basic cheeseburger ($4.95). The 100 percent ground-beef burger is full of flavor, seasoned and grilled to perfection. I added barbecue sauce to spice up the taste and had the best burger I’ve ever eaten. My barbecue favorite, the pulled pork sandwich ($6.25), had succulent meat packed between two slices of Texas toast. The red onion marmalade adds sweetness to the sandwich, which is something I’d never had, but the combination works well together. There isn’t a lot of seasoning, but it’s juicy and had my mouth watering before every Photo by Corrisa Jackson/Staff Writer bite. Before eating their entrees, Rooster’s Roadhouse customers can dig into crispy fried pickles, okra, pulled pork nachos or other appetizers. All burgers and sandwiches are served with homemade crispy potato Cleanliness chips, which may be too Service crispy depending on In Fort Worth, Arlington, Grapevine, Southlake, Hurst, Forest Hill, White preference and can be Affordability Settlement, North Richland Hills, Richland Hills, Watauga, Haltom City, Colleyville, switched with fries, okra, Keller, Bedford, and elsewhere in Tarrant County. Atmosphere vegetables or tater tots. (817) 924-3236 bla Food Quality Se ha l. If there is room for 3024 Sandage o dessert, I suggest ordering Españ Fort Worth, TX 76109-1793 *No promise as to results some. Your home-style choices are chip brownie is served warm and *Any fine and court costs are not included in fee for legal representation the chocolate chip brownie, banana topped with whipped cream and www.JamesMallory.com pudding, bread pudding, peanut a couple of chocolate chips. It will brittle and blueberry cobbler, though definitely satisfy any sweet tooth. Rooster’s is a place for good the menu varies during the week. The interesting part of the desserts barbecue in an amusing atmosphere is that they’re baked inside about a – an experience few other barbecue 3-inch-tall glass jars. The chocolate joints can reflect.

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GeoSCENE GeoSCENE

Friday 09.16.2011

4

One person’s cache is another’s treasure

Brill said. “[Geocaching] is kind of like that, in that you have a little device that is telling you where to go, but once you get there it’s a little bit of a hunt.” Geocaching began in 2000 when the government removed selective availability from civilian GPS systems, according to geocaching. com. Basically, before May 1, 2000, only the military had access to extremely accurate GPS signals. After selective availability was removed, GPS enthusiasts began thinking of ways the new technology could be used. On May 3, 2000, Dave Ulmer hid the world’s first geocache and posted the coordinates online so that people

could try and find it. There are more than 5 million

“...It’s probably kind of dangerous to get to, and you have to climb up on all the branches to get to it.”

—Grant Brill Criminal justice senior

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Criminal justice senior Grant Brill unravels the scroll found in a geocache the size of a small battery. Some geocaches offer adventurers just the scroll to jot their name down while many others offer a swapping system. The swapping system can consist of anything from small action figures to gift cards and kaleidoscopes. Brittni Barnett Senior Staff Writer

Grant Brill logs into an online account and downloads a series of global coordinates marking the location of his prize. He punches the code into a handheld device that communicates via satellite to map his route. Next, like a high-tech Indiana

Jones, Brill, a criminal justice senior, may be led over mountains or through dense brush and trees as he follows the computer screen on his tracking monitor. There’s no gold or silver at the end of Brill’s adventure though – he’s searching for something a little less shiny: a geocache. Geocaches are generally filled

with various items such as notes, trinkets, toys and a logbook. Brill, like many geocachers, finds the coordinates on the website, geocaching.com. The site is the hub of the game played by millions across the globe. When a geocacher hides a cache, they record the coordinates of the location to the website. Once at the location, though,

cachers are not finished. Typically, geocaches are hidden out of sight so a search is necessary to find the container hidden there. Brill said his biggest caching challenge so far was a geocache hidden 50 feet high in a tree at Bonham State Park. “I mean, it’s way up there and is kind of probably dangerous to get to, and you have to climb up on all the

branches to get to it,” he said. When geocachers find a container, they’re welcome to take an item from the box as a keepsake, sign a logbook or add something of their own before returning the geocache to its original location. “You know that compass from ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ that would point you where you wanted to go?”

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Grant Brill, a criminal justice senior, adds his name to the list located in a geocache. Geocaches come in various sizes ranging from that of the size of a small battery to a box or a crate.

geocachers worldwide who search for the more than one and a half million geocaches, according to geocaching.com. Brill has even found one on the top of Mount Diamond Head in Hawaii. However, not all caches are so difficult. “I used to tutor an autistic kid, and we would work on social skills and things like that and I actually used to take him geocaching,” he said. “He didn’t really want to go out and do outdoorsy things, but because it was like a treasure hunt, you know that really excited him, and got him outside and being active.” Gabriel Olvera, a student at NCTC, also geocaches, and has found several of the caches located on the UNT campus and in the Denton area. “It pretty much just keeps me busy,” Olvera said. “It’s a very good outdoor activity of course, and it’s usually something new; you never know what you’re going to find in there.” Olvera said some geocaches contain trackables – a geocaching “game piece” with a unique code on it that can be entered on the website to track its movements as geocachers move it from one place to another. For those who are currently “muggles,” or non-geocachers, the Pohl Recreation Center is offering a free clinic on geocaching on Oct. 26. “Most of our clinics are for beginners,” said Ben Hanisian, assistant director of outdoor pursuits. “They are for folks who don’t have a lot of knowledge on the subject and are just looking to have fun.” Brill said one of the best parts of geocaching is the excitement of finding the cache and he said he makes a point to go geocaching when he is in a new place, such as on vacation. “A lot of times geocaching will take you to a cool view, or an offthe-beaten path kind of place,” Brill said. “You experience more of your local area that you wouldn’t otherwise stop and look at.”

Friday 09.16.2011

5

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Grant Brill, a criminal justice senior, looks toward a possible location of a cache while following the coordinates on his GPS. Geocaching requires adventurers to carefully follow directions, coordinates and, in some occasions, riddles to find hidden loot.

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Criminal justice senior Grant Brill reveals a scroll hidden in a small container. Geocaches come in a large array of sizes, making some more difficult to find than others.


GeoSCENE GeoSCENE

Friday 09.16.2011

4

One person’s cache is another’s treasure

Brill said. “[Geocaching] is kind of like that, in that you have a little device that is telling you where to go, but once you get there it’s a little bit of a hunt.” Geocaching began in 2000 when the government removed selective availability from civilian GPS systems, according to geocaching. com. Basically, before May 1, 2000, only the military had access to extremely accurate GPS signals. After selective availability was removed, GPS enthusiasts began thinking of ways the new technology could be used. On May 3, 2000, Dave Ulmer hid the world’s first geocache and posted the coordinates online so that people

could try and find it. There are more than 5 million

“...It’s probably kind of dangerous to get to, and you have to climb up on all the branches to get to it.”

—Grant Brill Criminal justice senior

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Criminal justice senior Grant Brill unravels the scroll found in a geocache the size of a small battery. Some geocaches offer adventurers just the scroll to jot their name down while many others offer a swapping system. The swapping system can consist of anything from small action figures to gift cards and kaleidoscopes. Brittni Barnett Senior Staff Writer

Grant Brill logs into an online account and downloads a series of global coordinates marking the location of his prize. He punches the code into a handheld device that communicates via satellite to map his route. Next, like a high-tech Indiana

Jones, Brill, a criminal justice senior, may be led over mountains or through dense brush and trees as he follows the computer screen on his tracking monitor. There’s no gold or silver at the end of Brill’s adventure though – he’s searching for something a little less shiny: a geocache. Geocaches are generally filled

with various items such as notes, trinkets, toys and a logbook. Brill, like many geocachers, finds the coordinates on the website, geocaching.com. The site is the hub of the game played by millions across the globe. When a geocacher hides a cache, they record the coordinates of the location to the website. Once at the location, though,

cachers are not finished. Typically, geocaches are hidden out of sight so a search is necessary to find the container hidden there. Brill said his biggest caching challenge so far was a geocache hidden 50 feet high in a tree at Bonham State Park. “I mean, it’s way up there and is kind of probably dangerous to get to, and you have to climb up on all the

branches to get to it,” he said. When geocachers find a container, they’re welcome to take an item from the box as a keepsake, sign a logbook or add something of their own before returning the geocache to its original location. “You know that compass from ‘Pirates of the Caribbean’ that would point you where you wanted to go?”

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Grant Brill, a criminal justice senior, adds his name to the list located in a geocache. Geocaches come in various sizes ranging from that of the size of a small battery to a box or a crate.

geocachers worldwide who search for the more than one and a half million geocaches, according to geocaching.com. Brill has even found one on the top of Mount Diamond Head in Hawaii. However, not all caches are so difficult. “I used to tutor an autistic kid, and we would work on social skills and things like that and I actually used to take him geocaching,” he said. “He didn’t really want to go out and do outdoorsy things, but because it was like a treasure hunt, you know that really excited him, and got him outside and being active.” Gabriel Olvera, a student at NCTC, also geocaches, and has found several of the caches located on the UNT campus and in the Denton area. “It pretty much just keeps me busy,” Olvera said. “It’s a very good outdoor activity of course, and it’s usually something new; you never know what you’re going to find in there.” Olvera said some geocaches contain trackables – a geocaching “game piece” with a unique code on it that can be entered on the website to track its movements as geocachers move it from one place to another. For those who are currently “muggles,” or non-geocachers, the Pohl Recreation Center is offering a free clinic on geocaching on Oct. 26. “Most of our clinics are for beginners,” said Ben Hanisian, assistant director of outdoor pursuits. “They are for folks who don’t have a lot of knowledge on the subject and are just looking to have fun.” Brill said one of the best parts of geocaching is the excitement of finding the cache and he said he makes a point to go geocaching when he is in a new place, such as on vacation. “A lot of times geocaching will take you to a cool view, or an offthe-beaten path kind of place,” Brill said. “You experience more of your local area that you wouldn’t otherwise stop and look at.”

Friday 09.16.2011

5

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Grant Brill, a criminal justice senior, looks toward a possible location of a cache while following the coordinates on his GPS. Geocaching requires adventurers to carefully follow directions, coordinates and, in some occasions, riddles to find hidden loot.

Photo by Brian Maschino / Staff Photographer

Criminal justice senior Grant Brill reveals a scroll hidden in a small container. Geocaches come in a large array of sizes, making some more difficult to find than others.


Page 4 Sean Gorman, Sports Editor

Sports

Friday, September 16, 2011 seangorman@my.unt.edu

UNT to face pair of California teams Bobby Lewis

Senior Staff Writer

Photo by James Coreas/Senior Staff Photographer

Everett Daniels of the University of Houston fouls junior wide receiver Christopher Bynes during last weekend’s home game. The football team plays Alabama at 6:30 p.m. Saturday.

Football The Mean Green (0-2) will have its hands full, entering the conest with a 1-41 all time record against ranked teams. W ide receiver Brela n Chancellor has been a bright spot for the Mean Green in its first two games. The sophomore was named the Sun Belt Conference Special Teams Player of the Week for his performance against Houston, in which he racked up 286 yards on nine kickoff returns.The Copperas Cover native ran for a UNT record 332 all-purpose yards in the loss. Chancellor currently leads the nation in all-purpose yards with an average of 297 yards per game. “North Texas is a team, in my opinion, that has some very, very good players that’s very capable of making explosive plays,” Alabama head coach Nick Saban said in his weekly press conference. “[Head coach Dan] McCarney has come from some really good programs and is a really good coach. You can see a lot of improvement.” Senior running back Lance Dunbar will hope to bounce back Saturday after being held to less than 100 yards the past

Continued from Page 1

two weeks. Since becoming a starter, Dunbar has never rushed for less than 100 for three consecutive games. Seventeen starters – seven offensive, 10 defensive – return from Alabama’s 2010-2011 team, including running back Trent Richardson. The junior has notched five touchdowns in two games and is a candidate for the Doak Walker Award. “[I tell the players] all the pressure is on Alabama,” McCarney said. “In this wild and wacky and crazy year of college football, everybody has to be ready.” The Mean Green has developed a history of facing the nation’s top teams, as Alabama will be UNT’s eleventh Top-10 ranked opponent since 2000. UNT will visit Tuscaloosa for the second time in three years. The Mean Green and Crimson Tide last met in the 2009-2010 season. Alabama routed UNT 53-7 en route to winning the 2009 BCS National Championship. Saturday’s game will be broadcasted on Fox Sports South and ESPN3.com and can be heard on 88.1 FM, KNTU.

In its first action since suffering its first loss of the season, the Mean Green women’s soccer team will travel to Albuquerque, N.M., for a pair of weekend games in the Nike Classic. UNT will start the tournament against UC Riverside (3-4-1) at 5 p.m. today and finish up against Cal State Fullerton (2-4-1) at 11:30 a.m. Sunday. Both games will be played at the University of New Mexico Soccer Complex. “These games are not going to be easy because California teams can play,” UNT head coach John Hedlund said. “Their records don’t show it, but UC Riverside beat Mississippi State, an SEC team, and Fullerton has always been a pretty good program.” With victories over the Titans and Highlanders, UNT would complete its non-conference schedule with just one loss for the first time in school history. The Mean Green (5-1-1) tied the school record for longest unbeaten streak to start a season last Friday, but had it snapped in a 2-0 loss to Baylor two days later. “I think we’ll be just fine coming off of the loss,” sophomore defender Tori Adame said. “It wasn’t like it was a bad loss. They were a good team,” In the loss against Baylor, UNT brought only four players off the bench because of injuries, but Hedlund said that shouldn’t be a problem this weekend. “It looks like we’re going to be able to get some of these kids back for this weekend,” Hedlund said. “We get [senior defender] Shannon Gorrie back, we get [freshman midfielder] Leah [Cox] back. So we get those two back, which helps. I think it will be better than we were against Baylor.” Freshman midfielder Haley Dockray, who left last Friday’s

Photo by James Coreas/Senior Staff Photographer

Senior forward Nikki Crocco kicks the ball during Tuesday’s practice. The women’s soccer team plays UC Riverside at 5 p.m. today. game against Sam Houston with a sprained knee, has already been ruled out for this weekend’s games. “Our goal this weekend is we want to be 7-1-1 at the end of it,” Hedlund said. “I think that would give us a lot of confidence, a lot of momentum, especially with the big SMU win and having seven wins under our belt.”

What To Expect Watch for UNT’s offense to get going early after being held without a goal for the first time all season against Baylor. UNT leads the Sun Belt in goals, so the offense certainly has the explosiveness to score with the best. Expect a pair of relatively easy wins this weekend.


Friday 09.16.2011

6

EntertainmentSCENE

Sept. 17

Sept. 19

Sept. 21

Sept. 22

Grapefest The 25th anniversar y of Grapefest offers food, w ine and live music in historic downtown Grapevine, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

“HAZE” As part of Hazing Prevention Week, the movie “H A ZE” will be shown to bring up the topic of hazing awareness. The film will be shown in the Lyceum at 6:30 p.m. The Boxcar Bandits will play a show at Dan’s Silverleaf on Industrial Street. The show time is 10 p.m. There is no charge for admission.

Video Fest The 24th annual Video Fest shows new films and documentaries plus a short film from acclaimed director Spike Jonze. The films will be shown at the Texas Theatre at 231 W. Jefferson Blvd. in Dallas.

Gourmet Cooking on a Budget Get new cooking ideas and learn how to cook without breaking the bank. From 5:15 – 8 p.m. in Chestnut Hall 324; students must RSVP.

Sept. 18 Salsa Festival The first annual Lone Star Salsa Fest will feature food, music and dance to celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and will be held at Dallas Cowboys Stadium. The festival begins at 12:30 p.m. and runs all day. Balloon Show Hot air balloons will fill the sky over Plano. The event starts at 6 a.m. and goes until 7 p.m. and is located at 2801 E. Spring Creek Parkway in Plano

Sept. 20 Jewish Film Festival The Jewish Film Festival of Dallas shows 10 Jewish films. The film starts at 7 p.m. and is located at 7900 Northaven Road in Dallas. DJ Lick Deez performs at the Denton Garage on Fry Street. There is no cover charge for admission.

Sept. 23

Sept. 22 Garth Fagan Dance As part of the UNT Fine Arts Series, Garth Fagan, a Tony Award-winning choreographer, will showcase his new works. The show starts at 8 p.m. in the Margo Jones Performance Hall at TWU. UNT on the Square Thursday night music, a free program put on by the College of Music with performances by music students and the house band, from 7-9 p.m. at 109 N. Elm St.

Oktoberfest Ok tober fest comes to dow ntow n McKinney and brings music, beer and food. Free to get in and runs through Saturday, and starts at 4 p.m. at 111 N. Tennessee St., downtown McKinney. Josh Abbott Band Concert The Josh Abbott Band will perform at the Western Days Festival in Lewisville. They play at 10 p.m. and the festival also features Pat Green.

[ In theaters today... ] S S / D E / OPINION

“Straw Dogs”

“I Don’t Know How She Does It”

In this remake of a 1971 movie, Amy and David move into her childhood home. When her high school boyfriend Charlie starts showing up too often, David forces him away. Her ex decides to get revenge by rounding up his friends, breaking in and attacking the couple. I’m sure you can predict the ending. Starring: Kate Bosworth, James Marsden and Alexander Skarsgård

Sarah Jessica Parker tries again, and fails, to break free from her “Sex and the City” role. Trying to balance two kids, an unemployed husband and a flirty new boss, Kate relies on her best friend Allison to keep her sane in this mediocre comedy based on the novel of the same name. Spoiler alert: critics hate it. Starring: Sarah Jessica Parker, Greg Kinnear, and Olivia Munn

“The Lion King” The Disney classic is back and more real than ever. This 3-D version allows today’s generation to experience all the fights, stampedes and jungle friends and in a new way. The enhanced computer animation alone should be worth a ticket. Starring: Voices of James Earl Jones, Jeremy Irons, Ernie Sabella and Nathan Lane


GlamourSCENE

Friday 09.16.2011

7

Fashions from the past have lessons for today HOLLY H ARV EY

garments of the “Adrian: Glamour in the Age of Austerity” exhibit are more modest and less embellished, with a focus on the historical, Figueroa said. The idea for a 1940s exhibit was conceived about five months ago, and the garments are all from t he Texas Fashion Collection, Figueroa said. “We pulled a bunch of pieces that were pretty and significant historically and could be fit on something,” she said.

Staff Writer

T he 13 ga r ments f rom t he 1940s featured at Fashion on Main aren’t stunningly embellished or f lashy. Instead, t he construction and fabric attempt to utilize and reuse a limited amount of materials. The “Adrian: Glamour in the Age of Austerity” exhibit is part of the Texas Fashion Collection in Dallas and features several desig ners, most prom i nent ly Gi lber t Ad r ia n, a Hol ly wood costume designer, a long w it h Hat t ie C a r ne g ie a nd s ome unk now n a rtists. The ex hibit shows the strengths of designers who, during a time of war, created styles using different materials due to war rationing, said Dawn Figueroa, assistant curator of the Texas Fashion Collection. “The designers took the limitations a nd turned it into a n artistic creation,” she said. “They created something unique.” Instead of luxury fabrics like silk that were hard to get, designs feature utilitarian fabrics like rayon, said Myra Walker, director of the Texas Fashion Collection and a professor in the College of Visual Arts and Design. “One of the themes was make do and mend,” Walker said. “And now, our society has gotten to saying that everything is expendable when we could easily make do and mend,” Walker said. Creating garments out of old clothing is important to fashion design sophomore Shera Gary, w ho s a id reu si ng f a br ic i s crucial. “I’ve lea rned about how so many fabrics and clothes go to waste, a nd it’s rea l ly bad for the environment,” she said. “So many clothes are made and just dumped.” While previous fashion exhibits had more extravagant looks, the

Not only are the pieces historical, but their time period reflects the U.S.’s current climate, Walker said. “The country was in a period of high alert and it’s similar to the time period we’re in now,” she said. “People are tightening the belt, and it would be really good for people to use what they have.” The free exhibit runs from Sept. 10 through Nov. 11 at Fashion on Main in Dallas.

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LifeSCENE

Friday 09.16.2011

8

A day in the life.... [

of a custodian

]

that’s a class

?

Mythic Rhetoric of the American Superhero Class: COMM 4849 Subject Matter: Mythic Rhetoric of the American Superhero Better Known As: The Comic Book Class PHOTO BY ANA ARAIZA/INTERN

Custodian Vickie Matthews gets ready with her cart that has everything she needs to make her rounds in the Language, Curry and Art buildings. M ARLENE GONZALEZ Staff Writer

Crumpled paper towels spilling out of overfilled trashcans and un-flushed toilets welcome Vickie Matthews to work each morning. Matthews is one of UNT’s 102 custodians. “You don’t take anything personal ‘cause if you did, you’d be mad every day,” Matthews said. She has been working at UNT for 12 years and, as a mother of four, picking up after others comes naturally to her, she said. “It’s the same thing as if it were at home, you just do it for a living,” Matthews said. “It keeps you busy. I couldn’t just sit in an office because I’d be fat.” Each weekday, Matthews is up at 7:30 a.m. and walks into work by 10 a.m. She cleans and stocks the bathrooms of the Language, Art and Physics buildings; Curry and Sage Halls; Willis Library and the Auditorium Building. Through her day, she’ll revisit each site twice

before returning home at 6:30 p.m. Although Matthews enjoys her job, she said it’s difficult at times. “Accidents happen. It gets nasty, so you gotta have a strong gut,” she said. Specifically, overflowed toilets and regurgitation are common accidents. For these, custodians put their regular work on hold to tend to the incidents. After a dozen years on the job, Matthews sees spots on doors and countertops that no one else would notice. David Barkenhagen, director of custodial services, said most of his staff works the night shift between 12:30 and 9 a.m. “It’s a different challenge every day; there is never a dull moment,” Barkenhagen said. “We don’t have a shutdown period; we’re cleaning the whole year. It’s a never-ending stage.” Barkenhagen said 98 employees work during the night when the

buildings are empty. “It’s a tough shift, but it makes us the most productive when the buildings are vacant,” Barkenhagen said. The night team sweeps, mops, stocks supplies, cleans the boards, dusts, vacuums and takes out trash. Taylor Douglas, a biolog y freshman, thinks students could make custodians’ jobs easier by being more considerate and not assuming someone is going to do it for them. “People say I wouldn’t do that job, but they should pick up after themselves,” Douglas said. Douglas said she’s overheard students say, “Oh, someone will pick that up,” or “It’s the custodian’s job.” “Clean after yourself; it’s not like we don’t have trash cans everywhere,” Douglas said. As for the dirtiest place to clean, Matthews said it’s usually the men’s restrooms.

Required Texts: “Myth of the American Superhero” by John Lawrence and Robert Jewett, “The Power of Comics” by Randy Duncan and Matthew J. Smith, Dr. Treat’s two reading packets and comics. CORRISA JACKSON Staff Writer

The Man of Steel and the Caped Crusader are more than just DC Comics’ shining superheroes. They, and other comic book characters, are a gateway to learning about American history and examining culture. In Mythic Rhetoric of the American Superhero, students unpack the social commentary, mysticism and literary archetypes found within the glossy panels of comic books. Through the study of comic books, students learn how to reflect on social issues and how they’ve developed over time, class instructor Shaun Treat said. “It’s used as a teaching bait-andswitch to introduce them to critical culture theory,” he said. Treat said there is an equal mix of students who have and have not read comic books. “Even students who don’t have familiarity with comics, whenever

they leave the class, they also enjoy and learn a lot,” he said. Jonathan Evans, a rhetoric graduate student at Texas Woman’s University who’s in the class, said he heard about it from a fellow student. Evans enjoys the visual rhetoric of comics and graphic novels and how they engage with mythology. The challenging part of the class is the amount of scholarly reading and trying to absorb all the information, he said. “I feel like there’s so much; I’m super enthused by it,” he said. Bri McDonald, an English graduate student, said graphic narratives are a large medium and the class is innovative. Learning about the archetypes used in comics, which influence and are informed by culture is “insanely interesting,” she said. “It’s one of those things I think people should pay more attention to, especially because they’re so culturally relevant,” McDonald said.

NTDaily 9-16-11  

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